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arroyo VOLUME 7 | NUMBER 7 | JULY 2011

35 10

FOOD ISSUE

24 40

10 MERLOT BY MAIL Monrovia’s Wine of the Month Club drinks to its longevity.

— By Michael Cervin

21 THE GREAT DEBATE Thin crust or foodie fantasy --- will the real pizza please stand up?

— By Bradley Tuck

24 THE LIQUID GOLD STANDARD Connoisseurs consider some gourmet olive oils liquid gold, but many consumers are still scratching their heads over the definition of “extra virgin.”

— By Steve Coulter

35 A PASSION FOR PANDA Andrew Cherng’s recipe for success has made his Panda Express empire the country’s No. 1 Chinese fast food chain.

— By Bettijane Levine

DEPARTMENTS 7

FESTIVITIES GLAZA’s Beastly Ball, KCET’s “Uncorked” and Pasadena Humane Society’s “The Fast and the Furriest”

9 40

STYLE SPY It’s sweet-and-whimsical bikini season. KITCHEN CONFESSIONS Another childhood memory gets hippified with the new wave of gourmet ice pops.

43

THE LIST Summer concerts at the Levitt, Burbank’s “party of the century,” Cirque du Soleil returns to the Kodak and more

ABOUT THE COVER: Olive oil photo by Robyn Mackenzie

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An olive oil producer and expert had flown in from Madrid to lead a room of novices through their tasting paces --- inviting us to slowly consider small sips of oils made from various olive varieties and determine whether they could be described as floral, fruity, green or peppery. Just when I thought my palate was scoring A’s at Wine U., here was yet another language I had to master if I was to be a self-respecting sybarite. Not surprisingly, California has leapt ahead of the rest of the country in olive oil production, just as it led the way in wineries. See why in Steve Coulter’s report on what Homer called “liquid gold.” keeps his nearly 40-year-old Wine of the Month Club humming along, even in this age of easily accessible wired wine reviews and stores. This month’s food issue also takes on pizza, with Dining columnist Bradley Tuck considering the contest between

empire, No. 1 in its field, and his reported plans to bring coals to Newcastle (or perhaps orange chicken to Shanghai) by expanding into China. And Kitchen Confessions columnist Leslie Bilderback surfs the zeitgeist with a look at the 21st century’s new, improved and more expensive versions of the icy summer treats of

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FESTIVITIES

Zoo Director John Lewis, Slash and GLAZA President Connie Morgan

Jane Leeves, Betty White and Wendie Malick

Lovers of animals and autos got together on June 12 to kick off the San Marino Car Classic with a dinner dance at a private Pasadena club to benefit the spay and neuter programs of the Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA. Dubbed “The Fast and the Furriest,” the black-tie evening organized by benefit chair Mia Dunn was emceed by stand-up comedian and dog dad Peter Berman. Revelers included Steve McNall, PHS/SPCA president and CEO and past and present board

Billy, a resident of the new Elephants of Asia exhibit

members Barbara Bunting and Priscilla Hoecker... Animal lovers also partied on June 18 at the L.A. Zoo, where a large herd ponied up $1,000 a head to attend the Greater Los Angeles Zoo Association’s 41st annual Beastly Ball. Rocker and GLAZA board member Slash received the inaugural Tom Mankiewicz Leadership Award for advocating for zoos here and around the world. As guests checked out Tina, Billy and Jewel, residents of the zoo’s new Elephants of Asia exhibit, and their chimp and komodo dragon neighbors, they sampled tastes from Pasadena restaurants which again turned out in force, including Bar Celona, Ixtapa Cantina, Maison Akira, Jersey Mike’s Pasadena and La Cañada, Green Street Restaurant, Parkway Grill and Villa Sorriso... Former L.A. public television station KCET, which is moving to Burbank next year, celebrated its recent independence with PHOTOS: Jamie Pham (Beastly Ball); Lee Salem (KCET ‘Uncorked!’); Kerri Winters (Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA)

Pauley Perrette

“Uncorked” --- foodie fundraisers on June 12 and 13 hosted by star Chef Thomas Keller at his Bouchon Bistro in Beverly Hills. Arroyoland supporters on hand in-

Susan Erburu Reardon, Mary Mazur, Al Jerome and Chef de Cuisine Rory Herrmann

Priscilla Hoecker and Steve McNall

cluded Susan Erburu Reardon, KCET’s chief development officer; Mary Mazur, the station’s COO; Alicia Schoenfeld; and Ruth Ross.

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The budding trend this summer is floral-print swimwear. From concentrated and ditsy to sparse and romantic, great diversity in patterns and palettes is yours for the plucking. The trick to finessing the look is to go light on hibiscuses and plumerias; think simple roses and daisies instead. Be a modern-day Brigitte Bardot in these fun and flirty styles. Often blossoming with ruffles, these suits are just the thing for bathing beauties who like an extra dash of daintiness with their deshabille. Pair with a floppy hat and round sunglasses for garden-partymeets-pool-party chic.

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Multi-colored bikini with flower appliqués, Beach Joy, top, $48, bottom, $40, Risque Lingerie Boutique, Pasadena Banded halter bikini with rufffles and flounces, Kenneth Cole Reaction, top, $44, bottom, $46, Macy’s, Pasadena, Eagle Rock, Arcadia, Glendale Poppy print bikini, Juicy Couture, top, $85, bottom, $76, Juicy Couture, Pasadena, Glendale Ruffled ditsy floral two-piece, Hobie, tankini top, $34, hipster-tie bottom, $34, Macy’s, Pasadena, Eagle Rock, Arcadia, Glendale Polka-dot bikini, Betsy Johnson, top, $90, bottom, $72, Risque Lingerie Boutique, Pasadena 07.11 | ARROYO | 9


MERLOT BY MAIL The Wine of the Month Club Drinks to its Longevity BY MICHAEL CERVIN

IN MONROVIA, THERE’S A MAN WHO DRINKS ABOUT 400 WINES A MONTH. HE SAYS IT HELPS HIS CUSTOMERS. IS HE DELUSIONAL? MIGHT THERE BE SOME KIND OF SUBSTANCE-ABUSE PROBLEM? TO PAUL KALEMKIARIAN JR., IT’S JUST BUSINESS. The business is the Wine of the Month Club, touted by its oenophile owner as “the original and only” mail-order membership for lovers of the grape. The nearly 40-yearold company is a family concern, founded by his father, Paul Kalemkiarian Sr., who was inspired by a little old-fashioned serendipity. Not to say he wasn’t cut out to be a pioneer in the wine business. During his youth in Armenia, Paul Sr. studied plant chemistry, an expertise that foreshadowed the family’s ultimate focus. In 1964, Kalemkiarian moved the family to Palos Verdes, where he owned and operated a pharmacy. Eager to reduce competition in Malaga Cove Plaza where his store was located, he inquired about buying another pharmacy in the outdoor shopping plaza. The pharmacy’s proprietor also owned a liquor store in the same complex and insisted that the drug and liquor stores be a package deal. It wasn’t a hard sell because the liquor store was the only business making money, though Kalemkiarian Sr. was initially uncertain how he’d run two shops at the same time. As he doled out prescriptions in his lab coat, customers of the newly rechristened Palos Verdes Wine and Spirits would ask him what wine to buy, prompting him to leave the pharmacy to accommodate his new and growing customer base. When locals moved out of the area, they often continued to call him for wine suggestions. And when he went on vacation, he would leave behind a list of recommendations. And so it began. “The idea of sending wine by the mail was my father’s idea,” Kalemkiarian says. “He began to realize the business potential. I’ll never forget, our entire Hawaii vacation Dad was reading mail-order material.” And thus the Wine of the Month Club was born. These days good wine is nearly ubiquitous, connoisseurship a common leisure pursuit. Celebrities, CEOs and anyone else with a personal fortune can now own their own winery. It may be hard to imagine drier times, but the current craze was many years in the making, after Prohibition of the 1920s and early ’30s effectively killed off America’s wine industry. It didn’t recover until the late 1960s, and even then wine was a fledgling business here. –continued on page 12 10 | ARROYO | 07.11


PHOTOS: Val Levey

07.11 | ARROYO | 11


WINE OF THE MONTH CLUB’S 10 BEST SAMPLER Evaluating wines is not an easy task and the Wine of the Month Club’s Paul Kalemkiarian estimates he samples about 400 wines every month. That’s a lot to wade through in search of great wines at great prices. We asked Kalemkiarian for his 10 top picks currently available from the famed Napa Valley and other vine capitals around the globe. BEST REDS 2006

2005

Cabernet Sauvignon,

Merlot,

Vintage Flight,

Crusted Pie,

Monterey, $9.99

Napa, $14.99

2009

2004

Malbec,

Mataro,

Clayhouse Vineyards,

Trinitas,

Paso Robles, $14.99

Contra Costa, $20.99

2009 Shiraz/Merlot, H.M.S. Rattlesnake, South Africa, $14.99

BEST WHITES 2010

2009

Grillo,

Sauvignon Blanc,

Stemmari,

Dancing Derby,

Italy, $6.99

California, $9.99

2009

2008

Chardonnay,

Pinot Grigio,

Sonoma Hills,

Painted Van,

Russian River, $19.99

Washington State, $9.99

2009 Sauvignon Blanc, Babcock, Santa Barbara, $19.99

“IF YOU WALK INTO OUR WINE STORE, 80 PERCENT OF WHAT YOU SEE ARE WINES I’VE TASTED AGAINST OTHER WINES IN THAT SAME CATEGORY. I TAKE TWO $15 SONOMA CABERNET SAUVIGNONS AND TASTE THEM AGAINST EACH OTHER; IT’S A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT

–continued from page 10

That was the climate in 1972 when the Wine of the Month Club popped its cork and started operations. Kalemkiarian Jr. was working in the software industry and helping his dad on the side, going to wine tastings and growing the wine club. He eventually bought the business from his father in 1989, moving the store to Arcadia where he still lives, then Monrovia where he continues to expand its reach. Selling wine through the mail may seem strange, but nearly every winery in the country has its own wine club, with more than 6,000 of them promising access to specially selected vintages. The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Food & Wine magazine all offer private wine clubs, not to mention behemoth outlets like Beverages & More and Wine.com, which offer vast selections of wines you’ve never heard of at better than reasonable prices. Competition is aggressive and margins are slim. The Wine of the Month Club sells vintages from around the world, ranging from $19.98 to $39.98 for two bottles each month. “We are primarily a value-oriented business,” says Kalemkiarian, 52. “We look for varietally and regionally correct values. If we send you a Pinot Noir from the Edna Valley [in San Luis Obispo], we want it to be what it’s supposed to be so you can understand your palate.” It’s important to note that not all wines grown in a specific region like the Edna Valley truly represent that locale, but there should be a unifying flavor profile. Also, not all Merlot actually tastes like Merlot; some has been so manipulated by the winemaker that the varietal can’t be identified. Kalemkiarian’s preference is to sell wine that tastes like it’s where it’s from. He’s not trained as a sommelier, but he argues that decades of tasting and evaluating wines give him a better perspective — he’s a comparison shopper like you, rather than an expert focused on deconstructing a wine, finding flaws and extolling the esoteric virtues of indigenous yeast. “If you walk into our wine store, 80 percent of what you see are wines I’ve tasted against other wines in that same category,” he says. “I take two $15 Sonoma Cabernet Sauvignons and taste them against each other; it’s a completely different evaluation. That’s what we’re good at.” How does a small wine club survive four decades and continue to grow and ship wine around the U.S.? “There’s somebody behind this company who will take your phone calls, make recommendations for your home cellar and actually wants feedback from you,” Kalemkiarian says matter-of-factly. “We sell on the fact that this is a relationship and I’m the wine guy for your relationship.” And relationships are paramount; the Wine of the Month Club has more than 14,000 members, some of whom have been customers since the 1980s, with even a few sticking around from the very beginning, in 1972. Ultimately, though, Kalemkiarian can’t please everyone, and he doesn’t try. Instead, he offers an unconditional guarantee; you can return any wine you don’t like and he will replace it. Try that the next time you buy something online. Can mail-order wine compete in a technologically sophisticated landscape offering everyone immediate access to wine reviews, ratings and scores? The 60,000-plus Facebook “likes” for the Wine of the Month Club clearly show that something is working for Kalemkiarian. And he has turned some tech advances to his advantage. He just came out with a QR (Quick Response) code application that lets someone at a dinner party, who happens to like the Wine of the Month Club selection the host served, scan the wine label with his or her smart phone. That scan takes you to the club’s website (wineofthemonthclub.com), where you can read about the wine, watch video of Kalemkiarian discussing it and make your buy before even leaving the party. The Wine of the Month Club’s reach may be national, but its concerns are local — the club routinely donates wine for charity events and is the key sponsor for the late March “Santa Anita Uncorked” event at Santa Anita Racetrack, which benefits Arcadia High School. The club also supports Arcadia Little League, the Rotary Club and the Arcadia Girls Softball Association. That’s how wine gets sold — through community, ingenuity and relationships. |||| Michael Cervin is the co-author, with Philip Goldsmith, of Moon Handbooks’ California

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–continued from page 17 AVOIDING THE OOPS FACTOR We’ve all experienced the sinking feeling of buyer’s remorse. A dazzling decanter or dining room set looks irresistible in the rarified atmosphere of a showroom or on the pages of a catalogue; bring it home and you’re looking at your worst nightmare – a glaring, garish misfit that has invaded your home.That’s the oops factor.To avoid later regrets, come prepared.Yes, you should take your time, browse, wax poetic over every whimsical piece you encounter, but you should enter a showroom, gallery, craftsperson’s boutique or superstore with at least a few fundamental principles in mind. While it’s lovely to fall in love at first sight with an unexpected throw pillow or vase, or even a nook full of vintage furniture, you will save time, money and heartache if you can describe and identify your ideal living environment. Be ready to articulate – if only to yourself – the look and feel that pleases you in your home. If you’re overhauling an existing portion of your home, building a new home, or just looking for a few accents to enliven the place, the wisdom of “knowing thyself” will lead to great success. Think about your style, habits, tastes. How do you and your family use your home? What

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★ THE

GREAT DEBATE Thin crust or foodie fantasy --- will the real pizza please stand up? BY BRADLEY TUCK

FOR SOMETHING AS SEEMINGLY SIMPLE AS A BAKED MIXTURE OF FLOUR AND water, topped with some simple sauce, it’s remarkable how the humble pizza can be so passionately debated. Part of the fuss might stem from the fiercely nationalistic pride of the Italians themselves. I experienced this firsthand some years ago, while working in an Italian café in London. At the beginning of my tenure, I was greeted with palpable antipathy by the regulars. They were stout Italian men who had been ordering hand-pulled espressos from the bar for more than 40 years. The coffee machine was as old as the customers, with three levers, none helped along by automated convenience. An indifferently made espresso would be left on the counter, stared at coldly, without so much as a taste to confirm its inferiority. As an Englishman, an interloper, I was deemed incapable of making good coffee until I mentioned a little Italian in my heritage from several generations back.“Ah! You’re Italian!!” was the response. –continued on page 22

07.11 | ARROYO | 21


the Neapolitans migrating to New York in the late 1900s who brought pizza to these Thereon in, the Italians would request that I man the levers for their macchiato over shores and planted the seed of the debate about what constitutes good pizza, which now the elderly lady who had taught me my barista skills. Nationalism, chauvinism, what’s in rages whenever the pie is mentioned. a word? A friend of mine here in L.A., an Italian-American from the Bronx, is considerA good friend who was born and raised in Manhattan claims that elementary ing moving to San Francisco simply because it has an Italian neighborhood — North schools there teach that pizza was first brought to New York and then was adopted in Beach. “Why would I live in a city like L.A., a place where you can’t Chicago, where it was promptly ruined. This division between thin crust and deep pan is at the heart of the pizza debate. But it is surely more complex than get good bread, never mind good pizza?” he said, straight-faced, in a that. And charged with investigating pizza for this story, I decided to recent conversation. divide the quest for a good crust into two camps: the traditional This fierce national pride is perhaps somewhat ironic, when one mom-and-pop establishment (the type of place that occupies many a considers that Italy didn’t exist as a nation until 1861. Pizza, however, TARANTINO’S PIZZERIA 784 E. Green St. New York storefront, turning out thousands of inexpensive slabs of has a history that precedes even the country that claims it as its naPasadena cheese slices with toppings) and the new wave of pizza restaurant tional dish. There are accounts of pizza-like breads being made in (626) 796-7836 that has been opening of late (places that follow in the footsteps of Neolithic times, a crude dough baked beneath the stones of a fire. In Monday through Thursday, L.A.’s hot Pizzeria Mozza, with smoky wood-burning ovens and an the third century B.C., Cato the Elder (Marcus Porcius Cato), wrote 11 a.m.--10 p.m. array of foodie toppings). the first history of Rome, and in it he mentions something resembling Friday and Saturday, Inquiries among friends as to where one might find good pizza in a gourmet pizza, “a flat round of dough, dressed with olive oil, herbs 11 a.m.--11 p.m. Pasadena were met with responses ranging from shrugs to howls of and honey, baked on stones.” Sunday, 5--9 p.m. derision. One friend who lives in Brazil chirped in, “Good pizza in In the excavated ruins of Pompeii, evidence has been found of esL.A.? Good luck!” And so, with the weight of opinion against me, I tablishments that resemble the modern pizza joint — marble slabs, soldiered forth, ready to consume a month’s worth of carbohydrates in two days. ovens and other tools of the trade. It’s interesting to speculate what toppings were popuWhen it comes to hole-in-the-wall pizza joints, there are a few to choose from. No lar at the time. After all, tomatoes weren’t brought from the New World until the early doubt my choice of Tarantino’s on Green Street will be met with a chorus of “What 1500s, and even then were initially thought to be poisonous. But soon, the poor of Naples about Bianchi?!” The only defense I can offer is that Tarantino’s looks more like a New were adding them to their flatbreads, named pizza, made by cooks called pizzaoili. It was

TARANTINO’S PIZZERIA: Tarantino’s makes pies to satisfy both omnivores and purists (spinach pizza, right).

22 | ARROYO | 07.11

PHOTOS: Courtesy of Tarantino’s Pizzeria

–continued from page 21


A PALACE FOR PIZZA The Luggage Room’s offerings: (Clockwise from left) Rocket Man Pizza; handcrafted cocktail list; Bijou, Pepino and whiskey sour

gooey. But comparing the two eateries is like equating apples with oranges. They fulfill York pizza joint, or at least the pizza place in my mind. The neon Budweiser signs, the different needs, and at very different price points too. My New York friend had an interabundance of green, white and red references to the tricolore; the red-and-white checkesting take on the experience: ered vinyl tablecloths; the giant stack of boxes waiting to be filled with to-go orders all “Tarantino’s was Pasadena’s stab at New York– or Italian-American–style pizza by the yelled East Village pizzeria. slice. It was actually a little shocking to taste. The slices definitely packed more flavor The tiny space was crammed full of people the night of my visit with my diehard New than expected, maybe because the sauce tasted like marinara sauce, which was kind of deYork pizza lover. We decided to keep it simple and stick to a single pizza with a cheese licious but definitely not like many other pies. It tasted better than most of what is out topping, half of it topped with pepperoni. Our pizza was definitely tasty and was noticehere of that genre (the cheap, easy, quick pizza genre). It was like a much better rendition ably better when eaten at a temperature that threatened to remove the skin of one’s of Pizzeria Uno–style pizza, so the crust was kind of thick and the cheese was undermouth. The dough was interesting — somewhat crispy, with a nice edge — but it missed cooked, but the sauce pulled it together. It also reheated pretty well, that requisite thin-crust chewiness found in a real New York slice. It but why does the cheese never brown? What a mystery! was also slightly thicker. That said, they don’t market themselves as a THE LUGGAGE ROOM “The Luggage Room’s crust was really good, and the tomato New York–style pizza place, so that isn’t a criticism. The sauce also

PHOTOS: Courtesy of The Luggage Room

260 S. Raymond Ave.

sauce (which incorporated whole tomato chunks) was extra wondertasted like a marinara sauce, which was interesting but definitely tasty. Pasadena (626) 356-4440 ful. My only real complaint about it was that the crust was a little We had plenty of pizza left, so we boxed our leftovers and ventured on salty and maybe even a little undercooked. It didn’t reheat well — it to a contrasting establishment. Monday through Thursday, fell apart — but since the flavors were so good, it didn’t matter. It still The Luggage Room on South Raymond Avenue opened last year 5--10 p.m. tasted great.” as an adjunct to the very successful La Grande Orange restaurant. Friday, 11 a.m.--10 p.m. Of course, being a New Yorker, she added this qualifying stateHoused in the old Santa Fe train depot, it has been beautifully deSaturday, ment: “This expedition proved, once again, that there is no such signed, bearing the old station’s sliding wooden doors painted a cheery noon--10 p.m. thing as New York–style pizza in Pasadena or really the Los Angeles deep red. Even the approach to the Luggage Room whets the apSunday, area in general. I enjoyed both pizzas we ate on Friday, but neither petite, the smell of the wood-burning oven wafting on the breeze two noon--9 p.m. were New York–style pizza in a strict sense. In the case of the Lugblocks away. gage Room, the pizza was gourmet style and was based on Italian pizza anyway, but in We decided to keep it pretty simple for this visit too, ordering the Margherita, with the case of Tarantino’s it was the usual weird mistranslation of Italian-American food buffalo mozzarella added for an additional $5. At the end of the room, the cooks were that is endemic to this coast. So a New Yorker’s opinion is almost irrelevant in this shoveling pizzas into the oven, the coals clearly visible throughout the restaurant. Pies on comparison, because we’re not even talking about the same food. That said, my opinion wooden slabs were hurried to nearby tables. When ours arrived, it had a pleasing amount definitely means more in the case of Tarantino’s than the Luggage Room, which makes of char on the bubbled-edge crust. The smell of wood smoke rose to our noses. It was a gourmet pies that can be enjoyed by foodies of any geographic origin as long as they like really good crust — thin, with some crispiness, but some chewiness too. It flopped fresh mozzarella.” around when picked up, in a way that Tarantino’s slice didn’t. Again, that isn’t a judgment And thus, the pizza debate rages on. |||| on either. There were charred blobs of fresh tomato, and the mozzarella was melted and 07.11 | ARROYO | 23


24 | ARROYO | 07.11


THE LIQUID GOLD STANDARD

Connoisseurs consider some gourmet olive oils liquid gold — Homer’s metaphor for the precious fluid — but many consumers are still scratching their heads over the definition of “extra virgin.” BY STEVE COULTER

Pop into Roma Market in Pasadena any day of the week and you are likely to encounter a swarm of people gathered around the

PHOTO: Steve Coulter (Rosario Mazzeo)

small deli counter. That’s where 72-year-old Rosario Mazzeo slices cold cuts to order for some of the most delicious sandwiches available in the foothills, simple combinations of mortadella, capicola and soprisada topped with provolone cheese on a fresh-baked roll. What these sumptuous subs lack in greens they more than make up for in flavor, thanks in large part to the sole condiment Mazzeo uses on his celebrated creations — fruity and fragrant Partanna extra virgin olive oil imported from Sicily. “My customers come from all over for this oil, from Santa Barbara to Long Beach,” Mazzeo says as he drizzles the aromatic oil over another sliced roll. He has been importing this particular brand for more than 30 years, along with a whopping 500 pounds of Partanna olives each month. Three-liter cans of Partanna olive oil fly off the shelves at Roma Market, but watch the olive oil connoisseurs long enough and you will see that Mazzeo keeps a secret stash of another brand, Maestro Oleari, behind the deli counter just for them. Although Maestro Oleari comes from the same region of Sicily as Partanna, Mazzeo is only able to import a very limited number of cases each year, which keeps the olive oil lovers coming back. This level of devotion to gourmet olive oils is a trend that has recently gained momentum in the U.S., along with the popularity of the Mediterranean Diet, which preaches high olive oil consumption along with a regimen of grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, dairy products and fish. “These extra virgin olive oils are made with 100 percent olives — no chemicals or anything else. What they squeeze is what you get,” Mazzeo says. “With other olive oil makers there is a lot of monkey business. They mix in other ingredients.” The “monkey business” Mazzeo refers to has been a hot topic on the domestic culinary scene ever since the Olive Center at the University of California, Davis, released a report in 2010 indicating that an alarming number of imported olive oils labeled “extra virgin” fell short of international and U.S. Department of Agriculture standards. Extra virgin is the gold standard of olive oil, according to the International Olive Council (I.O.C.), an intergovernmental organization established in Madrid in 1959. In the simplest terms, the I.O.C. defines extra virgin as olive oil from the fruit of the olive tree, produced by mechanical or other physical means, that has not undergone any treatment beyond washing, centrifuging, decanting and filtration. The U.C. Davis study, conducted in collaboration with

Rosario Mazzeo brandishes a bottle from his stash of premium olive oil.

–continued on page 28 07.11 | ARROYO | 25


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a.k.a. E.V.O.O. Watch the Food Network for any extended period of time and you will see copious amounts of “extra virgin olive oil” — lovingly referred to as “E.V.O.O.” — being ladled into sauté pans. For many consumers, replicating the complicated recipes from the cable TV network is actually easier than figuring out whether or not the olive oils at the local grocery store are extra virgin. Here’s Beyond The Olive’s definition of E.V.O.O.: •

Made from olives only

Made mechanically with no chemicals

Processed without heat, usually within 24 hours of

Acidity less than 0.8 percent

Peroxide less than 20 milliequivalents per kilogram

No flavor defects Chip and Crystal Reibel promote the pleasures of California olive oils.

ENEMIES OF OLIVE OIL “Think of olive oil like wine: You don’t want to leave it out — it will oxidize and go rancid,” says Beyond The Olive’s Crystal Reibel. Once consumers have selected the extra virgin oil that suits their taste, it is important that they learn how best to store it in order to preserve the best flavor. The four enemies of olive oil are: Air — Keep your bottle tightly sealed. Heat — Olive oils will start to degrade if stored at temperatures above 80°. Light — Many quality olive oils come in dark glass bottles to prevent oxidation. Time — Olive oil can start to develop a musty flavor six to12 months after a bottle is opened.

THE GOLDEN STATE California’s olive oil production was fairly small scale when the C.O.O.C. was formed in 1992, but it has grown dramatically since then. “California produces less than 2 percent of the world’s olive oil, but we are catching up,” says Patricia Darragh, C.O.O.C.’s executive director. “This year we produced 1.1 million gallons in the state, surpassing French production.” Darragh says there are more than 50 olive varieties planted in California, with Arbequina and Arbosana the most popular. She expects production to continue to increase as long as California maintains its high quality. “We have set the bar for standards and we are very active in working with both the state and federal government to ensure quality,” she says. “California is a center for research and education as well.”

28 | ARROYO | 07.11

–continued from page 25

the Australian Oils Research Laboratory, found that 69 percent of imported olive oils and 10 percent of California olive oils labeled extra virgin failed to meet such standards. The U.S. is not a member of the I.O.C., but the U.S.D.A. has adopted similar standards in recent years — although some olive oil aficionados feel that the U.S.D.A. standards still do not go far enough. “Consumers should look at where the olives in their olive oil come from,” says Crystal Reibel, owner of Beyond The Olive in Pasadena. “If the olives come from six different countries, it might not be so good. Also look at when it was harvested or a ‘best by’ date.” Reibel and her husband, Chip, opened their specialty food store last year to educate consumers about the benefits of cooking with extra virgin olive oils and vinegars produced and bottled in California. When it comes to olive oil, Reibel says, Spain produces the most, Greece consumes the most and Italy exports the most. She also notes that Tunisia is another region that grows a lot of olives, but that the oil produced there has historically been shipped to Italy to package and sell. “California is much more strict on what is produced here than the laws on imported oil, so I would suggest a California oil until the U.S.D.A. can catch up with the fraudulent imported oil market,” Reibel says. One factor in the state’s higher standards is the California Olive Oil Council (C.O.O.C.), a nonprofit trade and marketing association founded in 1992, which offers a seal certifying what it describes as “true extra virgin olive oil.” To be able to label their olive oil “California certified extra virgin,” producers must submit their wares for chemical analysis and sensory evaluation by the C.O.O.C. Panel of Tasters. “Consumers are educated and are keen to have a healthy lifestyle,” says Patricia Darragh, the C.O.O.C.’s executive director. “They read labels and want to know the source of their food.” Educating knowledge-hungry consumers about California’s higher standards, highlighting the differences between extra virgin olive oils produced in California and many imported brands, is the Reibels’ mission. The counter at Beyond The Olive is lined with bottles of olive oil available for tasting, and customers can be heard to utter terms like “fruity,” “bitter,” “pungent” and “peppered” after taking a shot of straight olive oil from a plastic tasting cup. The staff regularly hosts classes and tastings aimed at informing customers about the differences among varieties, harvest times and producers. Beyond The Olive also sells a variety of extra virgin olive oils in bulk so that regulars can reuse their bottles and enjoy discounts on some of their favorite varieties, including Ascolano and Manzanillo, which can range from $15 to $31 per bottle off the shelf. Of course, gourmet olive-oil lovers — much like many wine connoisseurs — are willing to pay a premium for the specialty labels they love. “The price is a little higher, but the quality is high too,” Mazzeo says. “If you want the good stuff, you have to pay the price.” ||||

PHOTOS: Courtesy of Crystal Reibel; © istockphoto.com/Juan Carlos de la Calle Velez (E.V.O.O.); © istockphoto.com/AndrewFurlongPhotography (Enemies); © istockphoto.com/Fernando Alonso Herrero (Golden)

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–continued from page 19 so it takes a combination of lighting functions to serve our various needs. Vintage, contemporary and innovative lighting mechanisms themselves can be considered ornamental, works of art, and therefore define their own space and purpose in your home. Whether you peruse the wares of a lighting retail and manufacturing establishment, like Modern Lighting of Temple City, or wander through the aisles of more esoteric markets and galleries, you will want to consider the following questions: •

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Meet your neighbor, Andrew Cherng. You may have seen him hiking the hills with his dog, or out for dinner in Pasadena with his wife and business partner, Peggy. Perhaps you saw him interviewed on Nightline or noticed his name in Forbes. The magazine recently reported that Cherng is about to invade China, bringing his Arroyo-inspired brand of casual Chinese food back to the country of his birth. He will neither confirm nor

PHOTO: Courtesy of Panda Express

deny the move, saying only, “We are considering it.” Cherng has lived in the San Gabriel Valley for 40 years, raised three children here and kept a relatively low profile while elevating his Panda Restaurant Group to its current position as one of the largest, fastest-growing and most successful privately owned restaurant chains in the nation. He is, in other words, king of America’s fast-casual Asian cuisine, with 1,400 Panda Express stores in 39 states and Puerto Rico which reportedly earned $1.4 billion in 2010. And even in this challenged economy — or perhaps aided by it, selling food that rivals McDonalds’ thrifty price point — he continues to add new stores and rack up sales-growth figures that defy the general downward trend. And no, Cherng wouldn’t think of going public. “We wouldn’t know how to deal with shareholders,” he says. On a recent day, the founder of Panda Restaurant Group was trying to sit still for an interview in his exquisitely designed Rosemead headquarters — a two-story building precisely calibrated to reflect the Panda style and philosophy. The elegant, minimalist entry features exposed steel ceiling beams juxtaposed with tall urns that hint of Asian antiquity. The entire building is a magnified vision of any Panda Express eatery: It reels you in, makes you feel welcome and at home, but doesn’t inspire you to linger too long. That’s one of many visible clues to Panda Express’ success. A more important saga lies beneath the surface. It’s a classic American immigrant tale of sweat and toil spiked with advanced academic degrees, personal development courses and 21st-century technological twists. Cherng, now in his 60s, exudes the suppressed energy of someone much younger — a guy who’d like to leap out of his office chair and go for a run. With his buzz cut, casual clothes and low growl of a voice that commands attention, he is a man of few words that seem carefully chosen. He is polite, yet refreshingly candid. Ask too vague a question and he’ll respond with another: “What exactly do you mean by that?” He gives the impression of having acquired wisdom through struggle and a search for meaning. Trump-style selfpromotion and a quest for fame do not seem remotely appealing to him. He underplays his success, saying he has learned much but still has much to learn. Cherng was born in Yangzhou on the northern bank of China’s Yangtze River. He grew up in Taiwan, where his chef father, Ming-Tsai Cherng, settled with his close-knit family. In 1963, they all moved to Yokohama, Japan, where his father had taken a job as a chef. Prospects for the younger Cherng’s success as a Chinese person in Japan didn’t look promising. As Cherng recently told Bloomberg Businessweek magazine, “There’s a line…if you’re not Japanese, you can’t cross it.” So in 1966, at age 18, he traveled alone to the U.S. He spoke no English and desperately missed his family but was determined to get an American college degree. He chose Baker University in Baldwin, Kansas, because it didn’t require applicants to take the SATs, which are given in English. He chose math as his major because it required num-

Andrew Cherng

bers rather than command of a language he didn’t yet speak. As a Baker sophomore, Cherng met his future wife, Peggy Tsiang. She was a 17-year-old freshman just off the plane from Hong Kong. Both were math majors, who shared the travails of foreign students in a strange and difficult setting. Cherng worked summers, weekends and on holiday breaks, earning money for tuition while soaking up English and the vagaries of the restaurant business. He soon realized that Americans were falling in love with Chinese food. Cherng and Peggy entered graduate school at the University of Missouri-Columbia, where he earned a master’s degree in applied mathematics and she a master’s in computer science, staying on to earn a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He then moved to Los Angeles, where he managed a cousin’s Hollywood restaurant until his parents came to the U.S. in 1973. That’s when he reportedly took a bank loan of $20,000, borrowed $40,000 in small chunks from family and friends and opened his first sit-down restaurant — the Panda Inn in Pasadena. Cherng installed his father as master chef, while he ran the front of the house. Various relatives joined the staff, contributing to the company’s growth over the next 38 years. There are now six Panda Inn restaurants dotting Southern California. “We were blessed,” says Cherng, “but it wasn’t easy. It was a family effort from early on. We worked very hard, didn’t make money for the first few years. My father, mother, brother, sister all tried to help make a go of it. We have a very loyal family.” In 1983, 10 years after the first Panda Inn opened, one of Cherng’s customers suggested he open a mini Panda at the then-new Glendale Galleria Food Court. That was the start of the Panda Express empire which has grown so prodigiously — but not without cost. Cherng had to create a new fast-food formula by designing new recipes and new –continued on page 38 07.11 | ARROYO | 37


1

1 2

1 5 1 4

methods of preparation and distribution. The chain’s signature orange chicken recipe was conceived back then and remains a customer favorite. The chain uses mained stable, according to more than 65 million pounds of chicken per year — a figure that continues to grow. . Bloomberg Businessweek. BonBut even all that was not nearly enough to guarantee successful expansion. The secret nie Riggs of the research 1 3 ingredient was Peggy Cherng, who joined the firm just as the firm’s big surge began. She firm NPD Group told the brought with her expertise that may have saved the company from the dire fate of other publication that Asian fast food figures actually went up while the rest of the category Chinese fast food chains that opened with high hopes and quickly failed. Peggy is a softremained flat. And Panda Restaurant Group, which is 10 times larger than its closest ware expert and systems analyst who’d worked at Comtal/3M and McDonnell Douglas, competitor, “drives the entire category,” Riggs said. where she designed computer systems that helped build missiles. At her family firm, she Somewhere along the way, Cherng seems to have realized that excellent people, as designed the software and oversaw the technology that would lead to the successful stanmuch as excellent food, are key to his success. “I think that how fast we continue to grow dardization of record-keeping, allowing each restaurant to track its own inventory and is directly related to how we grow our people,” Cherng says of his approximately 20,000 automatically re-order ingredients. This led to the patented Panda Autoemployees. “If we do a good job growing them and they’re happy, then we mated Work Stations now in every Panda Express across the country. have a very dedicated and hardworking group that can really make a differA PANDA PORTFOLIO (Clockwise from top left): Peggy also designed software to regulate other aspects of the business and ence — not just in the business but in the world at large. We try to find the 1. Pasadena Panda Inn helped with financial planning. She was named CEO in 1990 and comright people, we pay them more, we treat them well, not only in their pock2. Wok-fried Scallops pany co-chair soon after. etbook” but in their minds and spirits, he says. 3. Andrew with his father, MasBy 1992, Panda Express had expanded to 97 locations, sporting colorful Cherng has been described in many publications as a devotee of perter Chef Ming-Tsai Cherng, new décor distinguishing them from competitors and generating revenue sonal development programs that encourage a healthy lifestyle and the adand Peggy Cherng 4. The first Panda Express growth of about 33 percent each year. “We’ve always had the longest line in vancement of the human spirit. He has reportedly subscribed to a location at Glendale Galleria all the mall food courts,” he says. “However, adapting that concept from Taiwanese group called Life Academy and a program called Landmark 5. Orange Chicken food courts into successful stand-alone street locations, and taking it a step Forum — personal training and development seminars that grew out of further to drive-through locations” has been an extraordinary challenge. “It Werner Erhard’s est — which claims to improve personal relationships as takes enormous attention to detail and demands excellence not only in the food we prewell as business performance. In Cherng’s mind, the customer comes first. And since the sent but the quality of our people.” He stops for a moment, as if overwhelmed by the customer can’t be happy unless he is cared for by happy Panda employees who are imcomplexity of trying to explain it all. proving their own lives while improving his bottom line, he pays for their seminars. Cherng’s timing was fortuitous. By the ’90s, Chinese fast-casual food was becoming “And while we’re talking about great people,” Cherng adds, “I’d like to say there are trendy. It was newer and more exotic than Mexican and a potential goldmine for anyone none better than here in the San Gabriel Valley, where this whole business started. My who could do it right. Even in the worst part of the recession, which has adversely customers have been loyal and generous. Without them, none of this could have hapaffected the restaurant industry as a whole, the non-burger category of fast food has repened the way it did.” |||| 38 | ARROYO | 07.11

PHOTOS: Courtesy of Panda Express

–continued from page 37


e t tas

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the flavors of arroyo

MALBEC NEW ARGENTINEAN CUISINE 1001 E. Green St., Pasadena (626) 683-0550 10151 Riverside Dr., Toluca Lake (818) 762-4860 Malbeccuisine.com

CUISINE

VIBE

Argentina is world famous for its cuisine, and Malbec Argentinean Bistro brings that cuisine to Pasadena with their homemade salads, pastas, fish and an abundant selection of their signature free range meats prepared on a wood-fire grill.

Elegant, yet casual, Malbec offers the perfect dining experience. From its warm and inviting lighting, to its rustic, yet charming decor, you'll feel the essence of the Argentinean pampa, while dining in a modern atmosphere.

DINERS’ FAVORITES

PRICE

1. Costa Patagonia ($9.95) 2. Homemade Sorrentinos ($15.95) 3. Ojo de Bife al ajo (rib eye) ($25.95)

$$$$$

RADHIKA 966 Mission St., South Pasadena (626) 799-2200 radhikarestaurant.com

Where Particular People Should Congregate FULSOME FOOD TRUMPS FRILLERY AT Z SUSHI & GRILL BY DAN O’HERON For those who are fond of good eating and pride themselves on knowing about delicacies of the table, this Japanese full-service restaurant is tastefully dedicated. There are no swaggering chefs flipping knives or setting fires on communal grills, nor young women in kimonos kneeling at your feet with a bowl of noodles and a smile. Nothing theatrical distracts you from the pleasures of eating, which chefs amply offer in extra tasty dishes like marinated and grilled black cod, Chilean sea bass and Scottish salmon. Especially delectable is the black cod, sometimes called Z Sushi and Grill Alaskan cod or sablefish. Caught in the deep waters of the 1131 N. Garfield Ave. Pacific Northwest, its flesh is plumper, softer and more savory Alhambra than regular cod. Its melt-in-your-mouth texture becomes a (626) 282-5636 perfect sponge for Z’s flavor-enhancing sweet miso sauce. zsushi.com Among the etceteras it comes with, the prize is a pair of crunchy baked mackerel fish sticks. And for varied appetites, there’s more than seafood entrees to satisfy. With filet mignon and skirt steak specialties, and some 35 small-plate, tapas-like servings, which include sweet yam French fries and melted-cheese fishcakes, a rich vein of Japanese/California modernity runs through the kitchen. Comfortable twin dining rooms seat 60 with plenty of leg room for both guests and servers to maneuver. On one side, a thicket of bleached bamboo stalks separates the rooms from a tropical cocktail bar. On the other stretches the longest sushi bar in the Valley, presided over for 12 years by Master Chef Toshi has the bar. For six of those years, “second chef” Tatsu has been at his side. Being a “second” has in no way diminished Tatsu’s celebrity. He’s the talker. On weekends when a full bar is seething in conversations, Tatsu always seems to get a word in, and the customers love it. ■

CUISINE

VIBE

Radhika Modern Indian Bistro, formerly Radhika’s in Pasadena, is now in South Pasadena, directly across from the Gold Line Mission Station. Radhika adds fresh twists to Northern India traditional favorites, offering delicious vegetarian and nonvegetarian options.

Adjacent to Radhika’s is Radha Room, with its enticing décor. It’s a lively wine lounge with an exotic menu with an attitude including Indian-influenced tapas, and features live entertainment and Bollywood music.

DINERS’ FAVORITES

PRICE $$$$$

1. Chicken Tikka Masala ($13) 2. Lamb Shank Kashmiri ($16) 3. Tandoori Chicken Half ($10/ Full $17)

ZUGO’S CAFE 74 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre (626) 836-5700 Zugoscafe.com

CUISINE

VIBE

Formerly known as Ugo’s Cafe, Zugo’s offer gourmet Italian cuisine with a charm for dessert, plus fine wines, Zugo’s dishes come fresh from farm to fork. All entrées also include a side salad and Zugo’s own artisan bread.

With 12 tables, an intimate bar crannied in a room marked with family-and-friend memorabilia, and a romantic classical guitarist on weekends, owners Chez & Sherri create the experience of a cozy café in Italy.

DINERS’ FAVORITES 1. Roma Artichoke ($7.99) 2. Lasagna Bolognese ($15.99) 3. Lobster Ravioli ($19.99)

PRICE $$$$$

07.11 | ARROYO | 39


KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

Ice Popular Culture Another childhood memory gets exhumed and hippified with the new wave of gourmet ice pops. BY LESLIE BILDERBACK | PHOTOS BY CLAIRE BILDERBACK

pecially at the north end of Oahu, the dessert has remained an island specialty, doused with multiple flavored syrups and stuffed with hidden ice cream or sweet red azuki beans. When you visit Hawaii, do not make the mistake of calling it “shaved ice.” It is shave ice. Trust me on this. With the exception of Hawaiian shave ice, snow cones in the U.S. are sadly inferior to the rest of the world’s icy offerings. To begin with, our snow-cone ice is crushed, not shaved, and thus requires a spoon-straw to suck up the syrup that sinks to the bottom. And suck is definitely the operative word here, because mainland snow cones really do. But the American Popsicle is another story. Its creation, as with all classic American treats, is crazily apocryphal. Just after the turn of the last century, an 11-year-old San Francisco boy named Frank Epperson was mixing some flavored soda water on the back porch, until he was interrupted (presumably around bedtime). In the morning he discovered the soda, cup and stirring stick had frozen solid overnight. Young Frank was haunted by this delicious event for the next 19 years (or he may have just been waiting to grow up) and in 1924, he patented the process. From that ice pop sprang a plethora of chilly treats to soothe your summer swelter. Everyone has his or her favorites, mine being the Creamsicle (also known as the 50/50 Bar). This consists of vanilla ice cream surrounded by frozen orange ice. (It comes in other flavors, but if your Creamsicle isn’t orange then I don’t think we can be friends.) I always felt that the Fudgsicle was a half-assed version of chocolate ice cream, served by moms who didn’t love their kids that much. (“You want some ice cream? Too bad! Have a Fudgsicle! Quit yer bawlin’.”) Also for cheapskates was the Twin Pop, with two sticks that are “perfect for sharing.”

Summer evokes the best kind of childhood memories --- running

(They are also perfect for hoarding at the back of the freezer and eating both sticks yourself when no one’s looking.) At age 7 the Push-Up Pop seemed to me like a tech-

barefoot on the grass, not caring how you look in your bathing

nological marvel, carefully crafted for my atomic snack pleasure by NASA. Later, I realized it was just a cardboard tube. Also popular in the freezers of my youth were Otter

suit, soaking your friends with a water-weenie, the sound of the

Pops, which came liquefied in plastic pouches that, when frozen, formed perfect sticks of fluorescent sugar water. Best of all, they had names like Alexander the Grape, which

ice cream truck and the pavement’s sting as you stub your bare

I still think is hilarious. If I had boys, you know one of them would have been named Alexander the Grape Bilderback. (My girls are lucky I thought Little Orphan Orange

toe racing to catch it. Oddly, the ice cream truck in my neighbor-

was more sad than funny.)

hood still plays that same song, and when I hear it my Pavlovian

On a recent trip to New York I happened by a gourmet pop store in Greenwich Village

I’m sorry to report that today frozen pops are rapidly becoming the new cupcake. with dozens of colorful pops displayed in a case, like jewelry at Claire’s. These pops

response is to rummage for spare change. But I quickly remem-

were not just frozen juice, mind you, but gelato and sorbet and yogurt, all in fanciful flavors like coconut-avocado and pineapple—sea salt. For an extra charge they will

ber that I am an adult, and the driver probably wouldn’t stop for

dip the pops in chocolate and roll them in nuts, granola or biscotti crumbs.(Only the snootiest cookie crumbs are good enough for our pops.)

me. No matter --- the beauty of being an adult is that I can go to

Such trend-setting Sicle purveyors are popping up all over the country. Why do the hipsters keep insisting on glamorizing my childhood memories, then charging me

the store right now and buy as many Popsicles as I want. (Of

$7.50? What’s next? Kindle-only Highlights subscriptions? Mr. Organic GMO-Free Potato Head? Hybrid wood-paneled station wagons, featuring on-board GPS with a pro-

course, I’ll have to do it in another neighborhood so no one rec-

grammable voice that can threaten to “turn this car around!”?

ognizes me.)

enjoy making frozen treats in the summer, especially in unique flavors. I have suc-

Of course, I am secretly mad as hell that I didn’t think of gourmet pops first. I do Yes, the ice cream truck has started cruising the neighborhood again. In fact, all over

cumbed to high-tech pop makers over the years, their clean lines and efficient design

the world frozen treat vendors are out in force. If you’re traveling abroad this summer, re-

luring me from catalogs promising summers filled with frozen wonderment. But invari-

member that eating a frozen pop is the international sign for “hot enough for ya?”

ably I can’t get the frozen pop out without resorting to running water, which makes a

Frozen dessert is thought to have originated in Japan around 800 A.D. during the Heian period. Blocks of ice were carried down from the mountains, kept in ice caves and shaved into snow with a sword at the emperor’s whim.(In my head, this seminal

mess and melts half the thing away. In the end I always return to the good ol’ Dixie Cup. You can rip that sucker right off without wasting a drop of summer refreshment. Now take that thing outside! ||||

snow cone was prepared with Kurosawian splendor by the seldom-discussed eighth

40 | ARROYO | 07.11

samurai.) By the 19th century, flavored ice called kakigori was popular in the cities,

Leslie Bilderback is a certified master baker, chef and cookbook author. A South

and Japanese laborers brought the technology (ice and a knife) to Hawaii. There, es-

Pasadena resident, she teaches her techniques online at culinarymasterclass.com.

Dixie-Cup Pops INGREDIENTS/EQUIPMENT Loaf pan Dixie Cups Plastic wrap Craft sticks Your favorite summer beverage*

* POP FLAVOR SUGGESTIONS COFFEE AND TEA Brewed, chilled and flavored as you like it, with cream and sugar, lemon or mint, condensed milk, honey, Kahlúa or Grand Marnier

METHOD 1. Arrange cups upright in a loaf pan. Fill three-quarters full with beverage, then cover whole pan tightly with one large sheet of plastic wrap.

FRESH FRUIT Blend to taste like your favorite fruit smoothie. Freeze it straight or flavored with honey, yogurt, herbs or spices. Try honeydew with mint, raspberries with Thai basil, peaches with vanilla and cinnamon, pineapple with coconut milk, strawberries with bananas and yogurt.

2. Insert craft sticks through the plastic into the center of each cup. The plastic will keep the stick upright as the pop freezes. Place the pan on a freezer shelf and allow to freeze solid (about 5 or 6 hours). Let sit at room temperature for a few minutes before removing the pop from the cup.

SODA POP Carbonated beverages maintain a hint of effervescence when frozen into a pop. Freeze them straight from the bottle or add a personal touch: Try lime or a maraschino cherry in your cola pop or a scoop of vanilla ice cream in a root beer pop. COCKTAILS Alcohol will freeze if it is diluted. Try making pops out of a Cuba Libre, mojito, sangria or mai tai. And don't forget a Shirley Temple for the kids. DESSERTS Lots of great dessert ideas can be morphed into a pop. Try a banana-split pop: Insert a craft stick into a banana, then place it in a cup that has been layered with the traditional ice creams and sauces, softened to pouring consistency. Puddings and gelatins freeze nicely in pop form, as do soft meringues. Try folding cake, cookies and fruits into pudding or softened ice cream before molding into a pop. 07.11 | ARROYO | 41


KITCHEN CONFESSIONS

Ice Popular Culture Another childhood memory gets exhumed and hippified with the new wave of gourmet ice pops. BY LESLIE BILDERBACK | PHOTOS BY CLAIRE BILDERBACK

pecially at the north end of Oahu, the dessert has remained an island specialty, doused with multiple flavored syrups and stuffed with hidden ice cream or sweet red azuki beans. When you visit Hawaii, do not make the mistake of calling it “shaved ice.” It is shave ice. Trust me on this. With the exception of Hawaiian shave ice, snow cones in the U.S. are sadly inferior to the rest of the world’s icy offerings. To begin with, our snow-cone ice is crushed, not shaved, and thus requires a spoon-straw to suck up the syrup that sinks to the bottom. And suck is definitely the operative word here, because mainland snow cones really do. But the American Popsicle is another story. Its creation, as with all classic American treats, is crazily apocryphal. Just after the turn of the last century, an 11-year-old San Francisco boy named Frank Epperson was mixing some flavored soda water on the back porch, until he was interrupted (presumably around bedtime). In the morning he discovered the soda, cup and stirring stick had frozen solid overnight. Young Frank was haunted by this delicious event for the next 19 years (or he may have just been waiting to grow up) and in 1924, he patented the process. From that ice pop sprang a plethora of chilly treats to soothe your summer swelter. Everyone has his or her favorites, mine being the Creamsicle (also known as the 50/50 Bar). This consists of vanilla ice cream surrounded by frozen orange ice. (It comes in other flavors, but if your Creamsicle isn’t orange then I don’t think we can be friends.) I always felt that the Fudgsicle was a half-assed version of chocolate ice cream, served by moms who didn’t love their kids that much. (“You want some ice cream? Too bad! Have a Fudgsicle! Quit yer bawlin’.”) Also for cheapskates was the Twin Pop, with two sticks that are “perfect for sharing.”

Summer evokes the best kind of childhood memories --- running

(They are also perfect for hoarding at the back of the freezer and eating both sticks yourself when no one’s looking.) At age 7 the Push-Up Pop seemed to me like a tech-

barefoot on the grass, not caring how you look in your bathing

nological marvel, carefully crafted for my atomic snack pleasure by NASA. Later, I realized it was just a cardboard tube. Also popular in the freezers of my youth were Otter

suit, soaking your friends with a water-weenie, the sound of the

Pops, which came liquefied in plastic pouches that, when frozen, formed perfect sticks of fluorescent sugar water. Best of all, they had names like Alexander the Grape, which

ice cream truck and the pavement’s sting as you stub your bare

I still think is hilarious. If I had boys, you know one of them would have been named Alexander the Grape Bilderback. (My girls are lucky I thought Little Orphan Orange

toe racing to catch it. Oddly, the ice cream truck in my neighbor-

was more sad than funny.)

hood still plays that same song, and when I hear it my Pavlovian

On a recent trip to New York I happened by a gourmet pop store in Greenwich Village

I’m sorry to report that today frozen pops are rapidly becoming the new cupcake. with dozens of colorful pops displayed in a case, like jewelry at Claire’s. These pops

response is to rummage for spare change. But I quickly remem-

were not just frozen juice, mind you, but gelato and sorbet and yogurt, all in fanciful flavors like coconut-avocado and pineapple—sea salt. For an extra charge they will

ber that I am an adult, and the driver probably wouldn’t stop for

dip the pops in chocolate and roll them in nuts, granola or biscotti crumbs.(Only the snootiest cookie crumbs are good enough for our pops.)

me. No matter --- the beauty of being an adult is that I can go to

Such trend-setting Sicle purveyors are popping up all over the country. Why do the hipsters keep insisting on glamorizing my childhood memories, then charging me

the store right now and buy as many Popsicles as I want. (Of

$7.50? What’s next? Kindle-only Highlights subscriptions? Mr. Organic GMO-Free Potato Head? Hybrid wood-paneled station wagons, featuring on-board GPS with a pro-

course, I’ll have to do it in another neighborhood so no one rec-

grammable voice that can threaten to “turn this car around!”?

ognizes me.)

enjoy making frozen treats in the summer, especially in unique flavors. I have suc-

Of course, I am secretly mad as hell that I didn’t think of gourmet pops first. I do Yes, the ice cream truck has started cruising the neighborhood again. In fact, all over

cumbed to high-tech pop makers over the years, their clean lines and efficient design

the world frozen treat vendors are out in force. If you’re traveling abroad this summer, re-

luring me from catalogs promising summers filled with frozen wonderment. But invari-

member that eating a frozen pop is the international sign for “hot enough for ya?”

ably I can’t get the frozen pop out without resorting to running water, which makes a

Frozen dessert is thought to have originated in Japan around 800 A.D. during the Heian period. Blocks of ice were carried down from the mountains, kept in ice caves and shaved into snow with a sword at the emperor’s whim.(In my head, this seminal

mess and melts half the thing away. In the end I always return to the good ol’ Dixie Cup. You can rip that sucker right off without wasting a drop of summer refreshment. Now take that thing outside! ||||

snow cone was prepared with Kurosawian splendor by the seldom-discussed eighth

40 | ARROYO | 07.11

samurai.) By the 19th century, flavored ice called kakigori was popular in the cities,

Leslie Bilderback is a certified master baker, chef and cookbook author. A South

and Japanese laborers brought the technology (ice and a knife) to Hawaii. There, es-

Pasadena resident, she teaches her techniques online at culinarymasterclass.com.

Dixie-Cup Pops INGREDIENTS/EQUIPMENT Loaf pan Dixie Cups Plastic wrap Craft sticks Your favorite summer beverage*

* POP FLAVOR SUGGESTIONS COFFEE AND TEA Brewed, chilled and flavored as you like it, with cream and sugar, lemon or mint, condensed milk, honey, Kahlúa or Grand Marnier

METHOD 1. Arrange cups upright in a loaf pan. Fill three-quarters full with beverage, then cover whole pan tightly with one large sheet of plastic wrap.

FRESH FRUIT Blend to taste like your favorite fruit smoothie. Freeze it straight or flavored with honey, yogurt, herbs or spices. Try honeydew with mint, raspberries with Thai basil, peaches with vanilla and cinnamon, pineapple with coconut milk, strawberries with bananas and yogurt.

2. Insert craft sticks through the plastic into the center of each cup. The plastic will keep the stick upright as the pop freezes. Place the pan on a freezer shelf and allow to freeze solid (about 5 or 6 hours). Let sit at room temperature for a few minutes before removing the pop from the cup.

SODA POP Carbonated beverages maintain a hint of effervescence when frozen into a pop. Freeze them straight from the bottle or add a personal touch: Try lime or a maraschino cherry in your cola pop or a scoop of vanilla ice cream in a root beer pop. COCKTAILS Alcohol will freeze if it is diluted. Try making pops out of a Cuba Libre, mojito, sangria or mai tai. And don't forget a Shirley Temple for the kids. DESSERTS Lots of great dessert ideas can be morphed into a pop. Try a banana-split pop: Insert a craft stick into a banana, then place it in a cup that has been layered with the traditional ice creams and sauces, softened to pouring consistency. Puddings and gelatins freeze nicely in pop form, as do soft meringues. Try folding cake, cookies and fruits into pudding or softened ice cream before molding into a pop. 07.11 | ARROYO | 41


arroyo

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BUILDERS & REMODELERS KRB CONSTRUCTION “When you’re ready to have remodeling work performed”, make sure to choose a competent, experienced remodeler like KRB Construction. With over 25 years’ experience in remodeling, they have an excellent track record of satisfied customers. From concept to completion, you will be in excellent hands with our team of professionals. The workmanship is of the highest quality, and your project will be managed, supervised and completed on time and on budget. Call KRB Construction for a free quote today at 310-766-5555.

CYNTHIA BENNETT Cynthia Bennett & Associates has been a celebrated design and build firm for almost 30 years. They specialize in innovative kitchen and bath design, general construction, historical renovation, project management and interior design. With all areas of residential design and construction being taken care of by Cynthia Bennett and Associates, Inc., each detail will be thought of and coordinated. Call for a consultation at (626) 799-9701.

INTERIOR SPACES COCKTAIL HOME Cocktail Home specializes in unique, design-forward barware, house ware, and home furnishings, including art from talented local artists. Cocktail Home is home entertaining's best kept secret! Mixologist Dan who works alongside fellow owner Suzanne, has won numerous awards and recognitions including ranking in the Top 5 for GQ Magazine/Bombay Sapphire cocktail contest in Los Angeles,944 Magazine's Top 4 "Best Sangria Recipe" in Los Angeles, City of Long Beach "Cocktail of the Week", and was a featured bartender in Patterson's Beverage Journal. Come in and let us bring cocktail culture to your home! cocktailhomestore.com In Westfield Santa Anita

HEALTH & BEAUTY CHRISTINE WON, M.D. What is Concierge Medicine? It’s a type of practice that allows you to spend 30 minutes for office visits (rather than 8 minutes in a traditional practice).You’ll be treated like a person instead of a number. We’ll focus on preventive care to maintain your good health through a comprehensive annual physical that includes extensive blood tests, EKG, metabolic test and much more. Call us for info and how to join at (626) 793-8455. DR.GREGORY VIPOND, MD FOR VIP FACIAL ARTISTRY Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery have the power to restore, enhance and correct. In the right hands, it can boost your self-esteem and outlook on life, give you a wealth of confidence, and transform how you are seen and treated by others. Dr. Gregory Vipond’s goal for every patient is for them to leave his office without appearing to have ever seen him by 42 | ARROYO | 07.11

MAUDE WOODS Stepping into Maude Woods: Artful Living, shoppers may feel they’ve entered someone’s beautiful home. Owner Carrie Davich mixes new upscale furnishings with vintage and renovated second-hand treasures. Within this “home” shoppers can find a unique hostess gift for $25, a $5,000 table and a variety of beautiful items in between. 55 E. Holly St., Pasadena. Call (626) 577-3400 or visit maudewoods.com MODERN LIGHTING Modern Lighting has been serving Southern California's lighting needs since 1946. With all types of fixtures in every price range, you’ll find what you want. If not, we do custom design. We have stocks of light bulbs to compliment your fixture and we continually watch the marketplace for the best buys. Our staff has decades of lighting experience.. Feel free to contact us if our service is what you are looking for: call (626) 286-3262.

TOP WOOD SHUTTER Built for strength, durability, and beauty. We design, build, and install our own shutters. Our shutters are made form 100% solid basswood, the highest quality hardwood available for shutters and blinds. Basswood is light weight, and also known for its resistance to sagging, and warping. Basswood has a fine, even texture to ensure a beautiful finish and rich appearance. We offer incredible variety! We have different mounting methods, framing options, louver sizes, specialty shapes, paint and stain options. 9142 La Rosa Dr., Temple City – 888-788-8977 – topwoodshutter.com

JEWELRY, ART & ANTIQUES ARNOLD’S FINE JEWELRY It’s a busy time at Arnold’s Fine Jewelry. Spring brings in brides and their mothers to select attendant gifts. Bruce Arnold and his seasoned staff work with patrons in choosing just the right Mother’s Day and Father’s Day gifts from diamond heart pendants to watches and rings. They also personalize jewelry by engraving graduation gifts sure to please lucky high school and college grads.“I’m often able to guide a gift giver, knowing what the recipient has chosen in the past,” says Arnold. Being a third generation jeweler, and frequently serving the next generation of a family, he knows the value of trust and tradition. After all, Arnold’s is celebrating 100 years in Pasadena. If you have something special in mind or an estate piece that needs updating, Bruce will custom design a piece of jewelry. Arnold’s Fine Jewelry is at 350 S. Lake Avenue. Hours are 10-6 Tuesday-Saturday. 626-795-8647. FANCY THAT! Whether you’re on the golf course, at the beach or by the pool, Fancy That! Has the summer’s best in home décor and distinctive hostess gifts. Begin with Italian hand crafted dinner ware from Vietri, add vintage Blenko glass, blend in classic frames from Cunhill or Galassi and finish with unique bar and stemware and you will dazzle… whether you’re entertaining or being entertained. Fancy That! 2575 Mission St. San Marino 626 403 2577 fancythat.us.com JOHN MORAN AUCTIONEERS A full-service auction house for over 40 years, John Moran Auctioneers is internationally recognized as a leader in sales of exceptional antiques, fine art, jewelry and eclectic estate items. In addition to monthly Estate Auctions, Moran’s conducts tri-annual California and American Art auctions featuring top 19th and 20th century Impressionist and Western artists. Clients value Moran’s for expertise and dedication to top-quality personalized service. For information about consigning, purchasing at auction, estate services, appraisals, and free walk-in Valuation Days, please call (626) 7931833 or visit johnmoran.com. WAYNE JASON JEWELRY DESIGNS Wayne Jason Jewelry Designs has been in business since 1987, in the same location in the city of Pasadena, California. Wayne designs most of his own jewelry and manufactures it on the premises, eliminating a middleman. Wayne Jason Jewelry Designs offers

unique, often one of a kind, top quality jewelry pieces at a value well below the competition. Most of our designs can be made in any color gold, 18-karat or 14karat, with any stones. 105 West California Blvd., Pasadena - 626 795-9215

OUTDOOR LIVING GARDEN VIEW LANDSCAPE Specializing in landscaping, nurseries and pools, Garden View Inc. can take you from a design idea to a finished, detail-oriented garden. Garden View & their clientele are recipients of 60 awards from the California Landscape Contractors Association. The intent of the company is to provide high-quality interrelated outdoor services. The synergy between having their own designer/project managers, in-house crews, their own large nursery, and being a licensed pool builder provides for efficiency, competitive pricing, quality and schedule control. Call (626) 303-4043. MOTHER MAGNOLIA A private residential landscape design and construction firm operating here since 1999, Mother Magnolia’s passion is creating an outdoor space for you to enjoy. Your outdoor space should be your refuge, a place with power to rejuvenate. Our reliable and dedicated inhouse designers, experienced masons, irrigation specialists, and landscape technicians will make your landscape vision a reality. Or, if you have a design prepared, we will provide construction bids. Fully bonded and insured, 3-time winner of HGTV’s “Landscaper’s Challenge,” and a member of the California Landscape Contractors’ Association, Angie's List, and the Better Business Bureau. Call (626) 296-2617, or visit mothermagnolia.com. TEAK WAREHOUSE Today’s hottest outdoor trend is the outdoor living room ... a favorite for hotels & resorts for years and now available for residential settings. Why go to an expensive resort for the weekend when you can turn your back yard into one? Invest in something that will bring comfort and style for the long run! Teak Warehouse boasts over 16 varied collections of deep seating, offering teak and wicker at the best prices in California. 133 E. Maple Ave., Monrovia. Call (626) 305-8325 or visit teakwarehouse.com

REAL ESTATE LIN VLACICH-SOTHEBY’S Lin Vlacich of Sotheby’s, a 25-year veteran in the real estate profession, is known for her reputation and success as a leader in the San Gabriel Valley brokerage community, as well as for high professional ethics, superior negotiating skills, innovative marketing plans and extensive knowledge of real estate sales. Committed to excellence in representing buyers and sellers throughout Pasadena, San Marino, South Pasadena and the surrounding communities. Call (626) 6886464 or (626) 396-3975 or email vlacichs@aol.com


THE LIST

A SELECTIVE PREVIEW OF UPCOMING EVENTS COMPILED BY JOHN SOLLENBERGER

SOUL, SAMBA, SURF ROCK AND GLOBAL SOUNDS AT LEVITT PAVILION

mote peace and coexistence through its

south of Huntington Drive.The parade, start-

featuring the Jan & Dean Show with

performance of Middle Eastern music, at

ing at 10 a.m., will include a dozen former

Dean Torrance plus Mariachi Divas, Drum

8 p.m.

Rose Parade queens who represented the

Corps International with five top units per-

Through July — The

July 21 — Grammy Award–nominated

city from the 1940s through the 2000s, plus

forming, the Ives Brothers and an FMX

Levitt Pavilion's eclec-

singer/songwriter Ximena Sariñana plays

a team of Clydesdale horses, the Arcadia

motorcycle stunt show. At 9:05 p.m.,

tic Summer Concert

pop rock with Mexican contemporary soul

Mounted Enforcement Team, a car show

Southern California’s biggest fireworks

Series is in full swing

and folk artist Carla Morrison at 8 p.m.

with classics and antiques, motorcycle units

show explodes with a pyrotechnic display

on Pasadena’s Me-

July 23 — Singer/songwriter Bettye

and more. A baby photo contest, perform-

by PyroSpectaculars by Souza. Tickets cost

morial Park stage

Lavette (pictured) performs classic soul,

ances by local bands and a song-and-

$13, free for children 7 and under and for

Wednesdays through Sundays. The free

blues and rock at 8 p.m.

dance group from Theaters of Vision

active-duty military personnel; they're on

music and dance concerts start at 7 p.m.

July 30 — Pasadena’s Lineage Dance

Productions are all part of the free event.

sale at the Rose Bowl ticket booth, Gate B.

Wednesdays and Sundays and at 8 p.m.

Company performs Defining Moments, a

Call (626) 538-5431 or visit arcadiasbest-

Parking, opening at 8 a.m., costs $20.

Thursdays through Saturdays until Aug. 28.

joyful journey through life-changing inter-

foundation.org.

The Rose Bowl is located at 1001 Rose

Wednesdays feature children’s entertain-

ludes, with live music by soul singer Chris

ment, from music to puppet shows. A few

Pierce at 8 p.m.

of this month’s highlights:

The Levitt Pavilion is located in Memorial

July 4— The Fourth of

July 1 — Grammy Award–nominated per-

Park, at Raymond Avenue and Holly

July means fireworks,

cussionist Souhail Kaspar performs tradi-

Street, Pasadena. Call (626) 683-3230 or

food and fun at the

tional Armenian music at 8 p.m.

visit levittpavilionpasadena.org.

Rose Bowl, site of

The Autry National

“Americafest 2011,”

Center in Griffith Park

Pasadena’s 85th an-

offers “Sizzling Sum-

Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Call (626) 577-3101

A FIERY FOURTH AT ROSE BOWL

July 8 — Sambadá fuses Brazilian funk,

SIZZLING SALSA, SMOKING GUNS AT THE AUTRY

beach party atmosphere, at 8 p.m.

ARCADIA PARADE TAKES LEAD FOR FOURTH FESTIVITIES

nual Independence Day celebration.The

mer Nights,” a season

July 13 — Pasadena’s Theatre 360 pre-

July 2 — “Arcadia’s Best Patriotic Festival,” a

event opens at 2 p.m. with the Family Fun

of Thursday twilight

sents a family-friendly version of the hit

parade and street fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,

Festival and Food Court in Rose Bowl Area

dance parties with

musical Hairspray at 7 p.m.

offers an early start on Independence Day

H and continues until 9 p.m. Gates open

July 14 — Salaam Ensemble aims to pro-

in the city’s downtown area, on First Avenue

at 6 p.m., and the live show starts at 7 p.m.,

samba, reggae and surf rock, creating a PHOTOS; Courtesy of Bettye Lavette; courtesy of The Autry National Center (“The Colt Revolver and the American West”); Bobak Ha’Eri (Rose Bowl); courtesy of Descanso Gardens; courtesy of Kristin Korb

or visit rosebowlstadium.com.

top L.A. salsa bands, food and drink, a sep–continued on page 44

SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT GETS HOT AT DESCANSO July 5 — The Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum per-

forms Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream at 5:30 p.m. as part of the Summer Family Series. Guests may bring picnics. Free with Descanso admission. July 7 — The 10-week “Music on the Main” summer jazz series presents Gonzalo Bergara’s jazz with gypsy and tango influences at 5:30 p.m. The audience may picnic on the grounds. Free with Descanso admission. July 12 — The Summer Family Series presents reggaeinfluenced tunes by the Aaron Nigel Trio at 5:30 p.m. Free with admission. July 14 — Drummer Sammy Miller and his band perform danceable jazz and soul at 5:30 p.m. July 19 — The Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum presents The Merry Wives of Windsor at 5:30 p.m. Free with admission. Guests may bring picnics. July 21 — Mitchell Long and Café Atlantico perform Brazilian music at 5:30 p.m. July 28 — At “Music on the Main,” bassist and vocalist Kristin Korb plays California cool jazz at 5:30 p.m.

Descanso Gardens is located at 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada Flintridge. Call (818) 949-4200 or visit descansogardens.org. 07.11 | ARROYO | 43


THE LIST

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BURBANK July 8 — Billed as “the party of the century,” Burbank celebrates its 100th anniversary with events from 5 to 10 p.m. on the streets around City Hall. Local restaurants will street corners. Civic dignitaries and film and TV celebrities kick off the event at 5 p.m. on City Hall's steps, to be broadcast live on KNBC-TV with weatherman Fritz Coleman. A time capsule will be opened and a new one buried. Mickey Mouse will present a cupcake big enough to feed 2,000 people, celebrity lookalikes will migle with the crowds and an air parade spotlights Burbank Police Department helicopters, World War II aircraft and other vintage planes going through their paces. A mascot parade featuring Warner Bros. characters like Bugs Bunny, Sergeant McGruff the Crime Dog and others will strut down Olive Avenue. Bands include Captain Cardiac and the Coronaries, the Alley Cats, Wartime Radio Revue and The Bluez Express. A kid’s stage will showcase Radio Disney talent. The event ends with fireworks set to Burbank-related soundtracks. All events are free.

Burbank City Hall is located at 375 E. Olive Ave. Call (818) 238-5180 or visit downtownburbank.org.

–continued from page 43 arate children’s dance floor, dance lessons

A VERMEER COMES TO VISIT July 9 — Woman with

Room. The concert costs $45 for loggia

and can be made by visiting brownpa-

seating, $28 for lawn. Call (800) 726-7147

pertickets.com or calling (800) 838-3006.

and fun. Dances run from 6 to 9 p.m.; the

a Lute, an oil painting

or visit swmusic.org.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections

museum and store stay open until 8 p.m.

by Johannes Ver-

July 10 — John Bidwell, Morgan Library

and Botanical Gardens is located at 1151

for the festivities. This month's lineup:

meer on loan from

and Museum curator of printed books

Oxford Rd., San Marino. Call (626) 405-

July 7 — Octavio Figueroa and La Combi-

the Metropolitan

and bindings, discusses “Early American

2100 or visit huntington.org.

Museum of Art, goes

Paper Mills: 500 and Still Counting,” draw-

nación Salsa Band open the series. July 14 — Johnny Polanco y su Conjunto

on display at the Norton Simon Museum.

ing on his research into the nation’s paper

A WATERSHED ANNIVERSARY

Amistad

At 4 p.m., Walter Liedtke, the New York

mills from 1690 to 1832. He explores the his-

July 14 — The Los Angeles and San

July 21 — Orquesta Son Mayor

museum's curator of European paintings,

tory of the trade that provided an impor-

Gabriel Rivers Watershed Council, which

July 28 — Yari Moré y su Orquesta

speaks on “Vermeer’s Women: Discreet

tant source of cheap newsprint --- a vital

works to improve water quality, monitors

Admission is free for Autry members and

Objects of Desire,” discussing the diverse

aspect of book publishing in the early in-

supply and leads efforts to end Southern

children under 3, $10 for adult non-

women in Vermeer’s paintings and what

dustrial era.The free lecture starts at 2 p.m.

California’s dependence on imported

members, $6 for students and seniors,

they meant to him, as subjects in Dutch

in Friends’ Hall. No reservations required.

sources of water, celebrates its 15th an-

and $4 for children ages 3 to 12.

art and as reflections of his distinctive

July 21 — “An Evening

niversary with a fundraiser from 5 to 8 p.m.

July 23 — A permanent gallery installation

approach to the visual experience.

with L.A. Opera: Music

in the Metropolitan Water District Court-

on “The Colt Revolver and the American

The Norton Simon Museum is located at

of the Regency”

yard near downtown Los Angeles. Con-

West” opens in the Greg Martin Colt Gallery.

411 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Call

showcases company

tributors toward an environmentally

The exhibition looks at the history of Samuel

(626) 449-6840 or visit nortonsimon.org.

artists at 7 p.m. on the

friendly future for the region will receive

Art Gallery loggia. The

awards; the event will also honor

Colt’s revolutionary weapon and its impact on the American frontier and the contemporary West. A special section is devoted to

MUSIC AND DISCUSSION AT THE HUNTINGTON

performance is staged in conjunction with

Pasadena City College’s National Public

the “Revisiting the Regency” exhibition at

Radio affiliate, KPCC-FM. The evening in-

the Colt Single Action Army Model Revolver,

July 9 and 10 — The

the Huntington. Mary Robertson, exhibition

cludes food, music, an auction and a his-

the so-called “handgun that won the West.”

Grammy Award–

curator, provides commentary on the

torical re-enactment of career highlights

All the firearms featured are of historical sig-

winning Southwest

works' historical context.

of Southern California water pioneers like

nificance, finely engraved and extremely

Chamber Music

July 26 — Excerpts of Chinese Kun opera

William Mulholland, architect of the Cali-

rare, such as Theodore Roosevelt’s Single

ensemble visits the

and conversation between impresario

fornia Aqueduct. Tickets cost $50.

Action Army Model Revolver. A large array

Huntington Art

Peter Sellars and Kun opera star Hua Wenyi

The Metropolitan Water District Courtyard

of Colt-related art and artifacts will be on

Gallery's loggia at 7:30 p.m. This summer’s

make for a special evening, exploring the

is located at 700 N. Alameda St., Los An-

display, including Samuel Colt’s first patent.

series is “Mozart and More,” a complete

art, expression and modern interpretation

geles, near Union Station, accessible by

The Autry National Center is located at

cycle of Mozart’s string quintets, plus works

of the oldest and most refined form of Chi-

the Metro Gold Line. Call (213) 229-9945

4700 Western Heritage Way, Griffith Park.

by living composers. Guests may bring a

nese opera. Admission to the 7:30 p.m.

or visit lasgrwc.org.

Call (323) 667-200 or visit theautry.org.

picnic or dine at the Rose Garden Tea

event is free, but reservations are required

44 | ARROYO | 07.11

–continued on page 46

PHOTOS: Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Collis P. Huntington, 1900 (Johannes Vermeer, Woman with a Lute); courtesy of Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens (Southwest Chamber Music and “An Evening with L.A. Opera: Music of the Regency”)

serve up their specialties while local bands and DJs perform on multiple stages and


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THE LIST

Cinema.The Quebec-based company’s circus theater production takes a lyrical, fanciful journey through the history of cinema in its various forms --- illustration, ani-

PLAYING THE MUSE/IQUE

mation, silents and talkies, black-and-white and color. (“Iris” refers to the adjustable opening controlling the amount of light passing through a camera lens). The task is accomplished through acrobatics,

July 30 — Rachael Worby, former music di-

dance, live video, filmed sequences and

rector of the Pasadena Pops, launches her

animation, using 72 performers, 200 cos-

new orchestra, MUSE/IQUE, with a 7:30 p.m.

tumes, 174 loudspeakers, more than 600

concert featuring opera star Jessye Norman

lighting features, 20 video projectors and

at Caltech’s Beckman Hall. Worby bills her

166,000 watts of sound. Philippe Decouflé,

new undertaking as a blend of high culture

founder and artistic director of French

and casual whimsy, embracing the diversity

dance troupe Compagnie DCA, wrote

of the iPod era and mixing familiar favorites

and directed the production. Grammy

from various eras with new works. Norman's

and Emmy Award–winner Danny Elfman

most recent album, Roots: My Life, My Song,

composed the score. Performances begin

was nominated for a 2010 Grammy Award.

at 8 p.m.Tuesdays through Fridays, 2 and

The orchestra will perform selections, plus

8 p.m. Saturdays and 1 and 6:30 p.m.

works by Duke Ellington, Leonard Bernstein

Sundays through December. Tickets range

and George Gershwin. Single tickets cost

from $43 to $253.

$75. Tickets for tables of six are available for

The Kodak Theatre is located at 6801 Hol-

$500 or $1,000.

lywood Blvd., Hollywood. Call (877) 943-

Caltech is located at 1200 E. California Blvd.,

IRIS or visit cirquedusoleil.com.

Pasadena. Call (818) 732-1712 for informa-

July 23 — The Main Stage at Boston Court Performing Arts Center opens a production of Heavier

Than… by Steve Yockey (pictured). The play conflates several Greek myths, with action taking –continued from page 44

for children ages 6 to 15 ($13 for GLAZA

The Orange Eats

place in a labyrinth where Aster the Mino-

JOIN THE BEASTS, HEAR THE BEATS

members and $8 for their children).

Creeps, a surreal

taur contemplates turning 30 in a world

The Greater Los An-

July 15 — “Local Scene Night” offers

coming-of-age hor-

that sees him as a murderous oddity. He

geles Zoo Associa-

performances by some of L.A.’s top

ror story about

must deal with warriors out to kill him, a

tion (GLAZA) offers

indie bands.

teenage hobo vam-

deceptively enticing chorus, a scheming

“Music in the L.A.

July 28 — “Classic Rock Night” features

pires, heavy metal

sister and Icarus, a sexually obsessed boy

Zoo” --- two nights of

cover bands playing music of icons like

and punk rock. Galleries open at 6 p.m.

with wings, all while longing to see his es-

after-hours animal

the Beatles and Led Zeppelin.

Admission to the event and the museum

tranged mother. Dry wit, lyric text and leg-

encounters against a backdrop of live

The Los Angeles Zoo is located at 5333

are free.

end combine to tell the story of the

music. The nonprofit GLAZA helps fund ex-

Zoo Dr., Griffith Park, Los Angeles. Call

The Pasadena Museum of California Art is

families we’d like to have, rather than the

hibits, plant and animal species conser-

(323) 644-6042 or visit lazoo.org.

located at 490 E. Union St., Pasadena. Call

ones we actually have. Abigail Deser di-

(626) 568-3665 or visit pmcaonline.org.

rects. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fri-

vation, capital projects and educational Food and beverages are available for

“WRITTEN IN CALIFORNIA” SERIES CLOSES AT PMCA

purchase, and guests may bring picnics.

and community outreach programs.

days and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Aug. 21. Tickets cost $32; $27 for

July 21 — In the year’s last Pasadena

NEW CIRQUE WORK SURVEYS CINEMA

The events run from 6 to 9 p.m., with ani-

Museum of California Art “Written in Cali-

July 21 — Cirque du Soleil returns to the

Boston Court Performing Arts Center is lo-

mals on display until 8 p.m. Admission

fornia” lecture at 7 p.m. Thursday, Grace

Kodak Theatre with its latest grand specta-

cated at 70 N. Mentor Ave., Pasadena. Call

each night costs $17 for adults and $11

Krilanovich reads from her debut novel,

cle --- Iris: A Journey through the World of

(626) 683-6883 or visit bostoncourt.com ||||

46 | ARROYO | 07.11

students and seniors.

PHOTOS: Hugh Stegman (Sarah Negadari Happy Hollows); Carol Friedman (Rachael Worby); Scott Tarasco (Grace Krilanovich); courtesy of Steve Yockey

“HEAVIER THAN …” REMIXES MYTHS AT BOSTON COURT

tion and visit muse-ique.com for tickets.


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Arroyo Monthly July 2011  

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