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A place of excitement Bernard Salt: Predicting the growth of the Coast economy

CBD: A standard for the future of urban developments

Airport Extension: Opportunities take flight with major airport upgrade

Suburb Statistics: How does your area compare?


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Welcome

INSIDE

SURFER ON THE SHORE: Alexandra Headland at daybreak. Photo: Erle Levey

Our home defines us The design of the Coast’s buildings reflects and respects what we love and value about this special place Erle Levey THERE’S so much to like about the Sunshine Coast: our climate, landscape, water, wildlife and clean, fresh air, and our diverse communities are fundamental values of the region. A walk through one of many national parks, along a river, the beach or through the hinterland reminds us of how glorious the region really is. That’s the beauty of living here. We can embrace the environment. Every day. We can be a part of it, not be apart from it – rolling surf and golden beaches, clean rivers, outstanding mountains and ranges. The design of our buildings reflects and respects what we love and value about this special place.

Good design is not about looking good, it’s about living comfortably, bringing the outside in, creating a lifestyle of wellbeing and health. At a recent Welcome to Country we were reminded of our responsibility to love the climate and cherish our landscapes, and treasure the ocean and waterways. The landscapes and dreaming stories teach us about this country and also how we can live within it ... never take more than is needed, leave seeds to regenerate for the future. We are a community of communities. It shows the diversity of the region where the land has always played host to guests from other nations – sharing the plentiful food, the richness of the environmental landscape. Yet all the while we need to discuss things that have been changing within the landscape ... the need to replenish resources, value the

differences within our communities. There are those creative places that are being embraced by wider collectives – in art and culture, sport, business, education, health and wellbeing. It’s a matter of building on what we have. We know what we are and know what we have to offer. People around the world want to live and holiday here. To look at the future we also need to acknowledge the past, learn from it, embrace it. We must encourage a design that is respectful to this place, and to and preserve the distinct look of this area. We all have a responsibility to care for this land ... ensuring it’s in better condition for the future than when we arrived. How we care for it defines who we are.

Bernard Salt.........................................................4 News ..................................................................5-13 Market Analysis .................................................14 Alexandra Headland .........................................15 Baringa.................................................................16 Beerwah...............................................................17 Birtinya ................................................................18 Bli Bli ....................................................................19 Buddina ..............................................................20 Buderim ...............................................................21 Caloundra ...........................................................22 Coolum................................................................23 Cotton Tree........................................................24 Currimundi .........................................................25 Dicky Beach .......................................................26 Forest Glen.........................................................27 Golden Beach ....................................................29 Kings Beach.......................................................30 Landsborough ....................................................31 Little Mountain .................................................32 Maleny.................................................................33 Marcoola.............................................................34 Maroochydore...................................................35 What’s your property worth.....................36-37 Minyama.............................................................38 Moffat Beach ....................................................40 Montville .............................................................41 Mooloolaba........................................................42 Mountain Creek ................................................43 Nambour ............................................................44 Noosa ..................................................................45 Palmview............................................................47 Palmwoods ........................................................48 Pelican Waters ..................................................49 Shelly Beach......................................................50 Sippy Downs ......................................................52 Warana ................................................................52 Woombye ...........................................................53 Wurtulla..............................................................54 Yandina ...............................................................55

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Feature

Our region is perfectly positioned Demographer predicts a “can-do” culture will guarantee the Coast has a prosperous future amid a population boom

LEADING demographer Bernard Salt has predicted the Coast will experience a significant shift over the next several years to keep up with economic demand. Mr Salt said the region’s entrepreneurial spirit had to be harnessed and developed further, to drive our knowledge sector and create jobs for the future. He said the Coast had “come out of nowhere” in 70 years since 1950 and was set to remain the nation’s ninth-largest urban mass by 2050. But with an extra 200,000 people, he estimated the Coast would have to carve out 20 new suburbs and increase its roads, schools and hospital beds to cater to the swelling population. He said the extra population, which had increased in just three years in State Government estimates, gave the Coast the firepower to demand the services it needed. Mr Salt said a fundamental shift in Queensland, from regions and mining communities to knowledge workers, lifestyle and retirement, had put the Coast “at the right place at the right time”. “It’s almost like the trajectory has focused on this place, at this time, with these values and these attributes if you like,” Mr Salt said. He advised every parent in the region to provide training of some sort to their children, and said university education, or technical skills, would be a must, for future workforces. But it was our innovative, self-starting streak, coupled with a broader knowledge sector, that could secure a prosperous future. “By the measure of every other comparable city on the Australian continent, this place is entrepreneurial, it is bizarrely entrepreneurial,” Mr Salt said. “It is a can-do culture. “Our future is different to the future of other cities around the world.” Mr Salt said he encouraged further emphasis on the growth of education, as the jobs were being created in education, healthcare, construction and public administration areas. “The best thing you could do for your kids is to give them some sort of training in the 4

PREPARE FOR GROWTH: The Demographics Group managing director Bernard Salt talks at the Future Northern Rivers event at SCU. Photo: Marc Stapelberg

future,” he said. He said extremely skilled and extremely unskilled jobs had all grown across the nation, but the middle sector, including trades, had flatlined. “I say this place needs to be extremely skilled,” Mr Salt said. “Every community and every parent needs to focus on resilience and agility in the workforce for future generations.” He listed the Coast’s needs as a new CBD,

expanded international airport, state of the art health and education precincts, heavy rail to Brisbane and “one-offs” like the broadband subsea cable. He also said a convention centre would be a vital addition to the region as a future pillar of regional economy, stating that as it currently stood, the Coast wasn’t even competing in the convention and events space. An upgraded stadium was also noted as must-have by Mr Salt.

“As our recent NRL crowds have shown, there is a huge appetite for elite sports in the region,” he said. As it stands, the Sunshine Coast population is 330,000 and it was projected to reach 579,000 by 2050.


News

New CBD sets the standards THE new Maroochydore CBD project has cemented itself as the standard for the future of urban developments on the Coast. The highly anticipated regeneration project is one of Australia’s largest and most innovative, and is being delivered over a 20-year period to service the wider Coast and the 518,000 people expected to call the region home by 2041. The 53-hectare site in the heart of Maroochydore is set to push the boundaries in terms of digital and environmental solutions combined with leading edge urban design. SunCentral Maroochydore, the company charged with designing and delivering the new CBD, has just launched the first stage of the project. SunCentral Maroochydore chief executive officer John Knaggs said the launch of the first stage was about inviting people in to experience all that it had to offer. “Ultimately, a successful city centre is about the people and enterprises it attracts, so the people’s day was a great way for the community to celebrate this innovative and ground-breaking CBD development as it evolves,” Mr Knaggs said.

EXPERIENCE

Mr Knaggs said one of the CBD’s biggest selling points was that it will soon be connected to Australia’s fastest data connection to Asia. “As a result of the construction of the international sub-sea cable and the scale of the development site, the CBD was attracting new and growing businesses, which will cement the Sunshine Coast as one of Queensland’s best-performing regional economies,” he said. The new CBD is a 20-year project that will evolve over time, with the first buildings commencing construction this year. “Major city centres are not built overnight, they evolve, but the end result will be a vibrant hub of commerce, technology, innovation, entertainment and inner-city living,” Mr Knaggs said. “The Maroochydore CBD will be a place where residents, workers and visitors will live, work and play in equal measure.” The Sunshine Coast has out-performed Brisbane in the growth of new small businesses over the past year, and with that comes the added demand for commercial space in the region.

REPUTATION

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FUTURE VISION: An artist’s impression of the new Maroochydore CBD. Photo: Scharp

“Those companies that are building and investing in Maroochydore’s new city centre will be in the heart of one of the strongest regional economies in the country,” Mr Knaggs said. “Their commercial, residential

and retail developments will be amongst the first to capitalise on the economic growth of this region where more than $12 billion in private and public infrastructure is either under way or in the pipeline.”

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News

DATA HUB: The Sunshine Coast international broadband submarine cable landing site at Maroochydore. Photo: Erle Levey

Cable puts region on map Undersea submarine connection set to deliver super-fast data speeds and stimulate investment on the Sunshine Coast THE Sunshine Coast is set to be placed on the international business map as the region secures an investment in a broadband submarine network. The Sunshine Coast International Broadband Network will provide Australia’s fastest, most affordable international data connection to Asia. Mayor Mark Jamieson said the new cable would increase data transmission speed, reduce risk and lead to a reduction in international communications costs for business and consumers. “The Sunshine Coast will be one of only three landing locations for international cables in Australia,” he said. “This will put the region on the international business map as a leading destination for commerce and industry.” The project includes a 550km undersea fibre optic cable that will connect the Sunshine Coast to the 9600km Japan-Guam-Australia South submarine cable, which is currently being delivered by a consortium led by RTI-C. At Guam, the JGA-S cable will connect to the SEA-US Cable System, a highly efficient Trans-Pacific cable that will forge connections between South-East Asia and the United States for more than 1.5 billion people.

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The investment of up to $35 million in the undersea cable connection from the Coast to the JGA-S cable plus supporting land-based infrastructure is being jointly funded by the Sunshine Coast Council and the Queensland Government. The project is expected to deliver up to 864 new jobs and stimulate $927 million in new investment in Queensland. Cr Jamieson said he believed these figures were conservative, given data traffic from Australia was increasing by at least 40 per cent annually. “The Sunshine Coast will provide the fastest, most affordable international connection point for Queensland and Australia to Asia, providing a significant step-change in Queensland’s attractiveness as an investment location,” he said. “This project will stimulate investment and jobs growth on the Sunshine Coast thanks to the superior telecommunications connectivity and data infrastructure and could serve to attract some of the world’s biggest data users to our region. “This game-changer will transform the Sunshine Coast and open up enormous opportunities for Queensland.” The project will have an early 2020 completion.


News

Opportunities take flight The $347 million Sunshine Coast Airport expansion opens the region up to unlimited destinations and an increase in visitor numbers THE Sunshine Coast Airport will be in line with the best regional terminals in the country once the planned $347 million upgrade is completed. This is according to Sunshine Coast Airport CEO Andrew Brodie, who said the expansion, which includes a new 2450m runway, would expand destinations domestically and abroad. The multi-million dollar project is set to be finished by 2020. “By the time we have a new runway and upgraded airport precinct we will have one of the best-quality regional airports in Australia,” Mr Brodie said. “It will certainly boost our capacity to attract new services from further afield in Australia and Asia Pacific, but you must create the demand first.” Mr Brodie said the airport was at a critical time in its evolution and it was important to implement a sustainable plan. “Our primary aim in the short-term with the new runway will be to grow additional services from our existing markets, but we will also be looking to grow trans-Tasman flights and in the longer-term flights to Asia,” he said. “Sunshine Coast Airport has been consistently rated as Australia’s fastest growing airport in recent years, but that growth has been held back by the existing runway. “The new runway will transform the airport and the region and provide a catalyst for major growth of the airport precinct and its facilities. It will enable us to become a truly international-standard airport.” Increased freight capacity from the region has long been held up as one of the supporting arguments for the airport upgrades. Mr Brodie said it was important to note that they weren’t looking at dedicated freight carriers to operate out of the new airport, but instead, hoped to fill the holds of passenger aircraft with local produce. Members of the Sunshine Coast-based Food and Agribusiness Network are waiting with bated breath to see which freight paths into Asia will be carved out by the upgraded airport. FAN general manager Emma Greenhatch said there was plenty of interest among the rapidly-growing network in seeing what freight opportunities would be created as part of the $347 million airport upgrades. She said once the freight paths were settled, the network could come in behind those with an export strategy, in a bid to get high-end, perishable Coast product around the globe fast. The network was currently focused on

Sunshine Coast Airport masterplan. Photo: Contributed.

opportunities in China, but depending on the routes, if freight flights were reliable enough, there was no reason why niche Coast products couldn’t be pushed into Asia by air. She said it was a high-value product play which would probably be best suited to seafood and some dairy products. “We do have niche, high-value products (rather than large-scale produce) on the Sunshine Coast,” Ms Greenhatch said. Ms Greenhatch said another advantage of

flights into Asia from the Coast was the opportunity for direct, inbound access to the region for buyers’ missions. She said those trips often led to more investment in local businesses, while high-end tourists often also took an interest in regional food. Food tourism, both domestic and international, was another sector Ms Greenhatch said increased flights would help grow. 7


News

Tourism brings numbers International and domestic visitors soar as four-year Visit Sunshine Coast vision continues to highlight region’s diversity and lifestyle WITH our beautiful beaches, lush hinterland and thriving food scene, it’s no wonder tourism numbers are sky-rocketing on the Sunshine Coast. The latest National Visitor Survey results released in January 2019 showed domestic tourism on the Sunshine Coast had increased by 18.4 per cent, with 3.4 million visitors spending more than $2 billion in the region. International visitors also topped 319,000 and visitor spend came to $248.2 million, in the year to September, 2018. Asian visitors increased by almost 40 per cent, up to 32,000, while French visitors rose by 21.4 per cent to 11,000. Visit Sunshine Coast CEO Simon Latchford said they’d been busily implementing a new vision for the region’s tourism over the past four years. He said the key had been to highlight the region’s diversity and show it was more than just a coastal playground. Natural attractions, climate, desirable lifestyle, rich food scene and convenience of access had formed the cornerstones of the long-term campaign to persuade visitors to keep coming back. Mr Latchford said the launch of the new runway and redeveloped airport at the end of 2020 would provide direct access to a “far wider range of markets around the Asia Pacific region” as well as more regular links to principal domestic markets. He said the opening up of the region meant the Coast had to develop its accommodation infrastructure. New hotels and outstanding attractions were crucial to establishing the region as one of Australia’s prime destinations for the lucrative meetings and incentives industries, according to the experienced tourism boss. To the region’s north, in what has long been considered the jewel in the Sunshine Coast’s crown, Tourism Noosa CEO Steve McPharlin said they were focused on trying to get their industry thinking differently. He said they were working to enhance the industry’s custodianship of the environment and protect it for future generations. “This includes strengthening partnerships with local groups and organisations that will ultimately benefit our whole community,” Mr McPharlin said. For Noosa’s southern neighbours, in the wider Sunshine Coast, Mr Latchford said the “immediate, negative reaction” to any development proposal, even containing “top-line” environmental and sustainability measures, was one of the region’s greatest hurdles. 8

Emma Boyd, from Rockhampton, with Chloe and Rachelle Casey, from Brisbane take some time away to enjoy a girls weekend at Noosa. Photo: Lachie Millard

“I think the whole community wants sensible development that will add to what the Sunshine Coast offers both visitors and residents, but very often good initiatives get drowned out by unreasonable negativity,” he said. “The Sunshine Coast is one of the fastest-growing residential areas and we need jobs and long-term sustainable careers for the young people growing up here. Tourism can provide that.” He urged the community to come together and support “appropriate tourism developments” to ensure jobs weren’t lost to Brisbane. Ageing accommodation infrastructure,

mostly 30 years old, and the lack of a new major hotel being built since the 1980s had also hurt the region’s tourism trade. The closure of the Hyatt Coolum was another devastating blow to the Coast’s ability to attract major conferences and incentives. Mr Latchford said the Westin Resort, a component of the controversial Sekisui House development at Yaroomba, needed to get moving “as fast as possible”. Coastal experiences remained central to tourism experiences in both regions over the next three decades. Mr Latchford said the Sunshine Coast would need more boutique and glamping-style accommodation, as well as major attractions

like the Actventure Water Park development on Steve Irwin Way. He said having a “truly international airport” would encourage a rapid maturing of the industry. “We will become a region full of rich ‘experiences’ — whether it is adventure travel, health and wellness breaks, food discovery tours or event-related stays,” Mr Latchford said. “This will help differentiate ourselves from the many other beach destinations along the east coast and cement the Sunshine Coast name as a prime destination for leisure, conference, incentive and business travellers.”


News

Catering for fast changes

nature.” A sub-par transport system also posed a major challenge to the council. “The Sunshine Coast’s transport system – road, rail and public transport – is under significant pressure and needs attention by the state and federal governments if the liveability of the Sunshine Coast is not to be compromised,” Mr Ruprai said. “Again, (the) council has OVERSEEING: Sunshine Coast Council's group executive for customer engagement and undertaken the planning that is planning services James Ruprai.Photo: Sunshine Coast Council needed to support an integrated public transport solution for the populated coastal urban area, but this can the region today and in the years ahead”. only be delivered by the state and federal But there were gaps in the region’s governments.” infrastructure portfolio which, if left to grow, The council is well aware of the challenge it has to keep up Mr Ruprai said established railway towns would become significant holes affecting the with a fast-growing population and is preparing well west of the Bruce Highway were experiencing future. strong growth rates, as people saw benefits in Mr Ruprai said the lack of a viable being closer to major transport nodes. convention and exhibition facility had been THE Sunshine Coast is growing fast and so is years. He said only about 13 per cent of the Coast’s long identified as a “key infrastructure gap” the demand for infrastructure to “Our challenge is to ensure people are total land area was within the urban footprint for the Sunshine Coast. accommodate the expansion. connected easily to where they live, work, and the council’s planning for the region “The region does not have convention and This is the challenge faced by James Ruprai recreate and access services while ensuring we focused on accommodating growth “through exhibition facilities of sufficient scale to and his team as the missing investment in maintain and enhance the lifestyle that is so consolidation in existing or currently planned attract and host major business and industry transport infrastructure for the region highly valued by our residents and that our urban areas, as opposed to expansion into conventions, trade exhibition, corporate and becomes more apparent. natural environment is preserved and rural areas”. government events, conferences and indoor The Sunshine Coast Council’s group enhanced,” Mr Ruprai said. “This is a long-standing feature of the entertainment events,” he said. executive for customer engagement and He said the region was benefiting from the Sunshine Coast landscape and is one that (the) “Our ability to significantly grow our planning services said the council was making council’s focus on directions it set for the council is committed to maintaining to the visitation numbers will continue to be provision to accommodate a population that region, with key projects under way “designed greatest extent possible,” Mr Ruprai said. hampered by the absence of a facility of this would reach more than 500,000 within 20 to improve the productivity and liveability of

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Education

EXCITING TIMES: Education Minister Grace Grace meets with prospective students of the new $115 million high school to be built at Baringa. Photo: Kristen Booth

Future’s looking bright Notepads replaced by iPads and robots roaming the classrooms as Sunshine Coast schools embrace the very latest in education AS THE region develops, so too does the education offered to its youngest residents. Many schools in the region are harnessing the power of technology as smartboards, tablets and robots become classroom staples. In 2018, Baringa State Primary School opened as the state’s first science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) school of excellence. The Prep to Year 6 school offers state-ofthe-art facilities to implement the program, including a two-storey discovery centre, laboratories, cooking facilities and a purpose-built robotics lab. Principal Noel Baggs told the Sunshine Coast Daily at the time the school’s focus on STEM was unlike most others in the state, enabling its students to develop advanced skills through an engaging teaching style. “These technologies enable us to implement 21st century skills and STEM in ways we haven’t been able to do before. “The main thing is to build curiosity in kids and make sure they are engaged,” Mr Baggs said. And it seems to be a trend that is catching on. In 2019 a brand-new school in Bli Bli, the Good Samaritan Catholic College, opened with its own take on maths and science. As part of the school’s early learning curriculum, Prep to Year 3 students are taking advantage of the high school science facilities and teachers in its integrated STEM program. Brian Lenane, one of the driving forces

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behind the program, said it gave primary pupils an opportunity to participate in STEM subjects in a way they’d usually not get to. “It will gain their interest from a very young age,” he said. Meanwhile, many schools in the region are fostering the abilities of children wishing to undertake a vocational education pathway. Coast students can participate in work experience programs in a diverse range of industries. During school hours, local state and private schools offer opportunities for apprenticeships, traineeships, work experience and studies in a range of certifications and non-tertiary programs. About $300 million will be injected into Sunshine Coast schools in the next 12 months to enhance educational opportunities. A key project is the $115 million secondary school to be built as part of the Baringa community. The school will open with Years 7 and 8, with a new cohort added every year until the school holds Year 12 students. The remaining $185 million will go towards a new primary school and new special school at Palmview, as well as enhancing existing schools across the region. Other key projects include seven new classrooms at Maroochydore State High School, eight new classrooms at Currimundi State School, enhanced STEM learning spaces at Woodford State School, and 13 new classrooms and an extension to the music block at Sunshine Beach State High School.

Eumundi State School will receive eight new classrooms, Buddina State School will receive $3 million for four new classrooms while Bli Bli State School’s tennis courts will be refurbished in a $150,000 project.


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Sporting

Hub of sporting circles State-of-the-art sports and athletic facilities to attract big sporting events as well as elite athletes are right here on the Sunshine Coast A NEW sporting hub and an upgraded stadium are two major projects aimed at not only luring sporting events to the Sunshine Coast but keeping talent from draining away from the region. The $27 million Sports Hub Sunshine Coast development at Bokarina officially opened this July, proving to be a “game-changer” for aspiring athletes in the region. Duporth Tavern publican Clayton Williams and Vantage Homes boss Shane O’Brien teamed up to deliver the high performance sports hub project to the region. Their focus was on providing young athletes with a choice of remaining on the Coast and continuing their development, instead of being forced to move away to pursue their dreams. The high performance aspect of the project features the gym, sports physiotherapy, osteo experts, martial arts spaces and even a hyperbaric chamber. Eventually it will also be home to a licensed club, which will provide funds to Sunshine Coast rugby league and rugby union. “We see that sports and health tourism will become a key part of the industry,” Mr Williams said. “Our university hospital is the best in Australia. We already have teams and athletes wanting to come to the Sunshine Coast to recover.” The facility will also provide accommodation, with 78 three-star rooms starting from $35 a night, as well as camp and conference facilities. Mr Williams said the biggest challenge facing the new facility was making sure all stakeholders bought into the journey. “The Sports Hub must have key

The Falcons played Redcliffe Dolphins at Sunshine Coast Stadium. Nicho Hynes. Photo: John McCutcheon

stakeholders’ support to enable the not-for-profit to strive to bring new technology to the Coast and continue to evolve to stay at the forefront of training, health and recovery,” he said. “The Sports Hub will attract new teams and athletes to the Coast, aim to increase their stay and showcase the Kawana Sports Precinct and, hopefully, the upgraded Sunshine Coast Stadium.” Sunshine Coast Council sport and community venues branch manager Grantley

Switzer said it was hoped that an upgrade to the stadium would drive in increased visitors and sporting events. “For the team at the stadium, it’s about creating an experience where people create memories by being present, not by watching on television or their device,” he said. They’ll be doing that under plenty of pressure though, as other regions across the country enhance their sports and entertainment venues in a bid to lure away some of the Coast’s current crop of events.

“We have to work hard to keep them here but also look at ways of improving our offering so we can attract those new events,” Mr Switzer said. “So whilst we have a terrific regional venue, future investment will be required to just keep pace. The stadium we have today will no doubt grow in its offering, and with projected population growth, it is not unreasonable to believe we will have our own Sunshine Coast team in one of the major football codes within the next 30 years.”

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News

Chief Executive Sunshine Coast Health Service, Adjunct Professor Naomi Dwyer at the Sunshine Coast Univerity Hospital. Photo: John McCutcheon

Delivering healthcare needs AS PEOPLE flock to live on the Sunshine Coast, the demand for the healthcare system to keep up takes on a new level of importance. With the current population boom showing no signs of slowing, planning for the delivery of sustainable and accessible healthcare on the Coast is critical. Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service chief executive, Adjunct Professor Naomi Dwyer is the woman tasked with orchestrating the public health system’s response to those rising pressures. She said collaboration with private health, as well as government and non-government agencies to address the “social determinants” of health - issues like employment, education and safety, would become crucial to maintaining high levels of healthcare. She said the health service was “committed” to doing its bit to enhance the health and wellbeing of the community over the next 30 years. “As the largest employer, we will

contribute to employment, produce outstanding health graduates to supply future workforce needs, and attract and lead the next wave of digital innovation,” Prof Dwyer said. She said the range and complexity of healthcare delivered locally would continue to expand, along with the depth of health research being undertaken. In order to guide the future of our public health system, an intensive clinical, consumer and community engagement program, including demand projection forecasting, would be undertaken to drive the 10 Year Master Clinical Services Plan. That plan would provide the blueprint for the delivery of public healthcare to the community, and where it would be delivered in a network of hospitals and communitybased services. Looking ahead, Prof Dwyer forecast changes to the health care provision model. Prof Dwyer said health service consumers

would become more engaged, educated and empowered to make choices about their wellbeing and healthcare over the next 30 years. She tipped more personalised medicine to increase, while the burden of chronic or lifestyle diseases would be less prevalent as newer generations became healthier. Technologies such as robotic surgery, 3D printed tissues and bones and more would continue to improve and expand, while Prof Dwyer expected new treatments based on genetic information would eventually be rolled out, enabling more personalised treatments and better outcomes. “The future of health in 30 years will be astonishing, with breakthroughs likely to happen at an exponential rate,” Prof Dwyer said. “Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service is ready to embrace it.”

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Market analysis

DRONE: Aerial photos of Mooloolaba, Alexandra Headland, Sunshine Coast. Photo: Patrick Woods

Next generation escapes Younger Australians are swapping city life for regional living, seeking attractive property investments, shorter commutes and better lifestyle JOBS help hold up real estate prices — at least that’s what property experts used to say, but the internet is turning that old school thinking on its head. There is nothing new about the retiree “tree change” or “sea change” movement, but younger Australians are increasingly escaping the cities and making their mark on property prices, thanks to technology. Ashley Fell, social researcher with McCrindle Research said their analysis has shown many of those leaving Sydney — which suffered the highest net loss of all greater capital cities with 27,300 people leaving town between 2017 to 2018 — are of working age. Dramatic increases in house prices, coupled with other “pain points”, has had them packing their bags in droves. “There’s certainly an incentive for people to move into regional areas where there are shorter commute times, and ways to downshift lifestyle and experience less stress,” she said.

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“And for those effected by property prices, they can take a bit of a breather with the mortgage by moving somewhere that’s more affordable.” Ms Fell added a key barrier in the past for career-minded city slickers looking to regional areas has been availability of jobs. “Teleworking now allows people to work more remotely and have more flexibility without being in the city or even an office,” she said. While researching Workplace Wellbeing, a new book to be released by McCrindle Research later this year, Ms Fell said a key finding was a desire for workplace flexibility “Workers said they wanted a location less than 30 minute’s commute from their home. “It was ‘extremely’ or ‘very’ important for over half (56 per cent) of the workers surveyed to be relatively close to work. “And that’s what you get when you leave the major cities; you reduce that commute time and increase time with families,” she said,

adding that figures out from HILDA last month showed that Sydneysiders had the longest daily commute times in the country, averaging 71 minutes, followed by Melburnians enduring 65 minutes in transit.

Work from wherever Entrepreneur, author and CEO of Collective Hub, Lisa Messenger, has been an employer for almost two decades and recently made the switch to a virtual workplace. Her goal was for her team to reap the financial and lifestyle rewards of living where they choose. “Last April I decided to decentralise after having a bricks and mortar office for about 17 years. I just said to my team ‘work from wherever you want’. “I’ve actually had many people working for me from all over the world for as long as I can remember,” she said. Her book, Work From Wherever, explains what the workplace shift has done for her.

“What I’ve learnt from closing a bricks and mortar office is that my productivity is far better now than it ever was when I was working in an office. “I used to say when I was in an office I was busy, but when I was travelling I was productive — and now I’m on fire! No-one cares where I’m living and working from.” Travelling across Australia as a keynote speaker, Ms Messenger said regional areas are home to some inspirational people so career-minded people shouldn’t feel they need to cling to the city. “Some of the smartest entrepreneurs and innovators I’ve come across were in some of the most remote places geographically. “Now technology means now you can literally work from wherever and live anywhere and I love that,” she said. “Now all you need is a laptop and a good idea. I’m getting the best talent from the happiest people because they’re living where they want, and that’s very cool.”


suburb | Alexandra Headland

A family favourite THE infrastructure changes to the Sunshine Coast are making it very attractive as a region for investors, as are the lifestyle factors for those wanting to live here. Not surprisingly, many of them want to live at Alexandra Headland. It’s one of the Sunshine Coast’s million-dollar suburbs and the place that just about everyone has been to at one time or another, whether to lie in the sun or catch a wave at the famous surf break. At the heart of the Sunshine Coast, Alexandra Headland enjoys that prime northerly aspect and long coastal views while being protected from the southerly breezes. It’s this mix of surf, sun and sand that creates an appealing casual lifestyle that is tempered by the salty north-easterly breezes off the ocean in summer. It’s a place where you will see people walking, jogging, swimming or surfing at daybreak or sunset. Referred to by locals as ‘Alex’, this relaxed lifestyle and its stunning beaches stretch as far as the eye can see. Alexandra Headland benefits from a blend of medium-rise buildings and high-end residential homes, integrating seamlessly with original beach houses, all set within a stunning seascape. About 50 per cent of residences are owner-occupied with a broad mix of holiday and permanent rentals among the variety of detached homes and units. Investors appreciate the land values and low rental vacancy rates. It is one of the best-performing property markets on the central Sunshine Coast, with the median sales price of houses $1,035,000 in October 2018, up from $1,010,000 at the start of that year and not far off the high of $1,192,500 in July. The five-year growth of values is dramatic, up from $582,500 in January 2013. The median sale price for units was $393,000 in October, very little change in 12 months when it was $378,500. A record price was achieved last year with the sale of 1 Kate St for $3 million. The median sale price of land is $650,000. Alex is home to

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$1,152,500 $580

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$378,250 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 12 months ................................. 3 years ..................................... 5 years ..................................... Annually (10 years) ....................

8.2% 12.7% 22.6% 62% 4.1%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

42 days

March

?

$

COASTAL BLISS: The view north from Alexandra Headland. Photo: Erle Levey

a precinct known as ‘the golden triangle’, which is well regarded for its solid land values and highly sought-after properties. Known for its rocky headland that produces some of the best surfing conditions on Queensland beaches, Alex is also popular with swimmers who make the most of the patrolled beach in front of the surf lifesaving club. This idyllic setting is also the perfect place to raise a family. There is an abundance of cafes, bars and local shops and restaurants stretching along the Esplanade. Then there is the central parkland with lake and island just one block back from the beach. Achieving the ideal balance of development of a seaside town and protecting the natural environment isn’t always easy, yet this seaside development has cared for the shoreline, leaving it relatively untouched.

The area is undergoing significant landscaping that has included the upgrade of the skate bowl near the Alex Surf Club. The surf club is at the heart of the community and provides a popular meeting spot for breakfast or morning coffee at the kiosk, while the Bluff Bar forms a pleasant extension of the club’s facilities. A walking path stretches from Maroochydore to Mooloolaba along the foreshore of Alex. Not only is the scenery beautiful, there are also exercise points along the way and plenty of friendly smiles. With a picture-perfect beachfront and seaside vibe, who wouldn’t enjoy a seaside holiday along the front, or even better, be fortunate enough to call Alexandra Headland home and wander leisurely down to the surf and sand at sunrise.

SAVVY SELLERS SELL WITH MARK MORE THAN ONCE.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

10.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

2.6% 5.5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3958 Average weekly household income $1377 Median age

45

MARK McGILL 0412 767 985 | mark@amberwerchon.com.au

ALANA OPPELT

0475 872 909 | alana@amberwerchon.com.au

“Mark gave us some tips for pre sale that worked, we recommend Mark to our relatives and friends. This is the third successful time we have used Mark for the purchase and sale of our properties. “ - Robin and Kevin Walsh 15


suburb | Baringa

A haven for families IT’S been a year of growth at Baringa, the first of the suburbs in Stockland’s Aura community south of Caloundra. And it has been setting standards for affordable and sustainable master-planned living. Already some major state-of-the-art amenities are shaping the $5 billion project and more milestones will be delivered over the next 12 months. Aura has been an outstanding success since its official launch in 2015, with roads and bridges constructed, parks, playgrounds, a cafe and display village, as well as the opening of the first school. More than 600 homes have been built at Baringa so far, with up to 10 families moving in every week. Apart from some fluctuations early in the life of the suburb in 2016, median house prices have remained steady since $487,300 in August 2016. After hitting $500,650 in September 2016 prices have levelled out at $490,600 in 2017 and $489,000 since March last year to $489,000 in October. The median price of land was $256,150 in October, up from $233,600 12 months earlier. Aura has been the fastest selling community in Queensland over the 12 months, with about 1400 lots sold. Highlights have included the fast-tracked extension to Baringa State Primary School, a state-of-the-art facility that has a strong STEM focus: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. It is expected to eventually educate up to 1100 students in 37 classrooms configured over two storeys. There has been the opening of Aura’s first early learning centre, an innovative $3.7 million centre operated by Goodstart Early Learning. Baringa Community Centre has been constructed as well as two neighbourhood parks in the southern section of Baringa near Wishart Crescent. Aura’s first retail hub, the Stockland Baringa Shopping Centre, is planned to be completed in late 2019. The centre will include a Supa

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$490,000 $480

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a n/a

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -1% 12 months ....................................-0.8% 3 years ........................................ n/a 5 years ........................................ n/a Annually (10 years) ....................... n/a

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

81 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

1 year

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

Baringa skate plaza.Photo: Zo Paterson @ Cove Photography

IGA, 13 specialty retailers, about 300 car spaces and commercial offices. The $6.5 million family-friendly Baringa Tavern is due to open in late 2019. The tavern will include a main bar and lounge area, large outdoor veranda, function rooms, a dedicated sports bar, a woodfire pizza kitchen and an extensive kids zone. The Aura Central precinct will ultimately have 2500 residential lots as well as a mix of townhouses, apartments and retirement living, a town centre with shopping and

2 in 5 BUYERS

entertainment, and education and sporting facilities. The 11-hectare People’s Place parkland will be more extensive than Brisbane’s South Bank parklands. Stockland will invest $1 billion in Aura in the first 10 years of the development, with a total of $5 billion to be spent throughout the duration of the project. Over the next three decades, Stockland will deliver more than 20,000 new homes.

considered buying in suburbs they hadn’t previously, because of our real estate section We extend your reach beyond the niche geographic search results of online listings. Source: Pulse of Australia On the Move Survey, May 2018; (n=982) 16

SPOTLIGHT

n/a Average weekly household income n/a Median age

n/a

5.1% n/a


suburb | Beerwah

Sleeping tiger stirs BEERWAH … it’s where crocs rule, according to the world-famous Australia Zoo that is centred there. Yet the hinterland town is building a reputation as the sleeping tiger in regard to the property market. And it’s starting to stir. Once known for pineapples and timber, it is a growing residential community strategically placed between Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast beaches. With ready access to the Bruce Highway and railway line, it is popular with commuters as well as down-sizers and green-changers. Situated 20 minutes’ drive south-west of Caloundra, this hinterland hub is known for affordable living. It has transitioned from a rural farming and timber community to a flourishing township linking city to country and the seaside to the Darling Downs. For commuters to Brisbane’s northern suburbs and CBD, the busy train station provides a vital service. Beerwah is expanding on all sides, most notably to the east with the Roys Rd interchange providing what will be southern access to Stockland’s master-planned community, Aura. Steady, consistent growth is the name of the game at Beerwah with the population having doubled in the past decade. The median house price in the past year was $481,000, based on 144 home sales, and was at $470,000 in October after coming off the all-time high in May. It was $440,000 in March 2017 and $380,000 five years ago. Compared to the same period five years ago, the median sales price for houses increased 26.6 per cent. Units were at $284,500 in October, off the $338,000 in December 2017, while land has been constant since mid-2018 at $297,500. The investor can look at a desirable one per cent vacancy rate, hardly surprising since Beerwah has been named in the top 10 of Queensland growth suburbs. Beerwah Town Green has been designed as a series of public spaces specific to the place and time of Beerwah and its future.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$468,500 $430

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$287,000 $370

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -2.4% 12 months .................................... -0.3% 3 years ........................................ 13.3% 5 years ........................................ 21.7% Annually (10 years) ....................... 1.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

45 days

March

?

$

Beerwah has rural charm. Photo: John McCutcheon

As part of the Streetscape Masterplan, the Tower Green reflects the area’s heritage and serves as a garden for people and endangered butterfly species, a meeting place and venue for community markets. Beerwah is also known around the world as the home of Australia Zoo. What started out as Beerwah Reptile and Fauna Park in 1970 has transformed into a worldwide attraction. The name Beerwah comes from the Kabi language birrawaman, with birra meaning sky and wandum meaning climbing up. The largest of the Glasshouse Mountains, Mt Beerwah, stands 555m tall. Beerwah Post Office opened by August 1907 and the Coochin Creek Provisional School opened in November 1888. The Big Mower, one of Australia’s big things, is in Beerwah. It stands opposite the town’s

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golf course, where you are just as likely to rub shoulders with a kangaroo as score a birdie. Public and private schools from Prep to Year 12 attract families and the township is further anchored by business, with all the major banks and retailers such as Target, Woolworths, Aldi and Supa IGA part of the local economy. People once moved to Beerwah for the half-acre block, but developers now produce much smaller lots in recognition of modern buyer demand. There has been a subsequent increase in townhouses and units to cater for a wide demographic that includes permanent rentals. Stockland’s development of Woodgrove Estate about a decade ago created a residential rush with young families seeking value for their hard-earned dollar.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.9 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.8% 6.7%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

6769 Average weekly household income $1225 Median age

39

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suburb | Birtinya

Boom time at lake DESIGNED as the perfect place to live, work and play, Birtinya is changing before our eyes. Built around Lake Kawana, this suburb is in high demand with multi-billion-dollar infrastructure and development taking place. The new $1.8 billion Sunshine Coast University Hospital has provided extreme stimulus for the commercial and residential development taking place around it. Surrounded by waterways and with kilometres of waterfront cycling and walking paths, the area is quickly becoming a world-class destination for the Sunshine Coast. The community has a wide range of quality home sites that border natural parklands as well as waterfront addresses. The $5 billion Oceanside development will offer a range of health services, commercial space, aged care facilities, shops and cafes, as well as hotel-style accommodation and residential living. The $830 million Birtinya Town Centre masterplan development is under way, with the $87 million Stockland Birtinya Shopping Centre having opened in December. Stage one features a flagship Coles and Aldi supermarkets, two mini-majors, an open-air, late night dining precinct, some 30 specialty retailers and 522 car parking spaces. Now the adjoining Birtinya Service Centre has opened with a Caltex Service Station and casual dining. The 600sq m centre will include a Caltex service station offering a range of convenience items as well as fuel, a Guzman Y Gomez restaurant and Oporto restaurant, both with a drive-through, and almost 50 car parking spaces. These developments will be important generators of local jobs. They form part of the broader future Birtinya Town Centre, which is expected to create more than 14,600 new full-time jobs on completion. Birtinya Town Centre and the Sunshine Coast Health Precinct will be connected to the new Bokarina Beach community this year by a pedestrian underpass and extension of Lake

Your home deserves Elite service James Goldsworthy 18

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$704,000 $560

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$427,500 $420

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 2.2% 12 months .................................... 6.7% 3 years ........................................ 21.4% 5 years ........................................14.8% Annually (10 years) ....................... n/a

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

78 days

March

?

$

Birtinya is surrounded by waterways. Photo: Erle Levey

Kawana under the Nicklin Way. While most of the residential estates have been completed there is still a lot of unit development ahead, built around the expanding town centre and improving public transport that will see Birtinya serviced by road, rail and either bus or light rail connections. Construction will continue on the new waterfront townhome community of Sway Birtinya will feature 60 designer homes, a central park for residents and a communal pool. With a wide variety of home sites for buyers to choose from, Birtinya is highly sought after. Housing styles vary from waterfront homes, terrace housing and apartment blocks through to house-and-land packages. From a median house price of $584,775 in

September 2013, prices dropped away to $558,000 in late 2014. They have increased since then and now sit at $659,900 in October 2018, down from a high of $668,500 in June. Five years ago it was at $513,100, at the bottom of the fall-out of the GFC. The population of Birtinya in 2011 was 315 people. Within five years it had increased seven-fold. The median sale price of units sits at $430,000 and land at $263,000. The $63 million Birtinya Retirement Village in the Sunshine Coast Health Precinct provides a mix of one, two and three-bedroom low-maintenance apartments. The new Sunshine Coast Public University Hospital has revolutionised healthcare on the Coast with a range of free public hospital services.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

4.4 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.1% 5.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

1933 Average weekly household income $1621 Median age

33

ALAN WHITE

18-19

REPRESENTING THE TOP PERFORMING AGENTS IN THE INDUSTRY Ray White Mooloolaba & Kawana 0400 635 141 james.goldsworthy@raywhite.com raywhitemooloolaba.com.au raywhitekawana.com.au


suburb | Bli Bli

Old and new collide WHERE else in Queensland can you boast having a castle in your neighbourhood? That’s the case at Bli Bli, between the Maroochy River and the foothills of the hinterland. Blending the old with the new and locals with tourists, Bli Bli is a place to watch. Named after the term “billai billai”, which is an Aboriginal word for swamp oak, Bli Bli has a wealth of history, yet it is experiencing a resurgence in infrastructure as well as new residential buildings. Within close proximity to Sunshine Coast Airport and the beaches of Maroochy North Shore, Bli Bli has taken on a more urban character than the original farming settlement created here in the 1800s. In a central location between the Maroochy River and ocean, it is an ideal location close to Maroochydore and Nambour. Set within the boundary of a grazing lease, which once had an area of 647ha, Bli Bli began to take shape in 1862, when a homestead was erected by John Westaway. Today the Bli Bli region is a growing river-front community with a mix of diverse housing styles and situations. Ranging from acreage lots to masterplanned communities and retirement villages, not only is this a safe place to live but it is also highly regarded. Bli Bli continues as an emerging force in the Sunshine Coast property market. New estates such as Parklakes and Cutters Landing have seen the housing market sky-rocket and significant infrastructure growth in the Bli Bli precinct will ensure this is one of the hot pockets to watch. A new Catholic college at Parklakes, offering from Prep to Year 12, is included as part of the master-planned community. The median house price in October was an all-time high of $546,000, up from $450,000 five years ago and $375,000 at the start of 2013. The median price for units in October was $425,000, just off the $427,500 in September, while land was $330,500, up markedly on $269,500 in 2017.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$546,500 $485

$

$$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a $420

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -0.4% 12 months .................................... 2.1% 3 years ........................................ 15.1% 5 years ........................................25.2% Annually (10 years) ....................... 3.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

39 days

March

?

In a central location between the Maroochy River and ocean, Bli Bli is an ideal location close to Maroochydore and Nambour. PHOTO: ERLE LEVEY

A range of shopping opportunities are available at Bli Bli, with more retail and commercial developments under construction, forming a bond between the township and giving the locals more choices to shop and spend within the region. In recent years, Bli Bli has welcomed the multimillion-dollar redevelopment of the Supa IGA and River Markets Shopping Centre. Stage two of the new $30 million Bli Bli Village Town Centre Development is scheduled to open in April. The multi-level commercial precinct offers a mix of retail shops, restaurants, cafes, medical and specialty services, and professional suites. The stage two opening will see eight exciting new businesses, including an F45 Fitness Studio, Suncoast X-Ray and Imaging, a Salvos variety store, photography studio,

fashion outlets, Ray White Real Estate as well as an accountancy practice. An Indian restaurant will also operate from one of the two restaurant tenancies within the building. Locals and tourists will enjoy a fully licensed tavern complete with gaming facilities and a drive-through bottle shop. The village will also feature new one and two-bedroom apartments. Three major tourist attractions of the Sunshine Coast can be found at Bli Bli. Known for the Maroochy River Wetlands Sanctuary Reserve and boardwalk as well as the famous Bli Bli Castle, it is also home to Aqua Park, a popular venue offering a range of water sports. The inflatable water park continues to draw crowds and it’s always a hit with families, especially during the warmer months.

Better than you ever imagined.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.5 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.6% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

7801 Average weekly household income $1355 Median age

40

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suburb | Buddina

Nature lover’s dream BETWEEN river and ocean, Buddina is undergoing a renaissance, with some major beach-side developments taking place. This is in conjunction with the recent expansion of the landmark Kawana Shoppingworld regional shopping centre. With its central location and the natural appeal of the surf beach and Mooloolah River, Buddina is benefiting significantly from the Sunshine Coast’s strong population growth. Along with its surf and still-water beaches, there are many notable features to this often talked-about community. A trend setter in the 1970s and ’80s with canal-front housing, Buddina has been rediscovered by new generations. Many of those may have rented there in their early adult life and have now found themselves in a position to buy into the area. Amid great fanfare, the Sunshine Coast’s first Gold Class cinema experience was delivered in December. Kawana Shoppingworld owner Mirvac Retail introduced a 6000sq m multi-screen Event Cinema complex, complete with GA, VMAX and a Gold Class experience. This was in conjunction with the new 595-space multi-deck carpark, more casual dining tenancies and street-fronting retail stores. Another major move has been the opening of The Point, at the corner of Nicklin Way and Point Cartwright Dr. Major brands already trading at the new centre include Hungry Jack’s, Beefy’s, Burrito Bar and IGA, as well as Aussie Home Loans. Buddina is regarded as a hot spot, with 42.5 per cent capital growth over the past five years. It offers a wide variety of housing options, from spectacular penthouse apartments on Point Cartwright to older-style houses along the Nicklin Way that are being utilised as work-from-home businesses. Stretched along the southern banks of the Mooloolah River and opposite the fishing fleet, it is understandably the favoured place for many commercial fishermen to call home. Yet amateur and sporting fishermen also fall in love with the location.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$775,000 $550

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$450,000 $390

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 0.3% 12 months ................................. -1.7% 3 years ..................................... 22% 5 years ..................................... 43.3% Annually (10 years) .................... 3%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

41 days

March

?

$

HATCHED: Turtle season generally starts in October when the shores stretching from Caloundra to Buddina are blessed with loggerhead turtles. PHOTO: FACEBOOK/NATURE CONNECTIONS SE

Very little land is available and it sits at $700,000. This is up from $561,000 a year previous but with not enough sales mid-year to warrant an average. There’s a good mix of low-set brick-and-tile homes, units and prestige ocean-front properties opposite the beach or on the canal. With residential construction under way between Kawana Shoppingworld and the beach front, the area will soon further accommodate those who are wanting to live a quiet, yet coastal lifestyle. Whether you fancy a swim in the river or a surf at the point, Buddina offers a premium lifestyle. The Mooloolah River boat ramp is always popular with boaties but Buddina is

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.7% 4.5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

also home to the Kawana surf club and a highly regarded state primary school. The Point Cartwright lighthouse has become an iconic landmark of the Coast. The hill at Buddina offers a popular outdoor gym, without the fees. People run up and down the hill for exercise, while being treated to the gorgeous view that overlooks the Pacific Ocean and a front-on view of Mooloolaba. For a less strenuous activity, the coastal boardwalk along Point Cartwright takes in some of Buddina’s natural beauty. With an abundance of trendy cafes, this area offers a wonderful location for a morning workout. Running tracks stretch for kilometres and the awesome scenery is truly not to be missed.

3885 Average weekly household income $1383 Median age

40

Over 60 Million in Settled sales

0400 444 011

20

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EXECUTIVE PROPERTY CONSULTANT


suburb | Buderim

On a mountain high

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$650,000 $550

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$400,500 $395

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 12 months ................................. 3 years ..................................... 5 years ..................................... Annually (10 years) ....................

-1.8% -3.3% 12.1% 22.6% 2.1%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

44 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

11.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.4% 5.1%

PICTURESQUE: Buderim’s tree-lined streets invite people in, while cooling summer breezes contribute to lowering the heat by as much as five degrees. PHOTO: ERLE LEVEY

DEMOGRAPHICS Sunshine Coast on its slopes and at the base. Immanuel Lutheran College, Matthew Flinders Anglican College, Sunshine Coast Grammar, Siena Catholic College and Chancellor State College all form part of the Buderim community. Health and well-being has long formed part of the Buderim culture, from Buderim Private Hospital to all manner of private practices. Never is the adage truer “buy land now, they aren’t making any more” — in particular for those living “on top”. Boutique developments continue to spring up but there has been a greater infill at Buderim in recent times, with larger residential blocks being subdivided or holdings amalgamated to create apartments.

The high-quality, rich, red volcanic loam is capable of producing almost anything — coffee, ginger (for which the township became famous), fruit and prize-winning gardens. Buderim comprises classic Queenslanders through to contemporary-designed homes. The real value, though, lies in the land, which is widely renowned as solid real estate underpinning value. An ocean view is prized, with the northern vista well-regarded for showcasing the best of the seasons and the southern outlook often referred to as the pretty outlook. To the west, the hinterland offers an array of reds and blues while the east looks over Alexandra Headland to the ocean.

Population

29,355 Average weekly household income $1402 Median age

45

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IT’S one of the most liveable places in Australia — the ideal escape from the heat of Queensland’s summers with the 180m-high mountain catching cooling sea breezes and the shade of its magnificent trees. It’s also one of the most established areas of the Sunshine Coast. Even so, Buderim has been undergoing a change in recent years. Included have been new unit and townhouse developments on top of the mountain and on the southern slopes, near the University of the Sunshine Coast and the emerging Sippy Downs town centre. As well as the Woolworths supermarket in the village centre, a new Coles supermarket is being constructed at North Buderim, opposite the refurbished IGA supermarket. Regarded as a health and knowledge hub, Buderim property prices hardly ever take a step backward. Residential developments such as Sage Landing are catering for long-term residents wanting to downsize. Buderim has an encouraging climate for art and culture, education, health and well-being, as well as fostering a true sense of community. It was founded as a township more than 150 years ago. The rich volcanic soils delighted early farmers as well as modern-day gardeners. It’s a pleasant surprise of incredible variations, from the tranquil Buderim Waterfall Park to award-winning architecture and picturesque gardens. Why so sought-after? Locals love the sense of community and the fact that a population of 40,000 can still feel like a small town. They love the blend of young and old, as well as the leafy streets, gardens, views and fertile soil, plus the links to the town’s heritage via Pioneer Cottage, the old post office, community hall, school oval and descendants of pioneering families. The new Buderim Village Park off King St adds to the sense of community that has been created at the memorial hall and art cottage opposite, as well as Buderim Mountain State School. Buderim is regarded as a knowledge hub, with its collection of private and public schools as well as the University of the

SPOTLIGHT

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suburb | Caloundra

Popular pretty city CLEAN, uncrowded beaches, walks around the headland, ice creams on the boardwalk and sporting venues that cater for all — Caloundra has traditional beach-side appeal that stretches back 100 years, from a time when it was first subdivided as a town out of what was grazing land. From that rich past it has become a vibrant commercial centre and residential community. Indeed it was the first part of the Sunshine Coast to proclaim itself as a city. That grew out of what was initially Landsborough Shire Council, which took in the hinterland areas of Beerwah, Landsborough and Maleny. Today it is a vital part of Sunshine Coast Regional Council. With the foreshore lined with huge Norfolk Island pines, it is clear why Caloundra is named after the aboriginal word “callanda”, meaning a beautiful place. Through the years the town has become a holiday haven. Bulcock St is the main precinct in the central business district and links to Stockland regional shopping centre along Bowman Rd. A major drawcard is the eastern beaches Kings Beach, Shelly Beach, Moffat Beach and Dicky Beach. Yet there are also the expanding residential communities of Bells Reach and Aura to the west. Caloundra offers a diverse property market for owner-occupiers, investors and developers, giving opportunity to purchase at almost any price level. Mosaic Property Group last year opened its Cyan residential apartments on the ridge overlooking Kings Beach. Its latest project, Solis, is being developed just a few doors further north. Median sales price at October 2018 was $530,000, compared to $447,500 five years ago. The all-time high was $539,000 in the third quarter of 2016. Prices lifted markedly from March that year and have remained in the mid-$500,000s since. Unit median sales prices have lifted from $367,735 in October 2016 to $430,000 at the

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$520,000 $420

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$456,500 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -1.9% 12 months .................................... 0.4% 3 years ........................................ 17.1% 5 years ........................................22.4% Annually (10 years) ....................... 1.3%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

31 days

March

?

SO MUCH ON OFFER: On a tour of the Pumicestone Passage with Ken McBryde, of Caloundra Cruise. PHOTO: WARREN LYNAM

same time last year. In general, Caloundra has clawed its way back to the pre-global financial crisis market of 2007. Prime positions are performing well. So are residential units, especially those near the beach under $600,000. Caloundra is served by a hospital, court house, a variety of public and private schools, and recreational and sporting venues. These include a tennis complex, gymnastics and aquatic centres, an indoor stadium and outdoor sporting grounds. Sunshine Coast Industrial Park at Caloundra South is attracting some big companies and Aura has the first businesses moving into its own business park. The new Sunshine Coast University Hospital at Birtinya is continuing to have a positive impact on Caloundra, especially in

regard to employment opportunities. Yet building continues to underpin the economy. On the lifestyle front, Caloundra has everything people could want. Popular and encouraging to local talent, Caloundra Music Festival is held annually and brings crowds from near and far. The festival is held over three days at Kings Beach, bringing the sun, surf and soul to this seaside community. A favourite for visitors and locals is Caloundra RSL, which has been a crowd favourite since the doors opened in 1963, providing a mix of food, events, live bands and entertainment. The Events Centre Caloundra is known for its selection of concerts, music, dance and plays on offer. With two theatres and more than 1000 dining spaces, the venue is well patronised.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12.9 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3917 Average weekly household income $833 Median age

58

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4.2% 4.6%


suburb | Coolum Beach

Beach and bushland IT’S the seaside area that everyone relates to – a carefree atmosphere that makes every day seem like a holiday. The seaside town’s natural beauty and coastal landscape is as refreshing as a sea breeze in summer. As the sun rises, a nurturing environment surrounds it, so living a coastal lifestyle in Coolum comes easily. The beach-front caravan park is a major benefit, especially with the recent streetscaping. Otherwise there is a wide variety of accommodation to cater to all tastes. Drift by Mosaic will feature 56 apartments at Point Perry, with another development soon to be announced by Mosaic for First Bay, overlooking the popular beach. Latitude, a boutique residential development by HMR Projects, is due to start construction shortly on the corner of Beach Rd and French St. Housing ranges from original beach houses to architect-designed homes that take advantage of the interesting geography of the elevated areas. High-end housing is found on the elevated sites such as in the Grandview Dr precinct, as well as quality beach-front apartments. The median house price for Coolum Beach in December was $$700,000, up from $680,000 at the start of last year — well ahead of the $576,000 at the start of 2017 and the $465,000 in April 2014. A Fauna Tce house achieved a sale of $2.68 million early last year, while a six-bedroom, four-bathroom house with pool at 31 Pacific Heights Crt sold for $3.58 million in November. A four-bedroom, one-bathroom house at 7 Bywater Rd sold for $678,000 in February and an older-style two-bedroom beach-front house at 1678 David Low Way sold in April for $1 million. While price growth has been steady and consistent, the number of sales rose quite sharply throughout 2017. Unit sales were at $397,000 in December, just off the high of $399,500 in October/

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$685,000 $500

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$405,000 $395

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -2.1% 12 months ................................. 0.7% 3 years ..................................... 24.5% 5 years ..................................... 47.3% Annually (10 years) .................... 3.6%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

39 days

March

?

STUNNING SCENERY: Coolum Beach plays host to the Surf Boat Carnival. The long stretch of beach allows for a refreshing swim without the crowds. PHOTO: CONTRIBUTED

November, while land was $440,000 in December compared to $331,760 in the previous year. Most house sales are in the $400,000– $800,000 range, with 21 in the $800,000– $1 million range, 15 above $1 million and three above $2 million. The Esplanade is filled with cafes, shops and businesses, highlighting the feeling that every day is a holiday. Derived from the Aboriginal word “gulum” or “kulum”, meaning blunt or headless, this refers to the shape of Mt Coolum, which is known for not having a peak. Forming a dramatic backdrop, Mt Coolum rises 208m above sea level and is the world’s second-largest rock behind Uluru. It’s a volcanic dome that can be seen from the length and breadth of the Sunshine Coast.

Spend your morning taking a walk or a run to the top. Another major innovation is the scenic walk along the boardwalk connecting Coolum Main Beach to Point Perry. Take in the sea air and get the legs pumping while overlooking a stunning coastal backdrop. Directly up from the sand is Tickle Park, the perfect place for a picnic or to practice yoga. With barbecues and a playground, you can enjoy a family-friendly atmosphere. Offering crystal-clear water and golden sand, the long stretch of beach gives way to a refreshing swim, without the crowds. The beach accommodates the whole family, even the four-legged ones. With the off-leash section of beach starting at entry 67, dogs are welcome for 1km north of Stumer Creek, through to beach entrance 72.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

13.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.8% 5.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

8497 Average weekly household income $1269 Median age

43

#1 for real estate Source: emma conducted by Ipsos, 12 months ending November 2018, Fused Nielsen Digital Panel calibrated to Digital Content Ratings, November 2018; P14+; Sunshine Coast Daily total monthly audience; Sunshine Coast PDA

23


suburb | Cotton Tree

Fall for its charm JUST about every visitor to the central Sunshine Coast goes to Cotton Tree … and falls in love with its charm. And they have been doing it for more than 100 years. A delightful community in Maroochydore, Cotton Tree is superbly situated between the calm Maroochy River and a stunning stretch of golden surfing beaches. The area takes its name from the hibiscus tiliaceus plant, also known as coastal cotton tree or cottonwood. First gazetted as a wharf and water reserve in 1873, it was soon popular as a camping reserve. Until the 1910s, Cotton Tree was accessible only by water. Then in 1927 a road was put through what is now Maroochydore. Andrew and Tom Petrie originally explored the area for resourcing timber. After building cottages to house employees for the timber depot, the accommodation was soon used to run Salvation Army holiday camps. After many changes through the years, the popular riverside location flourished as a tourist spot. In 1916 the Sunshine Coast’s first surf club, the Maroochydore Surf Club, was opened. Then in 1921 Maroochydore had the opening of the first school on the Sunshine Coast, and from there the growth has continued. The area was also used as an aircraft landing site, hence the street names Aerodrome Rd, Hinkler Pde and Kingsford Smith Pde. With the Coast’s housing market and real estate in general the focus of a lot of attention accompanied by developer confidence in the area, apartment complexes are on the rise. The landscape provides stunning views and colours only nature can produce. Cotton Tree Esplanade offers an ever-changing northern seascape over crystal sands and blue water. Holiday and residential apartments continue to be built to provide for the ever-increasing demand in such a location. Adding to the changing landscape along the esplanade is The Cosmopolitan Cotton Tree, a development of 143 luxury apartments in a riverfront location. Set on seven levels, it is due for completion this year. The population of wider Maroochydore grew 16.1 per cent between 2011 and the 2016 census.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$630,000 $525

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$418,750 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -2.9% 12 months .................................... 1.6% 3 years ........................................18.6% 5 years ........................................35.5% Annually (10 years) ....................... 3.8%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

53 days

March

?

$

SIMPLY GORGEOUS: The beach at Cotton Tree. Photo: Erle Levey

The median price for houses was $648,000 in January, just off the all-time high of $650,000 in November. It is up from $600,000 at the start of last year and markedly higher than the $465,000 in January 2014. The median price has remained above $600,000 since November 2017 and shows a steady increase, with no marked dips or rises. Units were very stable throughout the year, hitting $422,500 in November and sitting at $418,000 in January. Recent sales include 6/44 Beach Pde for $620,000 in December, 28/57 Kingsford Smith Pde for $545,000 in February, and 7/62-66 Sixth Ave for $780,000 in March. In December, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house in Third Ave sold for $1.18 million and a house containing seven bedrooms in Hinkler Pde sold for $1.1 million. Along with Cotton Tree’s charming strip of

boutiques, cafes and juice bars, this area is a hit with locals, tourists and the health conscious. Can you imagine a more perfect setting than fresh fish and chips by the waterfront while watching the sunset? Then there is the exciting range of restaurants and coffee spots. Handy to Maroochydore RSL and Events Centre as well as the regional shopping in Maroochydore, Cotton Tree has so much to see and do. There is the library and neighbourhood centre, and nearby childcare groups. Discover handmade crafts and fresh local produce at the Sunday markets along King St or put the white socks and sweat bands on for a game of tennis at the Maroochydore Tennis Club. You can have a hit on the table tennis tables outside Cotton Tree Aquatic Centre, featuring an Olympic-size riverfront pool.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

10.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.3% 5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

16,800 Average weekly household income $1065 Median age

46

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suburb | Currimundi

Town’s natural feel THERE are two sides to Currimundi – beachside and creekside. Consequently, it has wide appeal with a variety of housing as well as environmental features. Taking a stroll through Currimundi, is like taking a walk back in time by bucking the trend and retaining a natural feel. Innovative architecture, growing businesses and commercial development is on the rise, but high rises are not. Currimundi holds the classic 1970s feeling of relaxed beachside bliss with a touch of modern progression. And that’s just the way locals like it –quiet, family-friendly and a truly relaxing place to call home. The Watson St precinct is home to some impressive ocean-front homes that are continually in demand for renovations or extensions. So are the lakeside streets that attract sea breezes. Currimundi locals know how to keep a good thing quiet, with the area attracting young families, retirees, or simply those who know quality living when they see it. With two schools within the district, Currimundi State School and Talara Primary College, the kids will enjoy a morning ride to school. The Currimundi Markets, located on Nicklin Way, caters for all shopping list with Woolworths and 19 other handy shops. As well as some of the Sunshine Coast’s major car dealerships, Nicklin Way is home to a wide variety of businesses in and around the Currimundi Marketplace shopping centre. Then there is the Currimundi Hotel and the neighbourhood shopping of Pacific Haven along Buderim St near the Currimundi State School. With the opening of the Sunshine Coast University Hospital, and the high demand in residential apartment buildings, real estate has seen a boom within the surrounding areas. Adding property value to the area, the hospital has also become a great asset to the Sunshine Coast as a whole. The CoreLogic median sale price for Currimundi at October 2018 was $549,500,

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$540,000 $475

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$425,000 $430

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -1.7% 12 months .................................... 0.9% 3 years ........................................ 14% 5 years ........................................ 25% Annually (10 years) ....................... 2.3%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

32 days

March

?

The Currimundi Lake area is a great spot to catch the sunrise or sunsets. The cafes and parks make it perfect anytime of day. Photo: Che Chapman

reflecting steady growth since $433,000 in January 2104. It broke the $500,000 mark in August 2017 with $510,000. Unit sale prices were $435,000 in October, up from $410,000 at the start of last year. Virtually no vacant land is available, with one sale last year and a median price of $800,000. While these necessities are important, it’s the natural wonders and beautiful beaches that shape Currimundi into a beautiful seaside suburb. The first settler was John Ballinger, who selected land for sheep-raising in 1870, and his name is remembered today with Ballinger Beach, just to the south of Currimundi. The Currimundi Outdoor Recreation Centre takes up a large part of the beachside suburb,

making a natural break between the sand spit. Originally known as Girrimundi, former Queensland Governor, Sir Leslie Wilson, named the region after the Aboriginal word meaning a ‘place of flying foxes’. Perhaps Wilson noticed a colony of fruit bats flying over his Currimundi house he had built in 1936. Or perhaps it referred to flying fox lines put in place during World War II as the northern part of Currimundi Beach was gazetted for military defence training in 1939. Currimundi Lake, commonly known for the water course beside Currimundi Beach, provides almost still water yet tidal swimming that is a safe place for young families to enjoy. Currimundi Beach is an exposed beach break suitable for both naturals and beginners.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12.8 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.6% 5.3%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

6786 Average weekly household income $1174 Median age

43

25


suburb | Dicky Beach

Dicky Beach revival A POPULAR seaside suburb with a rich history, Dicky Beach has a new vibe to it. There is renewed energy in the local shopping centre that provides everything from surfboards to coffee shops, from butcher to supermarket, from quality restaurant to fish and chips. It all revolves around the beach and the adjoining holiday park. The only recreational beach to carry the name of a shipwreck, this area was named after the SS Dicky. The iron steamboat came aground while attempting to avoid damage during a cyclone in February 1893. Although left to deteriorate, the wreckage remained a landmark tourist attraction for many years. Dicky Beach had its beginnings as a community in 1936 when local real estate agents Farlow & Henzell launched Dickey Beach Real Estate 2.5km north of Caloundra’s town centre. Just picture what it was like in those days –a timber bridge over the creek, simple beach houses on the sand dunes and a carefree lifestyle. Mr Ballinger’s name is still remembered thanks to Ballinger Beach which is to the north of Dicky Beach. Today, the locality provides a mix of housing from simple holiday flats to substantial oceanfront residences. In recent times, the property market has witnessed significant sales as the confidence of buyers increases in what many describe as paradise. According to CoreLogic the beachfront position has seen the median house sales price sit at $786,000 in January 2019, holding above $775,000 since a high of $874,375 mid last year. The median price was $580,000 in January 2014, reaching $750,000 for most of the second half of 2015 before getting to $772,500 in April 2016 then falling away to $658,000 in early 2017. Unit median sales were at $343,500 in January this year after reaching $356,500 in November. There had been 27 house sales in the 12 months to January 2019, down from the mid

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$865,000 $490

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$346,000 $410

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 10.1% 12 months ................................. 5.4% 3 years ..................................... 12% 5 years ..................................... 49.2% Annually (10 years) .................... 5.9%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

26 days

March

?

$

Dicky Beach has a renewed vitality.

30s of 2016-17. Meanwhile 18 units were sold in the year. Most house sales were in the $600,000-$800,000 range with six in the $800,000-$1m and seven from $1m-$2m. The prime precincts include Wilson Ave, Neill, McKay and Cooroora streets as well as Ngungun St and Crees Pde while on the western side of Elizabeth St, the creekfront Macdonald St has plenty of appeal. Some boutique housing developments in recent years have also added to the rise in prices. The way in which new estates such as Driftwood and Scape were taken up in recent years shows the sought-after appeal of the suburb. Dicky Beach has a mix of housing styles, from creek and beachfront to units and townhouses with prices ranging from the high $200,000s for a one-bed unit to $4m-plus on

the beach. A five-bedroom beachside house at 4 Ann Street sold for $1,010,000 in late March, while a three-bedroom, two-bathroom beachfront house on 607sq m at 5 Wilson Ave sold in November for $2,450,000. A two-bedroom townhouse villa at 1/3 Bott Street sold for $540,000 in mid-February, and a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 405sq m at 15 Foreshore Ct sold for $866,000 in March. Then in April, a four-bedroom, three-bathroom house on 607sq m at 30 Henzell Street sold for $1,400,000. The Dicky Beach Surf Life Saving Club, formerly known as North Caloundra SLSC, was established in 1950 after an influx of residents signalled the necessity of regular patrols. Funds were raised locally to build a clubhouse and with a subsidy from the State Government, the club became a reality.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

13.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

2.9% 6.2%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

1895 Average weekly household income $1042 Median age

50

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suburb | Forest Glen

Country meets city IT’S where the country meets the city. Forest Glen is an emerging part of the Sunshine Coast, situated on the Bruce Highway between the Sunshine Motorway interchange and the Maroochydore Rd roundabout. As such, it is where country people from central and northern Queensland hit the urban area of the state’s southeast. It is also where the Sunshine Coast hinterland meets the coastal strip. With a size of about 6sq km, Forest Glen fits in a lot, with picturesque rural residential properties and a thriving commercial industry. Residential properties boast bush surrounds and the area blends with Mons. Many properties offer acre-size allotments, yet there is a new boutique residential community called Buderim Forest offering single and double-storey detached homes as well as terrace homes in a bushland setting. Substantial lifestyle properties blend with orchards, small cropping and hobby farming at Forest Glen as well as the surrounding communities of Ilkley, Eudlo and Chevallum. The median price of houses in January was $603,000, down from the 12-month high of $606,250 in November. The all-time high of $662,500 was reached in early 2017 after dropping to $510,000 late in 2014. Land sales have dropped away after a strong run from 2012-16 in line with estate releases. Recent sales, according to CoreLogic, include a four-bedroom, three-bathroom house on 6283sq m at 41 Anning Rd for $900,000 in February, a four-bedroom, twobathroom house on 511sq m at 31 Forest Pines Blvd for $620,000 in March, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 6001sq m at 17 Gardenia Pl for $905,001 in April, and a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house at 8/25 Owen Creek Rd for $583,000 in April. Forest Glen is a hive of activity for businesses, including caravan and trailer manufacturing, truck, tractor and off-road vehicle yards, the twin BP service centres, storage centres, warehouses and more. The turf farm is making way for continued expansion on the western side of the highway.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$632,500 $543

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a n/a

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 3.8% 12 months .................................... 16.1% 3 years ........................................ 7.7% 5 years ........................................ n/a Annually (10 years) ....................... n/a

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

33 days

March

?

$

Forest Glen. Photo: Erle Levey

The Natural Foodstore was for many years the centre of attraction at Forest Glen, yet its popularity has grown immensely since being transformed into Kunara Organic Marketplace – an incubator for holistic wellbeing. Always expanding, it offers an organic cafe, deli, fresh organic produce, and natural health and skin care. Other businesses such as Sunshine Coast Organic Meats have also relocated to the centre. A new $2.6 million roundabout at the intersection of Mons Rd and Owen Creek Rd has improved traffic flow as well as catering for future expansion of the shopping centre. A Big 4 Holiday resort with Spirit of Tibet restaurant is located at Forest Glen, plus there’s the Sunshine Coast Grammar School. Established in 1997, the school is set on a beautiful 40ha site with lakes and rainforest.

The independent, co-educational, Christianbased school for children from Prep to Year 12 forms part of the education hub – in and around Buderim – that has the University of the Sunshine Coast as its heart. Forest Glen is also the new home of Montessori International College, which includes a school and early learning centre. Forest Glen is also the birthplace of Hugh Sawrey, famous Australian artist and founder of the Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame, who was born here in 1919. Eudlo Creek, a tributary of the Maroochy River, is the main waterway in the area. Forest Glen was once a railway siding for the Buderim to Palmwoods tramway, built in the early 1900s. The line was closed in 1935 but in recent years part of the old track off Mons Rd has been made into a heritage walking trail.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

10.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.5% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

1390 Average weekly household income $1486 Median age

35

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suburb | Golden Beach

Enjoy golden glow WITH a name like Golden Beach, what more needs to be said? Hugging the shoreline of Pumicestone Passage, the glistening views across the shallow blue waters attract many locals and tourists. Looking across the blue waters towards the tropical green and sandy wonders of Bribie Island, you would have to agree that a view this stunning, truly is golden. While moving with the times from earlier years, this classic beach town has retained a lovely sense of yesteryear with a wonderful vibe, yet at the same time managing to retain the comforting sense of a tightly knit community. It is little wonder that locals are proud to call Golden Beach home. With developments of modern high-rises and stunning beach houses accommodating the continuous flow of tourists, growing resident numbers and retirees, it is no surprise that people continue to settle in, to become new Golden Beach locals. The population of Golden Beach grew by 7.5% from 2011 to the 2016 census, as unit developments took advantage of the location and proximity to Caloundra CBD. Golden Beach continues to develop, with modern homes and restaurants popping up to meet the growing population. Lined with dining options, this strip is popular with dedicated foodies, with an array of options to choose from. The Powerboat Club is a top pick among locals, where you can relish waterfront dining, a games room as well as live entertainment. A hot spot for brides and grooms to say ‘I do’, this club draws a classy crowd, where a night time’s enjoyment often transforms into lifelong memories. For a less formal outing requiring simple footwear or none at all, the golden strip of glistening sand and turquoise sea is a playground for the young and forever young. An ideal location for fish and chips along the waterfront, this is a popular spot for family gatherings or meeting up with friends. Beginning from the east and passing through the west of Golden Beach is a canal

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$583,000 $450

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$465,000 $380

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -0.3% 12 months ................................. 3.2% 3 years ..................................... 20.2% 5 years ..................................... 36.5% Annually (10 years) .................... 3%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

42 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

13.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4% 4.2%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

A pelican swims in Pumicestone Passage on sunset.Photo: Warren Lynam

from Pumicestone Passage. The calm water is a great spot to get the kayak or canoe wet. The passage is shallow and narrow with shifting sand and mud banks. At two metres deep, it provides beautiful aqua and golden patterns from the sand below. Not only does this make it a postcard perfect lookout, but the kids will love swimming in the shallow calm water. For a more adrenaline seeking sport, try your hand at jet skiing or wind surfing.

There is always something for the footy fans. The Caloundra Sharks Rugby League Club has all the action. With several different age divisions, there is never a dull moment on the field. The Caloundra Panthers Australian Football Club is based there, together with Caloundra United Football Club. The indoor stadium hosts a variety of sports from netball and basketball to indoor soccer, volleyball and badminton. It also hosts exhibitions and trade shows.

5575 Average weekly household income $1011 Median age

53

29


suburb | Kings Beach

Surf beach has it all AN EARLY morning surf, a swim at the beach pool, a walk along the boardwalk and headland, then a coffee at the heritage-listed beach bathing pavilion. It’s Caloundra’s surf beach and year-round playground. From the street art in and around Dingle Ave to the water playground on the beachfront. Kings Beach is between Caloundra Headland and Caloundra urban centre. It rises up from the crescent of sand and surf, giving views of the ocean, Moreton Island, Bribie Island and the Glasshouse Mountains. Considered by some as the king of beaches, it is this relaxed, seaside culture that is so appealing to so many. Such is the popularity of Kings Beach that several unit developments have been completed throughout the past year, catering for permanent residents and holiday-makers. The $20-million Cyan by Mosaic in Canberra Tce has recently been completed, as has their Solis development just a few doors to the north. So often Kings Beach has been the choice of unit and apartment buyers from Brisbane and southern states as weekenders or investments. Now younger people are snapping up the older units and taking advantage of the beach location to renovate them. It is the sleeping beauty for first home buyers. Those well located, albeit secondary positions of old units yet still with views and walking distance to the sand. The median sales price of houses was $965,000 in February this year, up significantly on the $650,000 in April 2015. The dwindling number of houses in the area compared to units has been reflected in the number of sales - 10 for the 12 months to February, nine the year before that. The median unit price was at $430,000 in February, according to CoreLogic, up from $380,000 in March 2018. In contrast, the number of unit sales were 140 in the previous 12 months and 183 for the year before that. Recent sales include a three-bedroom, 0ne-bathroom unit at 12/44 Edmund St for

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$1,130,000 $395

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$431,250 $365

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 16.5% 12 months ................................. 32.9% 3 years ..................................... n/a 5 years ..................................... n/a Annually (10 years) .................... 2.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

n/a

March

?

$

King’s Beach, Caloundra. Photo: Ross Eason

$333,000 in May, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom unit at 9/39 Canberra Tce for $642,000 in April, and a two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 6/35 Canberra Tce for $435,000 in late May. A two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 4/33 Burgess St sold in April for $308,000, a two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 3/27 Mahia Tce sold for $400,000 in early June and a five-bedroom, four-bathroom house at 10B King St sold for $1,485,000 in April. Kings Beach dates back to the late 19th, early 20th century. In 1877 when well-known Brisbane politician Robert Bulcock bought a large area of land at Caloundra. Almost 40 years later a portion of the parcel was subdivided, to be followed almost a decade later with a subdivision opposite Kings Beach. This area attracted strong residential and commercial interests. Named after the King family, who were the

PODCAST www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/realestate-podcast/

30

SPOTLIGHT

first residents of the area, it also prompted a move in 1893 by James Moffat from Moffat Head. By 1930, the North Coast, as it was known, was becoming very popular as a seaside resort. Guest houses attracted holiday-makers and Brisbane residents were especially drawn to the Caloundra area, just as they are today. The Caloundra Music Festival comes to Kings Beach each year with a diverse line-up of Australia’s best musicians as well as international artists. The Kings Beach bathing pavilion, the heritage-listed changing rooms situated in Ormonde Tce, were designed by Clifford Plant and built in 1937. Take the time to follow the Memorial Walkway following Esplanade Headland and Victoria Terrace, which has a series of dedications in remembrance of service personnel.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

17.8 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

1.8% 4.4%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

2788 Average weekly household income $1039 Median age

50

Listen in every Friday from 12 noon for an insight into the Sunshine Coast’s Real Estate market.


suburb | Landsborough

Sunny Coast gateway BETWEEN mountains and beach, Landsborough was long regarded as the gateway to the Sunshine Coast. A quiet, affordable and convenient place away from the hustle and bustle of the coastal suburbs yet within a 20 to 25 minute drive of the beaches and major shopping centres. Not only was it an important transport hub for railway and bus, but the Bruce Highway used to run through the historic town and provides a link to the M1. Landsborough is a stepping-off point for the coastal areas, it is close to attractions such as Australia Zoo at Beerwah or you can head up the Blackall Range to Maleny and Montville. With the improved rail connections, it has become a highly sought-after location for city workers who want easy access to the attractions of Brisbane coupled with the proximity to Sunshine Coast beaches. Named after explorer William Landsborough, the first European to cross Australia north to south, the small town is just off the Steve Irwin Way. Its appeal lies in the variety of housing on offer, from modern homes in new estates to established Queenslanders on acreage. The population of Landsborough grew by 2.3% from 2011 to the 2016 Census, when it reached 3813. The median house price in March was $466,500 after reaching a high of $478,000 in October. It was $390,000 in March 2014. The median sale price of land was $265,000 in March, up from the $248,500 in September. There were 86 house sales in the 12 months to March, and 29 land sales ‌ off the 57 and 71 respectively in 2017-18 following some major subdivisions. Recent sales have included a two-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 1012sq m at 26 Caloundra Street for $405,000 in May, and a four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 2119sq m at 2 Gympie Street North for $460,000 mid-June. A three-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 0.8ha at 6A Gattera Road sold for $685,000 in March while a vacant 36.60ha at 21 Isambert

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$466,500 n/a

$$

$

March

?

UNIT ....................

$400 $348

BUY RENT

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -2.4% 12 months .................................... 4.5% 3 years ........................................ 16.6% 5 years ........................................ 21.2% Annually (10 years) ....................... 2.1%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

45 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.4 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.5% n/a

Landsborough Pub. Photo: John McCutcheon

DEMOGRAPHICS Road sold for $975,000 in April. Originally known as Mellum Creek, Landsborough was settled in 1871. Mellum is an Aboriginal word for "volcano", and Isaac Burgess first erected a slab hut as "port of call" for Cobb and Co coaches stopping for refreshments and a change of horses. Ex-servicemen and their families were encouraged to move to the region in the 1900s under the Beerburrum Soldier Settlement Scheme which provided them with land where they grew pineapples. However, many farms were unsuccessful which resulted in men turning to the timber industry to earn a living.

Landsborough State School opened in September 1879 and caters for students from Prep to Year 6. There are a number of other public and private primary and high schools located within the surrounding townships. Big kids will enjoy a lap around the go-kart track or a visit to Ewen Maddock Dam where nature is in abundance. The Landsborough Sports Complex is a highly-regarded venue on the outskirts of town while the historic Peace Memorial Park was opened in 1922 and commemorates the end of World War I. Then there is the highly-popular Pioneer park and playground at the eastern entrance to the town.

Proudly a Family Owned & Operated Agency Sales | Auctions | Property Management

Population

3812 Average weekly household income $1240 Median age

41

If you are thinking of buying, selling or require property management services; we invite you to experience exceptional levels of service and care with our agency.

For all enquiries contact Rodney Millett 0477 702 073 Owner Principal

David Gamble 0419 720 575 Sales Consultant

Terri Lake 5494 3022 Property Management

Riverside Centre, 1/4 Maple St, Maleny 5494 3022 | info@malenyrealestate.com | www.malenyrealestate.com 7038052dp

31


suburb | Little Mountain

Town’s laid-back feel IT’S the gateway to Caloundra. As soon as you come over the crest of the hill you know you have arrived. In front of you are the blue waters of Pumicestone Passage and Moreton Bay. In the distance is the unmistakable shape of Moreton Island and its sand patch, while the Caloundra skyline is in the foreground. There is an overwhelming sense of every day being a holiday. You feel the sea breeze, sense the laid-back lifestyle. Little Mountain is the name given to the low range that rises from the surrounding plains. Around it are the emerging urban areas of Ivadale Lakes, Meridan Plains, Parklakes and Creekwood. The population grew by 13.0% to 10,220 in the five years from 2011 to the 2016 Census. The median house price has risen steadily over the past five years but spiked at $559,000 in September 2017 and $560,000 in July 2018. Since then the price has climbed to an all-time high of $565,000 in February-March - a big rise from the $465,000 in 2014. Unit prices were at $387,500 last year, while land was at $330,000, in January. Recent sales include a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 501sq m at 5 Alicia Circuit for $610,000 in June and a four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 0.4ha at 34 Ascot Way for $795,000 in April. A four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 501sq m at 79 High Park Crescent sold for $477,500 in April and a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 863sq m at 21 Ivadale Boulevard for $775,000. Meridan Plains is Aboriginal for “place of kangaroos or dingoes” and was the name of an early property in the area. Nearby Bells Creek is named after Mary Alice Bell, an early landholder in the area. Settlement of the area dates from the late 1800s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Significant residential development did not occur until the 1970s. Rapid growth took place from the early 1990s. The population increased seven-fold between 1991 and 2011.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$570,000 $500

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a $425

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 12 months ................................. 3 years ..................................... 5 years ..................................... Annually (10 years) ....................

1.6% 3.3% 6.5% 22.6% 2.2%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

39 days

March

?

$

Little Mountain has bush surrounds but close to town.

The original part of Little Mountain is Sugarbag Rd with its winding road, large blocks and parts affording great views of the coast and Caloundra city. The next section, originally developed as The Three Worlds of Little Mountain, is to the south of Caloundra Rd, off Pearce Ave, and consists of larger rural residential blocks from 0.2ha to 0.8ha. The country club-style development has bigger homes in a long-established, spacious and well-treed setting with thoroughfares such as Raintree Blvd, Lexington Dr, Ascot Way and Kentucky Ct. People could stable a horse and be part of the emerging equestrian scene in line with the advent of Corbould Park Racecourse and nearby pony club. On a good run it’s only seven minutes into Caloundra or to the Bruce Highway.

Access to Mooloolaba and Kawana has been made easier by the bypass from Caloundra Rd to Kawana Way and the new Sunshine Coast Public Hospital. The racecourse has since expanded to be a major centre for Queensland Racing with first-class stables and training facilities. The latest developments in Little Mountain have been Parklands, Ivadale Lakes and Creekwood that offer units as well as detached homes on smaller blocks in close proximity to schools and shopping centres. On the eastern slopes of Little Mountain is Caloundra West with housing and bulky goods and service businesses; warehouses such as Bunnings, Repco, Bob Jane and Petbarn; and others from service stations and car retailers to Caloundra Airport and the air museum.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.8 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.6% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

10,212 Average weekly household income $1361 Median age

41

Brent Higgins 0414 775 133

brent.higgins@raywhite.com ALAN WHITE

18-19

“Brent has great knowledge of the property market on the Sunshine Coast and was able to find the right house in Minyama for our family after we had given him a very tough brief. We have now listed and sold our current Minyama home and we are very happy that Brent and his team helped us through that process as well.” Campbell Family. 32

Ray White Mooloolaba & Kawana


suburb | Maleny

Simple life at its best IT’S a breath of fresh air. Situated on the southern end of Blackall Range, Maleny is about 450m above sea level. This homely hinterland township sits among serene, undulating hills. Once known for timber cutting and dairy farming, today it is full of people looking for an alternative lifestyle or friendly community. Brisbane day-trippers also enjoy the country town atmosphere of Maleny. It provides a fascinating landscape and variety of housing options,including traditional Queenslanders, cottages in the town and on small acreages, larger farms and retirement homes. Maleny Folk Festival has grown to be the largest folk festival in Australia at its own home near Woodford. With two supermarkets, hospital, police station and ambulance, primary and secondary schools plus a golf course and showgrounds, residents are well catered for. Several subdivisions have been developed in recent years to cater for those looking for the benefits of a country lifestyle with town services. Real estate in this area has crept up quite significantly and there have been some exceptional prices paid for properties. Many have fantastic views over the whole of the Sunshine Coast. But there are still some well-priced properties to be had as well. The median sale price for houses in April, according to CoreLogic, was an all-time high of $625,000 and has continued to be above the $600,000 mark since July last year. It was at $495,000 in May five years ago. The population grew by 8.6 per cent in the five years to the 2016 Census, when it reached 3735. The median sales price for units was $390,000 at April. The median sale price of land was $320,000, down from an all-time high of $380,000 in February. There were seven house sales in the $1 million–$2 million range. Recent sales include a vacant 739sq m block at 13 Cloudwalk Dr that sold for $288,000 in May, while a two-bedroom, one-bathroom

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$625,000 $440

$$

$

March

?

UNIT ....................

n/a $350

BUY RENT

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 1.6% 12 months ................................. 11% 3 years ..................................... 21.4% 5 years ..................................... 30.5% Annually (10 years) .................... 2.2%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

53 days

March

?

The lush, rolling hills of Maleny provide the perfect backdrop for a rural outing, complete with a view of the Glass House Mountains. PHOTO: WARREN LYNAM

duplex unit at 1/9 Fig St sold for $375,000. A four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 1087sq m at 15 Greenhills Esplanade sold for $570,000 in June and a four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 2.29ha at 7 Lawrence Pl sold for $990,000 in July. The adage “a picture paints a thousand words” could easily refer to this community, which defied the reduction of services experienced by many rural towns. It also resisted the trend for such places to become dormitory towns for people working on the coast or in Brisbane. Maleny has thrived by encouraging what life’s all about – a good community spirit in a clean environment. Put simply, there are few words or postcard pictures that do justice to the hinterland. The elevation provides the perfect positioning for

a superb lookout and, fortunately, the cooler air brings with it a refreshing atmosphere. The combination of lush, rolling hills and a winding creek provide the ultimate backdrop for an ideal rural outing. It’s little wonder Maleny is one of the most popular wedding destinations in Australia. Maleny is a tourist destination that caters for all occasions. It’s co-operative history has laid the seeds for its reputation for fresh, locally grown produce. With something for everyone and a Queensland favourite, Maleny Dairies started out in the production of cream. The family-owned local company has since expanded to milk, cheese and yoghurt. And few could resist the temptation of the Maleny Food Co for cheese, gelato and ice cream.

Proudly a Family Owned & Operated Agency Sales | Auctions | Property Management

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

11.4 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.7% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3734 Average weekly household income $981 Median age

57

If you are thinking of buying, selling or require property management services; we invite you to experience exceptional levels of service and care with our agency.

For all enquiries contact Rodney Millett 0477 702 073 Owner Principal

David Gamble 0419 720 575 Sales Consultant

Terri Lake 5494 3022 Property Management

Riverside Centre, 1/4 Maple St, Maleny 5494 3022 | info@malenyrealestate.com | www.malenyrealestate.com 7038052dp

33


suburb | Marcoola

Laid-back lifestyle THE beach-side village of Marcoola is set to take off in more ways than one. A multi-faceted jewel of the Sunshine Coast where one relishes the luxury of time and simple pleasures, the area lies between the glorious stretch of beach and Sunshine Coast Airport. With the expansion of the airport due to be complete in 2020, creating an east-west runway, Marcoola will be a big beneficiary with the change in flight paths and improved services. Property values and numbers of sales have been increasing in light of the $347 million expansion of the runway and terminal to international standard. The latest development in Marcoola is The Shore, a multimillion-dollar beach-front project on 5.5ha that will include 33 direct beach-access homes, followed by a 114-room hotel resort and retail precinct. The median sale price for houses in April was $640,000, according to CoreLogic, after breaking through the $600,000 mark in August last year. Five years ago it was $517,000, so it has been a steady climb, apart from a downturn in April 2017 when it dropped back to $530,000. Median sale price of units was $370,000 in April, up on the $350,000 of 12 months prior to that. The number of house sales was 33 for the 12 months to April after hitting 42 to April 2018. Unit sales were 80, down from the 91 in 2018 and 113 to April 2017. Most house sales were in the $600,000– $800,000 band (15), with five in the $800,000– $1 million range and one in the $1 million– $2 million category. There were 38 unit sales in the $200,000– $400,000 range, 30 in the $400,000– $600,000, four in $600,000–$800,000 and one above that. There were seven in the up to $200,000 mark. Recent sales include a vacant 573sq m block at 27 Lakedrive Cres for $440,000 in April, a two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 9/73–75 Keith Royal Dr for $240,000 in June, a two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit at

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$660,000 $460

$$

$

March

?

$370,000 $390

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 8.2% 12 months ................................. 12.3% 3 years ..................................... 24.5% 5 years ..................................... 37.5% Annually (10 years) .................... 4.4%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

35 days

March

?

Locals can frequently be seen walking the family dog and stopping for a coffee at one of the many cafes at Marcoola. PHOTO: ERLE LEVEY

17/885 David Low Way for $315,000 in April and a five-bedroom, three-bathroom apartment at 121/885 David Low Way for $1,005,000 in June. A four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 546sq m at 22 Boronia Cres sold for $640,000 in April and a four-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 823sq m at 35 Orungal Crt sold for $780,000 in May. Bordered by ocean to the east, the Maroochy River to the west and Pacific Paradise and Mudjimba to the south, Marcoola edges north into Mount Coolum National Park. It is a town of two parts – the main shopping centre and tourist accommodation along David Low Way and the quieter residential area to the north, centred around Lorraine Ave. Here there are beach-front restaurants, coffee shops, a general store and surf club.

It is also the site of Friday night food markets that have become a real family affair. The residents passionately love where they live. Tucked away, this quiet, relaxed hub is adored for what it isn’t. With an easy, laid-back attitude, the residents enjoy every day in every way. It’s a haven where the simplest of activities are often the best. The name Marcoola comes courtesy of its position, between Maroochydore and Coolum. Located within the suburb boundary of 4564, it is also the first stop for many tourists as they fly in. The patrolled beach, climate and idyllic lifestyle is holiday enough for those looking for an easy, stress-free vacation. The beaches are pristine, the sand sparkles and the water is clear. Shorts and sandals are not only accepted but recommended.

Out of catchment enrolments encouraged 111 Palmwoods-Montville Road, Palmwoods P. 07 5453 2444 palmwoodsss.eq.edu.au 34

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

14.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3173 Average weekly household income $1201 Median age

42

3.6% 5.5%


suburb | Maroochydore

Simply buzzing

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$630,000 $525

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$418,750 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -2.9% 12 months .................................... 1.6% 3 years ........................................18.6% 5 years ........................................35.5% Annually (10 years) ....................... 3.8%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

53 days

March

?

$

On the riverfront at 10 Duporth Ave, Maroochydore. Photo: Erle Levey

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

10.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.3% 5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

On the adjacent lot, Brisbane-based Habitat Development Group will start construction of its $83 million development with two residential towers and six Small Office Small Home townhouses. Sunshine Coast Council has also started its project planning for the proposed City Hall building. This is to be a key building in the commercial core and will be designed as a nine-level 5-star and Green Star-rated building accommodating up to 600 council staff. The City Hall building has a target opening date of July 2022. Meanwhile, Lendlease is halfway into its

$400 million Sunshine Plaza expansion that will include specialty shops being introduced to the area such as David Jones, H&M, Tommy Hilfiger, JB Hi-Fi, Kathmandu and Big W. Other businesses are repositioning themselves around the city heart in preparation for the development planned for the next two decades. At the southern end of the CBD, Bunnings has shown confidence in the Coast with a $40 million superstore in Dalton Dr, with Officeworks following suit. The population of wider Maroochydore grew 16.1 per cent between 2011 and the 2016 census.

16,800 Average weekly household income 1065 Median age

46

Central

45 S % TA SE GE CU 1 RE D

THERE is a real buzz around Maroochydore at the moment. Something seems to be happening everywhere you look, whether it’s new development projects or venues. It’s more like an unwrapping or an awakening as areas have become more walkable and inviting. New streets, cycle paths and an urban square are taking shape, breathing new life into the heart of the region. Between ocean and river, Maroochydore has been designated as the Sunshine Coast’s commercial hub and is living up to that with the development of the new 52ha CBD. Along with the construction of new city streets, footpaths and cycleways, the installation of significant underground telecommunications infrastructure will cement the new CBD as one of the country’s most digitally advanced city centres, capable of state-of-the-art urban services and amenity. Apart from being the first CBD in Australia to have an underground automated wastecollection system, the proposed digital infrastructure network will enable smart city Wi-Fi systems incorporating smart signage, lighting, security, parking and traffic management systems. An associated key element of the CBD’s technology credentials is its capability for global connectivity thanks to Sunshine Coast Council’s announcement of the sub-sea international broadband cable that will provide Australia’s fastest data connection to Asia and second fastest to the US. Extensive streetscape works, including the planting of thousands of trees and shrubs, have also been completed, giving the future city centre shape and form, along with the completion of the first park space with public seating and lighting for informal events. Exciting commercial commitments have been announced in the northern part of the first stage, including prominent local builder Evans Long to develop a $30 million eightstorey, 4500sq m office building with retail space on the lower level.

SPOTLIGHT

1 & 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS FROM $299,000 • The best value apartments in the heart of the Sunshine Coast • Carefully considered and designed with chic fixtures and finishes • Opposite Sunshine Plaza Shopping Centre, close to local cafés and restaurants • Easy access to world-class beaches, schools, medical facilities and transport Sales office open Tuesday to Saturday, 8:30am to 5pm (or by appointment) 12 Amaroo Street, Maroochydore ARTISTS IMPRESSION

1800 752 630

PLAZACENTRAL.COM.AU 35


WHAT’S YOUR PROPERTY WORTH Suburb

Property Type

Number Sold (12 months)

Median Sale Price (12 months)

Change in Median Price (past 3 months)

Change in Median Price (1 year)

Change in Median Price (3 years)

Change in Median Price (5 years)

Annual Change in Median Price (10 years)

Alexandra Headland

U

137

$378,250

-2.5%

-3.1%

6.1%

16.4%

2.0%

Aroona

H

61

$550,000

0.0%

-3.4%

11.0%

26.4%

2.5%

Baringa

H

104

$490,000

-1.0%

-0.8%

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

Battery Hill

H

38

$565,000

-3.3%

-2.8%

20.4%

31.7%

3.7%

Battery Hill

U

29

$282,000

-1.1%

-1.1%

7.6%

15.1%

1.2%

Beerwah

H

130

$468,500

-2.4%

-0.3%

13.3%

21.7%

1.7%

Beerwah

U

11

$287,000

n.a.

-8.9%

-5.1%

27.6%

-0.4%

Belli Park

H

14

$675,000

4.2%

17.9%

39.9%

81.2%

n.a.

Birtinya

H

68

$704,000

2.2%

6.7%

21.4%

14.8%

n.a.

Birtinya

U

37

$427,500

-0.6%

-6.0%

-8.8%

11.0%

-2.3%

Bli Bli

H

161

$546,500

-0.4%

2.1%

15.1%

25.2%

3.7%

Bokarina

H

27

$702,000

0.0%

-1.0%

15.6%

30.7%

3.7%

Buddina

H

63

$775,000

0.3%

-1.7%

22.0%

43.3%

3.0%

Buddina

U

23

$450,000

0.0%

-6.3%

5.9%

25.0%

-0.4%

Buderim

H

525

$650,000

-1.8%

-3.3%

12.1%

22.6%

2.1%

Buderim

U

149

$400,500

2.7%

0.5%

3.5%

8.4%

1.5%

Burnside

H

55

$455,000

0.4%

5.8%

6.4%

21.3%

2.2%

Caloundra

H

34

$520,000

-1.9%

0.4%

17.1%

22.4%

1.3%

Caloundra

U

152

$456,500

1.4%

6.2%

21.7%

30.4%

1.7%

Caloundra West

H

121

$494,000

-1.2%

4.7%

9.3%

20.5%

1.8%

Caloundra West

U

16

$360,000

0.0%

1.6%

-5.3%

16.1%

1.9%

Coes Creek

H

38

$461,250

1.4%

5.4%

18.3%

21.1%

1.9%

Conondale

H

11

$600,000

20.0%

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

4.3%

Coolum Beach

H

149

$685,000

-2.1%

0.7%

24.5%

47.3%

3.6%

Coolum Beach

U

91

$405,000

1.3%

3.8%

17.7%

15.7%

1.7%

Currimundi

H

83

$540,000

-1.7%

0.9%

14.0%

25.0%

2.3%

Currimundi

U

25

$425,000

-3.8%

-1.4%

9.3%

24.3%

2.1%

Dicky Beach

H

24

$865,500

10.1%

5.4%

12.0%

49.2%

5.9%

Dicky Beach

U

21

$346,000

0.3%

1.9%

6.5%

17.5%

n.a.

Doonan

H

79

$875,000

0.0%

-1.7%

26.8%

36.3%

2.9%

Dulong

H

16

$647,500

0.0%

n.a.

14.0%

n.a.

n.a.

Eerwah Vale

H

13

$635,000

-2.3%

2.4%

20.7%

33.7%

n.a.

Eudlo

H

19

$455,000

-5.7%

-13.3%

1.1%

-8.8%

-0.2%

Eumundi

H

55

$685,000

-8.4%

13.0%

8.7%

40.9%

3.0%

Flaxton

H

23

$580,000

-6.8%

-6.8%

-0.9%

13.7%

1.4%

Forest Glen

H

27

$632,500

3.8%

16.1%

7.7%

n.a.

n.a.

Glass House Mountains

H

98

$526,250

2.7%

6.0%

18.3%

31.6%

2.4%

Glenview

H

22

$685,000

-3.3%

-2.1%

7.0%

18.1%

1.7%

Golden Beach

H

94

$583,000

-0.3%

3.2%

20.2%

36.5%

3.0%

Golden Beach

U

79

$465,000

6.4%

14.8%

14.7%

27.4%

2.6%

Ilkley

H

12

$942,500

-13.9%

10.9%

41.7%

103.4%

n.a.

Kenilworth

H

10

$310,000

-11.4%

-25.7%

2.5%

n.a.

n.a.

Kings Beach

H

10

$1,130,000

16.5%

32.9%

n.a.

n.a.

2.7%

Kings Beach

U

140

$431,250

-0.4%

0.3%

9.6%

33.7%

0.6%

Kuluin

H

36

$502,000

0.2%

-0.3%

12.8%

26.0%

2.3%

Kureelpa

H

13

$600,000

0.0%

0.0%

13.2%

n.a.

1.6%

Landsborough

H

88

$466,500

-2.4%

4.5%

16.6%

21.2%

2.1%

Little Mountain

H

193

$570,000

1.6%

3.3%

6.5%

22.6%

2.2%

Maleny

H

80

$625,000

1.6%

11.0%

21.4%

30.5%

2.2%

Mapleton

H

43

$507,000

-4.0%

-10.9%

12.7%

23.7%

1.6%

Marcoola

H

33

$660,000

8.2%

12.3%

24.5%

37.5%

4.4%

Marcoola

U

80

$370,000

1.4%

4.2%

19.4%

21.3%

2.0%

Maroochy River 36

H

21

$775,000

3.3%

7.6%

26.0%

39.6%

2.8%


Property Type

Number Sold (12 months)

Median Sale Price (12 months)

Change in Median Price (past 3 months)

Change in Median Price (1 year)

Change in Median Price (3 years)

Change in Median Price (5 years)

Annual Change in Median Price (10 years)

Maroochydore

H

170

$630,000

-2.9%

1.6%

18.6%

35.5%

3.8%

Maroochydore

U

340

$418,750

-0.3%

2.6%

16.6%

14.8%

1.9%

Meridan Plains

H

68

$515,000

-1.9%

1.0%

19.8%

13.1%

0.9%

Minyama

H

52

$930,000

-5.1%

-25.0%

-2.1%

31.9%

1.0%

Minyama

U

24

$375,000

-1.3%

-1.3%

8.7%

28.9%

2.5%

Moffat Beach

H

51

$796,000

1.1%

4.4%

22.5%

37.2%

4.8%

Moffat Beach

U

10

$545,000

-0.9%

5.8%

16.1%

40.6%

2.6%

Mons

H

23

$980,000

0.0%

21.7%

40.0%

56.8%

n.a.

Montville

H

20

$737,000

1.0%

4.2%

24.3%

18.9%

2.7%

Mooloolaba

H

74

$820,000

-3.0%

8.7%

22.4%

36.1%

4.6%

Mooloolaba

U

255

$406,000

-1.0%

0.2%

6.8%

14.4%

1.6%

Mooloolah Valley

H

47

$535,000

-0.9%

-0.5%

17.6%

26.6%

1.8%

Mount Coolum

H

70

$612,500

3.8%

0.4%

1.7%

33.2%

2.6%

Mount Coolum

U

63

$420,000

1.6%

6.3%

10.8%

54.1%

1.4%

Mountain Creek

H

187

$595,000

-2.5%

-0.8%

10.2%

20.2%

2.3%

Mountain Creek

U

37

$400,000

-0.2%

3.6%

7.0%

5.5%

4.2%

Mudjimba

H

45

$730,000

1.2%

2.2%

15.0%

35.9%

4.3%

Mudjimba

U

28

$465,500

2.5%

7.9%

12.4%

27.0%

0.7%

Nambour

H

213

$400,000

0.0%

2.7%

13.5%

22.7%

1.7%

Nambour

U

58

$274,000

5.0%

1.7%

1.5%

16.5%

0.8%

Ninderry

H

29

$700,000

-2.1%

11.7%

21.3%

31.5%

n.a.

North Arm

H

12

$676,000

4.8%

n.a.

20.1%

n.a.

n.a.

North Maleny

H

13

$800,000

0.0%

-12.1%

-4.2%

n.a.

0.5%

Pacific Paradise

H

36

$485,050

2.1%

4.3%

16.9%

29.9%

2.7%

Pacific Paradise

U

17

$367,000

-0.8%

7.9%

24.6%

36.9%

3.1%

Palmview

H

61

$550,000

-3.3%

-9.5%

-20.1%

0.2%

n.a.

Palmwoods

H

117

$558,000

2.4%

4.3%

20.0%

26.8%

1.7%

Parrearra

H

71

$755,000

2.0%

12.7%

18.9%

37.3%

4.0%

Parrearra

U

75

$513,500

1.2%

9.5%

18.0%

33.0%

1.2%

Peachester

H

24

$565,500

-0.8%

-2.5%

-2.3%

16.3%

1.9%

Pelican Waters

H

152

$749,500

-0.1%

-1.4%

11.0%

23.9%

2.4%

Pelican Waters

U

25

$422,000

-6.4%

-9.2%

-18.1%

-6.9%

-0.7%

Peregian Springs

H

181

$630,000

-1.6%

0.8%

10.0%

13.5%

1.0%

Peregian Springs

U

32

$565,000

-5.0%

9.5%

88.3%

133.5%

4.0%

Reesville

H

11

$730,000

0.0%

-8.2%

n.a.

n.a.

n.a.

Rosemount

H

20

$607,000

1.5%

-3.8%

9.5%

50.4%

2.1%

Shelly Beach

H

12

$930,000

2.2%

6.9%

11.4%

38.2%

3.7%

Sippy Downs

H

152

$518,000

3.6%

4.4%

10.4%

23.3%

2.0%

Sippy Downs

U

33

$315,000

19.5%

20.6%

-12.5%

1.4%

4.6%

Tanawha

H

20

$946,500

10.7%

13.7%

5.6%

39.2%

3.1%

Twin Waters

H

66

$887,500

-3.5%

10.9%

23.3%

32.5%

3.3%

Twin Waters

U

19

$670,000

-1.8%

13.6%

24.1%

38.7%

3.0%

Verrierdale

H

12

$720,000

7.9%

13.4%

17.1%

16.1%

2.3%

Warana

H

59

$686,000

8.9%

4.3%

23.4%

37.2%

3.6%

Warana

U

37

$380,000

4.8%

15.2%

5.6%

19.7%

2.1%

West Woombye

H

14

$667,000

3.1%

6.3%

18.9%

53.3%

2.4%

Witta

H

12

$706,500

-2.6%

15.8%

47.2%

45.7%

2.8%

Woombye

H

58

$538,000

1.3%

9.8%

15.7%

31.2%

2.8%

Wurtulla

H

96

$652,500

0.4%

13.9%

19.3%

48.6%

4.8%

Wurtulla

U

11

$397,000

0.0%

7.0%

3.7%

40.3%

2.8%

Yandina

H

37

$467,500

0.0%

4.1%

12.0%

28.5%

2.1%

Yandina Creek

H

10

$848,500

7.4%

4.1%

41.4%

76.4%

n.a.

Yaroomba

H

45

$727,000

-5.3%

-7.4%

25.8%

41.2%

4.2%

Source: CoreLogic July 2019

Suburb

37


suburb | Minyama

Premium positions MINYAMA lives up to its name meaning “many” or “plentiful”. It’s one of the select addresses on the Sunshine Coast, yet the variety of housing reflects the diversity of the community. You only have to go for a morning walk to get the paper and you will meet teachers, fishermen, small business owners, corporate leaders, police officers, nurses or retired farmers. More often than not, they have moved to Minyama, from across the world or across the street. This diversity means it is no surprise you can expect to pay anything from the mid to high-$300,000s for a villa or townhouse to multimillion-dollar waterfront properties. In this past year there have been some significant sales, as well as a number of rebuilds, with people taking advantage of the prime waterfront position. The blend of waterfront and dry properties saw a median sale house price for May of $942,500, according to CoreLogic. There are not many units and townhouses in Minyama, with the median price at $371,500 in May, compared to $380,000 a year prior. There were 50 house sales in the 12 months to May, compared to 68 the year previous. Recent sales include a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house on 632sq m at 7 Balemo St for $755,000 in early August; a fourbedroom, three-bathroom house on 800sq m at 102 Chelsea Cres for $1.25 million in June; and a five-bedroom, three-bathroom house on 649sq m at 8 Myoora Crt for $2,225,000 in March. A three-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 147/4 Longwood St sold for $310,000 in June; a two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit at 74/8 Longwood St sold for $430,000 in June; and a three-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment at 101/11 Nicklin Way sold for $725,000 in July. Agents acknowledge there is a fair bit going on in Minyama as demand exceeds supply. Everyone is trying to secure top locations – and they are paying for it. The beauty of the suburb is the deep-water anchorages it offers on the various waterways branching off the Mooloolah River and the

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$930,000 $690

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$375,000 $375

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -5.1% 12 months .................................... -25% 3 years ........................................ -2.1% 5 years ........................................ 31.9% Annually (10 years) ....................... 1%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

54 days

March

?

$ The Minyama waterfront is hot property for professionals and young families, with the suburb known for its diverse community. PHOTO: ERLE LEVEY

close proximity to the ocean access. Minyama has always been known for homes of good design, especially on Minyama Island and Mooloolah Island. Now there are streets becoming filled with brand-new homes, such as Kumbada Ct and Cypress Ct. People understand it is better to invest in good product. Quite simply, you need to have a long vision and the right address. Buyers have been a combination of yachties and those wanting to moor power boats. Real yachties want bigger frontages. If it is an 18–20m frontage they may not accommodate the bigger boats. Those snapping up prime positions are predominantly local and Southeast Queensland buyers moving around a familiar

marketplace, one they understand. The demography is interesting – not so much retirees but professionals and young families. Young tradies are rubbing shoulders with specialists and surgeons, while young professionals are mixing with pilots and those downsizing from rural properties. Sydney and Melbourne buyers are coming, like in the ’90s and spending $3 million-plus. Minyama is more favoured than the Gold Coast. While it has still got that laid-back feel, Minyama is not as busy. The difference is the Sunshine Coast is now getting the infrastructure to support these new residents in terms of health, education, transport and recreational facilities.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12.5 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.9% 5.2%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

2542 Average weekly household income $1228 Median age

52

Brent Higgins 0414 775 133

brent.higgins@raywhite.com ALAN WHITE

18-19

“Brent has great knowledge of the property market on the Sunshine Coast and was able to find the right house in Minyama for our family after we had given him a very tough brief. We have now listed and sold our current Minyama home and we are very happy that Brent and his team helped us through that process as well.” Campbell Family. 38

Ray White Mooloolaba & Kawana


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suburb | Moffat Beach

Holiday lifestyle PROTECTED by the headland and with a year-round holiday lifestyle, Moffat Beach very much embodies the stereotypical Australian character of sun, sand, sea, barbecues and, of course, fish and chips by the beach. Highly regarded for many years as a holiday location and having a wide variety of residential homes, now the cafe culture is also firmly taking hold. Art galleries, restaurants and a craft brewery have become important aspects of the Seaview Tce-Nothling St precinct. Then there is the IGA foodstore, post office, bakery and medical centre in Maltman St. Moffat captures the best of beachside living, with excellent residential infrastructure and great community spirit. There is the traditional 16-perch block from the area’s early survey days, part of an eclectic mix including early fibro beach houses, designer apartments and high-end residences. Protected from the prevailing southerly sea breezes by a stunning headland, “Moffats” has sheltered waters suitable for young families as well as first-class waves rolling down the point for surfers. The sheltered location and elevated views, particularly from the headland, have led to great demand for renovations and extensions. Some of the streets to look for are Queen of Colonies and McIlwraith. Queen of Colonies, named after an 1863 shipwreck, commands a dramatic northfacing aspect as it climbs along the cliff-face from Seaview Tce to the headland. There has been a fairly constant rise in property values in Moffat Beach in the past five years, with the median house price remaining at $700,000-plus since hitting $717,500 in October 2016, achieving an all-time high of $772,000 in 2018. The median price was $561,250 in January five years ago and dipped to $580,000 in December 2015. Most house prices are in the $600,000 to $800,000 range and above. The median price of units was $540,000 in October 2018, compared to $451,000 the year

40

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$796,000 $505

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$545,000 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 1.1% 12 months .................................... 4.4% 3 years ........................................22.5% 5 years ........................................ 37.2% Annually (10 years) ....................... 4.8%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

50 days

March

?

Moffat Beach playground is ideal for family picnics and adventures. Photo: Contributed

before. Land sits at $540,000, compared to $335,500 in November 2017. The suburb and beach were named after James C. Moffat, a chemist from Brisbane, who established a holiday house on Moffat Head in 1883. The most prominent landmark is its headland, around which numerous holiday apartments are clustered. There is swimming in the protected Tooway Creek, which is the northern boundary of Moffat Beach. Houses vary in age and style from Queenslanders to low-set dwellings and about 70 per cent are detached. The buildings constructed around the time of World War II reflected a laid-back beach culture with a distinctive style and character. A good number of these beach homes

remain today and can be seen scattered throughout the seaside suburb. Featuring a coastal village vibe, Moffat Beach is home to one of the Coast’s popular ocean-front parks, ideal for picnics and adventures in the children’s playground. Moffat Beach is also famous for the Pa & Ma Bendall Memorial Surfing Contest. Held every Easter weekend, it is one of Australia’s longest-running contests. Just minutes from the Caloundra CBD, Moffat Beach is easily accessible to schools, hospitals, shopping and public transport, with Brisbane an easy one-hour commute. With a laid-back lifestyle and the beach as a backdrop, it is no wonder Moffat Beach is highly regarded by the local residents and tourists who return every year to enjoy this picture-perfect location.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

11.5 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

2553 Average weekly household income $1357 Median age

44

3.3% 3.8%


suburb | Montville

Old-school charm MIXING quality, culture and nature, it is no wonder Montville is a hot spot for interstate and international visitors. Montville was originally called Razorback due to the steep ridge on which it sits. Keen cyclists challenge their fitness by pedalling up the “zigzag razorback”. Situated at the midway point along the Blackall Range, there is a charm about Montville that is somewhere between early Federation Australia and an English or Irish village. The shops and building styles give a hint of the Swiss and German Alps. Apart from feeling as though you are on top of the world, you could be anywhere on a global scale. Montville is like a picture postcard in so many ways. There is a traditional village green, a historic church, community hall and primary school. Unpolluted crisp, clean mountain air greets you, so be ready with warm clothing. While it may look blue and sunny, the elevation lowers the temperature more than just a few degrees. Clinging to the eastern escarpment, this picturesque village hugs the range, giving dress-circle views of the coastline from Noosa and Coolum to Maroochydore, Caloundra and Moreton Island. On a clear day you really will think you can see forever. The first to select land were EJ Burnett and GL Bury in 1881, but the first to take up residence were Peter and Isabella Weitemeyer, who hand-picked their allotment in 1887 on the present Mill Hill Rd. Other families soon followed in 1888. William McClintock selected land for a farm on what became the site of the township of Montville. In 1893 Henry Smith and his brothers arrived. Smith built the only cattle dip in town and also opened the first shop and post office in Montville. Smith’s first two suggestions of a name for the post office – Razorback and Vermont – were rejected as having already been used. So he suggested Montville, the name of his

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$737,000 $648

$$

$

March

?

UNIT ....................

n/a n/a

BUY RENT

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 12 months ................................. 3 years ..................................... 5 years ..................................... Annually (10 years) ....................

1% 4.2% 24.3% 18.9% 2.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

95 days

March

?

Popular with tourists, the Sunshine Coast hinterland town hosts a number of cafes, galleries and novelty shops. Photo: Warren Lynam

hometown in Connecticut, US, and this was accepted. It accurately lives up to its name origin “village of the mountain”. With an altitude of about 400m, the area enjoys cool summers and chilly winters. Montville was predominantly a logging then farming community of dairy, citrus, avocados, pineapples and macadamia nuts. The charming main street is lined with a variety of shops and businesses focused towards the steady stream of tourists as well as catering to locals. Arts and crafts, health and well-being all find a fit within the Montville landscape. With a variety of dining options in Montville and its surrounds, there is no shortage of places to enjoy a delicious meal. From fine bistro dining accompanied with

a choice bottle of wine, to cafes and restaurants, the range of different tastes is well satisfied. The area is sure to please the wine palate and sweet tooth. Apart from local vineyards, Montville’s boutique sweet shops are a treat as they entice with decadent handmade chocolates or fudge. Drive down Western Ave to Lake Baroon and picnic by the waters. Then there is the renowned Spicers Clovelly Estate, a special treat for any occasion. Towards Maleny, you’ll experience the charm of Gardners Falls or the beauty of Mary Cairncross Reserve and the spell-binding view of the Glass House Mountains. Montville has a pleasant mix of housing, from cottages and designer homes to hobby farms and acreages.

Proudly a Family Owned & Operated Agency Sales | Auctions | Property Management

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.6% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

970 Average weekly household income $1211 Median age

55

If you are thinking of buying, selling or require property management services; we invite you to experience exceptional levels of service and care with our agency.

For all enquiries contact Rodney Millett 0477 702 073 Owner Principal

David Gamble 0419 720 575 Sales Consultant

Terri Lake 5494 3022 Property Management

Riverside Centre, 1/4 Maple St, Maleny 5494 3022 | info@malenyrealestate.com | www.malenyrealestate.com 7038052dp

41


suburb | Mooloolaba

Golden sands appeal THERE’S a lot to like about Mooloolaba. With its curve of golden sand at the surf beach and deepwater access for boating, the area has built a world-wide reputation as a place to visit and to live. The ocean and river have been part and parcel of the long-time beach suburb. Yet things are changing with several major developments proposed as well as infrastructure upgrades. Among them is the Brisbane Road carpark redevelopment that is being proposed to deliver both car parking with a retail/accommodation component. Mooloolaba is also a port of call for cruise liners as they make their way around the Pacific and along Australia’s eastern coastline. The Esplanade takes advantage of the ocean beach yet the renewal of The Wharf along Parkyn Pde and Pier 33 at the sailing club has added impetus to the river precinct with a number of bar/restaurants and cafes creating an eat street flavour. This is in addition to the existing reputation for quality seafood at the eastern end of Mooloolaba Spit, where the fishing fleet is moored. It is also the northern base for pilot vessels that control shipping through to the Port of Brisbane. Due to its sheltered location in the lee of Point Cartwright, it is an all-weather harbour favoured by recreational sailors. This deep-water access has encouraged substantial homes to be built along the waterways on the river mouth side of Brisbane Rd. Through the years people have stopped at Mooloolaba for holidays or on their way through and many have returned and stayed on to make it their home. The population of Mooloolaba grew by 5.5 per cent between 2011 and the 2016 Census, due mainly to the new unit developments. The increased population of 4557 owes a lot to the picturesque beauty of Mooloolaba Esplanade. A favourite with families, Mooloolaba is considered one of the safer swimming beaches

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$850,000 $550

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$406,000 $400

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. -3% 12 months .................................... 8.7% 3 years ........................................22.4% 5 years ........................................ 36.1% Annually (10 years) ....................... 4.6%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

42 days

March

?

$

The 2017 Mooloolaba ITU Triathlon World Cup. Photo: John McCutcheon

on the Sunshine Coast, with the northerly facing arc of sand providing protection from the prevailing southerlies and south easterlies. The surf club is a popular community venue as well as helping keep beachgoers safe. The landmark tourist attraction Sea Life Mooloolaba is just around the corner. With three patrolled beaches within 1km of each other, there is almost always somewhere that is ideal for a swim or to put the boogie board into action. Whether it’s a big swell or gentle ripples that you are after, you’re almost certain to find it at Mooloolaba. Fitness trails are busy from first light with people walking, running or jogging along the crescent of golden sand, bordered by surf. Mooloolaba provides a magnet of a health haven for everyone from mum and dad

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.5% 5.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

7730 Average weekly household income $1192 Median age

43 walkers to athletes. The iconic Mooloolaba Triathlon appeals to the first-timer through to the seasoned athlete and it is a favoured venue for the Ironman 70.3 world series.

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suburb | Mountain Creek

A sense of belonging

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$595,000 $520

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$400,000 $420

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -2.5% 12 months ................................. -0.8% 3 years ..................................... 10.2% 5 years ..................................... 20.2% Annually (10 years) .................... 2.3%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

38 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.5% 5.5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

A Mountain Creek morning. Photo: Erle Levey

primary school, child care and tavern. Residing in the Mountain Creek school zones has long been a drawcard to the area because of their reputation. For example, the high school runs the International Baccalaureate diploma Program in the senior section. Today the median price of houses sits at $600,000, climbing sharply in the past 12 months along with demand. A long way from March 2014 when the median price was $490,000. The area termed Mountain Creek today

encompasses Mountain Creek Park, Saltbush’s Mountain Creek Estate and Hideaway Waters. The first block was sold in 1982. Originally, the development company Beaver Dredging proposed to build a waterfront holiday resort. When developers Saltbush Pty Ltd purchased the 65.6ha in 1981, they changed the name and instead developed a residential estate with a man-made lake. Today, the suburb 4557 is highly regarded for its family-friendly lifestyle, central location, quality amenities and highly regarded education facilities.

11,254 Average weekly household income $1624 Median age

33

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NAMED after the stream that flows down the southern slopes of Buderim, Mountain Creek was designed in the late 1970s as the next big thing for the Sunshine Coast. A community bounded by mountain and water, it embodied all that was great in urban planning. Wicky Up was the name of the original development designed around a central lake. Larger sized blocks and wider streets were the main attraction for families. With easy access to major road links as well as the beaches, Mountain Creek is ideally situated between Mooloolaba and Buderim. It was planned as the new Mooloolaba, with the Sunshine Coast TAFE campus and Mountain Creek High School on the site of the original Mooloolaba Airfield. The development was the beginning of a new era and for the first time on the Coast, home-owners could have waterfront that was on a river or canal. Residents hadn’t seen anything quite like this new way of living before; the opportunity to live in well-designed homes among leafy surrounds. The road lay-out and underground power were other innovations. Brisbane’s World Expo in 1988 was the turning point. It saw a boom as people from interstate discovered how attractive Queensland could be. A lot of Mountain Creek houses had an L-shape design with garages at right angles to the street. It was a time when the office became the norm instead of formal dining and when outdoor living came into vogue. Ensuites were not that large or lavish and spa baths were in. Mountain Creek was promoted as the best of family living. Exclusive homes with a hint of California about them. The population of Mountain Creek grew by 60.7 per cent between 2011 and the 2016 census. Much of this is a result of the Brightwater Estate that comes under the Mountain Creek banner yet is becoming a community in its own right with a shopping centre, state

SPOTLIGHT

c21.com.au/Buderim 43


suburb | Nambour

Geographical heart A THRIVING regional town nestled between the hinterland and the beach, Nambour is a major transport hub for both road and rail. At the base of the Blackall Range and regarded as the geographic centre of the Sunshine Coast, Nambour is undergoing a revival after the closure of the Moreton Sugar Mill. Derived from the Aboriginal word “naamba”, referring to the red flower bottlebrush, the town was named after Nambour cattle station that was settled in 1891 after the rail link to Brisbane was complete. The official opening announced a renaming of the historic settlement of Petrie’s Creek to the now familiar Nambour. Now stationary and on display through the centre of Mill, Currie and Howard streets, you find old tram tracks as a reminder of Queensland Rail’s history. The heritage-listed Nambour to Coolum tramline carried passengers and sugar cane in the early 1920s. Closing at the end of 2001, the track and signal lighting still remains, emphasising the settlement’s rich history. Sprawling over 14.52ha of recreational land, Nambour Showgrounds is home to a string of events including large equestrian trials, festivals, conferences, expos and trade shows. The Nambour Show was first held 1909 and the much-loved family tradition continues today. Events such as the Queensland Garden Expo have become traditions in their own right, building on the area’s rich horticultural heritage. From the first settlement in 1870, Nambour has made a gentle transition from characteristic vintage township to a coffee lover’s hipster hamlet. One-hundred-and-one kilometres from the city lights of Brisbane, Nambour offers the facilities and comfortable lifestyle of a regional town, minus the traffic jams and pollution. Serviced by Queensland Rail, Nambour station offers regular services making it a distribution hub for the Sunshine Coast. Whether you are a renovator on a mission,

MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$400,000 $400

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$274,000 $320

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 0% 12 months .................................... 2.7% 3 years ........................................ 13.5% 5 years ........................................ 22.7% Annually (10 years) ....................... 1.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

42 days

March

?

The outskirts of Nambour still have a country charm. Photo: Che Chapman

or looking for a coast to hinterland tree-change, Nambour offers one of the Sunshine Coast’s most affordable and solid real estate areas. With the benefits of a tropical and rural environment, and a mere 20-minute drive to pristine beaches, the locals are spoilt with the best of both worlds and a wide choice of activities. The median house price has risen from $325,000 in 2014 to $398,275 in 2019, underlining the stability of the market. Nambour is home to a number of boutique land subdivisions, particularly on the higher parts of town at areas such as Burnside and Highworth. The Nambour General Hospital and a string of other emergency services and professional practices are based there and it has been the administrative centre of the Sunshine Coast

Regional Council. With the Sunshine Coast University just a 20-minute drive, Nambour is a central location for many educational facilities. The educational hub boasts several primary schools as well as a renowned high school that was responsible for nurturing students such as Kevin Rudd, Kellee Slater and Wayne Swan. Also home to a major Queensland TAFE, the campus offers a wide range of courses. Petrie Park is positioned in the heart of this hinterland haven. Footbridges and paths traverse the park and creek banks. Wildlife thrives and with patience and time, sightings of water dragons, terrapin and even a platypus or two can be seen. A historical background with a splash of modern day living, Nambour continues to offer a growing, diversified community.

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44

SPOTLIGHT

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

10.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

11,187 Average weekly household income $966 Median age

40

5.2% 6.1%


suburb | Noosa

Quality guaranteed NOOSA Heads has experienced a spectacular rise to the top of Australia’s best performing suburbs. Always highly regarded as one of Australia’s most sought-after property markets, the median house price grew by 17.2 per cent last year to sit at $1.125 million. At the same time the median unit price rose 30.1 per cent to $745,000. This has been in part because of southern buyers recognising the value being offered in such a desirable location as opposed to their own property markets. The confidence in the Noosa market has led to a a once-in-a-generation opportunity to acquire tightly held properties in select locations. Beachfront properties have been keenly sought when offered to the market, with some substantial sales, particularly towards the end of 2018. Hastings St is one of Australia’s premier tourism precincts and there is strong demand for quality retail as well as professional office space. Situated adjacent to the beach, the street features an eclectic variety of alfresco dining, boutique stores and holiday accommodation. Noosa Heads is also one of the most sought-after residential addresses. The area is popular with owner-occupiers and investors, who are undoubtedly drawn to the region’s relaxed lifestyle. Home to almost 4000 people, the area boasts a pristine environment and is free of high-rise buildings, preserving its village ambience. The Noosa Heads market can be broken up into three areas: Little Cove, Hastings St and Noosa Sound. The Little Cove market is driven by a very limited supply. Its geography, sandwiched between the national park and Laguna Bay, prevents sprawl. Popular housing styles include coastal-influenced retreats. The 1980s made way for major housing development with the focus these days more

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE .....................

$1,065,000 $630

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT .....................

$840,000 $498

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -5.3% 12 months ................................. -0.9% 3 years ..................................... 36.5% 5 years ..................................... 60.2% Annually (10 years) .................... 4.9%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

58 days

March

?

Some of the homes Stay Noosa Real Estate have on offer. Photo: Contributed

on larger, waterfront properties. Another popular residential area is the original Noosa Hill development which merges perfectly with the natural environment. Many of those lucky enough to secure property on the hill have views across the coastline and down on to Hastings St. Noosa Sound has earned a reputation as the most sought-after area. Witta Ct is one of the prime precincts with waterfront homes commanding high prices. It’s the same along Noosa Pde with properties facing north over the sheltered waters of the river. As for Hastings St, there are about 155 beach-facing apartments that can be bought in the beachfront precinct. Walk down the street and there are not

many vacancy or for sale signs. Many owners seem content to hold properties due to strong returns, on the back of improved tourism numbers. Noosa has long been a place of exceptional attraction. In particular, Sydney and Melbourne residents enjoy a sojourn to bask in warmer winters and a relaxed lifestyle. Guiding their whale boat up the Noosa River in search of timber and sheep grazing country in 1842, Andrew Petrie and Henry Russell were among the first Europeans to explore the region. Noosa’s most valuable natural asset, Noosa National Park, had its beginnings in 1879 when the untouched green tract of forest on the headland was declared the Town Reserve. In 1930 the preserved land was gazetted as a national park, ensuring its protection.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.1% 3.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

4484 Average weekly household income $1375 Median age

52

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suburb | Palmview

Best of all worlds CENTRALLY situated on the Sunshine Coast, Palmview is located right on the Bruce Highway, with a 10-minute drive to the pristine beaches of Mooloolaba. There are three parts to Palmview. The first is the established area on the eastern side of the Bruce Highway, towards the Mooloolah River and Caloundra Rd intersection. This area is the site of the Strawberry Fields farm and Palmview Sawmill. Then there is the area on the western side of the highway, behind Aussie World pub, shops and entertainment zone. This comprises the Palmview Forest estate that offers blocks from 2000sq m to more than 4000sq m, the average size being 3430sq m, and ranging from flat and level land to elevated with coastal and hinterland views. Then there is the new community of Harmony to the east of the highway and to the north bordering Sippy Downs. AVID Property Group’s $3 billion masterplanned community is set on 378ha and will deliver more than 4800 homes for 12,000 future residents, catering to a wide range of buyers. At the centre will be 130ha of open space and the future delivery of a town centre. Major upgrades to the Bruce Highway between Caloundra Rd and the Sunshine Coast Motorway will make it six lanes, cutting congestion, plus both interchanges and the service road will be upgraded for local traffic. A network of rehabilitated creeks and walkways weave through Palmview, making this a family-friendly area. With the breathtaking Sunshine Coast hinterland just 15 minutes up the road, Palmview has it all within arm’s reach. It is home to the well-known Aussie World and recently rebranded tourist attraction The Pub. The iconic outback building used to be called the Ettamogah Pub. Built in 1989, the venue today offers meals, live events, music, functions and weddings. It also provides a common ground for car lovers to meet and show off their prized possessions. The opening of Aussie World in 1989 formed

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$550,000 n/a

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

$495 n/a

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -3.3% 12 months ................................. -9.5% 3 years ..................................... -20.1% 5 years ..................................... 0.2% Annually (10 years) .................... n/a

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

57 days

March

?

$

Palmview has three distinct parts – the eastern side of the Bruce Highway, the western side of the Bruce Highway behind Aussie World and the new community of Harmony. Photo: John McCutcheon

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

2.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.7% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

part of the large tourism precinct including the Aussie World Retail Village. There are more than 30 rides and games for all ages, whether you are young or just young at heart. An array of added unique attractions appealing to tourists – Opals Down Under, Skirmish and, of course, Strawberry Fields – allow you to pick your own adventure. They all add value to Palmview and the attractions it has to offer. Declared a major development area in October 2016 by the Queensland Regional Plan 2005-2006, Palmview was soon under construction with a residential housing estate. As the housing developments progress,

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Palmview is fast becoming a popular residential area. Ideally positioned in the centre of the Sunshine Coast, Palmview is an easy five-minute drive from the Sippy Downs shopping village, which offers shops, a gym and fast-food outlets as well as schools and the University of the Sunshine Coast. Beaches, Sunshine Plaza and Sunshine Coast University Hospital are all within a 20-minute radius of this estate. Offering a family-friendly environment with a central location, Palmview is becoming the new ‘it’ suburb, with all the lifestyle benefits the Sunshine Coast has to offer.

893 Average weekly household income $1963 Median age

38

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www.sandmanskips.com.au 47


suburb | Palmwoods

Heart of hinterland ENJOY the perfect Sunday drive and explore the hinterland paradise we call Palmwoods. Located in the heart of the hinterland, this railway town has been undergoing a transformation via street beautification and a new energy in the shopping centre. The popularity of laneway dining and the nostalgia of the retrofitted Rick’s Garage means visitors from Bribie Island and Brisbane readily rub shoulders with those from Buderim and Mooloolaba. Classic cars, food and live music are part of the recipe for success of Rick’s in what was a mechanical garage. Visitors come to Palmwoods and end up spending the whole day there. A recent 15-lot subdivision has added to the variety of housing on offer, from the traditional 800sq m blocks down to small lots offering dual-key properties. In 1881, the Kuskophs, early European settlers, named the region Merriman Flats. The official opening of the North Coast Railway in 1891 formally announced the renaming of the small town to Palmwoods, after the piccabeen palms that grow in the area. The 1870s saw a wave of new settlers in the Maroochy region. Following the 1880s, which led to tree clearing, the rich farm land was used to farm avocados, custard apples and paw paw orchards, along with orange and banana plantations. The North Coast Railway became an important part for the outlet of fresh produce. To this day, Palmwoods is responsible for supplying a large quantity of fruit and vegetables to suppliers local and interstate. Citrus growing saw a local fruit juice company expand but now Gourmet Garden is the major landmark, a packaged fresh herbs and spices manufacturer under international control. A strong community has been built around the school of arts hall in the centre of town. A popular primary school and swimming pool are part of a town where most sports and recreation activities are catered for.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$558,000 $460

$$

$

March

?

RENT

n/a n/a

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 2.4% 12 months ................................. 4.3% 3 years ..................................... 20% 5 years ..................................... 26.8% Annually (10 years) .................... 1.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

38 days

March

?

$ The ES&A Bank at Palmwoods is 100 years old and one of many historic buildings in the unique township. PHOTO: CONTRIBUTED

The historic Palmwoods Hotel was established in 1912. A small, family-owned business known for its welcoming, family-friendly atmosphere, the hotel soon become a popular venue and tourist drawcard. Word-of-mouth has given the hotel an enviable reputation for its great food, fabulous steaks and quality entertainment. Surrounded by a beautiful hinterland backdrop, Palmwoods is the perfect place to sit and enjoy a well-deserved coffee as you relax and watch the world go by. On the eastern side of the railway line, Kolora Park and its duck pond and playground is always a popular spot. Boasting numerous cafes and restaurants serving local and seasonal produce,

Palmwoods is also home to international venues serving Indian, Thai and Middle Eastern food. Neighbouring the charismatic Blackall Range villages of Maleny, Montville and Mapleton, this hinterland region is an ideal place to call home. Enjoy a 25-minute scenic drive to the Blackall Range or a 25-minute drive towards the coastline, where you will reach the heart of Maroochydore. This unique township is home to countless art and craft enthusiasts and the boutique stores are filled with inspiring artwork, which are not only handmade and unique but created with inspiration. As you can imagine, with an area of such beauty, it is no wonder the art is exciting and unique.

Out of catchment enrolments encouraged 111 Palmwoods-Montville Road, Palmwoods P. 07 5453 2444 palmwoodsss.eq.edu.au 48

BUY

UNIT ....................

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

11.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

5676 Average weekly household income $1361 Median age

42

4.3% n/a


suburb | Pelican Waters

Lifestyle destination WITH the town centre expansion under way Pelican Waters is evolving into one of the Sunshine Coast’s most desirable destinations to live, work and play. Known for beautiful waterfront views, gorgeous housing and golf course precinct, it is claimed to be the Sunshine Coast lifestyle of choice. The population grew by 24.4% from 2011 to the 2016 census. It has been a year to remember for the residential community, highlighted by the success of its new waterfront and water-view land at The Quays and major progress being made on the world class marina and town centre development. A luxury residential sanctuary the Carlyle Terraces has been another strong performer. With stage one now built, attention has swung to the larger, stage-two terrace homes offering future marina views. The marina design is well under way, further transforming Pelican Waters into a lifestyle destination in its own right. Comprising 80-100 wet berths and state-of-the-art dry stack storage for up to 300 vessels, the marina will form the heart of the vibrant new town centre project featuring a mix of dining, retail and commercial businesses surrounded by a modern mixed-density residential development. Other highlights for the estate this year include the construction of the new childcare centre at the entrance to the future town centre and the official opening of Scribbly Gum Park – an innovative all-ability sensory playground. Encompassing 810ha of a water-based living, Pelican Waters offers a mix of residential land, featuring both waterfront and dry home sites. With larger style blocks, all with underground services, and the added bonus of no traffic lights thereby alleviating traffic congestion, this community is the ideal location to raise a family or retire in style. It is these generous open spaces and the natural environment that sets Pelican Waters

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$749,500 $422,000

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

$555 $415

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... -0.1% 12 months ................................. -1.4% 3 years ..................................... 11% 5 years ..................................... 23.9% Annually (10 years) .................... 2.4%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

48 days

March

?

$

Pelican Waters is a desirable destination. Photo: Erle Levey

apart from all other residential estates. Built with location in mind, the Pelican Waters Town Centre and Marina is right in the heart of the estate. Offering Coles, Woolworths, restaurants, cafes, medical centre, service station, childcare facilities and plenty of parking, it really does offer everything, except the crowds. Home to Greg Norman’s first world-class residential golf course, Pelican Waters Golf Club is the perfect location for golf enthusiasts. Comprising 6289sq m of golf course, surrounded by existing landscape, it delivers a challenging golfing terrain, impressive driving range, practice putting and a golf shop. The Caloundra City Private School has been a major boost to the area, supplementing the Golden Beach State Primary School and Unity College at Caloundra West.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

7.5 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.9% 5.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

6277 Average weekly household income $1392 Median age

51 With an abundance of flora and fauna, there is a documented 35 different species that have nestled in Pelican Waters. The main focus is to keep the native plants in order to retain the beauty of this suburb.

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suburb | Shelly Beach

Beach a hidden gem NOT only one of the Coast’s tightly held suburb, Shelly Beach is also a hidden gem. With a lovely stretch of ocean front that is un-patrolled and not suitable for swimming, means you will rarely see a crowd. Always in demand, Shelly Beach is tucked away between Moffat and Caloundra Headlands and is perhaps the most private of Caloundra’s famed eastern beaches. There are some substantial properties in the area among original homes from the 1950s and ’60s when the natural advantages of the area were realised. No matter where you are, it is probably no more than 800m to the sand. Here, you can throw down a towel, soak up the sun and dip your toes in the rock pools as Shelly Beach is a hidden treasure and a treat for all. Adding to its residential appeal, Shelly Beach has only one commercial property in the suburb - the corner store. The start of the first settlement started in the 1860s. During World War II, Shelly Beach was off limits, lined with barbed wire fences with no access. Later, this exquisite location was primarily used for agriculture and grazing. Believed to be named after the amount of shells covering the beach, today the suburb has grown into a mixed area with most real estate comprising low-rises and unpretentious as well as architect-designed housing. Shelly Beach is prime residential property. The original hotel was replaced by the Hotel Francis (1906) in Albert St which became a well-known and popular meeting place for the Caloundra community. Soon after the war, the Hotel Francis Estate was launched near the hotel. That hotel has been demolished to make way for five residential blocks. About 1990 the former beachfront caravan park along Victoria Tce was transformed into high-end residential housing. Albert St was so wide because it was planned to be the main street of Caloundra. The police station was in King St.

50

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$930,000 $525

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a $350

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 2.2% 12 months ................................. 6.9% 3 years ..................................... 11.4% 5 years ..................................... 38.2% Annually (10 years) .................... 3.7%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

n/a

March

?

Shelly Beach is a perfect place to soak up the sun. Photo: Erle Levey

The original Shelley Beach holiday park has left a legacy of walkways through the area to the beach. One of the Sunshine Coast’s hidden gems, facing directly east, this stretch of oceanfront is unpatrolled which means you’ll rarely see a crowd on the shore. This is the perfect place to enjoy a tranquil sunrise or reconnect with nature on a solitary beach stroll. Shelly Beach is bounded by picturesque headlands and rock platforms, with rocks in the centre of the beach. The result is no sand of the rock formations is a steep reflective beach bar, which can cause strong permanent rips. The ankle-deep rock pools abound with marine life, delighting both adults and budding marine biologists.

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

13.2 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

854 Average weekly household income $1513 Median age With a charming serenity that can be hard to come by at some of Queensland beaches, relax with a good book and listen to the sounds of the waves as the kids play on the swings and shaded play equipment. Pack a picnic and enjoy lunch at the picnic facilities, which include a barbecue. There is a beachfront park with tables making it the ideal spot for a picnic.

47

2.9% n/a


suburb | Sippy Downs

Suburb on the rise SIPPY Downs is undergoing a major transformation as work progresses around the new town centre. Once regarded as part of Buderim, Sippy Downs is now a community in its own right. It is bordered by the beautiful Mooloolah River National Park and the Bruce Highway. What was grazing and sugar cane land up until the late 1980s, became the largest master-planned community on the Sunshine Coast for its time. Development is continuing to gain momentum, with insurance company Youi opening the $73 million first stage of its new global headquarters at the eastern gateway to the new Sippy Downs town centre. Central Sippy Downs, a $25 million two-stage development offering 3500sq m of commercial space, is 95 per cent leased. Meanwhile, groundwork has started on a development by the Vitmer Group for five commercial lots with a residential component on the landmark site at the corner of Stringybark Rd and Central Dr. Another key site at the eastern exit of the Sunshine Motorway is a major Caltex service station, McDonald’s, KFC and Stellarossa Espresso Coffee Franchise. The recently-completed 3765sq m Coles supermarket, together with a 150sq m Liquorland outlet on an 11,220sq m site, sold in April 2018 for $24 million. Sippy Downs started when the $200 million Chancellor Park Estate was launched in June 1994, and the 300ha development was planned for a population of about 10,000. The population of Sippy Downs grew by 13.1 per cent from 2011 to the 2016 census, and the predominant age group is between 10–19 years and households are primarily made up of couples with children. Sippy Downs is between the Sunshine Motorway, the beautiful Mooloolah River National Park, and the University of the Sunshine Coast. USC opened its doors in 1996 with 500 students and two significant buildings. Now there are 23 buildings and 16,000

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$518,800 $495

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$315,000 $365

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 3.6% 12 months .................................... 4.4% 3 years ........................................10.4% 5 years ........................................23.3% Annually (10 years) ....................... 2%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

31 days

March

?

$

Flame Tree Pocket at Sippy Downs.

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

8.6 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

5% 6%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

10,298 Average weekly household income $1237 Median age

students, and continues to grow. The university’s health and sport stadium features state-of-the-art testing and training facilities and is home to the Sunshine Coast Lightning netball team. The Lightning, a joint venture owned by NRL team Melbourne Storm and USC, took out back-to-back premierships in the inaugural Australian Super Netball competition.

Prime site The latest on commercial property

The Sippy Downs town centre is progressing well — major retail outlets such as Coles, the Super GP Medical clinic and Youi are recent developments. There is also a police station and post office. Sippy Downs is also home to Chancellor State College and Siena Catholic College. The Chancellor Village shopping centre is anchored by Woolworths, Chancellor Tavern, and a string of retail brands.

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51


suburb | Warana

Your own paradise APPROPRIATELY named after the Aboriginal word meaning blue skies, Warana boasts kilometres upon kilometres of golden sand and open surf beaches. It lies between Bokarina and Buddina on the central Sunshine Coast, offering older-style brick and tile homes prime for renovation no more than 400 to 500m from the beach. Add to that the fact beachside land is a limited commodity and housing prices in the Warana area are holding firm. It’s one of the narrowest beachside strips from Nicklin Way to the beach - and there are a variety of parks along the foreshore for a picnic or barbecue. People are always asking for beachside ... somewhere to hear the sound of the surf at night. At Warana, it’s about position and the price. One of the main reasons people tend to be buying at Warana is the fact that block sizes are a little bit bigger – from 550sq m to 650sq m. Residents have all the conveniences of shops, the link through Kawana Island to the Bruce Highway to Brisbane, Kawana Shoppingtown, Currimundi Marketplace and the link out to the future Birtinya town centre where Spotlight and the Homemaker Centre is, the new Stockland Birtinya shopping centre, and the Sunshine Coast University Hospital. Entry level for a duplex is $300,000 to $350,000, while a basic three-bedroom, one bathroom, single garage home starts over the $400,000 mark. The beauty of Warana Beach is that there are no high-rises overlooking you and you get the feeling you could be miles away secluded in your own paradise. It’s a more family-oriented area compared to its more prestigious neighbours – the Bokarina beach courts and waterfront Minyama homes, with a range of homes to suit all budgets. At the other end of the scale, absolute beachfront properties can sell between $1 million and $2 million.

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$686,000 $495

$$

$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$380,000 $380

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 8.9% 12 months .................................... 4.3% 3 years ........................................23.4% 5 years ........................................ 37.2% Annually (10 years) ....................... 3.6%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

22 days

March

?

$

Warana Beach. Photo: Erle Levey

The population of Warana rose by 5.4 per cent between 2011 and the 2016 census. The predominant age group is 30-39 years and households are primarily couples with children. Most house sales are now in the $600,000-$800,000 range. Well-positioned close to Kawana Shoppingworld, Warana residents also have the convenience of strip shopping along Nicklin Way with a semi-industrial area at their back door and the Nicklin Way strip with its larger retailers such as Good Guys electrical, Auto Barn and Super Amart. Because of the expanding Birtinya town centre and Kawana health hub, the commercial holdings at Warana have been in high demand when they come onto the market, especially with long-term tenancies in

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

12.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.8% 5.2%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3688 Average weekly household income $1244 Median age

40

place. You’ll also find smaller shops; Warana Markets, the Fruit Shed, Mick’s Meat Barn, Be Fresh and Banjos along Nicklin Way.

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suburb | Woombye

Just picture-perfect ONE drive down Woombye’s main street, will have you falling in love with the pictureperfect mountain views and quaint old shops. Located on the Sunshine Coast hinterland and 100 kilometres north of Brisbane, Woombye is derived from the Aboriginal word Wumbai, referring to the meaning of a place of black snake, black myrtle or axe handle from black myrtle. Dating back to 1867, when the discovery of gold at Gympie promoted the road opening between Brisbane and the goldfield, the route was directed down from Maryborough. Originally called Middle Camp, Cobb and Co started a catch service from Gympie in 1868 and established an overnight stop at this location. With confusion about the name, it was later changed to what we know it as today, Woombye. It was then in 1889 when the township was surveyed that a school, Cobbs Camp Hotel and a considerable number of farms opened up. Finally in 1891, the railway was open for business. Fruit growing, particularly pineapples, was Woombye economic mainstay. Today the area consists of acreage properties and gated, secure communities. Woombye is a community grown suburb that thrives of local support and is home to the Sunshine’s Coast longest established soccer club, Woombye Snakes. The town is centered off the railway station that provides numerous rail services travelling both north and south. Departing for Brisbane daily, Woombye is an ideal location for hinterland living, with easy access to the Brisbane. The iconic Woombye Pub has been a foundation of community life since the 1800s. Conveniently situated in the heart of the Sunshine Coast, and voted The Best Pub on the Sunshine Coast in 2011, Woombye Pub offers a family-friendly atmosphere where everyone is welcome. Whether you are after a pub meal lunch with friends, or a catch up dinner with family,

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$538,000 $460

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a n/a

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months .............................. 1.3% 12 months .................................... 9.8% 3 years ........................................ 15.7% 5 years ........................................ 31.2% Annually (10 years) ....................... 2.8%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

28 days

March

?

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

9.3 years

Woombye Memorial Park. Photo: Warren Lynam

this locally owned establishment offers a wide mix of entertainment. A perfect recipe for an entertaining night or a lunch time ritual. Home to the heritage-listed tourist attraction, The Big Pineapple, this 16m high structure opened in August 1971. Situated on 165ha of land, the family-friendly venue offers two rides, one being a small train that takes visitors on a tour of the plantation. Used for other variations of events, this site also hosts an annual music festival, animal zoo and is home to markets offering locals and visitors a range of fresh, local fruit and vegetables. Woombye is home to the Paynter’s Creek rest area, that is one of the three north coast roadside rest areas that are heritage listed rest areas in Queensland. Listed in February 2009 after satisfying a specific criteria, this rest area accommodates visitors with timber picnic tables and seats,

$

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.4% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

3246 Average weekly household income $1347 Median age

large grassed areas, a discreet camping area to the northwest and a car parking area. All of which are ideal for a stopover on those long road trips in any directions. With a country-style feel and home to two of the Sunshine Coast’s heritage listed icons, Woombye is a community based town that thrives of success and support of the local community.

39

Out of catchment enrolments encouraged 111 Palmwoods-Montville Road, Palmwoods P. 07 5453 2444 palmwoodsss.eq.edu.au 53


suburb | Wurtulla

Suburb on the move BLENDING original houses with substantial new infrastructure projects, the beachside area of Wurtulla is under-going a major transformation. Yet with picture-perfect beaches and well-kept parks, the area remains popular with the locals and provides a great Sunday afternoon stroll along the beach with opportunities to explore the untouched ocean front. The word and meaning for Wurtulla first came from the local Aboriginal language, meaning southward, and was named by the Kawana Estates employees in the 1970s. Neighbouring Birtinya and Currimundi, Wurtulla is one of the six sections of the 9km stretch that runs from Point Cartwright to the Currimundi Creek mouth. Separating the beach from the housing estates, is a vegetation strip lining the foreshore. With housing being built and development under way, only the southern, one kilometre strip bordering Wurtulla Beach down to Currimundi Creek is likely to remain natural, as an environmental park. Immediately to the north is the new Bokarina Beach beachfront residential community. Wurtulla has two neighbourhood shopping centres but is set to benefit from major developments on its doorstep. The mixed-use residential, retail and tourism hub is a key component of Stockland’s $5billion Oceanside community anchored by the new Sunshine Coast University Hospital. Bokarina Beach will have road, footpath and cycleway connection to Birtinya town centre and waterway connection under Nicklin Way to Lake Kawana. The new Bokarina Beach community will feature a surf club and community centre. The infrastructure and development in the Bokarina/Birtinya areas will have a positiveimpact on Wurtulla. Older beachside and canal-front homes are being revamped, raising the standard of houses to compete with prestigious new

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$652,500 $490

$

$$

March

?

BUY RENT

UNIT ....................

$397,000 $420

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 0.4% 12 months ................................. 13.9% 3 years ..................................... 19.3% 5 years ..................................... 48.6% Annually (10 years) .................... 4.8%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

37 days

March

?

$

Wurtulla’s beautiful beaches, pristine ocean and wonderful parks ensure the area is much sought-after. Photo: Che Chapman

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

13 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

3.9% 5.5%

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

houses popping up. The population grew by 6.0% between 2011 and the 2016 census, and the predominant age group in Wurtulla is 40-49 years. There are three parts to Wurtulla: the ocean beaches, the Currimundi Lake and the waterways to the west that are linked to the southern reaches of Lake Kawana and the Wurtulla Canal system. Local shopping centres are off Nicklin Way at the corner of Piringa St, and further north, at the corner of Moondarra Dr. Crummunda Park is a pleasant picnic area on the northern shore of Currimundi Lake, while Kathleen MCArthur Conservation Park

is a much larger remnant of wallum heath that covered much of coastal southern Queensland. Enjoy short walks, wildflowers, coastal birds, and views. Popular with locals and their dogs, Wurtulla Beach is not only family friendly but also a “dog off leash” area from section 226 to 247. Wurtulla Beach is a gorgeous stretch of coastline but the nearest patrolled swimming area is at Currimundi. With the sea breeze straight off the ocean, the sand between your toes and a coastal lifestyle, what more can you wish for in a place to call home.

5905 Average weekly household income $1392 Median age

41

SELL FASTER AND FOR A HIGHER PRICE When you combine newspaper and online advertising

^

AVERAGE SALE PRICE^ Online only

Paper only

Print and Online

$587,371 $695,710 $706,700 54

^ Source: CoreLogic 12 months to August 2018


suburb | Yandina

Population growth YANDINA is undergoing a transformation. No longer is it simply the centre of sugar cane and ginger farming, it has been discovered as an urban community with a rural edge. Its own IGA, hotel, several coffee shops, the blend of village life with some bigger holdings is mixed with new estates. With Mt Ninderry to the east and Cooloolabin plus the Mapleton State Forest on the ranges to the west, it is the best of both worlds. The population grew 6.4% between the 2011 and 2016 census. An area rich in natural rainforest parks and reserves, Yandina, is known for its pub, the Ginger Factory, Yandina Station and Wappa Falls Astronomy Observatory. Found just off the Bruce Highway and with the imposing backdrop of Mount Ninderry in the east, this quiet subtropical town is brimming with heritage-listed buildings. It is also one of the oldest towns of the Sunshine Coast. This is an attractive suburb for people looking to relocate for calmer, village-style living or acreage properties. A small community to the west of the town was one of the settings for Peter Carey’s award-winning novel, Bliss. Today, an IGA supermarket anchors a new shopping centre on the southern entry to the town. With neat three-bedroom homes still available in the low $300,000s and blocks of land available for those wishing to build new homes even less, Yandina is an affordable area for the investor or for first home buyers. In recent times there have been both town subdivisions as well as small acreage subdivisions. Yandina is the hub for an expanding industrial park that includes such national products as Rockcote renders, textures and paints, as well as Nutworks macadamia nut processing. APN Print’s multi-million-dollar printing facility is part of the estate. Situated half way between Maroochydore and Noosa, this hinterland town is a

SPOTLIGHT MEDIAN PROPERTY PRICE HOUSE ....................

$467,500 $420

$$

$

March

?

BUY

UNIT ....................

RENT

n/a $300

CAPITAL GROWTH

Change in median sales price in: Past 3 months ........................... 0% 12 months ................................. 4.1% 3 years ..................................... 12% 5 years ..................................... 28.5% Annually (10 years) .................... 2.1%

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS ON MARKET

52 days

March

?

$

AVERAGE HOLD PERIOD

8.1 years

GROSS RENTAL YIELD

Houses..................................... Units........................................

4.7% n/a

DEMOGRAPHICS Population

The Retreat, Yandina. Photo: Erle Levey

destination point for foodies visiting the multiple award-winning Spirit House. The Spirit House not only offers patrons a place to eat but also a very popular cooking school. The historic river-front property at The Rocks is the venue for weddings, conferences, corporate and lifestyle events. The Yandina hotel dates back to 1889. When the railway came through town, the pub was relocated in 1891 using rollers and a bullock team. In the same year, the post office was moved to the new railway station.

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Heritage listed and privately-owned Koongalba homestead is one of several local historic homes. Yandina’s name comes from “yan” meaning “to go” and “dinna”, meaning “feet”. Not only a town but also a locality, Yandina was home to Aboriginal people who lived in the district for more than 40,000 years. Along with other tribes occupying traditional resource areas, they belonged to the Gubbi Gubbi language group.

2371 Average weekly household income $1157 Median age

42

Bookings advised as seating is limited, particularly our garden area

M-F: 7:30am - 4pm | S-S: 8am - 3pm Ph: 5472 8330 | 16 Farrell Street, Yandina Visit cafeinvigor8.com.au 55


News

The beautiful Mooloolaba Esplanade and marina. Photo: John McCutcheon

Sunny Coast market spikes Property market upswing in recent weeks is a combination of a number of factors, including season, money and interstate markets THERE has been a spike in the Sunshine Coast property market in the past few weeks with agents reporting increased activity as well as sales. Yet the reason is not clear. It could be the traditional spring selling season or a variety of reasons that include the protests in Hong Kong. Ray White Mooloolaba principal Brent Higgins said there had definitely been a spike in the third quarter of 2019. Yet it could be a combination of three things: Season, money and interstate markets. His initial reaction was to put it down to the traditional spring lift in urgency. “It marks three months out from Christmas and people really need to buy in October to be in their new home by then. “In regard to interstate inquiry, there has certainly been interest coming from Sydney in particular. “We’ve also noticed quite a few transactions

56

in which we’ve had inquiry or some form of communication from months ago and now they are coming back to us. “I would say it’s a combination of money starting to be easier to obtain and interstate transactions picking up. “Auction clearance rates in recent weeks have been really high … Sydney 84.7 per cent and Melbourne 79 per cent. “Days on market throughout east coast of Australia has had a bearing. “They slowed but they are gathering momentum again now … we’re seeing inquiry on residential and investment property. “Certainly investor numbers have improved in the past two quarters.’’ Stewart Property principal Vicki Stewart said August had certainly seen a change in the market. “In regard to written business, it has been the best year since the office was opened in 2007.

“It is interesting to see the source of the sales that have taken place, most important was that every single listing that sold, had come the office via personal referral and return business. “That is what makes our hearts sing. “And the buyers are broad. We had older couples downsizing, the investors are back, with four properties selling straight to the rent roll. “The lower end of the market is very, very active, with anything under $450,000 selling quickly, some with multiple offers.’’ In Noosa, Tom Offermann Real Estate principal Tom Offermann has seen a big uplift in sales in August which has been influenced by a number of positive factors. “Firstly, the unpredicted Federal election outcome has been a positive stimulus for the property market Australia wide. “That combined with lower interest rates, the end of the banking Royal Commission,

and southern markets rebounding have stimulated our market. “There is always a surge of fresh properties being brought onto the market for the traditionally stronger spring selling season and this year many of those properties have been sold to waiting buyers. “The majority of property sales are to buyers from the eastern states and from the local market. “However, there has been a spike in inquiries from expats. Noosa has has been a popular destination for people repatriating to Australia and for those remaining overseas wanting an investment which can double as a holiday home. “Our primary expat countries are Singapore and Hong Kong. “We are fielding a a lot more enquiries than usual from Hong Kong-based expats and that is increasing as the length of the civil unrest grows.’’


Property market

Planning: the first step into the property market By ALICIA NALLY

W

hen it comes to taking that first daunting step on the property ladder, finance experts agree on a few things — have a plan, do your research, and don’t rush in. Mortgage Choice chief executive officer Susan Mitchell said it was important to ask yourself a few questions, including whether you wanted to live in the property or rent it out, if you’d prefer an apartment or a house and where you want that dwelling to be located. “Once you’ve answered these questions, find out the value of the type of property you wish to buy,” she said. “From there, you will know potentially what deposit amount you will need. “If you don’t already have one, create a budget, with a savings plan, so you can figure out how much you need to save each pay cycle in order to reach your goal within the time frame you set yourself. “Living on a budget has never been more important for those planning to purchase a home. “Lenders have been assessing home loan applicant living expenses with a heightened level of scrutiny over the last 18 months. “If you live on a budget and have a clear understanding of your expenses, you are going to be less likely to overspend in areas where lenders could raise their eyebrows. “Further, if you can set yourself a living expense budget for each month, and stick to it, it will go a long way to convincing a lender that you are in control of your spending and disciplined enough to maintain it. “If you realise you will not have the capacity to save the amount you need in the time frame you set, you will need to decide whether your goal is unrealistic or whether you need to change some of your spending habits in order to save more.” High–interest savings accounts, including ones created specifically for the purpose of saving a first home deposit, can help first home buyers to build a deposit, plus there is also the bank of mum and dad. The First Home Loan Deposit Scheme, scheduled to start January 2020, will mean eligible first home buyers will be able to borrow more than 80 per cent of a property’s value and not need to pay for lenders’ mortgage insurance. The scheme will be open to first home buyers who have saved a deposit of at least five per cent. Buyers may also be eligible for a first home buyer grant from your state/territory government. NAB acting general manager for Queensland regional retail, Wayne Tawse, said many people opened a separate account in which to store their savings. He also recommended putting money aside weekly to help develop a habit. Once you’ve got a nice nest egg behind you, it is time to decide how much of a deposit you will put on a property.

Mr Tawse said that all depends on the buyer, the location and whether you decide to buy a house, a unit or a larger lifestyle block. “A deposit of between 10 – 30 per cent is ideal,” he said. “Ideally, if you’ve got a 20 per cent deposit, you will not need mortgage insurance, and the more you save, the less you’ve got to pay in interest. “It’s really important any customers do their research. “You have to think about the location, the type of property you want, how many bedrooms you need, your long–term plans, whether you can maintain a block, if you want to be close to schools and shops, and what your lifestyle habits are. “We find most people buy in the area they rent in because that’s where they feel comfortable. “But, you have to assess how you travel to work and what your life will look like in the future and how the property fits into that. “We get some people who come in for advice and then we don’t see them again for six months and that is great because we know

they’re taking the time to plan and research.” Ms Mitchell adds that a 10 per cent deposit as a minimum is legally required at the time of exchanging contracts, so don’t be caught short. “Rent–vesting could be another pathway to home ownership. “If you’re serious about buying a property, but you can’t afford to buy where you want, you may want to consider buying where you can afford and renting where it’s convenient,” she said. She also reminded buyers of the other costs associated with home buying, which are not a part of your deposit, such as stamp or transfer duty, state taxes imposed on all property transactions; solicitor’s fees; and building and pest inspections. “It is important to conduct these inspections before you purchase a property. It may seem like just another expense but the reality is, it will give you peace of mind and allow you to identify structural faults or pest infestations in the property which would be much more costly over the long-term,” Ms Mitchell explained. “Seek expert advice. Chances are that

buying your first home or investment property is going to be the most significant financial decision you have made to date. “There are many things to consider, which can be overwhelming. That’s where a mortgage broker can step in to guide you along the way. “Whether you’ve just decided to buy a home and you need help determining what size deposit you need to save, or you’ve been saving for a while and think you’re ready to consider your home loan options, a mortgage broker can help. “Not only that, they will do all the legwork for you from helping you get all your paperwork together for your loan application, to negotiating with lenders on your behalf to ensure you’re getting a competitive deal on your loan.” On a final note, both Mr Tawse and Ms Mitchell recommend inspecting as many properties as you can before settling on one. And, even if you don’t plan to buy through an auction, attend a few just in case that ends up being the only way you can get your dream home. 57


Investment tips

Property investment tips from the experts

By DEBRA BELA

B

ecoming a property investor is like parenthood. You prepare the property for market, ensuring it is in a supportive suburb with schools, shops, and transport close by. You help it stand out from the competition and arm it with resilience to weather the ups and downs of a fluctuating market. Then, you let it out into the world, where you hope others will take good care of it, knowing you will always be needed when things break down, fall apart, or the rental relationship doesn’t turn out as long–term as you’d hoped. But, with the right advice upfront, the life of a Queensland property investor can still be a rich one. Queensland property experts share their top investor tips: UNIT OR HOUSE? A unit is a good investment option if you are a first home buyer, Belle Estate Agents managing director Jonathan Bell said. Home owners could potentially avoid stamp duty and get the first home owners grant, if it was a new unit. “We wouldn’t suggest for a first home buyer to sit and wait for five years, saving to buy a house, if they could enter the market earlier in an apartment,” he said. However, Mr Bell said he was a strong 58

advocate for buying a house over a unit, where appropriate. Look for hidden costs in the unit market before opting for an investment unit over a house, Streamline Property qualified property investment adviser Melinda Jennison said. Body corporate fees, hidden maintenance costs, rental vacancy rates for the area and competition from other rental units must all be considered. “The other thing we would consider, even with units, is how much land content can be attributed for a single unit,” she said. “Generally, the land component appreciates and the building component depreciates, so this is something that needs to be considered if long–term capital growth is the outcome.” LOCATION Look for inner–city locations, regional areas that are experiencing growth, and suburbs close to transport corridors, schools and shops. An inner–Brisbane apartment rental review by property consultants Urbis shows vacancy rates in new apartments for the March quarter at 1.6 per cent, a 0.6 per cent improvement on the previous quarter. Across all inner–city rentals, the Real Estate Institute of Queensland reported a 2.1 per cent vacancy rate, down from 4 per cent in the last quarter of 2018. WHEN TO LIST Peak times for people looking for rental

properties are in September (at the start of spring) and in the December/January summer period (before school and work transfers), Place director of property management Cathie Crampton said. But, she said, winter (which is traditionally a slow time for house rentals) was a peak time for apartments. “In New Farm we are enjoying rent increases in winter,” she said. Ray White property manager Jessica King said December could be busy, despite slowing around the Christmas break. “Talk to your local agent about what time frames are in their market and seasonal times at that time of year,” Ms King said. “If your property is going to be available at the end of April, make sure it’s ready for the school holidays around this time, or co–ordinate with a long weekend.” PRICE POINT Analyse what is on the market, relative to your property and based on functional inclusions, like bathrooms, parking, location to transport and amenities, Ms Crampton said. “In the inner city, if you have off–street parking, a double garage and swimming pool, these are very popular and do drive a price up,” she said. “Security and air–conditioning will definitely position a property higher than one without.” If an area starts dropping rental prices,

particularly a regional area, Ray White property manager Jessica King’s advice is to hold firm. “If one person drops the price, everyone starts pulling prices down,” Ms King said. “Sometimes you need to hold firm, allow the uneducated ones to come in sharply, undercut everyone and then the market stabilises again.” However, do consider adjusting your rental price by 5 – 10 per cent if the property has been on the market for 7 – 14 days without being rented. WHAT RENTERS WANT Queensland renters remain on the hunt for support with their rent, with the National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) the most searched rental term on realestate.com.au. In second place, renters are looking for properties with swimming pools. Other property features sought by Queensland renters include pet–friendly properties, fully furnished, and properties with dual–living or granny flats. Realestate.com.au chief economist Nerida Conisbee said she was unsurprised by the findings, which indicate people are looking for ways to reduce financial pressure by sharing rental responsibilities and seeking assistance. The Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC) housing affordability report 2019 found 52 per cent of private renters faced difficulties in meeting housing costs, compared with 38 per cent of home owners.




BR UC E

TO GYMPIE

12

HI

SUNSHINE COAST

Lake Cootharaba

Kin Kin |

Boreen Point |

GH

Traveston

WA

|

Y

TEEWAH

1

Lake Cooroibah

LakeTewantin Macdonald | 2

| Pomona NOOSA BOTANICAL

NOOSA HEADS

3

GARDENS

| Cooroy

16

| Imbil

Lake Weyba

| Eumundi

Obi Obi | KONDALILLA FALLS NATIONAL PARK

17 | Flaxton

Lake Witta | Baroon

| Woombye

15 | Montville| Palmwoods | Eudlo

Maleny MARY |

CAIRNCROSS PARK

EASY INTERMEDIATE

TO BRISBANE



NooSA NATIoNAl PARk ▷ Approximately 2.5km from the

4

cooluM ▷ 2km from Coolum Surf Club to

first rock wall

MARoocHY RIVER FoRESHoRE ▷ 2.7km one way

Sunshine Coast Airport

7

BuDERIM FoREST ▷ 1.4km boardwalk return or 2.6km

6

8

AlExANDRA HEADlAND To MooloolABA ▷ 2.5km one way

9

kAwANA SuRF cluB To PoINT cARTwRIGHT ▷ 2.5km one way

MAROOCHYDORE ALEXANDRA HEADLAND 7 8 MOOLOOLABA | Buderim

9 KAWANA

13 14

AY

Beerwah |

LEGEND

3

Noosa Yacht and Rowing Club to the last boat hire

6

11 CURRIMUNDI

Landsborough | Peachester |

NooSA RIVER ▷ 1.7km from the

MT cooluM ▷ 1.6km return

Ewen Maddock Dam

Glass House Mountains 18 |

HARD

10

HIGHW

| Bellthorpe

| Nambour

BRUCE

| Conondale

Mapleton |

2

5 5

Yandina|

MAPLETON FALLS NATIONAL PARK

MT cooRooRA ▷ 2km return

Point Arkwright lookout

4 COOLUM BEACH Kenilworth |

1

CALOUNDRA

BRIBIE ISLAND

to the waterfalls return

10

MARoocHY BoTANIcAl GARDENS ▷ Distance varies

11

cuRRIMuNDI lAkE ▷ 1.4km one way

12

kIN kIN couNTRYSIDE ▷ 14km circuit

13

MoFFAT BEAcH To kINGS BEAcH ▷ 1.5km one way

14

cAlouNDRA’S coASTAl PATHwAY ▷ 9km one way

15

BARooN lookouT ▷ 4.4km one way

16

EuMuNDI REGIoNAl PARk ▷ 2.3km, 3.6km, 4km and 5.1km

17

koNDAlIllA FAllS ▷ 2.4km, 3.2km or 4.6km tracks

18

GlASS HouSE MouNTAINS Mount Beerburrum (1.4km), Mount Ngungun (2.8km), Mount Tibrogargan (3.3km) 59


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Buying Investing and Selling Real Estate on the Sunshine Coast

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Buying Investing and Selling Real Estate on the Sunshine Coast