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December 2011

APS Selected for Prestigious Stem Cell Study Therapy for back pain tested PAGE 9

Avoid Winter Injury Hit The Slopes With Care PAGE 4

Old Father Time Caring for Arthritis PAGE 7

PLUS Winter Cooking ➲ p.6

Meet Dr. Glen Halvorson ➲ p.12


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December 2011

WELCOME D e c e mber is one of our favori t e months; not only does t h e weather seem like a glor i o u s reward for having surv i v e d another summer, but it i s a l so a time to celebrate the b i r t h of Christ. This month’s i s s u e of Arizona Pain Monthly i s d e dicated to spirit. We hope t o h onor your spirit, and ours, b y p roviding great information o n i nnovative research taking p l a c e at APS, fibromyalgia and t h e many treatment options, h o w to avoid winter sport injur i e s and a handful of holiday re c i p es to keep your family w a r m and well fed. This holiday season, as you hold your family close and c e l e b r a t e t h e e n d o f t h e y e a r, we hope you will reflect on y o u r b l e s s i n g s . We c e r t a i n l y will be thinking of you when saying our thanks. 2011 has been another incredibly successful year for APS; we have been able to see and treat more patients than ever b e f o r e . We a r e s o t h a n k f u l o u r g r e a t s t a ff h a s b e e n a b l e t o relieve the pain of so many in

Paul Lynch, MD and Tor y McJunkin, MD

And the angel answered her, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be called holy–the Son of God.” A r i z o n a . We h a v e o n l y b i g g e r dreams for 2012. May th e s p i r i t o f t h e s e a s o n bless y o u a n d y o u r f a m i l y !

– Luke 1:35 From our families to yours, Dr. Paul Lynch and Dr. Tory McJunkin A r i z o n a Pa i n S p e c i a l i s t Fo u n d e r s


December 2011

Clinical Editor: Tory McJunkin, M.D. Publisher: Nick Ryan Editor/Writer: Kelli Donley,

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CONTENTS

Kristen Wesley Layout: Addie Mirabella

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Dr. Paul Lynch and Dr. Tory McJunkin welcome you to the December issue of Arizona Pain Monthly.

Caring for arthritis. By Chance Moore, DC

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APS Selected for Prestigious Stem Cell Study

Welcome letter Contact Us Joe Carlon, CEO 9977 N 90th Street, Suite 320 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 Phone: 888-627-6121 Email: info@boostmedical.com Print Subscription Information 888-627-6121

Avoid Winter Injury Hit the slopes with care.

Old Father Time

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Therapy for back pain tested.

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December Cooking These seasonal recipes combine both a great variety of vegetables, and produce you should find in plenty at your local market this winter.

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MEET THE STAFF APS welcomes Dr. Glen Halvorson. By Kelli M. Donley

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Sudoku Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing.

Published monthly by Bo ost Medical 9977 N 90th Street, Suite 320 Scottsdale, AZ 85258 Volume #21 Published December, 2011


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December 2011

Avoid Winter I njury H i t th e S l opes With Care A l e x L a n t o n , P T, D P T i s a physical therapist at Atlas P h y s i c a l T h e r a p y i n D e n v e r, Colorado. Landon, who has his doctorate in physical therapy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says there are basic strategies everyone can do to remain injury free in winter weather – whether that means hitting the slopes or the links.

injury is to perform balance activities especially with your eyes closed. This works on receptors called proprioceptors, which help contribute to balance and normal motion of your joints. Improving your balance will prevent injuries and improve performance during sporting activities and d e c r e a s e f a l l r i s k . 

Q : W hat are some of the most c o m mon injuries you see?  A: I see almost every type of injury from neck pain to vertigo. In the orthopedic field we see low back pain of various causes as the most common ailment b y f a r.

Q: How d o i n j u r i e s y o u t re a t vary in t h e w i n t e r ? A : We g e t a l o t s k i i n j u ries, most commonly to the knee. They consist of traumatic injuries, such as torn ACLs, and repetitive injuries, such as patello-femoral synd r o m e .   We a l s o s e e m a n y f r a c tured radius secondary to slips and falls on ice.

Q : W hat are some of the e a s i e st ways to prevent injury? A: The best way to prevent

Q: Wha t a re s o m e t o o l s f o l k s can use a t h o m e t o s t re t c h ? A: The best aid for stretching at

Alex Lanton, PT, DPT

home is a stretch strap. They are available at any sporting goods store. However, simply knowing proper stretching technique will allow one to get all the benefits of stretching. Q: If you could give one piece of advice to the general public, what would it be? A: The best way to prevent injury is to stay active. This


December 2011

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Most common ski injuries are to the knee. They consist of traumatic injuries, such as tor n ACLs, and repetitive injuries, such as patello-femoral syndrome. 

keeps people at a basic level of fitness that decreases risk o f i n j u r y. D o w h a t y o u l o v e ! This can be anything from w a l k i n g , t o y o g a , t o s o c c e r. Q : W hat made yo u want to b e c o me a physical therapist? A: From a young age I always

knew I wanted to work in healthcare.  I have multiple members of my family with mental and physical disabilities and from those experiences I knew I wanted to help people.  I had the opportunity to spend my senior year of high school observing all aspects of health

care and this is when I fell in love with physical therapy.  Q : H o w c a n o u r re a d e r s re a c h you if they have further questions? A : T h e b e s t w a y t o re a c h m e i s t h ro u g h e - m a i l a t Alex@atlasptco.com


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December 2011

December COOKING The idea of an anti-inflammatory diet is to provide your body with the healthiest ingredients that are shown to provoke the fewest inflammatory responses. While each person will react differently to foods, research has shown diets including a wide variety of vegetables are the healthiest. At Arizona Pain Monthly, we also believe in seasonal eating. These recipes combine both a great variety of vegetables, and produce you should find in plenty at your local market in winter.

Roasted Root Vegetables Ingredients: • 2 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into chunks • 2 pounds potatoes, unpeeled, cut into chunks • 1 pound sweet potato, unpeeled, cut into chunks • 1 bunch beets, trimmed but not peeled, scrubbed, cut into chunks • 1 head of garlic, cloves separated, peeled

• 2 tablespoons olive oil Directions: Heat oven to 400°F. Coat two large rimmed baking sheets with olive oil. Combine ingredients in large bowl; toss to coat with oil. (Sprinkle with cayenne, cumin, pepper or sea salt if desired.) Divide and spread vegetables between baking sheets. Roast until tender (about 1 hour).

Curried Pumpkin Soup Ingredients: • 2 medium onions, chopped • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter • 2 large garlic cloves, minced • 2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger • 2 teaspoons ground cumin • 1 teaspoon ground coriander • 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt • 3/4 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes • 2 (15-oz) cans solid-pack pumpkin • 4 cups water

• 2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth • 1 (14-oz) can unsweetened coconut milk, or coconut water if opting for low-fat • 1/4 cup olive oil • 2 tablespoons curry seasoning Directions: On low heat, cook onions in butter for 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger, stirring for 1 minute. Then add cumin, coriander, curry and cardamom for another minute. Add salt, red pepper

flakes, pumpkin, water, broth, and coconut milk/water and simmer, uncovered for 30 minutes, stirring when necessary. Using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth. Top with sour cream or plain yogurt before serving.


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Old Fat her Time: Caring for Arthritis B y Chance Moore, DC Physical aging thankfully occurs slowly; a common sign is injuries suffered and recovered during youth slowly starting to reappear. Change within the joints of the body is called arthritis, with the most common type being osteoarthritis (OA), or degenerative joint disease. These types of arthritis cause discomfort for more than 20 million Americans, and is more common in women than in men. O st e oarthritis is the breakd o w n of cartilage within the j o i n t . The resiliency of cartil a g e differs by person. Family h i s t o ry of OA , being overw e i g ht, lack of exercise, and p r i o r joint injuries are cons i d e red OA risk factors. Many y o u n g athletes can develop e a r l y -onset OA by playing t h ro ugh cartilage injuries. W h e n cellular damage occurs w i t h i n the joint, the joint’s a b i l i t y to repair itself is lesse n e d . With time, this causes

Osteoarthritis is the breakdown of cartilage within the joint.

the car t i l a g e t o l o s e i t s w a t e r conten t , b e c o m e t h i n , a n d eventua l l y w e a r o u t . Commo n s i g n s o f OA i n c l u d e :

steady or intermittent joint pain – most common in the knees, hips, and low back, but also in the neck and should e r s ; j o i n t s t i ff n e s s a f t e r


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December 2011

s i t t i ng, sleeping, or otherwise n o t moving for a long time; s w e l l ing or tenderness in the j o i n t s; and, a crunching feeling o r s o und of bones rubbing a g a i nst each other.  O A d i ffers significantly from r h e u matoid arthritis ( RA). RA is a n a utoimmune disease and is a t y p e of inflammatory arthrit i s , a ffecting 1% of the US p o p u lation (about 2.1 million p e o p le). R A often begins in m i d d le age, although in some r a re cases it can also be diagn o s e d in youth. The immune s y s t e m attacks the lining of t h e j oint called t he synovium. A s a result, fluid builds up in t h e j oints, causing pain and i n f l a mmation influencing joints o n b oth sides of the body. E v a l u ation from a physician, i n c l u ding imaging and blood w o r k can differentiate between O A a nd RA . Many patients who suffer from joint pain avoid physical activity, but a proper exercise routine is extremely beneficial for the management of these conditions. Exercise should be a controlled activity that allows the body to respond by strengthening the muscular support around the joints, as well as improving joint mobility

Low-impact activities such as using a stationar y bike work best for arthritic patients.

and function. Exercise is one of the best forms of arthritis treatment and prevention. Daily activity helps control and maintain a healthy weight, and empowers an arthritic patient to help take control of their symptoms.   Conside r t h e f o l l o w i n g e x e rc i s e tips to h e l p i m p ro v e a r t h r i t i c conditi o n s : • D o n o t p u s h t h ro u g h p a i n . Star t s l o w l y a n d s e e h o w the b o d y re s p o n d s t h e nex t d a y. S l o w l y i n c re a s e the d u r a t i o n a n d i n t e n sity o f e x e rc i s e . I f y o u a re ove r w e i g h t , u s e e x t r a p re cau t i o n b e c a u s e o f t h e incre a s e d l o a d o n t h e weig h t b e a r i n g j o i n t s . • L ow - i m p a c t o r n o n - w e i g h t bea r i n g a c t i v i t i e s , s u c h a s

walking, stationary bike, e l l i p t i c a l , s t a i r cl i m b i n g , s w i m m i n g , w a t e r a e ro bics and light weight training work best for arthritic patients. • Us e l i g h t s t re n g t h e n i n g e x e rc i s e s i n t h e m u s c l e g ro u p s t h a t s u p p o r t t h e a ff e c t e d j o i n t . • C o n s i d e r d i e t a r y c h a n g e s t o h e l p l o s e w e i g h t a n d re d u c e inflammation. If c o n c e r n e d y o u h a v e a r t h r i tis, make an appointment with a pain specialist for diagnosis. C o n s i d e r t h e a f o re m e n t i o n e d e x e rc i s e s u g g e s t i o n s a n d m a k e dietary changes. An antiinflammatory diet, in combinat i o n w i t h a n a p p ro pr i a t e d a i l y e x e rc i s e ro u t i n e , m a y s i g n i f i c a n t l y re d u c e a r t h r i t i c p a i n .


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APS Selected for Pre stigious Stem C ell Stu dy T h e ra py for Back Pain Tested A r i z o n a Pa i n S p e c i a l i s t s ( A P S ) has been selected as one of four pain practices nationally t o b e p a r t o f a n F D A - a p p ro v e d regenerative medicine study

examining chronic back pain. Using a single stem cell – gathered through donor m a r ro w s t e m c e l l s – p h y sicians at APS will use an

experimental therapy to treat chronic back pain. It is estimated 15% of Americans have lived with back pain for more than six months.


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December 2011

A s a site selection for the s t u d y, APS founders Dr. Tory M c J u nkin and Dr. Paul Lynch e x p ressed their excitement a n d pride at being included in t h e potentially revolutionary s c i e nce.

modali t i e s , ” s a y s D r. Pa u l Lynch. “ T h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o researc h t h i s t h e r a p y g i v e s m e hope th a t p a t i e n t s w h o s u ff e r from co n d i t i o n s l i k e d e g e n e r a tive dis c d i s e a s e m a y f i n d s u c cessful re l i e f . ”

“ S t e m cell research within t h e d isc is very exciting. I t f o c u s es on addressing the s o u rce of the pain, rather than s o l e l y the treatment,” says M c J u nkin.  “As an intervent i o n a l pain doctor I have seen i n c re dible advances in the spec i a l t y during the past 10 years – a n d this study shows we are s t i l l at the tip of the iceberg f o r major advances in pain m e d i cine.”

APS res e a rc h e r s a n d o t h e r s nationa l l y h o p e t o f i n d a n e w treatme n t f o r c h ro n i c , d e b i l i tating b a c k p a i n l a s t i n g m o re than si x m o n t h s . Pa t i e n t s w i t h degene r a t i v e d i s c s m a y f i n d long-te r m re l i e f w i t h o u t b e i n g hospita l i z e d f o r b a c k s u r g e r y. Donor m a r ro w s t e m c e l l s , n o t to be c o n f u s e d w i t h e m b r y onic st e m c e l l s , m a y re v e r s e damage t o t h e s p i n e s e e n i n degene r a t i v e d i s c d i s e a s e a n d other d i s c o g e n i c c o n d i t i o n s .

M e s o blast Limited, an A u s t r alian research firm, is s p o n soring the trial. Mesoblast i s k n own in the industry for t h e i r work with reversing d e g e nerative pro cesses and re g e nerating disc material in a n i m al studies. The company is w e l l respected for being at the f ro n t of regenerative medicine a n d quality of life research. “ Pa i n is difficult, and we b e l i e ve in an aggressive, mini m a l l y invasive a pproach to p a i n management that incorp o r a tes various treatment

Ryan Ta p s c o t t , P h D a n d d i re c tor of re s e a rc h a t A P S , s a y s there a re s p e c i f i c c r i t e r i a f o r patient s w h o m a y b e i n c l u d e d in the s t u d y. “Some 1 0 0 p a t i e n t s w i l l b e enrolle d i n t h e c l i n i c a l t r i a l nationa l l y, ” h e s a y s . “ We h a v e an expe c t a t i o n t o e n ro l l 2 5 patient s . H o w e v e r, w e h o p e to exce e d t h a t n u m b e r. T h e re are a n u m b e r o f i n c l u s i o n and exc l u s i o n c r i t e r i a t h a t must b e m e t f o r a n i n d i v i d ual to p a r t i c i p a t e – t h e m o s t

s i g n i f i c a n t b e i n g t h a t p a rt i c i p a n t s m u s t h a v e c h ro n i c l u m b a r b a c k p a i n f o r g re a t e r than 6 months due to degene r a t i v e d i s c ( s ) . Pa t ie n t s c a n be male or female, 18 years or o l d e r, a n d m u s t h a v e f a i l e d a t least 3 months of conservative l o w b a c k p a i n t re a t m e n t . ” Ta p s c o t t s a y s h e i s e a g e r f o r t h e re s e a rc h t o b e g i n b e c a u s e p re c l i n i c a l s t u d i e s h a v e s h o w n g re a t re s u l t s . “ A l t h o u g h t h e re i s n o d i re c t h y p o t h e s i s , p re v i o u s s t u d y re s u l t s u s i n g a n i m a l m o d e l s have shown that the intrad i s c a l   i n j e c t i o n o f st e m c e l l s c a n h e l p t h e b o d y ’s o w n c e l l s t o h e l p re p a i r t h e da m a g e d discs of the spine,” he says. “If re s u l t s o f t h i s c l i n i c a l trial show that this minimally i n v a s i v e t re a t m e n t i s s u c c e s s f u l i n h e l p i n g re p a i r t h e damaged discs of the spine, it c o u l d g o a l o n g w a y t o re p l a c i n g t h e m o re i n v a s i v e , c o m p l i cated surgeries (e.g., spinal f u s i o n ) n o r m a l l y u s e d t o re p a i r damaged discs. This would o n l y h a p p e n w i t h re p l i c a t i o n f ro m o t h e r f u t u re c l i n i c a l t r i a l s , b u t t h e c u r re n t t r i a l would serve as the first evid e n c e t h a t t h i s t re a t m e n t works on humans and opens


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u p a whole new world of p o t e ntial treatment options.” Ta p s cott’s role in the study is c o n s i derable, and his enthusia s m is palpable. “ I t w ill be my job to identify a n d enroll patients, develop s p e c ific study logistics so that a l l s tudy assessments and proc e d u res are completed by each p a t i e nt enrolled in the study, s t o re and manage all materials n e e d ed for study, track each p a t i e nt throughout the study d u r i ng the 36 months it lasts, i n c l u ding monitoring their re s p onses to treatment, and a c t i n g as liaison between APS a n d study sponsor, Mesoblast. ” W h i l e APS has long particip a t e d in studies with vendors, s u c h as St. Jude, this is the f i r s t long-term clinical trial for t h e practice. The notion that i n f o r mation will be gathered a t A PS that may ultimately c re a t e a long-term solution for b a c k pain for people worldwide h a s t he entire staff notably a n i m ated. “Being involved in a study of t h i s c a l i b e r, t h a t i s s o c u t t i n g edge, really shows the commitment and dedication of APS to be leaders in pain

APS researchers and others nationally hope to find a new treatment for chronic, debilitating back pain lasting more than six months.

m a n a g e m e n t , ” s a y s Ta p s c o t t . “This includes being at the f o r e f r o n t o f n e w, e x c i t i n g

treatments that could benefit our patients and improve their quality of life.”


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December 2011

APS Welcomes Dr. Glen Halvorson B y Ke l l i M . D o n l e y D r. G l e n H a l v o r s o n j o i n e d t h e s t a ff o f A r i z o n a Pa i n S p e c i a l i s t s i n J u n e . D r. H a l v o r s o n i s w e l l re s p e c t e d a m o n g p a i n s p e c i a l i s t s n a t i o n a l l y for his work with nerve conduction studies. O ne o f h i s re s e a rc h i n t e re s t s a n d re c e n t p u b l i c a t i o n s h a s b e e n n e u ro d i a g n o s t i c t e s t i n g o f d i a b e t i c p a t i e n t s w i t h n e u ro p a t h y. A n d yet, our interview with the latest physician o n s t a ff s h o w s h e i s a n y t h i n g b u t j u s t a n academic.

D r. Glen Halvorson

Q : Te l l u s a b o u t y o u r f a m i l y. A n d d o y o u have pets? A : Fa m i l y l i f e i s a l i t t l e c r a z y. We h a v e 1 2 c h i l d re n . F i v e a re a d o p t e d – f o u r f ro m E t h i o p i a a n d 1 f ro m G u a t e m a l a . We a l s o h a v e five grandsons. My wife home schools eight child re n . We a re a c t i v e i n s p o r t s , m u s i c , d e s k t o p publishing, video and music editing and our c h u rc h . And yes. We have pets! We have two Bengal cats, one aging Newfoundland and one golden retriever. It’s a full house. Q : W h e re d i d y o u s t u d y ? W h a t a re y o u r c e r t i f i c a t i o n s a n d a ff i l i a t i o n s ? A: I have a BA in English literature from Pacific Lutheran University. I received my MD and an MS in biophysics from the


December 2011

University of Washington. I have board certifications in physical medicine and rehabilitation, and electrodiagnostic medicine. Most of my professional career reflects those early interests in electromyography (EMG) and in sports medicine. In Tucson I had a busy clinic that saw a lot of athletes for non-surgical injuries. I was a team physician with the University of Arizona for ten years and director of the sports medicine clinic at Student Health Services as well

I served for a brief time on the education committee for the AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine). That led to an appointment as an oral examiner for the national EMG board and a subsequent posit i o n a s A r i z o n a ’s p h y s i cian representative to the AANEM for ten years. In 2002 we made a family decision to move to California where I established a busy pract i c e d o i n g E M G ’s f o r o r t h o -

Why did you want to become a physician? “ ‘ To s a v e t h e w o r l d . ’ I w a s v e r y i d e a l i s t i c a n d w a n t e d t o m a ke a difference. I was part of a college s e r v i c e g r o u p t h a t w o r ke d w i t h k i d s from families without dads.” as covering high school sports. I was a volunteer physician at the US Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs in 1992 and was the first chairman and cofounder of the sports medicine special interest group for the American Association of PMR. I loved working with athletes, but when my kids started playing sports I wanted to spend more time with them and gravitated once again toward EMG.

pedic clinics treating injured workers and became a Qualified Medical Examiner for the State of California. I’ve also worked as the medical director of a national Medicare certified neurodiagn o s t i c s l a b , a n d h a v e i n t e rpreted more than 10,000 nerve conduction studies in the last three years. Q: Good grief! You stay busy. Do you have any time for hobbies

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outside of work and family? A: I am a confessed gym rat. I m a k e s u re t o h i t t h e g y m e v e r y m o r n i n g b e f o re w o r k . I ’m a l s o an avid golfer – 1 handicap! I love to play the guitar and write. And of course, my kids. When you have 12 kids, they a l s o b e c o m e y o u r h o b b y. Q : W h e re i s y o u r f a v o r i t e p l a c e you’ve traveled? Why? A: Hawaii for the golf and w e a t h e r. S w i t z e r l a n d f o r t h e s k i i n g a n d p h o t o g r ap h y. Q: Why did you want to become a physician? A : ‘ To s a v e t h e w o r l d . ’ I w a s very idealistic and wanted to m a k e a d i ff e r e n c e . I w a s p a r t of a college service group that worked with kids from families without dads. I found there was little we could do without s k i l l s a n d f i n a n c i a l a b i l i t y. Medicine seemed a good way to be able to influence others, b u t t o b e h o n e s t – I d i d n ’t even consider medicine until after I graduated from college with a degree in English and started wondering what to do with my life. After my appointm e n t t o t h e Pe a c e C o r p s w a s c u t s h o r t b y k n e e s u r g e r y, I took a test and was told I scored the highest aptitude they had seen for medicine.


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December 2011

I went back to college for t w o y e a r s o f p re - m e d b e f o re attending the University of Wa s h i n g t o n . Q : P r ior to coming to APS, w h e re were you working? A : I was a qualified medical e x a m iner in California. I was a l s o working as an MD doing E M G s for workers compensat i o n clinics, as well as doing U ti l i zation Review of injured w o r k ers cases. And, I worked a s t h e medical director of a n e urodiagnostics testing c o m p any. Q : W hat do you think of your j o b a t APS? How is it different f ro m previous positions? A: Pain management has different challenges than workers compensation and sports medicine. The cases are often more complex, so EMG referrals have been excellent from an academic and professional interest p o i n t o f v i e w. P a i n p a t i e n t s as a rule have more patholo g y. T h i s m e a n s a h i g h e r percentage of abnormal tests that are integral to both choice of care and expected outcomes. I believe I have an exceptionally high level of proficiency in electrodiagnostic medicine, so there

is a great deal of personal and professional satisfaction that comes from being able to contribute to care when you are asked to sort out difficult diagnostic challenges. The quality of EMG referrals at APS has been outstanding. Q: What is one interesting thing few people know about you? A: Probably the least known to people in medicine is that I’ve been formulating nutritional supplements for direct response companies for nearly 20 years. I was also the author of one of the bestselling audiotapes in network marketing history in the e a r l y 1 9 9 0 s . “O P C S u p e r s t a r Antioxidant” became the longest selling tape for a m a j o r t a p e d i s t r i b u t o r, e n j o y ing more than a 10-year run. My research book on this subject is being published at t h e e n d o f t h i s y e a r. T h i s h a s been a 10 year project compiling all the known research worldwide on antioxidants found in grape and pine bark extracts. These are the same chemicals discovered in red wine that protect against heart disease and other diseases.

I’d guess the other little known fact to those who have c ro s s e d m y p a t h i n m o re t h a n 30 years of medical practice is our passion for adoption. During the last four years, my wife and I have adopted f i v e o r p h a n s a n d a re a c t i v e l y i n v o l v e d i n i n t e r n a ti o n a l a d o p tion ministries. Q: What would your last meal be? Why? A: A baked potato, meatloaf, early garden peas and corn, ice cream, raisin bottom spice cake and chocolate chip cookies. My wife and my mother are fabulous cooks; I am a Montana farm boy at h e a r t a n d w e d o n ’t e a t j u s t one helping. Oh! And a good quality red wine. One last shot of polyphenols I have been writing about before singing with a heavenly host of angels! Q: What would you like your p a t i e n t s a n d t h e s t a ff o f A P S to know about you? A: I hope they see me as a person of integrity and maturity. I am a very fortunate guy with a great wife and great kids. D r. H a l v o r s o n p ra c t i c e s a t t h e Scottsdale location of Arizona Pa i n S p e c i a l i s t s .


December 2011

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Arizona Pain Monthly December