Page 1

E 5 2, N O. 3 | $2 2 .50 LUM VO

2x U.S. National Champion PCF

U.S. National ARABIAN JUNIOR MARES


2015 Arabian Mare (Bey Ambition x AP Sheez Sassy)

2016 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION YEARLING FILLY ~ HIGHEST SCORING FILLY 2016 REGION 15 UNANIMOUS CHAMPION YEARLING FILLY 2017 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS SALON DU CHEVAL - BEST MOVEMENT PERFECT 20’S 2017 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS SALON DU CHEVAL - JUNIOR MARE CLASS CHAMPION 2017 REGION 15 UNANIMOUS CHAMPION 2-YEAR-OLD FILLY 2018 LAS VEGAS WORLD CUP CHAMPION 3-YEAR-OLD MARE 2ND HIGHEST SCORE OF THE SHOW! 2018 LAS VEGAS WORLD CUP CHAMPION BEST MOVER OF THE ENTIRE SHOW!


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Ar abian Horse Times | 2 | Volume 52, No. 3


Proudly bred & owned by Dr. Marta Wasiak and Dr. Babu Rankupalli Kharismatic PGA+// x Ladys Dance Contact Becker Stables 530.477.5588 Multi-Program Nominated Sire

Ar abian Horse Times | 3 | Volume 52, No. 3


table of

CONTENTS Volume 52, No. 3 Issue 6

11

Cover Story: Rae-Dawn Arabians ... Our Foundation, Our Future! by Braden Davidson

48

Her Story Continues ... Siwar Al Shaqab–The World Is Her Stage by Beth Ellen Hunziker

92

The Beloved Double Or Nuttin by Mary Kirkman

419

APAHA’s Trainer Challenge Cup

420

55 Years At The U.S. Nationals

432

55th U.S. Nationals Preview

434

U.S. Nationals Judges’ Perspective

442

U.S. Nationals Profiles

472

Tulsa Hot Spots

476

Fire And Goldd by Catherine Cole Ferandelli

478

Good Blood Always Shows Itself … The Horses Of Amazing Horsewoman LLC by Sarah Jayne Johnson

482

AHT Qualifications Survey

488

In Memoriam

6

Comments From The Publisher

474

Faces & Places

480

Equine Tips: Liability Releases ...

Looking Ahead

512

Index Of Advertisers

E 52 ,

510

LU M

Trainers Directory

VO

494

NO

. 3 | $2 2.

50

Tips For Enforceability by Johanna Sheehe

2x U.S. National Champion PCF

U.S. National ARABIAN JUNIOR MARES

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On The Cover: Giana Leah PCF (Polidoro FC x Aliyah Vision PCF), owned by Murray and Shirley Popplewell.


w w w . R o y a l A r a b i a n s . c o m Ar abian Horse Times | 5 | Volume 52, No. 3


COMMENTS from the publisher Publisher Lara Ames Director of Creative and Organizational Development Ashley Gallún Managing Editor Charlene Deyle Advertising Account Executive Lesley Blain Mazur Contributing Editor Mary Kirkman Contributing Writers Theresa Cardamone Catherine Cole Ferandelli Beth Ellen Hunziker Sarah Jayne Johnson Production Manager Ed Barredo Print & Web Design Wayne Anderson Sales Assistant Hannah Giesen AHT Abroad Representative Mieke Opsteyn Director of Finance & Administration Sara Thomas Accounts Receivable Deb Trebesch Show Operations/ Media Support Specialist Meaghan Estes Social Media Coordinator Cari Alford Kirchner

© Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 52, No. 3, October 2021, is published monthly, except April, May, June, August and November, by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 70, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $22.50. Subscription in U.S. $80 per year, $140 two years, $200 three years. Canada $130 one year, $250 two years, $340 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $190 one year, $320 two years, $380 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, P.O. Box 70, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 70, Jordan, MN 55352. For subscription information, call 952-492-3213. Arabian Horse Times P.O. Box 70, Jordan, MN 55352 Fax: 952-492-3228 www.ahtimes.com

THE MISSION OF AHA There’s a lot of discussion these days about the recently-passed rule by AHA that changes our qualification system for regional and national shows. Personally, I’m going to do what is necessary to qualify for Nationals, but do these rules benefit the industry as a whole? Not everyone supports them and many have concerns. My observations deal with the big picture—an issue that is indicated by the amount of dissention on this topic and others that have simmered increasingly over the years. In September, Arabian Horse Times did a survey of opinions and found that 80 percent of the people canvassed were not in favor of moving forward with the qualifications that were approved by AHA’s Board of Directors. What that told us was that there are a lot of people troubled about the state of the industry and the disassociation between elected officials and the membership. So, let’s take an honest look at where we are as a community and a breed organization. First and foremost, we need to remember that our main product is the Arabian horse. No matter how we feel about the qualification rule, let’s ask ourselves how AHA can better serve its community (and in the process, hopefully, inspire less discord). What do members, as Arabian horse owners, breeders and exhibitors, want from AHA? As an AHA member, I feel that we need to look more closely at our association and how it is run. Over time, it has changed many things and many changes have been for the good. One thing, however, that does not change is the timing of the convention and its voting process. With the convention scheduled for mid-November, right before holiday season, it is therefore often difficult for those who participate in U.S. Nationals—people who are involved in the industry, who devote significant time and money to their horses—to attend and express their views. I think AHA (and we, as members, if we don’t speak up) has too often taken its eye off the ball. I feel it should direct more of its time and energy toward helping these great animals and the people who breed them. We can worry about the qualifications all we want, but if we do not do something to promote the breed and breeding, we will not have to worry about horse shows. To me, focusing on growing the breed is job one. If that means we need to examine how AHA is run and consider reorganizing it to do better, then I think we should. At the end of the day, the Arabian horse should be the most important subject. Let’s take this opportunity this issue presents to come together and talk. In no way is this meant as an attack on AHA officials or anyone else; personal attacks are out of place and unproductive. We all love our horses. I’d just like us to speak more about our priorities and how we achieve them—and that means a hard conversation, requiring all our honesty. It also requires that while we may not all agree, we understand that we all genuinely care about our horses. We want to do the best for them. Finally, when many of us are in Tulsa for the Nationals, let’s celebrate the Arabian horse. As breeders and owners, we can be very proud of our accomplishments and our desire to guide our horses and our community into a bright future.

Ar abian Horse Times | 6 | Volume 52, No. 3


El Tino x SW Victoria For breeding information contact MIDWEST David Boggs 612.328.8312 | david@midwestarabian.com

Owned by Stone Ridge Arabians, Dan & Maureen Grossman 812.322.5776 | www.stoneridgearabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 7 | Volume 52, No. 3


HHA and Dr. Mark have really allowed us to take a look at our horses on a deeper level and provide better nutritional care for them as a result. In identifying areas where our horses are struggling, we can help them with those exact issues. Thanks to HHA, we are able to help sustain optimal health for our breeding horses, and the results are obvious. ~Sarah O’Brien, Palmetto Arabians

Pictured: Multi-National Champion Sire Always A Jullyen V

Proud supporter of:

Ar abian Horse Times | 8 | Volume 52, No. 3


For decades, Dr. Mark DePaolo has treated horses with preventable issues such as Cushing’s syndrome, allergies, nervousness and chronic stiffness. Through the Horse Hair Analysis Program and its affiliated lab, mineral testing is the perfect solution to help navigate these problems. The easy process of hair sample collection, laboratory testing, and consultation with a veterinarian will result in a customized supplement unique to your horse. No guessing required.

Ar abian Horse Times | 9 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 10 | Volume 52, No. 3


As the morning orange sun rises over Scottsdale’s Sonoran Desert, a crystal-clear blue-sky breaks dawn on a new day of happenings on Arabian Park Drive, the heart of Scottsdale’s Arabian horse community. Murray and Shirley Popplewell’s Rae-Dawn Arabians has made some sweeping changes to their story over the past few years, and just when one would think it couldn’t get any better, it does, and new chapters continue to be written encompassing the goodness of a beautiful life entwined with Arabian horses. As so often happens when one share’s their life with Arabian horses—an eye for beauty develops to be more inquisitive, along with a taste and style that not only is sensitive to the eye but creates a love and a passion that develops more personally—emotions transcend the dream into manifestation. Sharing time with Arabian horses for any period of time has a magical way of this most magnificent breed intrinsically weaving themselves in and out of your very being. Suddenly your life has completely changed for the better, to do better, to breed better; and as opportunity presents itself, you also welcome into your life, and your breeding program, some of the very finest of bloodstock. Rae-Dawn Arabians is no exception. “It’s the people, the horses, and the lifestyle that comes along with being involved with Arabian horses,” Murray shares, “and it’s a wonderful way of life for Shirley and I. We enjoy every moment of it.” Both Murray and Shirley are quick to exclaim, almost in unison, that the only thing guaranteed in life is that it is ever changing. And change, does it ever.

continued... AleSIA eNB

(Atticus ENB x Aliyah Vision PCF) Pictured top to bottom: RD MARcIeA Bey (Bey Ambition x RD Marciena), MD MASSIMA (Truest x MD Mirka), GIANA leAh PcF (Polidoro FC x Aliyah Vision PCF)


to the U.S. Nationals one last

RD MARcIeA Bey (Bey Ambition x RD Marciena)

time,” smiles Murray. RD Marciea Bey will show with Mr. Alcides Rodrigues in the Senior Mare class, vying for the title of United States National champion. With an eye always on the lookout for the next “phase” of Rae-Dawn, Giana leah PcF was added to the program in January of 2018. “She was eccentric, and all the pieces just fit,” says Murray. “She came out of her stall, tail over her back, neck arched, and with the most incredible showy attitude. And her face … it was so sculpted, so refined.” Giana leah PcF hails from Sam Peacemaker’s PcF Arabians. She is by Polidoro Fc and out of the illustrious producing Aliyah Vision PcF (PcF Vision x Maria PcF, to DA Valentino/ Afire Bey V/Padrons Psyche/ echo Magnifficoo). “The pedigree doesn’t get much finer,” says Murray, “and she looks exactly as her pedigree says she should which excited us very much.” After joining the Rae-Dawn collection in 2018, Giana leah

“Our exposure to the world-class mare NW Siena Psyche

PcF captured the coveted Junior Filly championship rose garland at Scottsdale a month

catapulted our program many steps forward” says Murray. “We saw

later. That very same year, she went on to be named 2018 U.S. National champion Open

Siena during a presentation in Santa ynez and we were awestruck.”

yearling Filly. “There was a lot on the table at the 2019 U.S. Nationals,” Murray recalls.

NW Siena Psyche is a daughter of Padrons Psyche and out of

“There were some very, very special 2-year-old fillies competing and the pressure was

the Bey Shah daughter NV Shanteuse. The classic blending of

on.” Stress and excitement aside, Giana leah PcF prevailed and was crowned 2019 U.S.

Psyche and Bey Shah+ and a near unbeatable mare in the show

National champion 2-year-Old Filly with Alcides Rodrigues. After a brief hiatus with time

ring culminated in Siena’s dynamite production abilities, gracing

to relax and rejuvenate last year, Giana leah PcF will return to the U.S. Nationals this

the industry with some of the most winningest horses ever. “We

year as a 4-year-old to compete in the Junior Mare division, again with Rodrigues. “It’s for

purchased two embryos from NW Siena Psyche on that visit to

sure not an easy decision to bring back a horse who accomplished so much as a yearling,

california and RD Marciena was one of the resulting fillies,”

especially one of our very best,” says Murray, “but it’s a horse show and we’re here to have

notes Murray. RD Marciena is sired by QR Marc and was the 2010

fun and enjoy.” Nothing like embracing the moment, and the now, with a mare like Giana

Breeders World cup Gold champion yearling Filly in las Vegas,

leah PcF.

2010 U.S. National champion yearling Filly, and 2012 U.S. National champion Futurity Filly. But aside from RD Marciena’s

Despite the depth and consistency of the Rae-Dawn herd, Murray and Shirley Popplewell

tremendous show career and accomplishments, is her ability to

have always been open to the idea of a new addition, should they come across a horse

produce producers, like her dam before her. Bred to Bey Ambition,

that ignites each other’s passion and makes sense for the RD show and breeding program.

RD Marciena produced RD Marciea Bey, a second generation of

likewise, Rae-Dawn’s resident trainer, Alcides Rodrigues, keeps his eyes peeled for

Rae-Dawn breeding and arguably one of the most beautiful mares

opportunities to continue to elevate the farm’s profile on the world stage. As fate would

in the world today. From a blending of Ali Jamaal, Marwan Al

have it, the 2020 Scottsdale Show presented an opportunity and MD Massima came

Shaqab, Padrons Psyche, Bey Shah, *Bask, and *el Shaklan to

into the picture and joined the Rae-Dawn herd. A spectacular daughter of Truest, MD

name but a few, RD Marciea Bey has curated a repertoire high in

Massima descends from the matriarch herself, MD Mirka, a mare blending the program

success: 2016 U.S. and canadian Reserve National champion

of ecuadorian breeder Mr. Manuel Durini. MD Mirka is a daughter of AJ Thee luca

Futurity Filly, 2018 U.S. Reserve National champion Junior Mare,

(Thee Desperado x *heD caramba, by Magnum Psyche) and out of the Padrons Psyche

and this year, masterfully presented by resident trainer Alcides

daughter MD Psylk. Ironically, MD Massima traces to canadian-bred Showgirl SP who

Rodrigues, 2021 Arabian Breeders World cup Silver champion

was bred and born in Ontario; how wonderfully fitting that this mare line comes full

Mare on the Polo Fields in Scottsdale. “We are taking her back Ar abian Horse Times | 12 | Volume 52, No. 3


has inherited a tremendous ancestry of the circle back to canada. “We knew Massima’s

Arabian breed’s greats. “Smooth bodied and extra

mother line was very special, as grandmother

refined, she has a wonderful showy character

*Anastasiaa is also the dam of big-time winning

that is so important in today’s show ring,”

MD hibat Allah,” exclaims Murray. “Adding to

comments Alcides. “She has a unique sparkle

her power-packed pedigree, MD Massima won

when competing at the very highest level; just

the 2020 International Gold championship title

ask Shirley. She showed Nova so beautifully at

at Scottsdale with then trainer Mike Wilson and

Scottsdale and together the pair captured 2021

capped an already momentous year being crowned

Scottsdale Signature yearling Filly championship

2020 U.S. National champion yearling Filly

honors in February.” It was a phenomenal win

with Alcides Rodrigues in a perfect ending to the

amongst a group of the top fillies in the country,

show season.” Alcides couldn’t agree more. “She

in the world for that matter. An elimination

is one of the biggest 2-year-olds I have ever seen

cut which can be grueling for babies under the

and is ultra-feminine and very refined with lots

February desert sky, and some 40+ fillies later,

of curves—we love her!” MD Massima will also

RD Nova JP came out on top. “She won it!”

return to the U.S. Nationals this October to stake

celebrates Murray. While Rae-Dawn Arabians

her claim of the red rose garland as champion Two-year-Old Filly with Rodrigues. Also moving the Rae-Dawn program forward, are two very special fillies welcomed in December of 2020: Alesia eNB and RD Nova JP. And how

GIANA leAh PcF (Polidoro FC x Aliyah Vision PCF)

fitting that both fillies, bay in color, coincidentally have a sparkle so reminiscent of stablemates Giana leah PcF and MD Massima, both purchased near the same age and same time in years past. “Alesia eNB took our breath away when we saw her at Sandro Pinha’s Arabians International,” exclaims Murray. “her attitude was electric—we got goosebumps when she came walking out of the barn. We knew what we were getting ourselves into with Alesia because she shares the same

Alcides Rodrigues, MD Massima & Shirley and Murray Popplewell

mother as our beloved Giana leah PcF.” From Mike Weinstein’s breeding program, Alesia eNB

has won many top honors at Scottsdale,

is sired by Psynergy’s junior stallion Atticus eNB,

including big wins in the Signature Auction

who is a son of *el Nabila B and out of Om el

classes, winning the Signature Futurity Filly

Benedine, by *Sanadik el Shaklan. her dam,

class was a first for the farm and a wonderful

Aliyah Vision PcF, needs little introduction,

accomplishment.

as this mother line is prevalent in Rae-Dawn’s collection and has produced phenomenal show

“Breeding Arabian horses is an art all of

and breeding horses for both the farm and others.

itself,” notes Murray. “you don’t know what

“We’ve come to learn this pedigree is very predictable,” says Murray. And predictable it is. Alesia eNB dazzled the crowd at the Arabian

RD NOVA JP (Ibn Farid x Starry Night JP)

earning the highest movement score of the entire show, propelling Rodrigues to the forefront as the 2021 Arabian Breeders World cup handler of excellence. With fall sights set on Tulsa, Rodrigues and Alesia eNB will show this October in the coveted yearling Sweepstakes Filly class. She has been expertly managed and prepared for by the Rae-Dawn team this year and Nationals will be her second outing and arena she steps into this year.

to uncover pedigrees and horses that fulfill and bring forth qualities and traits that light

Breeders World cup this past April capturing the coveted Silver champion yearling Filly trophy and

you don’t know, and it takes years studying

your soul on fire.” Arabian horses have woven Bred by Jack Perry, the beautiful bay yearling filly RD Nova JP is by the international import *Ibn Farid and out of Starry Night JP, who blends a lovely mother line of some of the industry’s greatest show horses, ever— Magnum Psyche, Padrons Psyche, ynazia hcF, Odyssey Sc (by Versace), and Arn-ett Perlane+. Murray and Shirley didn’t think twice when they first saw Nova at Greg Knowles’ training barn. “She exuded so much quality!” Murray exclaims, “we weren’t leaving there without her!” RD Nova JP is a style all her own who

themselves into the Popplewell’s fabric of life. What started as a small acquisition of a “few” riding horses for a hobby, has morphed into a world-class collection of the finest stallions, mares, and foals housed in facilities that span two countries—the breeding farm in Saskatchewan, canada and the marketing, sales and show center in Scottsdale, Arizona. With sights set on Tulsa, the old adage of “be careful what you wish for” and “the sky’s the limit,” rings very, very true for the Popplewells and Rae-Dawn Arabians. 

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2020 U.S. National Champion Jr. Horse & AWPA AAOTR Maturity | 2019 U.S. National Champion AWPA Futurity & AAOTR Maturity O w n e d b y R i c h a r d & A n d r e a M a r t o g l i o | Tr a i n e d b y J o e R e s e r, S h a m r o c k F a r m s | 5 7 4 . 3 6 0 . 5 6 4 9 | M u l t i - P r o g r a m N o m i n a t e d S i r e Ar abian Horse Times | 19 | Volume 52, No. 3


2x

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse | AATR Select

Ar abian Horse Times | 20 | Volume 52, No. 3


SF Aftershoc x Ginger’s Dance

Ar abian Horse Times | 21 | Volume 52, No. 3


ASA Scandalous Affair x ASA Midnight Lucille

Proudly bred & owned by Dr. James Blevins & Kim Butler South Chesterfield, VA

Ar abian Horse Times | 22 | Volume 52, No. 3



Pyranha Product Timeline A family-owned company in operation for 50 years, Pyranha® is a pioneer in insect control, grooming products, and barn and residential misting systems. In 1972, Pyranha founders Carl and Lon Cunningham developed the SprayMaster®, the first barn misting system for insect control. Today, David and Greg Cunningham continue the family tradition providing horse owners and caretakers across the country with the industry’s leading spray system, along with the highest quality insecticide products available to help protect their animals. Pyranha offers an array of innovative insect control products, from pyrethrin-based formulas to natural, botanical blends. Pyrethrin is expressed from the Chrysanthemum plant. It has the strongest insect- repelling qualities Mother Nature offers. The Chrysanthemum’s powerful, natural elements vary with each new harvest. These variations are vital for controlling resistance changes, due to immunity.

1972

1973

Pyranha was incorporated & SprayMaster System introduced. System patent was held from 1975 through 1990 for misting inventor/ pioneer

1985

Pyrethrin Shampoo Introduced

Insecticide Aerosol Introduced Pyranha fly sprays contain emulsifiers that allow them to remain distribtute within the solution, meaning Pyranha’s products don’t need to be shaken and won’t separate. Insect control products that separate can be less effective, particularly if not adequately shaken before use. Effectiveness is not an issue in Pyranha’s handheld ready-to-use products, and SprayMaster® system concentrates. Pyranha’s products deliver from the first spray to the last. The Pyranha team believes horsemen and women shouldn’t have to pay a premium for highly effective, top-tier quality horse products.

1988

1-10HP & 1-10HPS Introduced

The Insecticide Aerosol was Pyranha’s first ready-to-use product, and introduced in 1973. Since then their 3 other signature ready-to-use sprays have been added. The family of sprays is known as “The Ultimate Protection Collection”

Pyranha refrains from broad statements about repellant longevity due to outside factors that often influence the duration of protection. Pyranha wants the horse owner observing their horses to look for any efficacy or application concerns. Pyranha customer service is available for conversation at any time. All products are registered trademarks of Pyrannha Animal Health.


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Ar abian Horse Times | 25 | Volume 52, No. 3

2022

Pyranha Acquires Adeptus Nutrition

Legacy Introduced, Pyranha acquires Barracuda Bottling to bring production back in-house

Zero Bite, Stock Guard & Odaway Introduced

In 2017, Pyranha established its own bottlling company, Houston-based Barracuda Blending and Bottling, which reduces production costs and increases savings to customers.

2018

Pyranha Celebrates 50 Years of Protecting Animals Nationwide!

West Nile Virus and fly-transmitted Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA), that can threaten a horse’s life. Pyranha partners with various organizations to educate equestrians on the Pyranha Animal Health product line. As part of the Pyranha family we will continue our commitment to the animal, creating only the highest quality products. We thank you for growing with us for 50 years. May we continue to grow in the next half-century. We appreciate you believing in us, and for your loyalty to our products.

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Ar abian Horse Times | 26 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 27 | Volume 52, No. 3


M.M. Epic

Junior Stallions with Ted Carson

Royal T Paris

Junior Mares with Ted Carson

Rasheems Psong BR

Junior Mares with Aiden Cunningham

Agera

Futurity Fillies with Ted Carson

Alexana

Futurity Fillies with Michaiah Carson

Vittoria CFA

Canadian National Futurity Fillies with Ted Carson

Koweta Lemon Drop

Half-Arabian Futurity Fillies with Ted Carson

Zarev

2-Year-Old Colts with Ted Carson

CW Glamour Girl

2-Year-Old Fillies with Ted Carson

Xx Emeresst

2-Year-Old Geldings with Ted Carson

A Little Bit Naughty

Half-Arabian 2-Year-Old Fillies with Ted Carson

Exxalente Al Atlas

Yearling Colts with Ted Carson

Elle Narre

Yearling Geldings AOTH with Keegan Gay Yearling Geldings with Ted Carson

Vladimir BFA

Open Geldings with Ted Carson

Ar abian Horse Times | 28 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ted Carson 910.876.7332 www.TedCarson.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 29 | Volume 52, No. 3


FA El Rasheem x M.M. Esplendida

Junior Stallions with Ted Carson

2021 World Cup Supreme Gold Champion Stallion Bred & owned by Mario Matt

Ar abian Horse Times | 30 | Volume 52, No. 3


Brontes FM x WH Passant

Junior Mares with Ted Carson

2021 Region 12 Champion Mare

Bred & owned by Theresa Lungwitz

Ar abian Horse Times | 31 | Volume 52, No. 3


Exxalt x Adavia CE

Futurity Fillies with Michaiah Carson Owned by Brandi Carson

FA El Rasheem x Psong Of Padron

Junior Mares with Aiden Cunningham 2021 East Coast Championships Reserve Champion Mare Owned by Brandi Carson


Exxalt DA x Elegantra

2-Year-Old Fillies with Ted Carson

Bred & owned by Jeff & Sybil Collins and Brandi Carson

Ar abian Horse Times | 33 | Volume 52, No. 3


Twilight Solstice x Pearl’s Misty Spring

H/A 2-Year-Old Fillies with Ted Carson

2020 Mid Summer National Reserve Champion H/A Yearling Filly 2021 Region 14 Champion H/A Mare Bred & owned by Keegan Gay

Exxalt x Elle Ajmara

Yearling Geldings AAOTR with Keegan Gay Open with Ted Carson

2021 East Coast Championships Champion Colt/Gelding 2021 East Coast Championships Reserve Champion Gelding ATH Owned by Keegan Gay

Ar abian Horse Times | 34 | Volume 52, No. 3


SF Veraz x AR Most Irresistible

Open Geldings with Ted Carson

U.S. National Champion Futurity Gelding 2021 Region 15 Champion Gelding Owned by John, Annette & Salvatore Graffeo

Ar abian Horse Times | 35 | Volume 52, No. 3


2 - Y E A R - O L D

C O L T S

W I T H

T E D

C A R S O N

javan

2021 Region 15 CHAMPION 2-Year-Old Colt

PA Appalonia Dancer

Gazal Al Shaqab Veronica GA Sundance Kid V Acappella V

javan

SF Veraz

SF Veraz

PA Appalonia Dancer

Lisa Gaudio & James Kazanjian

2020 U.S. National Halter Breeder Of The Year

Multi-Program Nominated Sire | SCID, CS & LFG | For 2022 introductory breeding information contact Ted Carson at 910.876.7332 www.KyrieArabians.com




Poco Van Star Two x Candy Girl V | Proudly owned by MD Equine LLC

Ar abian Horse Times | 39 | Volume 52, No. 3





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Ar abian Horse Times | 44 | Volume 52, No. 3


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by BETH ELLEN HUNZIKER

Even when life provides everything needed to achieve your destiny, you must still choose greatness. Siwar Al Shaqab was blessed with ethereal looks and near perfect conformation. She also has the heart and mind of a champion. She meets every challenge with a bold self-confidence that declares, “This is my destiny, I was born for this!” Siwar Al Shaqab has claimed her place among the generations of champions bred and owned by Al Shaqab–Member of the Qatar Foundation whose breeding program has profoundly influenced show rings and other breeding programs around the world. Siwar’s rise to stardom began early and the trajectory was straight to the heavens. Siwar Al Shaqab began the 2021 European show season at the prestigious Mediterranean and Arab Countries Arabian Horse Championship in Menton, France. Presented by Raphael Curti, Siwar earned the coveted titles of Champion Three-Year-Old Mare, Best Arabian Type/Junior Mare, and Best Head among the Three-Year-Old Fillies. Then, on Championship Sunday, Siwar’s perfect performance earned her the ultimate title of Gold Champion Junior Mare, bringing honor and distinction to her team and the Al Shaqab breeding program. Khalid Al Jehani, Manager of the Al Shaqab Breeding and Show Department, said: “I am delighted with our achievements in Menton. This was an important win, at an important show, at an important time. Siwar Al Shaqab captivated everyone with her beauty and performance, and she delivered a simply outstanding display.” Siwar Al Shaqab’s win in Menton was both prestigious and pivotal as she is poised to compete for the highest honor of all at the upcoming Arabian Horse World Championships in Paris, France with Raphael Curti at the lead. Siwar Al Shaqab’s show ring success was altogether predictable. Al Shaqab is unquestionably the most successful and influential breeding program in the world, producing National, International, and World Champions year after year. Siwar’s sire, SMA Magic One (Psytadel x Majidah Bint Pacha), is a proven sire of World Champions. Her dam is the show ring superstar and champion-producer Abha Myra (Marwan Al Shaqab x ZT Ludjkalba) who comes from Marieta Salas’s world-renowned breeding program of Ses Planes. All eyes will be on Siwar Al Shaqab as she enters the Paris arena and yet her future holds so much more in store. Her manager, Khalid Al Jehani, will be cheering her on to victory, (Inshallah!) but his mind will be focused on even greater achievements – her possible contributions to Al Shaqab’s breeding program. Today, Siwar is a valuable show horse, but soon she will prove her worth as a producer of champions. Once again, she will be given every opportunity to fulfill her destiny and achieve greatness. After her presentation in Paris, Siwar Al Shaqab will be bred to Rhan Al Shahania (Marwan Al Shaqab x Jwaaher Al Shahania), a stallion whose titles include the Gold World Champion Yearling Colt, Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Champion, and United States National Champion. With such powerful pedigrees and physical excellence, there are great expectations for this mating. The goal for these champions is to produce a new generation of champions for Al Shaqab and the Arabian horse breed. Khalid Al Jehani has deep faith in Siwar Al Shaqab and her abilities, “I believe it is her destiny, she was born for greatness!”

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www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE WITH SHAN WILSON ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-49 ABS ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT WITH JENNIFER HAGALE

SF Specs Shocwave x A Party Girl, by AA Apollo Bey Mid Summer National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Open & AATR www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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HALF-ARABIAN PARK HORSE AAOTR MOUNTED NATIVE COSTUME AAOTR WITH JENNIFER HAGALE HALF-ARABIAN MOUNTED NATIVE COSTUME WITH CARISSA HAIGH

Mamage x The Vintage Rose Multi-National Champion www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE WITH CHRIS WILSON HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY WITH JAMIE HAGALE

Undulata’s Nutcracker x Ames Deja Vu Mid Summer National Reserve Champion & NSH Finals Champion www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH SHAN WILSON

Black Daniels x Templeton Rye NSH Finals Champion www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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ARABIAN PARK HORSE AAOTR ABS ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT WITH JAMIE HAGALE

Vegaz x CSP Gisele | Mid Summer Reserve National Champion www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 58 | Volume 52, No. 3


ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE WITH CHRIS WILSON ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR ABS ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR JACKPOT WITH JAMIE HAGALE

Afires Heir x Felicia Afire U.S. National Champion Mid Summer Reserve National Champion

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Mid Summer National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Jr. Horse

AEPA HALF-ARABIAN SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY WITH SHAN WILSON

HA Toskcan Sun x Laurel Hill Pennies from Heaven www.HagaleFamilyArabians.com

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Contenders

A True Temptation Enrico Ethereall Fire Everybodys Talken Heir Force One Pretti Woman Princess of Baske Reba McEnfire Snap Chat VH

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Strawberry banks farm

ENRICO A Temptation x EA Candy Girl Bred & Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm 2-time U.S. National Champion Arabian Mounted Native Costume in Open and AAOTR with Lance Lewis and Lissa Tehan ARABIAN NATIVE COSTUME with LANCE LEWIS & LISSA TEHAN Ar abian Horse Times | 63 | Volume 52, No. 3


United States Nationals Ar abian Horse Times | 64 | Volume 52, No. 3


EVERYBODYS TALKEN Everybodys Talken Baske Afire x Emayzing Grace by Hey Hallelujah OHIO BUCKEYE CHAMPION ENGLISH PLEASURE

Home bred, home grown, home trained and home shown, ‘Talken’ is everything we hoped he’d be with the blood of some of our most treasured horses pumping through his veins. He is sired by Baske Afire and is out of Emayzing Grace. Emayzing Grace is by multi National Champion, Hey Hallelujah and out of our beloved double National Champion, Ericca.

AEPA English Performance Futurity with Brian Murch

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HEIR FORCE ONE Afires Heir x EA Leathernlace+/ Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm ARABIAN SHOW HACK AAOTR with SAWYER TEHAN

PRINCESS OF BASKE Baske Afire x Berry Fancee Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm ARABIAN CTRY PL DRIVING OPEN and AOTD with BRIAN MURCH and SAWYER TEHAN


Reba McEnfire REBA MCENFIRE Undulata’s Nutcracker x Remember Romance | Bred & Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm HALF ARABIAN HUNTER FUTURITY with LANCE LEWIS

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SNAP CHAT VH SF Aftershoc x Undulata’s Chick Chat Owned by Lissa Tehan HALF ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH with BRIAN MURCH

A TRUE TEMPTATION A Temptation x A Blessing Bred & Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PL AAOTR MATURITY with LISSA TEHAN

PRETTI WOMAN A Temptation x Princess of Baske Bred & Owned by Strawberry Banks Farm ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY with SAWYER TEHAN


Ethereall Fire

ETHEREALL FIRE Afire Bey V x Ritida Owned by Lissa Tehan

Design by Riyan

HALF ARABIAN SHOW HACK OPEN & AAOTR with LANCE LEWIS & SAWYER TEHAN

StrawberryBanksFarm.com

East Aurora, New York | info@strawberrybanksfarm.com | Barbara Chur - Owner Brian Murch - Trainer 716.983.3099 | Lance Lewis - Assistant Trainer 716.652.9346

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U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE JR. HORSE with Randy Sullivan

PA Phoenix Kid x RA April Rose

Black Homozygous Stallion

Proudly owned by Donna and Nic Lubben www.RandySullivan.com | 217.801.0793 | info@randysullivan.com Ar abian Horse Times | 70 | Volume 52, No. 3







SWEET TALKING GUY CA

Hunter Pleasure Futurity with Jen Schmitt

P.C.

P.C.

COOL RIVER KID

Hunter Pleasure with Jen Schmitt Performance Stallion Halter with Lori Conway

WINDSONG CA

Western and Hunter Pleasure Jr. Horse with owner, Jen Schmitt

P.C.

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KHALIFORNIA KHROME J

Western Pleasure AAOTR 60 & Over and Western Pleasure AAOTR Jackpot with Lori Conway

I WANNA BE FAMOUZ

H/A Western Pleasure Jr. Horse with Jen Schmitt H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Lori Conway

AFIRES REJOICE

Country English Pleasure AAOTR 60 & Over and AAOTR Jackpot with Lori Conway Ladies Side Saddle English with Anna Conway Trained by Bridlewood

ONZIA FMA

Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 19-39 and Jackpot with Rachel Conway Schieffelbein Ladies Side Saddle English with Jen Schmitt

KHA CHING CA

AWPA Western Pleasure Futurity with Jen Schmitt

P.C.

Trainer Jen Schmitt

Lori & Peter Conway, Chatfield, MN | ConwayArabians.com | 507.202.4440 Ar abian Horse Times | 77 | Volume 52, No. 3









U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE JR. HORSE WITH MATT SIEMON ROL Divine Style+ x Notability (MHR Nobility x Baychelsea V) 2021 Mid Summer National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Jr. Horse Trained & Represented by Siemon Stables, Chuck & Matt Siemon New Carlisle, Ohio | (937) 849-1487

Proudly owned by 401K Arabians, Joni Hyrick | (716) 867-5277 and Jerland Farms, Lawrence Jerome | (715) 205-0357

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2010 Chestnut Mare MHR Nobility x Baychelsea V, by Huckleberry Bey++ Multiple Regional Championships and Reserves in Ranch Riding and Working Western Proudly bred & owned by 401K Arabians, Joni Hyrick | (716) 867-5277

AVA I L A B L E FOR PURCHASE

Contact Jim Hitt, Trainer (303) 917-4119 Gambel Oaks Equestrian | Elizabeth, CO

INTRODUCING HER TO THE 2021 U.S. NATIONAL ARENA IN ARABIAN RANCH RIDING OPEN/ATR ARABIAN TRAIL ENGLISH & WESTERN Ar abian Horse Times | 86 | Volume 52, No. 3


Baske Afire x Evalina V, by Huckleberry Bey++ | 2011 Bay Gelding 2019 U.S. National Top Ten Arabian Country Pleasure Driving 2021 Mid Summer National Top Ten Country, Native Costume & English Side Saddle Multi-Regional Champion & Reserve

AVA I L A B L E F O R P U R C H A S E For information contact Siemon Stables (937) 849-1487 Proudly bred & owned by 401K Arabians, Joni Hyrick

SEE HIM AT THE 2021 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING AND ARABIAN NATIVE COSTUME ARABIAN LADIES SIDE SADDLE ENGLISH Ar abian Horse Times | 87 | Volume 52, No. 3




Half-Arabian Side Saddle • Costume

Owned by Luciana Hernandez Christy Higman-Clements Training • Ocala, FL • 305.606.0645 • www.chctrainingocala.com design by Brandy Phillips

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Nuttin

The Beloved

Double or by MARY KIRKMAN

The key, John Rannenberg says, was trust. He had to trust you—but when he did, he became not only your truest friend, but one of the finest show horses you’d ever been on. And he would take you on a journey that would change your life. “He” was multi-U.S. and NSHR national champion Double Or Nuttin, known to his friends as William. He represented owner Linda Musso’s first foray into breeding horses, at Rannenberg’s suggestion. “He was our journey together,” John says. “Linda and I were friends before; he took us on a journey that made us best friends.” William was born on April 13, 2012, but he was already a story by then. For one thing, he was not easily achieved. It took them two years, and finally, the services of renowned Saddlebred horsewoman Joan Lurie to get an embryo from Linda’s retired show mare, the Hucklebey Berry daughter Ingennue. Their choice of Saddlebred sire Undulata’s Nutcracker came from their annual trips to the World’s Championships, where they watched Nutcracker babies collect titles like some horses gobble up peppermints. When William arrived, Linda feared that his wide chrome blaze would detract from his obvious quality, but John shook his head. “One day,” he promised her, “he’ll wear that bridle and you won’t even see that big white face.” They named him Double Or Nuttin (for Nutcracker, but also for Linda’s husband Vince, a professional poker player). Around the barn, though, the young chestnut was christened “William,” after a handsome actor on Dancing With The Stars, then a must-see for John and Linda. When their William grew up, John would describe him as “sensitive,” “complicated,” and “complex.” He possessed the upright, elegant silhouette of a show horse, but early on, he didn’t trot much; he liked to gallop more. And while he learned to wear a bridle almost instantly, he spent weeks bucking at the idea of carrying a rider. “As much as we loved him, he could be a screwball,” Rannenberg admits, but overall, their soon-to-be star was special from the day he hit the ground. “When you know in your heart— in your gut—that you’re around someone who’s great, he stands apart from the others.” With more experience, John identified William’s issues. “He had to understand what he was doing and he looked to us for guidance.” That’s where the trust came in, on both sides. William was so highly sensitized that he could react badly when his trainer so much as wiped his sweaty hands on his pants. The youngster was looking for direction, for reassurance. “If he had to be alone, he could get nervous,” John recalls, “but as long as you were there and he felt your trust, he was fine. I talked to him when I was on his back and it somehow bound us together.”


When everything fell into place, the colt took to his profession. “Some horses aren’t crazy about going to work,” John grins, “but William was ‘me, me, me! Let’s do it!’” Double Or Nuttin left for his first show, the 2015 NSHR Finals, when he was 3; he’d never been off the farm, never been on a trailer, never been on a showground, and was new to the canter. Even his caretaker, J.B. Singleton, was apprehensive. “It’s going to go one way or another,” John told J.B. “They either gravitate toward you for support or they go totally the opposite way and all hell breaks loose.” William gravitated, and nailed the championship in the Country English Pleasure Futurity. He had never practiced with ribbons until he won the mile-long tri-color at the Finals, but he put his faith in John and the flying streamers never fazed him. A month later, at the U.S. Nationals, the brand-new garland of roses was just fine too. For the rest of his life, he almost never lost a class when showing with John. “He was the kind of horse that goes into the ring, doubles down and does what he has to,” John observes. “And you know how long those Half-Arabian classes can be! He had so much stamina and heart and true grit, he could stay strong through them.” The championship titles kept coming—regionals, NSHR Finals, U.S. Nationals (Futurity, Junior Horse, Open, champion, champion, grand champion).

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And over time, William developed such a rapport with Linda that despite his earlier rodeo antics, she was never afraid to get on him. In 2018, she joined in the fun, logging a national reserve championship with him and following up with top tens. Really, for her, the titles weren’t the point; battling MS, her strength came from the desire to ride her horse. And from her relationship with him. Their friendship, in the show ring and out, became a story in itself. When she rode, they were a picture. “He took such good care of her,” John says. “There were times that she’d drop a stirrup and he’d just stop and wait for her to pick it up.” That said, William was no snap to ride; he was strong, with a big engine, so it was impressive that Linda and John were able to share him at the same shows. As adeptly as a grand prix driver, he shifted gears between open and amateur, wide open and dazzling with John, smooth and complementary with Linda. As there was a bond of trust and respect with John, so there was with Linda too. It was as if William said to them both, “We’re in this together.” Around the barn, meanwhile, he remained his same goofy self. “He talked to me,” Linda smiles. And they played. There was the time in the crossties when he suddenly regarded the brush as if it were an alien being. “William!” she exclaimed, laughing, “We’ve been doing this for eight years! It’s a brush, you silly goose!” She adds, “He wasn’t really the big, brave show horse. It was more that in the ring, he was a man. Around the barn, he was a little boy.” Because they were such a team, it might be surprising that last spring, Linda sold William, and he left in May. It was difficult, but even with all their titles together, she felt that he had more to offer—that he deserved an opportunity in a new division with a younger rider. After that, he could come home, she thought. He could play all he wanted, live out his days with them, close and loved. It didn’t happen. In June, word came that William—multi-national champion Double Or Nuttin— had colicked and could not be saved. “Every horse has a personality,” John reflects, “but then there’s one that you just have that connection with—they can read you and you can read them. Every time I called on him, he would give me his heart. Linda and I thought we were breeding a show horse … The truth is, we got a family.” ■

HIS FAN CLUB Thank you to the invaluable professionals who cared for William during his life with us: Euchee Matthews, farrier Lisa Casinella, D.V.M. J.B. Singleton, caretaker

We all lost a treasured friend.

J

Rannenberg ohn P.

s

h

o

w

h

o

r

s

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s

John P. Rannenberg | 352.266.6446 jprannenberg@aol.com | Ocala, FL

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stacowsi arm us nationas 2021

JMF CHEAP

THRILL PB HUNTER PLEASURE A AOTR

, M AT U R I T Y + A AT R S E L E C T

Odyssey SC x Challbe JMF | Owned by Ashton Stachowski | Bred by Margaret A Friesz

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no meowing. it’s time to roar.

USN/2021

LOWE SHOW HORSE CENTRE

JIM LOWE / SOMIS / CALIFORNIA

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MALACHI KW 2021 MIDSUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION PUREBRED COUNTRY PLEASURE WITH JIM LOWE

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OWNED BY SARA GLASER / PARADISE VALLEY / ARIZONA Ar abian Horse Times | 145 | Volume 52, No. 3


HUCKS

FINN

2021 MIDSUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION PUREBRED PARK AAOTR WITH SARAH JAYNE JOHNSON PUREBRED ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR WITH LESLEY WRIGHT JOHNSON OWNED BY WHITE ROSE ARABIANS / LEBANON / GEORGIA

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LONDON

CALLING

2021 REGION 1 AND REGION 8 CHAMPION HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE WITH JIM LOWE HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY WITH BETH JUPP OWNED BY BETH AND PETER JUPP / RANCHO SANTA FE / CALIFORNIA

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Multi-National Champion EC +//

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Jackpot and AAOTR 19-39 with Maggie McCarthy A Noble Cause x EC Brass Motion Proudly owned by Debra & Maggie McCarthy KA

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity with Wendy Potts Noble Honor x Diamond Lil Proudly owned by Gayle Everitt

SHF

National Top Ten

Half-Arabian AHPA Hunter Pleasure Futurity with Wendy Potts Callaway’s Northern Kiss x CWF Rubie Joule Proudly owned by True North Farm, Dan Weeks & Chris Audet Ar abian Horse Times | 148 | Volume 52, No. 3


Reserve National Champion WC

Hunter Pleasure Jr. Horse with Wendy Potts Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Maturity, AAOTR 40-59 & Performance Halter Geldings AAOTH with Jayme Martino LC Athens x WC Marissa Proudly owned by Julie Beckham, Jayme Martino & Family

Reserve National Champion BF

Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Jackpot and AATR Select with Ralph Manning Nobilistic BF x Callaway’s Prize Possession Proudly owned by Whistlejacket Trust Ar abian Horse Times | 149 | Volume 52, No. 3


Multi-National Champion OH +/

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Jackpot and AAOTR 19-39 with Melissa N. Subjeck

National Champion VA

Pryme Thyme x ZZ Supreme Proudly owned by Melissa N. Subjeck

Hunter Pleasure with Wendy Potts VA Chips Afire x Wisdom Sundance V Proudly owned by Whistlejacket Trust

Multi-National Champion PA

+++//

Hunter Pleasure Jackpot and AAOTR 40-59 with Carole Ann Van Dyke Always A Jullyen V x BP Meditation Bey Proudly owned by Carole Ann Van Dyke & Alex Morgan

Ar abian Horse Times | 150 | Volume 52, No. 3


Reserve National Champion SRW

Hunter Pleasure AHPA Futurity with Wendy Potts AAOTR Maturity with Jill Contreras KM Bugatti x SRW Goddess Of Gazal Proudly owned by Jill Contreras

KF

Hunter Pleasure Open Jackpot, AAOTR 40-59 and AATR Select with Kelly LaPar KM Bugatti x KF Kali Proudly owned by Kelly LaPar

Multi-National Champion

+++//

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 60 & Over with Cheryl Nelson AAOTR 19-39 with Ashley Carriage ABS AAOTR Jackpot Baske Afire x Haute Chocolate Proudly owned by Cheryl Nelson

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Royal Nobility+ VJ Royal Heir | Joleen WB by MHR Nobility 2019 & 2021 Buckeye Champion English Pleasure 2019 Region 14 Champion English Pl Jr Horse 2020 Region 14 Champion Pleasure Driving 2020 U.S. Reserve National Champion Pl Driving Owned by Betsy Kubiak of Sugar Hill Farm Trainer Mitch Sperte | SugarHillArabians.com

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Photo by Ferrara | Art by Riyan Ar abian Horse Times | 167 | Volume 52, No. 3


2021 United States National Contenders bred and marketed by Sugar Hill Farm SHF Red Hot Stilettos Black Daniels | Style Is My Game by Undulata’s Nutcracker Presented by Mitch Sperte in Half Arabian English Pleasure and Pleasure Driving for owner, Ava Lehman

SHF Rolls Royce Callaway’s Northern Kiss | CWF Rubie Joule by Allience+// Presented by Wendy Griffith in the AHPA Half Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity for owner, Daniel Weeks

SHF Managed Assets Nutcracker’s Nirvana | Misstafirebey by Afire Bey V Owned and shown in Half Arabian Country English Pleasure by Jamie Stelzer-Fisher

Dante Afire +// Afire Bey V | DA Desireeble by Triften+/ Owned and shown in Arabian Native Costume and Country Pl Driving AAOTD by Emily Holden

SHF Sabrina Fairchild SF Aftershoc+ | Bewitched By Moonlight by Charmed and Bewitched Presented by Dalton Budd in HA Country English Pleasure Futurity for new owners, Rachel and Callihan Barnhart

SHF Matildabey The Renaissance | Mistafirebey by Afire Bey V Presented by Dalton Budd in Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity for new owners, Iain Morrison and Jaime Stelzer-Fisher Ar abian Horse Times | 168 | Volume 52, No. 3


ign Des

iyan

by R

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lF Hil

om ns.c a i ab lAr l i H gar u S | ork Y ew ,N r o t Vic


Khadraj NA+++/ x Aphrodite FA, by Fame VF Owned by the Pitassi Family Standing at Becker Stables 530.477.5588 13227 Elster Place, Grass Valley, CA 95949 info@beckerstables.com Multi-Program Nominated Sire SCID & CA Clear


Kharismatic PGA+// x Ladys Dance+// Owners Dr. Marta Wasiak & Dr. Babu Rankupalli

Kharismatic PGA+// x Sheza Loded Lady+// Owners Jamie & Sally Leonardini

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Congratulations to the Leonardini Family on the accomplishments of this historic dam line totalling 46 National Championships in Half-Arabian Western Pleasure!

2021 MID SUMMER CHAMPION H/A OPEN 2021 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION H/A OPEN 2020 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A ABS AAOTR JACKPOT 2018 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A JUNIOR HORSE

Sired by Kharismatic PGA+// Out of Sheza Loded Lady+// Out of Aura Spring+/

Brett & Marji Becker | 13227 Elster Place, Grass Valley, CA 95949 | www.BeckerStables.com | 530.477.5588 | info@beckerstables.com Ar abian Horse Times | 172 | Volume 52, No. 3


WESTERN PLEASUURE JR. HORSE WITH BRETT BECKER Sundance Kid V x Kheanne+// | Sweepstakes Nominated Sire | AWPA Enrolled Sire | Scottsdale Signature Stallion | Proudly owned by Steve & Karen Freeman

Brett & Marji Becker | 13227 Elster Place, Grass Valley, CA 95949 | www.BeckerStables.com | 530.477.5588 | info@beckerstables.com Ar abian Horse Times | 173 | Volume 52, No. 3


established 1984 Mike Miller, Manager/Trainer Bob Phillips, Trainer Lyric Phillips, Instructor Stockton, New Jersey | 908.500.2634

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MULTI-NATIONAL CHAMPION

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & Over with Carol Skeuse-Hart

Bred & owned by Springwater Farms Vegaz x Mona Ar abian Horse Times | 175 | Volume 52, No. 3


NATIONAL TOP TEN

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE

AAOTR 60 & Over with Nancy Maximuck

Owned by Nancy Maximuck Afire Bey V x Singularcylection Ar abian Horse Times | 176 | Volume 52, No. 3


NATIONAL TOP TEN

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & Over with Nancy Maximuck

Owned by Nancy Maximuck Afire Bey V x Sweet ‘N Nutty

Ar abian Horse Times | 177 | Volume 52, No. 3


NATIONAL TOP TEN

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE

AAOTR 60 & Over with Carol Skeuse-Hart

Owned by Springwater Farms VCP Magnifire x GSF Ambienze Ar abian Horse Times | 178 | Volume 52, No. 3


NATIONAL TOP TEN

WESTERN PLEASURE

AAOTR 60 & Over with Elaine Finney

Owned by Elaine Finney Khadraj NA x Gai Alicia Ar abian Horse Times | 179 | Volume 52, No. 3


MULTI-NATIONAL CHAMPION

WESTERN PLEASURE

AAOTR 60 & Over with Nancy Maximuck

Owned by Nancy Maximuck Khadraj NA x TN Katiki Ar abian Horse Times | 180 | Volume 52, No. 3


RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION

HALF-ARABIAN WESTERN PLEASURE

AAOTR 60 & Over and ABS Western Pleasure Jackpot with Nancy Maximuck

Owned by Nancy Maximuck C A Hermoso x Cyventh Heaven Ar abian Horse Times | 181 | Volume 52, No. 3


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

ENGLISH PLEASURE

Junior Horse with Mike Miller | AAOTR Maturity with Carol Skeuse-Hart

Owned by Springwater Farms Black Daniels x Psolitare Affire Ar abian Horse Times | 182 | Volume 52, No. 3


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE Junior Horse with Mike Miller

Owned by Elaine Finney Baske Afire x Undulata’s Queen for a Day Ar abian Horse Times | 183 | Volume 52, No. 3


FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE

Junior Horse with Bob Phillips | AAOTR Maturity with Carol Skeuse-Hart

Owned by Springwater Farms HA Toskcan Sun x GSF Synchronize Ar abian Horse Times | 184 | Volume 52, No. 3


BLACK DIAMONDS EF

BETTER THAN LOVE

2016 PB Mare Black Daniels x Psolitare Affire by Afire Bey V

2016 H/A Mare Baske Afire x Undulata’s Queen for a Day by Undulata’s Nutcracker

This 5-year-old is out of a National Champion Afire Bey V daughter, sired by the exciting English pleasure stallion, Black Daniels. All sorts of ability in this one; black with four white feet and lots of type! She’s a head turner.

Upright and marchy, this bright, young horse will excel in the country pleasure divisions and be a possible equitation mount. See her in Tulsa in H/A CEP Jr. Horse.

GSF SIREN SONG

KHRISTIAN MAC

2016 PB Mare HA Toskcan Sun x GSF Synchronize, by Apollopalooza

2017 PB Stallion Justin Mac V x JMA Khareena, by Khadraj NA

With great expression in the bridle, this is a balanced, marchy mare who trots off all corners. Just starting her show career, she was champion at East Coast Championships this year. She will be a great horse for the showman or breeder.

This youngster is a product of western pleasure royalty generations deep. He earned Top Five honors his first year out at the East Coast Championships in Western Pleasure Jr. Horse. Quiet, soft and fancy.

FLASHPOINT EF

RIZING PASSION EF

2016 PB Gelding GSF Rizing Son x Afires Quintina Out of an Afire Bey V/ Barbary English pleasure National champion, talent goes way back in this pedigree! He is sired by the Apollopalooza son, Multi-National Champion GSF Rizing Son and will give anyone the added advantage in the show ring. He’s fancy!

2015 PB Mare GSF Rizing Son x Afires Quintina, by Afire Bey V This 6-year-old was 2019 East Coast Top Five CEP Jr. Horse her first show out. She will make a beautiful amateur mount, but has the quality for the open division as well.

Contact trainers Mike Miller, 908.500.2634 | Bob Phillips, 973.214.7664 or come by out stalls at the in-gate aisle of the Ford Truck Arena.


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S H O W

H O R S E S

U . S .

N A T I O N A L

C O N T E N D E R

PSAXY AND I KNOWIT

K R O H N


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American Horse Publications Announces Their 2021 Equine Media Award Winners! General Excellence Self-Supported Publication

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D E D I C A T I O N

JOEL KIESNER ASHTON KIESNER

T O

E X C E L L E N C E

WYATT BUDD RUBY HINTZ

www.KiesnerTraining.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 279 | Volume 52, No. 3


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2021 Filly (KW Micah x Bonita Afire) Owned by Franklin Farm LLC

Mamage x KW Sapphire, by Baske Afire

ENGLISH PLEASURE with Joel Kiesner 2020 U.S. National Unanimous Champion English Pleasure Jr. Horse

2021 H/A Filly (KW Micah x Coconut Cream Pie) Bred and owned by Joel & Ashton Kiesner 2021 H/A Colt (KW Micah x A Pleasant Surprize) Bred and owned by Hagale Family Arabians Multi-Program Nominated Sire For breeding information contact Ashton Kiesner 865-556-0412 Proudly owned by Franklin Farm, LLC

Ar abian Horse Times | 281 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 282 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afire Bey V x IXL Miss Firefly

ENGLISH PLEASURE with Ashton Kiesner ARABIAN PARK with Joel Kiesner

Multi-Program Nominated Sire For breeding information contact Ashton Kiesner 865-556-0412 Proudly owned by DELSAN Arabian LLC www.ROLDIVINESTYLE.com

Multi-National Res-Champion Ames Divine (ROL Divine Style+ x Julietta Ames)

Ar abian Horse Times | 283 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 284 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afires Heir x Ritida

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR Maturity with Alexa Cohn | Jr. Horse with Joel Kiesner

Proudly owned by I Ask LLC Ar abian Horse Times | 285 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afire Bey V x Styling Time

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE Jackpot and AAOTR 50 & Over with Dr. Joe Kinnarney | Open with Joel Kiesner

Proudly owned by Dr. Joe Kinnarney & Bradley Marlow | www.Reidsvillevet.com Ar abian Horse Times | 286 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afires Heir x The Way She Moves+/

PARK AND ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 50 & Over with Dr. Joe Kinnarney

Proudly owned by Dr. Joe Kinnarney & Bradley Marlow | www.Reidsvillevet.com Ar abian Horse Times | 287 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afires Heir x SA Adriana

AEPA SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY with Joel Kiesner

Proudly owned by Dr. Joe Kinnarney & Bradley Marlow | www.Reidsvillevet.com Ar abian Horse Times | 288 | Volume 52, No. 3


Prosuasion x Heirs Noble Love

ENGLISH PLEASURE Futurity with Joel Kiesner

Proudly owned by Karlton & Mary Anne Jackson Ar abian Horse Times | 289 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afires Heir x Coconut Cream Pie

HALF-ARABAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE Jr. Horse with Joel Kiesner

Proudly owned by Chris Gillham Ar abian Horse Times | 290 | Volume 52, No. 3


Undulata’s Nutcracker x Adoniis Amber Rose

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE Jackpot and AAOTR 19-39 with Jennifer Bate Richy

Proudly owned by Jennifer Bate Richy Ar abian Horse Times | 291 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afires Heir x VTM Pistachia

ENGLISH PLEASURE Futurity with Wyatt Budd Proudly owned by Joel & Ashton Kiesner

ROL Divine Style x Best Of My Love

COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE Futurity with Wyatt Budd Proudly owned by Sarah Matthews & Wyatt Budd

Ar abian Horse Times | 292 | Volume 52, No. 3


ROL Divine Style x Matterial Girl

HUNTER PLEASURE with Ashton Kiesner

Proudly owned by DELSAN Arabians, LLC | www.ROLDivineStyle.com Ar abian Horse Times | 293 | Volume 52, No. 3


CF Dressed In Style

Del Fuego CAA

2015 Purebred Mare ROL Divine Style x Dress To Impress

2014 Purebred Gelding Heritage Bey King x Grace Of Heir PCP

This mare has Afire Bey V, MHR Nobility, Zodiac Matador and Apollopalooza in her pedigree! She is a who’s who in Arabian breeding and a big time winner in the show ring! Don’t miss this high quality mare!

Multi Regional champion and National Top Ten. Perfect country and equitation horse for anyone who wants to win. He has a great attitude and beautiful carriage and style.

The English Heiress

Supreme Glamor CRF

2016 Purebred Mare Afires Heir x VTM Pistachia, by MHR Nobility

2014 Half-Arabian Mare Noble Supreme CRF x Glamorize

This tall, beautiful mare, has all the motion for English and perfect manners to win in the country classes. She is a full sister to National Champion Open English JK Heiristocracy. 2021 Region 12 & 15 Champion Country Jr. Horse. She is well suited for any level rider.

Lannister 2018 Purebred Gelding Saxton DGL x SA Adriana This young, exciting 3-year-old is tall and super stylish. He’s got incredible motion, wearing just a plate, and a beautiful pluming tail. By National Champion Saxton DGL and out of the great mare Adriana, by H Mobility H and out of the regal Rumina Afire.

Sweepstakes Nominated MultiNational Top Ten, Mid Summer National Champion, National Show Horse Finals Champion H/A Open and ATR English. A beautiful and fun English mare ... just what everyone wants! Could be a great Equitation mount as well.

CF Judy Jetson 2015 Half-Arabian Mare Baske Afire x She’s A Mystery Fun English mare, full sister to CP Jimmy Neutron! Multi regional champion and national Top Ten winner in the amateur English division. She’s always in the top of her class in the very competitive H/A English AOTR division.

Noble Fascination

Captive Heir CRF

2014 Purebred Gelding IXL Noble Express x Foxy Afire, by Afire Bey V

2016 Half-Arabian Gelding Afires Heir x Captivating Style

Sweepstakes Nominated. Fun and exciting English and Park horse. In just his first year of showing, he was impressive and consistent in the show ring, winning from Scottsdale to Region 13. High quality young horse.

Sweepstakes Nominated. This young horse is just getting started. He has perfect motion and manners for country and keeps getting better. Bred to the max!

For sale information, come by our stalls during the show or call Ashton Kiesner at 865-556-0412 | www.Kiesnertraining.com


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Greg Harris Danielle Stock Zane Bucher 12201 308th Avenue NE, Duvall, WA 98019 | HarrisShowHorses.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 296 | Volume 52, No. 3


Sundance Kid V x Verset Proudly owned by Franklin Farm LLC

2016 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION AWPA $100,000 WESTERN PLEASURE FUTURITY 2017 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Ar abian Horse Times | 297 | Volume 52, No. 3


12X NATIONAL CHAMPION 3X RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION

C Our Zeus x DR Fonda Color

2020 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN 2019 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN 2015 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN 2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN

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LEADING HALF-ARABIAN NATIONAL WESTERN PLEASURE WINNER 2 YEARS IN A ROW!

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2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AATR ELITE 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AATR ELITE

12X NATIONAL CHAMPION 3X RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION 2020 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE ABS AAOTR JACKPOT 2020 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & OVER 2019 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2019 CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AATR ELITE 2019 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER 2015 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER 2013 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION H/A WESTERN PLEASURE AATR SELECT

Ar abian Horse Times | 301 | Volume 52, No. 3


Jullyen El Jamaal x Khantina Girl V

2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AATR ELITE 2021 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2020 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN 2020 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & OVER 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER

Multi-Program Nominated Sire | SCID & CA Clear For breeding information contact Greg Harris: 805-245-5755 HarrisShowHorses.com Proudly owned by Franklin Farm LLC

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GSF Rizing Son x Callaway’s In The Money 2020 U.S. NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & Over with Diane Franklin 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & Over with Diane Franklin

Pogrom x Rohara Mademoiselle 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE Junior Horse with Zane Bucher Proudly owned by Franklin Farm LLC

Ar abian Horse Times | 304 | Volume 52, No. 3


Khadraj NA x RA Kela

Proudly owned by Diane Athey

Ar abian Horse Times | 305 | Volume 52, No. 3


Hermez E x Hologram

2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION HUNTER PLEASURE with Stephanie Sage Walker RESERVE CHAMPION HUNTER PLEASURE AATR Choice with Leigh Jasper CHAMPION HUNTER PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & Over with Leigh Jasper

2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION HUNTER PLEASURE AATR Choice RESERVE CHAMPION HUNTER PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & Over with Leigh Jasper

Ar abian Horse Times | 306 | Volume 52, No. 3


Afire Bey V x OF Dancin Daze 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR 2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER 2019 U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT with Leigh Jasper Proudly owned by Leigh Jasper

Ar abian Horse Times | 307 | Volume 52, No. 3


ferrara photo

2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL TOP TEN H/A PARK with Dani Stock

2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL TOP TEN H/A PARK AAOTR with Leigh Jasper SF Aftershoc x Halstead’s Polka Dot Proudly owned by Leigh & Dawn Jasper

2020 MID SUMMER NATIONAL TOP TEN H/A MOUNTED NATIVE COSTUME AAOTR with Leigh Jasper Ar abian Horse Times | 308 | Volume 52, No. 3


Khaja J x Keepsayke 2021 MID SUMMER NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE AATR Choice with Leigh Jasper Proudly owned by Leigh & Dawn Jasper

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0 . 2 | $2 2.5 NO E 52 , UM VO L

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Ryan & Elise Strand Bucyrus, Kansas | 816.651.7424 | libertymeadowstc@gmail.com www.liberty-meadows.com

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SF Aftershoc+ x Phun Night

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned by Charity Davis

Ar abian Horse Times | 312 | Volume 52, No. 3


SF Aftershoc+ x Phun Night

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 19-39 | AAOTR MATURITY WITH JENNA TEKOLSTE Owned by Kari and Jenna TeKolste

Ar abian Horse Times | 313 | Volume 52, No. 3


CA Afires Heir x MD Roullette

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT AAOTR MATURITY WITH HANNAH MESSERLI Owned by Hannah and Blake Messerli

Ar abian Horse Times | 314 | Volume 52, No. 3


VJ Royal Heir x CP Metropolitan

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned by Kari and Jenna TeKolste

Ar abian Horse Times | 315 | Volume 52, No. 3


CSP Mamage x The Gossip Writer

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT AAOTR 40-59 WITH TAMMY MCELLIOTT Owned by Tammy and Russ McElliott

Ar abian Horse Times | 316 | Volume 52, No. 3


Vegaz x River Dance NA

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING AATOD AAOTR 40-59 WITH JANNA O’NEILL Owned by Janna O’Neill

Ar abian Horse Times | 317 | Volume 52, No. 3


Majesteit x Mizpah Ulla

H/A HUNTER PLEASURE AATR SELECT AAOTR 19-39 WITH JESSICA HERRBOLDT

Owned by Jessica Herrboldt

RR Signifikaynce x Beijings Ruby BHF

ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE FUTURITY WITH LISA POWELL Owned by Dean and Lisa Richman Ar abian Horse Times | 318 | Volume 52, No. 3


A Noble Cause x Gloria Afire

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR AAOTR 40-59 WITH CHARITY DAVIS Owned by Charity Davis

Ar abian Horse Times | 319 | Volume 52, No. 3


CA Proximus CA x Wonderful Surprise

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AATR SELECT AAOTR 19-39 WITH LEXIE MATTINGLY Owned by Lexie Mattingly

Ar abian Horse Times | 320 | Volume 52, No. 3


LR Thunder Struck LR x Vesper Lynd

H/A ENGLISH PLEASURE 50 & OVER AAOTR MATURITY WITH ROBIN MANFIELD

LR Thunder Struck LR x Weavers Black Sensation

H/A COUNTRY PLEASURE FUTURITY Owned by Robin and Michael Manfield

Ar abian Horse Times | 321 | Volume 52, No. 3


TRGR H Mobility H x Miz Behavin V

ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & OVER WITH LINDA HACKETT

Baske Afire x Isabel’s Supreme Lady

H/A COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 60 & OVER WITH LINDA HACKETT Owned by Linda and Ralph Hackett

Ar abian Horse Times | 322 | Volume 52, No. 3


SMP Baskghazi x On Tulsa Time

AEPA $50,000 H/A SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY

Owned by Salt Creek Arabians ~ Bonnie and Kristin McElroy

Ar abian Horse Times | 323 | Volume 52, No. 3


KT Afires Heir x SA Gisele

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE Owned by Midori Farms ~ Kay Thatcher

Ar abian Horse Times | 324 | Volume 52, No. 3


DD Afires Heir x Empress Of Anza

ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE FUTURITY

Owned by Dawn Dawson

Ar abian Horse Times | 325 | Volume 52, No. 3


Undulata’s Nutcracker x Expressly Bella

H/A ENGLISH PLEASURE AATOR 19-49 PARK AAOTR WITH AMBER STEARNS Owned by Amber Stearns

Ar abian Horse Times | 326 | Volume 52, No. 3


SA Undulata’s Nutcracker x SA Gisele

2022 H/A ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE

Owned by Rex Vanier

Ar abian Horse Times | 327 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ultimate Fire CRF

Afire Bey V x Ames Patina

2014 PB Gelding

Breakaway LOA

HF Mister Chips+ x Sultan’s Daybreak

2008 HA Mare

Electro Shoc MA

SF Specs Shocwave x Paris Hilton

2011 PB Gelding

Ascend BHA

HA Toskcan Sun+ x MD Chardonnay

2017 PB Stallion

FVF Roses Afire

Afires Heir x Love and Roses

2010 HA Mare

Toskcan N Turnin RT

HA Toskcan Sun+ x BF First Love

2017 PB Gelding

Le Marage

Mamage x Marissa LOA

2014 HA Gelding

Xquisite Heir

VJ Royal Heir x Xquisite W

2017 PB Gelding

Trane To Paris CA

Coltrane SS x Haute Little Number

2018 PB Mare

Nuttin To It

Undulata’s Nutcracker x Expressly Bella

2012 HA Mare

Ames Revelation

H Mobility H x Ames Patina

2018 PB Gelding

CP Incognito

The Renaissance x CP Tatiana

2013 PB Gelding

Ridin The Storm Out

Thunder Struck LR x Tainted Luv

2018 PB Gelding

Tshampagne Starstruck

SF Aftershoc+ x Phun Night

2018 HA Mare

Mischief Managed

Majesteit x Mizpah Ulla

2013 HA Gelding

Ascend BHA

Breakaway LOA

CP Incognito

Xquisite Heir

Nuttin To It

Electro Shoc MA

Ryan Strand 816-651-7424 | Bucyrus, KS | www.liberty-meadows.com | libertymeadowstc@gmail.com Ar abian Horse Times | 328 | Volume 52, No. 3


Prosecco MCR Twizt and Shout Magic or Tragic Goldd Tstrike TA Heart of Goldd HHF Atomic Fireball RR Styling and Profiling Name Pending Name Pending Name Pending Name Pending Magnified Love Inceptional Love Gentleman Jack LR One Last Kiss PF Timberr GRA Ellawyn Heir LR Name Pending Name Pending Name Pending

Prosuasion x Meringue Kisses Vegaz x River Dance NA Noble Braveheart x Heirabask SA Fire and Goldd x Phun Night Fire and Goldd x El Baile VCP Magnifire x Front Page Divine ROL Divine Style+ x Evening Dance Fire and Goldd x Viva Las Vegaz Vegaz x Xquisite W Afires Heir x Social Light H Mobility H x Mac Bey Afire VCP Magnifire x Best of My Love Inception x Best of My Love Thunder Struck LR x Weavers Black Sensation Inception x JSN Cosmopolitan VCP Magnifire x Capability Afires Heir x Evelyn LR Life Inthe Fazt Lane x Le Soleil RTA Majesteit x Venuz Vegaz x Xquisite W

2020 PB Mare 2020 PB Mare 2020 HA Mare 2020 HA Gelding 2020 HA Gelding 2020 HA Gelding 2020 HA Gelding 2020 PB Gelding 2020 PB Gelding 2020 PB Mare 2020 PB Mare 2019 PB Mare 2019 PB Mare 2019 HA Gelding 2019 PB Mare 2019 PB Gelding 2019 PB Mare 2019 PB Mare 2019 HA Gelding 2019 PB Mare

REFERENCE SIRES

H Mobility H

Afires Heir

Vegaz

VCP Magnifire

Life Inthe Fazt Lane

Ryan Strand 816-651-7424 | Bucyrus, KS | www.liberty-meadows.com | libertymeadowstc@gmail.com Ar abian Horse Times | 329 | Volume 52, No. 3


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THE CHAMPIONS 55 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park PB English Pleasure PB Western Pleasire

Dornaba Petit Jean Century 21 La Flaisan Oran Van Crabbet Gdynia Sur-Galant

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THE CHAMPIONS 50 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park

Serenity Sonbolah Ansata Ibn Sudan Il Muna Dalul Mikado

THE CHAMPIONS 50 YEARS AGO: PB English Pl PB Western Pl PB Pl Driving PB Reining PB Trail

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El Malika Nihal Hillcrest’s Tishamba Bay-Event Ibn Witraff


THE CHAMPIONS 40 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park

Rohara Tsultress Marsianin A-May Zing BF Cimmeron EW Natal

THE CHAMPIONS 40 YEARS AGO: H/A Park PB English Pl PB Western Pl PB Pl Driving PB Reining (Stock) PB Trail

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SF Monty Python Lite My Fire Baskadandi Cyrk Cinco Grande El Bey Moon


THE CHAMPIONS 30 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park HA Park

Gaishea Simeon Shai Bey Serenade SF Autumn Séance Red Tape Catalyst

THE CHAMPIONS 30 YEARS AGO: PB English Pl HA English Pl PB Country Pl HA Country Pl PB Western Pl HA Western Pl

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Hucklebey Berry High Lyte Badr Taskmanian Devil Mi-Tiffany Spotsdale


THE CHAMPIONS 30 YEARS AGO: PB Hunter Pl HA Hunter Pl PB Pl Driving HA Pl Driving PB Reining (Stock) HA Reining (Stock) PB Trail HA Trail Ar abian Horse Times | 425 | Volume 52, No. 3

MDF Wizard Ofoz Leaveit To Beaver JA Rave Review Sultan Suzort KA Summa Novia Bey Bask Hiyarandy Bold Beauty


Ar abian Horse Times | 426 | Volume 52, No. 3


THE CHAMPIONS 20 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park HA Park PB English Pl HA English Pl PB Country Pl HA Country Pl PB Western Pl HA Western Pl PB Hunter Pl HA Hunter Pl PB Pl Driving HA Pl Driving PB Reining (Stock) HA Reining (Stock) PB Trail HA Trail

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S Justadream Millennium LOA S Justadream EA Echstravagant Apollopalooza Maximumm Overdrive Hey Hallelujah OA Star Struck CA Flamethrower FSR Final Cheers C A Hermoso Phenom WF Reigning Heir Forever Fame SFL JDM Rain Dance Bright Ghaza Trevor VF Im Destinees Hobby Serannada Diamonds R Awesome


THE CHAMPIONS 10 YEARS AGO: PB Mare PB Stallion PB Futurity Filly PB Futurity Colt PB Park HA Park

Panarea By Palawan LD Pistal Valori TRF Vitorio TO Mandalay Bay REA My Allience

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THE CHAMPIONS 10 YEARS AGO: PB Country Pl HA Country Pl PB Western Pl HA Western Pl PB Hunter Pl HA Hunter Pl PB Pl Driving HA Pl Driving PB Reining (Stock) HA Reining (Stock) PB Trail HA Trail PB English Pl HA English Pl

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Bonfire ROF Americanbeautie Onyx A Lets Get Loded Cylent Lightning CCA Vivienne LR Expressamo Guided Im The Real Deal HH Charmed N Color Magnums Shogun TR Despret For Achic Starr Llight Second Sight


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# `) Ļ

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In-Hand/Breeding Greg Knowles | Paul Kostial | Steve Dady | Karen Homer-Brown

What is a seemingly small detail that you appreciate seeing in the ring? KNOWLES: A well-groomed horse and handler.

KOSTIAL: Quiet presentation, not overly dramatic, simple setup, and quiet

viewing so the judges can do their job without the exhibitor getting in the

way of what’s needed. Less is more in so many situations in life, including presenting any horse in the show ring.

What is your biggest pet peeve(s) seen in the show ring?

KNOWLES: An exhibitor constantly and nervously pulling on the shank. KOSTIAL: Same as the previous question but reversed. Too much dramatic “look at me”, whether in the breeding classes or the performance arena. Just

make sure that you are giving each judge a proper distance and “open space” to see your entry and let them do their job. Judges are trained to see every

entry, though it’s the exhibitor’s responsibility to give each judge the space to

do so. Eyeballing judges to see if they’re looking at you is also frowned upon.

KOSTIAL: Quiet and confident but unassuming. Simple presentation

without exaggerated effort. Again, less is more, and giving the judge the opportunity to do their job without having to maneuver to do so. What advice would you give trainers coaching from the rail?

KNOWLES: Shut up. I don’t need to know that the horse is one of yours,

and you’re making your client nervous.

KOSTIAL: Keep your voice as low as possible. There’s no need for loud

coaching from the rail. Any trained rider will know their trainer’s voice, and they can hear your “whisper” from a mile away. Simple, quiet instructions

while not calling attention to the disaster that your rider is experiencing. Hand signals work great too, when possible. Very quiet demeanor. What do you consider to be good show ring etiquette? KNOWLES: Obey the rules!

Just check to see if the judge has proper visibility, and let the judge do their

KOSTIAL: Same as the previous response; remember, the judges have a job

issue. We often must ask some exhibitors repeatedly to “please walk” and they

make it easy for the judge to see your entry, to judge your entry, and to have

job without intrusion. In breeding also, not “walking on a loose line” is a huge say yes, but continue with an inflated or elevated walk, which is not meeting the class requirements as written in the rules for the division. What stands out to you as a great presentation?

KNOWLES: An honest, solid stand up, where the horse is doing his job but not intimidated.

to do, and the final placings reflect their work. It’s the job of the exhibitor to their best perspective of you. Recently, an exhibitor watched me so much

while showing, it was hard to get a good look without being stared down, so

to speak. Just move along, with your eyes forward, and make sure we have direct eyesight for your entry. If that’s there, then knowing my position is more than expected, but staring at a judge while they’re trying to evaluate your entry isn’t necessary.


KNOWLES: I judged the Buckeye and 90 yearling fillies. It seemed like they entered the ring forever.

KNOWLES: Hopefully, we progress or why breed? We tend to increase and

enhance the qualities the market wants. Sometimes it’s fashion, sometimes it really is an improvement. The sad thing is that we have separated the Arabian horse into several different styles. An English horse is not built to

KOSTIAL: To get myself into judging, I started with numerous one day all

look like Glady’s halter trophy, it is built and bred to trot; western horses to

and stock breeds to increase my experience and mental acumen for judging.

is very unlikely that any could compete in all divisions due to the qualities the

breed shows, using my background with Arabians, Saddlebreds, Morgans

be western; and halter horses to look like beautiful Arabian halter horses. It

That first exposure, I remember, made me see that there’s so much more to

horses have evolved into to excel in their own disciplines.

realizing how much of what “we” exhibitors think the judge worries about

I love all Arabian horses, and I can tell you, nowhere in the world do

immediately started altering the ways I showed my own entries in amateur

horse; we are the best. However, I worry. Remember, an Arabian will not out

experience. Therefore, I now coach amateurs to help them have the same

Thoroughbred, but an Arabian will always be the most beautiful breed. I

makes a huge difference showing.

KOSTIAL: The GBE painting is still the gold standard and likely, always

doing a good job judging than most realize. And in that position, I began

is often NOT what the judge is most concerned. The judging perspective

performance horses come close to the North American Arabian performance

classes, and how my showing style evolved as a result of my first-hand judging

trot a Saddlebred, out cut a cutter, out slide a Quarter Horse, or out run a

opportunity for success with more knowledge of the judge’s perspective. It

hope we will always be sure to keep it that way.

What could you share to encourage more people to pursue getting their judges card?

KNOWLES: It’s a great chance to judge good horses, at their best, and fun to travel all over the world. And of course, a small way of giving back to the breed.

KOSTIAL: I’d say no to this. ONLY do it if you think it’s your true calling. It’s grueling, doesn’t pay well, and tiring. And many of us love it. I would encourage every amateur to get coached about judging, or to at least do the

“judges’ school” or some training from a judge, as mentioned before, but

NOT get your judges card unless you feel directly called to do so. Yes, it’s very

will be. If we veer from this too much, we’re not basing our future on the

original integrity of the Arabian horse. It’s an important standard by which

all breeding entries shall be evaluated and, it’s a legendary gift GBE gave us. From time to time we see horses in the breeding/halter division whose presentation is more intense than others. When you see a horse who seems to crouch behind, in your opinion, does this affect the overall presentation and does it impact the final placement on your card? KNOWLES: No doubt it should and does affect the placement on my card. It

clearly means that the horse is conformationally deficient, or intimidated. Either way, the horse should be penalized.

rewarding, but not without the correct perspective, commitment and desire.

KOSTIAL: Yes, no doubt. We (judges) are now quick to ask for a proper

What about judging U.S. Nationals are you most looking forward to?

crouching. It’s not good, and it will affect the placings on my card, and no

KNOWLES: I can’t wait to judge a ring full of top-quality horses.

KOSTIAL: I always love judging this show, it’s a pinnacle of judging for

Arabians, and for any breed’s national show. Working with my fellow judges is also very rewarding. I’m always interested to hear why they chose a certain

entry, or what they saw and how their mind processed the information to complete their final placings. It’s intriguing and I always enjoy seeing such exceptional entries presented by exceptional trainers and amateurs who have worked so hard to get to this juncture. It’s rewarding and gives me so much

appreciation for the many people we have who give so much to the Arabian breed and their passion for these beautiful animals.

standup, ask the exhibitor to put the horse flat on their feet, without

doubt, all the judges. It’s unacceptable, and it’s an unprofessional manner in which to respect and honor these beautiful horses we are gifted with.

How important is the walk? What are you looking for? What things are you able to see/identify at the walk that aren’t as apparent while in motion or stood up? KNOWLES: Sometimes halter horses can transform themselves when they

stand up and hide some faults. I like to evaluate the horse at the walk to see balance, quality, shoulder angle, and length of hip.

KOSTIAL: The walk is mandatory in the breeding classes. It’s required to “walk on a loose line” and if not, most judges will ask an exhibitor once or

The famous Gladys Brown Edwards painting of the white Arabian horse is often thought of as the “standard” by which Arabian halter horses are judged. Is that depiction still applicable today? Is there an Arabian horse that you’ve seen in person that most exemplified that standard of what an Arabian halter show horse should look like for? If you feel the standard has changed; how do you feel the Arabian breed has evolved?

twice to please walk. It’s mandatory, and I can’t stress this enough. Yes, some

horses are “excited” but really, that’s just an excuse. Let the horse walk so we can see them without all the “conjured” presentation and hype. At some point

we’ll see those holes you’re likely trying to cover, and entries not walking is a

helpful hint there’s some reason you’re not walking, i.e., more than just “he’s so excited” ... so, please walk. It’ll only help your chances.

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-2 ,%2( &6))(-2+

What and when was your first official judging assignment? What do you remember most about it?


Performance Laura Doran | Tim Goggins | Lorne Robertson | Greg Gallun | Ann Judge | Beth Stover

What is a seemingly small detail that you appreciate seeing in the ring?

ROBERTSON: A horse and rider combination working in unison

horse and rider. You are already five steps ahead if you come in on a clean,

specifications and performing with a positive attitude will always be in

DORAN: I’m not sure how small this is, but I love to see a well-turned-out well-groomed horse with a healthy coat and weight. Five more steps ahead if your attire fits well, augments your horse’s good looks and your boots and tack are clean.

GOGGINS: A seemingly small detail I appreciate is exhibitors who make

the most out of utilizing the call to reverse to better position themselves in the ring, the reverse is often a good time to “reset” your position and give the judge a chance to see you as the class progresses.

ROBERTSON: Respect and courtesy from exhibitors to other exhibitors. What is your biggest pet peeve(s) seen in the show ring?

GOGGINS: A) Exhibitors who get revved up and go too fast in any of the

saddle seat classes. Horses should not be pressed to go fast at the cost of

losing form; not every horse can handle high speeds and many look better

backed off just a bit. Know your horse’s best rate, and show him that way, do not just chase the speediest horse. B) Exhibitors who are slow getting to the ingate and getting in to show. Making everyone wait because they are unprepared makes the whole show drag. Get ready on time!

exemplifying the class specifications. A quality combination meeting these contention.

If a horse makes a mistake as a result of an event outside of the ring (i.e. child hanging over the rail, garbage can getting knocked over) do you take this into consideration? Why or why not? GOGGINS: I try to always give the horse/exhibitor the benefit of the doubt in a case like that, we have all had a ride damaged by an incident beyond our

control. As long as the horse recovers quickly and can return to work, I will likely not penalize him at all. Judging and ranking horses should be based on looking for positives, never on tabulating negatives.

ROBERTSON: Firstly, I think it is important to always judge from a

positive perspective. As such, if I see the entire event and the horse and rider combination returns to form quickly, then that is a positive perception. If the horse and rider does not return to form, you cannot guess at what might have been. Most often though, as a judge, you do not see the cause, but you

see the effect. Even in these cases, if the horse and rider recover quickly and

return to form, the momentary loss of form, although considered, is a minor

error. As a judge, you must always look at each incident independently and

ROBERTSON: Crowding the center ring. Get out, not necessarily all the

make your judgement as to how that placing will be impacted, taking into

for you to show your horse to me, but also for me to see your horse in profile.

to form quickly, stay positive and act like it never happened. Remember, at

How do you feel about exhibitors taking extra laps after the lineup has been called?

advantage.

way to the rail, but close enough to the rail that it gives firstly, the opportunity

GOGGINS: If it is not excessive, I am totally fine with a few extra passes. While it is very unlikely to change a placing on my card, it is a fun way

to showcase a horse to the crowd. After all, it is called a horse “show” and should be entertaining to look at.

ROBERTSON: Within reason I am fine with it! It is the last chance to show your horse, so make the best pass possible, but limit it. What stands out to you as a great performance?

consideration their entire performance. So, my advice to a rider is return nationals there are three judges, so never stop showing your horse to its best Do you feel attire can distract from the horse/performance? What is your perspective on being properly suited for competition? What things do you typically find distracting?

GOGGINS: Attire would have to be pretty extreme to be distracting to me. As long as it is clean and fits correctly, it’s probably fine. Personally, I pay very little attention to a rider’s attire. I think the western attire we routinely

see is a bit over the top, they do look good, but it’s probably unneeded. For

me, no matter how well turned out your outfit is, it will certainly not help

GOGGINS: Anytime a horse looks like he is doing his work effortlessly, it

move youup in the placings if your ride is mediocre, nor will wearing a simple

natural athlete who is well prepared through conditioning and training. This

ride. I would encourage people to spend money on livestock and training and

means he is having a great performance. Effortlessness demonstrates a great concept applies to any discipline.

cotton shirt, black chaps and a good straw hat hurt you if you have a good spend less on bling.

Ar abian Horse Times | 436 | Volume 52, No. 3


many accredited judges and started down that path. What I remember most

should always complement you and your horse, the rest is a matter of taste.

I also believe it made me a better exhibitor and a better mentor to others.

honoring the tradition of the discipline, it would not distract. Your attire

about those experiences was how welcoming and encouraging people were.

GOGGINS: Coaching from the rail does not bother me in the least, but I

What could you share to encourage more people to pursue getting their judges card?

enough on their plate without an endless list of intricate detailed instructions

to hear people complain about the judging. You might hear them cite

few strides anyway. Keep it simple and encouraging.

99% of judges are trying their best to find the unsurpassed winner of that

What advice would you give trainers coaching from the rail?

would advise trainers to ‘encourage more and instruct less”. Amateurs have

DORAN: Judging from center ring is harder than it looks! It’s not uncommon

that, in their heightened state of nervousness, they will probably forget in a

political agendas, allegiances to friends, or incompetence. In my experience,

ROBERTSON: Focus on one thing and be discreet. What do you consider to be good show ring etiquette?

DORAN: Good show ring etiquette starts with the realization that your

performance today is not all about you. The Arabian horse community is there to support our breed and watch some beautiful performances. Owners

have trusted you with their beloved horses, and the horses that we ask so much from, trust you. Good show ring etiquette involves showing grace to your horse, being considerate of your fellow exhibitors, and displaying

professionalism whether you are called to the winner’s circle or walking out of the gate.

GOGGINS: As in all things, common courtesy and civility, be polite and reasonable, everyone wants to win and everyone deserves a chance, so be

aware of your fellow exhibitors and allow everyone to have their own “space”. ROBERTSON: As per above, be respectful and be courteous. Isn’t that just

good manners?

Chewing gum in class, tack that isn’t clean, poor grooming, distracting attire, not utilizing the entire arena. Put these things in order from your biggest pet peeve to the least. GOGGINS: 1) not intelligently utilizing the entire arena 2) poor grooming 3) tack that isn’t clean 4) distracting attire 5) chewing gum.

ROBERTSON: Again, as per above, being respectful includes showing yourself and your horse and putting your best foot forward. As such...

What and when was your first official judging assignment? What do you remember most about it?

GOGGINS: In 1996 or ‘97, my first or second show was in the southwest.

class (based on specifications that we are trained to follow), then 2nd best, 3rd best, etc., which is not easy to do well. Judging from the rail is far easier

than it is from center ring. Firstly, you can see almost the entire class all the

time from your vantage point. From center ring, you are simply not seeing everything at once. From the stands, you can watch the gaits at a better

angle which makes it easier to find the best movers more quickly. Finally, while watching from the outside, you are not struggling to find and note

the exhibitor numbers all while trying to process who should place where. I would strongly encourage ALL exhibitors to attend the Judges’ School at

least once! It will make you a better exhibitor AND the industry needs new judges. If you find that you have a knack for it, you could be on your way to

fulfilling a new venture in judging! At the very least, you might just find that you have a whole new appreciation for the job.

GOGGINS: We all know some good horsemen that do not have their cards. Come on folks, we need you. Your opinions and perspectives are valuable. Exhibitors and show committees want a larger list to choose from; it’s an important component to our sport, and it can be pretty fun!

ROBERTSON: I think that all exhibitors would benefit from the AHA

School. The EEC puts in tremendous work, and it is a very beneficial endeavor. It will make you a better exhibitor if nothing more! Then examine your

motivation to become a judge. Look at why you think you would enjoy it

and test yourself. Firstly, you must enjoy being at shows from start to finish; then you must want to be there watching those classes that you love; but more importantly, the ones you may not know lots about or not enjoy as

much. You must also have patience and a smile. Then decide if it is still

something you would enjoy and if it is, go for it.

They had a lot of junior exhibitors show up and offered lots of kid classes.

What about judging U.S. Nationals are you most looking forward to?

as the canter was called for, she would soon lose her stirrups and in a few

best horses and horsemanship our industry has to offer. Sometimes with

One girl kept coming in the country and equitation classes and as soon

GOGGINS: This is the easiest question. I am looking forward to seeing the

strides fall off. The horse always stopped, she would cry a little and the trainer

all that’s going on in our industry, and in the world at large, we forget to

each time making it a little longer. In her last class she almost made it to

how skilled the horsemen, exhibitors, and grooms who prepare and present

allowing her to keep trying and assured me normally (at home) she canters

forward to this one just as much as I did that first time.

would take her out. The next session she would be back in there trying again,

appreciate just how beautiful and amazing these horses really are and just

the lineup, but not quite. After the show, she came up and thanked me for

them are. I attended my first U.S. Nationals in 1980, and I am eagerly looking

without a problem, but at the show, she was so nervous about being “judged”.

ROBERTSON: This is my fourth national show to judge, and honestly,

I told her it was fine and to keep trying. In a true testament to perseverance, several years later the same girl won a national championship in equitation.

ROBERTSON: I started out judging many years ago ~ 30! Typically, it was at small hunter jumper shows and local fairs as a starting point. I was asked

because of my individual success as a competitor. Through that process I met

without a doubt, I am looking forward to the experience! I’m looking forward to judging the quality of not only the best of the best, but at a time when they are typically giving their best! I am looking forward to those “goosebump” moments!

4)6*361%2')

ROBERTSON: If you are attired within the rules and in most classes


8VEMP 7LS[QERWLMT ,SVWIQERWLMT 4IVJSVQERGI ,EPXIV Kari Albiol | Terri Delbridge | Margo Shallcross | Kelly Alcorn | Tami Pacho

What is a seemingly small detail that you appreciate seeing in the ring?

a judge, I don’t want the coaching to interfere with my ability to judge the

judging is to have the competitor’s number displayed so that it is easy for

lead!” I am immediately made aware that one of the horses in the class has

ALBIOL: The one small detail I really appreciate no matter what class I am me to see. Numbers on the saddle pad are really great, but even with a back

number I often find that the rider or handler will have the number covered by a long ponytail or braid. Take a little extra care to make sure your hair is up

neatly and not covering your number. It makes it so much nicer for the judge! DELBRIDGE: An exhibitor whose expression tells me that they really enjoy presenting their horse.

What is your biggest pet peeve(s) seen in the show ring?

ALBIOL: Every judge has their own personal likes and dislikes that might

be seen in different classes. This year I am honored to be judging trail and

showmanship, so it seems I should take the time to express my feelings as related to those classes. My biggest pet peeve in a showmanship class is when

class fairly. When I am judging a rail class and someone yells out “wrong picked up a wrong lead and I can’t help looking to see who it is. Giving pointers as a rider passes on the rail is much preferred. Coaches also should

be aware that in a showmanship class where the exhibitors are in the ring for the entire class, they are being judged the entire time. It is not like a halter class where the judge only judges the horse presented to them. A good

showmanship judge will take the time to occasionally check to see what is going on with handlers on the rail between presentations. If they are talking to their coach instead of watching the judge, it can make a difference in how

they are placed!

DELBRIDGE: I would prefer them to be subtle enough so as not to be disruptive.

the handler allows their horse to cock a hind leg. I see this a lot at the lower

SHALLCROSS: Trainers coaching from the rail need to communicate with

important they be aware of their horse and make sure to correct it when the

performance.

level and beginner shows and always try to point out to the handler that it is horse decides to be “relaxed” and stand with a hind leg cocked. DELBRIDGE: Seeing a great horse over shown. What stands out to you as a great presentation?

ALBIOL: A great presentation whether it be in showmanship or a

performance class is when the horse and handler/rider work well as a team. No matter how fancy your outfit or how beautiful your horse, it is important that the horse be focused and responsive to the cues and that the handler/

rider be able to communicate efficiently without rough handed corrections. Patterns need to be smooth flowing with correct geometry and the horse should perform without resistance. The handler should look confident and in control without appearing stiff or over rehearsed.

DELBRIDGE: A well turned-out horse and rider who shows confidence and is respectful of other exhibitors.

their riders in a way that does not bring negative attention to the rider’s What do you consider to be good show ring etiquette?

DELBRIDGE: Respect for other exhibitors! I appreciate someone getting out and showing their horses but NOT at the expense of others.

What and when was your first official judging assignment? What do you remember most about it?

ALBIOL: I don’t recall my first official judging assignment, but I remember my first experience as a learner judge sometime in the 1970s. It was with

Peter Cameron and the lessons I learned were invaluable. What I remember most is that by the end of the first day, he knew every horse’s number and

would say them out loud to me as they entered the ring. No need to check the back numbers in the lineup. He was never wrong!

DELBRIDGE: It wasn’t the first, but it is the first that stands out in my mind. It was a 4-H show and I had always fretted about getting it right and

SHALLCROSS: A great presentation happens when the horse and rider

being fair. The little girl on the spotted pony approached me and asked me

between the two.

ribbon; ironically it was in trail. That was when I realized that if I follow the

give the appearance of performing effortlessly and you can feel the connection What advice would you give trainers coaching from the rail?

ALBIOL: There is nothing wrong with trainers coaching form the rail. As

why she didn’t place. She had been tied for sixth and she ended up without a rules, I am being paid for my opinion and for that day, my opinion is right. From then on, I became more confident in my judging.


ALBIOL: Judging horse shows is not for everyone, but it can be a rewarding and exciting experience. I think everyone should at least attend one of the judges’ schools and do some learner judging to see if they like being in center ring. I think it is important if you love the Arabian breed and want to make

a difference. In many ways our judges determine the direction our breed is

going. If you are unhappy with the way things have developed in the show

ring, becoming a judge and being a part of real change. It’s so much better than complaining and wishing it were different. You will find our judges are honest and well informed and totally dedicated to our beautiful Arabian horses!

DELBRIDGE: I love the fast pace of evaluating horses on any level. Maybe it is because I no longer ride, but even watching people work horses is exciting to me. I always learn something!

SHALLCROSS: The incredible horses and riders you have the privilege of

judging, the places you are invited to judge across the U.S. and internationally, along with lifelong friends you make as a judge … what could be better?

making it look easy even though it is a complicated and tricky maneuver. The

horse should be bright and attentive with ears forward, working on a light rein; no ticks or uneven strides and no hesitation. Upon completion of the

lope over, the ideal trail horse will be already focused on the next obstacle. I think it is an easy mistake for judges to score only based on faults and negative scores, so I am always looking for the performance that will earn a plus score!

DELBRIDGE: A +3 is perfect and not easily achieved. The horse and rider would have to be fluid, cadenced, and smooth, as if when viewed from the belly up, all you see is forward motion.

What impact does attire have in a showmanship run?

ALBIOL: Attire in showmanship needs to be neat and look professional, without taking attention away from the overall performance. Too much bling

can be a distraction, but an old shirt tucked into blue jeans does not make

for a professional appearance no matter how neat you are. In showmanship, that overall impression can make a difference, so I think it is important to

put together a nice outfit that fits well and brings the whole presentation together. Dress appropriate to the division you want to showcase. Don’t show

What about judging U.S. Nationals are you most looking forward to?

your horse in an English hunt bridle and wear a western style jacket, for

from all over the United States and Canada. So often we find ourselves

floppy fringe. Put your hair up and don’t let those long flowing locks bounce

across the country!

class! Making a bad impression because your attire is a bit off can impact

ALBIOL: I am really looking forward to seeing the best Arabian horses

example. Don’t wear something that will be distracting, like lots of glitter or

restricted to shows in our own area and seldom get to see the horses from

free. Make sure everything fits well and do your best to stay clean for the

DELBRIDGE: Everything! This is my first National assignment, and I am

your score, no matter how well you perform.

excited just to be a part of it!

DELBRIDGE: My preference is neat, clean and business like. The plain

Do you prefer the pattern portion or the rail portion to be first in western horsemanship? Why?

SHALLCROSS: Attire that fits properly, is neat and clean, can have a

DELBRIDGE: I prefer rail work first so I can get an idea of my placing before the pattern.

classic look seems to be trending and I like it!

positive impact on the overall score, but dirty boots, a number that is placed crooked, or attire that is ill fitting can certainly have a negative impact on the

In English trail, when a horse negotiates trot-overs, do you prefer the rider post, sit, or two-point?

overall score.

for different horse and rider combinations.

ALBIOL: I’ve worked with a lot of scribes and have never minded working

DELBRIDGE: Whatever makes it look smoother, this might be different SHALLCROSS: I have no preference, I want the rider to show their horse to the best of their ability and I am looking for horses that are willing, cadenced and balanced going over the trot-overs.

What qualities does a western trail horse need to exhibit to earn +3 on lope overs? ALBIOL: There are two things I consider when giving a maneuver score

in a trail class. One is the actual performance of the horse and the other is

the degree of difficulty presented by the obstacle. I most likely would never see a 3+ score on a lope over that consisted of two poles on the ground in a straight line of travel. The more complicated and difficult the maneuver, the

higher the score will be if the horse executes it well. So, for the horse to earn

What qualities do you like to see in a good scribe? How important is it that you have a scribe that is experienced at a national show?

with those who are just learning the ropes. A scribe is a great help to a judge because it allows us to see the entire performance and not take our eyes off the exhibitor for even a second. A good scribe will wait to ask questions until

after the completion of each individual performance and will not get lost in

the scoring. At a national show, it would be more important to have a scribe with experience and even better if it is a scribe you have worked with in

the past and feel comfortable with. Competitors work hard all year to bring their horses to a national show and they need to feel the judge is focused

completely on their performance and not spending time working with an inexperienced scribe. A good scribe makes a huge difference in the judging experience!

a 3+ on lope overs, it must first be a difficult obstacle. Next the horse needs

DELBRIDGE: It is someone who can keep up with me and is willing to

no resistance. The horse should be in the proper frame loping an even stride

think they should have some experience prior to scribing at nationals.

to perform the lope over correctly with smoothness and efficiency, showing

allow me to go back at the end of the run and quickly readjust if I need to. I

Ar abian Horse Times | 439 | Volume 52, No. 3

86%-0 7,3;1%27,-4 ,367)1%27,-4 4)6*361%2') ,%08)6

What could you share to encourage more people to pursue getting their judges card?


;SVOMRK ;IWXIVR Brenda Brown | Guy Vernon | Terry Wegener | Ben Balow | Bozo Rogers

What do you feel is the Arabian’s best attribute to the working western division? BROWN: Their disposition, train ability and stamina.

BROWN: A good stop and turn with the cow, without excessive help from the rider.

VERNON: The ability to stop well and control the cow.

VERNON: Their intelligence.

WEGENER: Credit in the box comes from correct position and control.

WEGENER: Its great mind.

And lack of resistance to its rider.

How do your standards/expectations vary when judging different breeds in the reining division?

When does a loose rein become a draped rein in Ranch Riding?

same, no matter the breed.

VERNON: The change for me is when the rein becomes so long it’s difficult

BROWN: As an NRHA/NRCHA judge, our maneuver standard stays the VERNON: My standards don’t change at all when judging different breeds. WEGENER: My expectations do not vary from breed to breed. I take them at face value and evaluate them accordingly.

What differences have you noticed in the way Arabs are shown vs. Quarter Horses? VERNON: I really don’t see any.

WEGENER: I expect a good Arab to be presented like a good Quarter Horse.

Who was the most impressive Arabian reiner or class you’ve judged? What made it stand out? VERNON: That’s a hard one for me, I’ve seen a lot of great performances.

WEGENER: The best Arab reiner I’ve judged was a chocolate Half-Arab

shown by Crystal McNutt. Custom Chrome breeding. Joe Betten owned him. Beautiful horse!

In your opinion, do reined cow horse, reined work maneuvers and reining maneuvers have a different “look”? Can a horse do both well? BROWN: I feel a horse can show very successfully in both events. Great reining maneuvers are appreciated in both disciplines.

BROWN: When the length of rein looks excessive. to easily make contact with the bridle.

WEGENER: A loose rein becomes a draped rein in ranch riding when the rider attempts to pick up slack and contact the horse and still has a bow in the reins. Again, always think of staying in position and in control.

What qualities do you like to see in a good scribe? How important is it that you have a scribe that is experienced at a national show?

BROWN: A scribe with experience and maybe even some “big show” experience is always appreciated.

VERNON: I feel the best qualities of a scribe are the ability to communicate

well and to have a good attitude. Experience is important, but I’d trade experience for a good attitude any day.

WEGENER: A good scribe listens well, records legibly, and shows up on time. Most good ones can do basic math as well.

What is a seemingly small detail that you appreciate seeing in the ring? BROWN: Good sportsmanship.

VERNON: A well-turned-out horse. WEGENER: It’s always nice to see a well-turned-out horse and rider come into the pen.

VERNON: I have to say yes, they do carry themselves differently. They can do both well.

What is your biggest pet peeve(s) seen in the show ring? BROWN: Excessive schooling.

WEGENER: I don’t think reined cow horses and reining horses should

look any different in their maneuvers. I can only reference the horses we train. I’ve always made them and presented them the same.

In reined cow horse classes, what does a horse need to show you to mark up in the boxing portion of the cow work?

VERNON: I’m not sure I have one. WEGENER: When a rider goes to schooling one and doesn’t do anything productive to help the horse, but in fact, creates more issues than they already

have. I appreciate good schooling but limit that to approximately the same amount of time as a correct pattern.

Ar abian Horse Times | 440 | Volume 52, No. 3


BROWN: I feel like going through a judges’ school improves your ability

VERNON: The teamwork between the horse and rider.

and knowledge both as a showman and a coach, even if you don’t have any

WEGENER: A great presentation is a well-trained horse performing confidently and efficiently with good talent.

What advice would you give trainers coaching from the rail? BROWN: Try to always keep it positive.

plans of actually getting a card.

VERNON: Learning how to judge a discipline will make you a better exhibitor.

WEGENER: The best reason to pursue judging education is that you learn

how to present your horses. Even if you never plan to judge a show, you’ll

VERNON: Don’t become a distraction. WEGENER: For trainers coaching from the rail, tell your riders things that help them.

What and when was your first official judging assignment? What do you

learn to show better.

What about judging U.S. Nationals are you most looking forward to? BROWN: The opportunity to judge good horses and meet new people.

remember most about it?

VERNON: Anytime you can judge the best horses in the country, how can

VERNON: The thing I really remember is that I was very nervous.

you not get excited?

WEGENER: My first official judging job was the NRHA Futurity. It was

WEGENER: I feel fortunate and honored to judge the U.S. Nationals and

a big first job.

love seeing the best horses and exhibitors in the world.

What could you share to encourage more people to pursue getting their judges card?

Ar abian Horse Times | 441 | Volume 52, No. 3

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What stands out to you as a great presentation?


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Ar abian Horse Times | 442 | Volume 52, No. 3


CANDY CONWAY

Colonial Wood Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2005. Just qualifying to be there was a thrill. I was so happy to be in the presence of such great horses and competitors! I vowed to go every year and I have! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Leaders and decision makers need to stay in touch with the competitors. At times, it feels like there’s a disconnect. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Remember that we all love the Arabian horse and making smart decisions about the future of our breed takes lots of listening and then acting. We ALL want to see our breed flourish! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I was involved in Paints and Quarter Horses in the late 90s. Arabians are so much smarter, exciting and trainable! As a saddle seat rider, they are fantastic! Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Vicki Humphrey. I ride English and her horses are so well bred and well trained!

LISA GAUDIO

Kyrie Arabians / Ted Carson

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The Senior Stallions and Mares on final nights. It’s very sad to not have that. Always such an amazing memory. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The separation of our halter and performance world. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? My first reason would be the loyalty they have to their humans. A huge factor to someone new would be their versatility and how one horse could be used by many family members, especially for one that can only afford one horse. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? Not doubling up on the same fault, known genetic behavior issues, huge and beautiful eyes, conformation, and athletic ability. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Great stabling, easy for friends and clients to get to, and good accommodations.

LORI-KAY FRYE

Colonial Wood Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1984. I was 15 years old and loved seeing all the horses, trainers and riders that I had been admiring in the magazines for years. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The green shavings for the final weekend and the championship/reserve championship trophies. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? We must find a way to make the Class A shows inviting to new riders, both youth and adults. I think one area in which this industry falls short is making it easy and non-threatening for adults that are just beginning their riding and/or show career. Yes, we have the select rider classes, but what about walk/jog or walk/trot for beginners, practice classes, or other fun classes to get new folks in the show arena without them having to compete against seasoned riders? What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I love the Arabian Horsemen’s Distress Fund and I’m proud that this community is always willing to lend a helping hand to those that have fallen on hard times, whether that help is in the form of money, resources, services or time. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Peter Cameron. Ar abian Horse Times | 443 | Volume 52, No. 3


MORGAN MOORE

MLM Arabians

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? The Arabian horse is the most empathetic of all breeds. They can connect and reach their human counterparts in a more emotional way. Their sensitivity, intelligence, durability, longevity and beauty make them ideal companions. Beyond these attributes, their athleticism and willingness to accept new challenges means they can excel in numerous divisions. Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you consider to accomplish these long-term goals? Next year will bring our first 5th generation foal. We think 1-2 generations into the future in making our breeding decisions and we tend to aim for small changes between generations to reach our goals. We have a strong mare base that allows us to focus on making tweaks instead of aiming for seismic changes. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I evaluate trends in the show ring on a frequent basis to evaluate if I would like to incorporate some of the more trendy bloodlines and individuals into our program. For our program, I never breed specifically for the market, however, “trendy horses” often yield attributes that I find inspiring to incorporate into my own program at home. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? Purpose, quality, type, movement, and balance. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Daily. We have competed in all three arenas before at a nationals show. Given that we have had horses in halter, hunter, western, and working western from our own program, we have a vested interest in watching the best individuals compete at U.S. Nationals in all divisions.

KRISTA BROOKS

Shino Training Center

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The green shavings! It’s magical to ride on them and I wish every class could have green shavings. I love them! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? One word … VERSATILITY! The Arabian breed is absolutely, hands down, the most versatile breed. Not only are they able to do so many disciplines, but their personalities are unparalleled in the horse world. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I love that so many of us, from all walks of life, can come together with the same passion and love for the Arabian horse and ride and compete. It’s pretty amazing to watch. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? My purebred country horse has a heart of gold! He’s a seasoned show horse, so he knows his job, but he is honest, always willing and absolutely gives his all every time we enter the ring. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? All the time! That’s part of the fun of Nationals, being able to watch other classes and divisions. I will be watching reining and trail more as my good friends have started competing in this division. I can’t wait to watch them at Nationals this year!

DWANE HANKINS

Colonial Downs Training Center

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I would love to see the halter ring and the performance ring join together again ... I miss that. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? AHA/USEF. I think safe sport is one of the worst things that has happened to our breed. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Please keep things in perspective, make time for yourself and always see both sides. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? I look for extreme talent and a great price! The only way to make any money is to be a realist about pricing it to sell. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? They are so intellectually smart! And I love the diversity of the breed. We do all the divisions, so it’s amazing. Ar abian Horse Times | 444 | Volume 52, No. 3


DEBORAH HAUG

Scion Arabians LLC

What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Listen carefully and be open to other ideas and opinions; don’t get stuck on your own. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? I consider Arabians as the Porsche in the horse universe. Compact, athletic, versatile with such beauty and quality. These horses bond with their humans and have an amazing willingness to learn and respond. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Pedigree and proven heritage are important, but we look for overall conformation; a big eye, forward well shaped ears, a long shapely neck and beautiful head; athleticism and stamina; powerful hind end and shoulder that support action and cadence; and general high quality characteristics. Pricing should be a function of the attributes above, age, degree of training, and show ring credentials the horse has earned. Pricing also follows a pyramid—there are fewer buyers of highly priced horses at the top, so one must know their market segment. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? There are many decisions in breeding and these are not necessarily in order of priority. First, know your goals for breeding, is it for business or pleasure? Do you plan to sell or ride offspring? What is your budget and timeline? Second, understand that identical crosses do not lead to identical offspring; there can be significant variability. Third, breed only top quality mares and stallions and use embryo transfer to increase output per year if your breeding program can support volume. Fourth, study bloodlines to know what qualities/traits may carry through from generations past. And last but not least, breed to capture the strong characteristics in each parent but to also embellish on characteristics that could be improved. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? We consider many factors. We do not take the same horses on long cross-country hauls more than twice a year as it is hard on them. We try to maximize attendance in local and regional shows to get the number of horses that need show experience in the ring. While winning is important, it is equally or more satisfying to see our horses perform with confidence and panache in the show ring as a tribute to good breeding and training.

ROBERTA LEMBKE

Cedar Ridge Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I first attended in 1984 as a spectator and new Arabian horse owner. Seeing Orans Adagio, Gai Argosy, Huckleberry Bey, etc., ignited the dream of showing at U.S. Nationals. Thirty years later, I am finally able to do it! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? That crazy excitement I feel driving onto the grounds the first day. It’s SHOWTIME! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? We need to acknowledge that there are two classes of competitors, USN bound and the local level, and we need to invest time and energies into revitalizing each. There is not a one-size fits all show solution and you can’t fix just one. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? I always wanted to learn from Gene LaCroix, and luckily I had one season where I did. It was an AMAZING experience. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? My show schedule is based on the health of my checkbook and my horse, the number of vacation days I have, and the goals I want to reach by season’s end. Of course, fun and friends are also factored in!


LANCE LEWIS

MORGAN PELZMAN-RUNYON

Strawberry Banks Farm

Holly Hill Farms, LLC / Colonial Downs Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2014. The most memorable part about it for me was when Zefyr and Onyx A did their hand gallop double victory pass. It was awesome.

Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you consider to accomplish these long-term goals? I certainly see myself breeding throughout my life, having multiple generations. I think on the biggest factors, especially as a small breeder, quality is key versus quantity … really bringing it down to selective breeding each year. The goal will always be breeding exemplary horses that inherit characteristics and personalities that will be desirable and complementary not only to an amateur but to the breed itself.

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The prestige that comes with a U.S. National Champion trophy. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The way the whole community will step up when one really needs it most. Whether it be an accident, disease, or weather event, you can always count on this industry to lend a helping hand. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/ learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Gene and Ray LaCroix. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Not as often as I would like, but I usually try and make sure I make it over to the reining pen to watch the Open classes. They always put on a show.

SARAH JAYNE JOHNSON Lowe Show Horse Centre / Stachowski Farms What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I attended in 2016, but I showed the first time in 2017 and the most memorable moment was seeing I made top ten on the whiteboard. However, I have bad eyesight, so I was making a face reading the board and my trainer at the time, Gabriel DeSoto, hit my leg and told me to smile, I made top ten at my first U.S. Nationals and I should be way happier! Honestly, I was just in shock and couldn’t see, but from that point on, whenever I make top ten, I am more than ecstatic! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Where Jim Lowe’s stalls are since it is really convenient. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I think the fact we are a dysfunctional family that loves these horses almost a little too much. No matter what we are facing, we all deal with each other because we’d rather bicker than walk away from the breed. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Peter Stachowski, because who wouldn’t want to work with Peter? As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? What makes the most sense for my horses is the most important, what we are willing to spend in a year, and honestly, my work/UFC PPV fight schedule.

When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? When I started breeding, a really good friend told me something that a very wise and respected owner/breeder said, “I breed what I want to see.” And so, truth be told, that’s what I do. I decide which mares I want to breed that year and cross her with a stallion that I know will pass on his trademarks to the foals, but also help improve upon the mare too. By not necessarily “following trends” I can remain tried and true to breeding horses that have extreme quality, athleticism, and solid conformation. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? The top five, in no particular order, would absolutely be the mare, mare’s dam line, and researching any additional foals she’s birthed (I like knowing what she has produced already and if it’s something I want to consider getting out of in a foal). Just like the mare, I do my same evaluation and research on the stallion, does he produce what it is I’m looking for in mindset, discipline, size, temperament/personality. Another thing I take into consideration is the industry itself and does it have a demand for what I’m wanting to breed at the time or a few years down the road once they are in leather. Being that trends seem to come in waves—they come and they go—I might hold off for a year, like I did recently, to watch babies grow and develop; see what comes of them. A large factor as a small breeder is cost, financial responsibility and personal time commitment. As breeders, it is our responsibility to feed, house, and tend to the horses we breed, so I never want to get myself in a situation where I have “too many” and cannot give them all the time or resources they need equally. I never want to have or breed more than I can afford financially or time-wise. Lastly, I always consider veterinary costs that come with breeding, gestation, foaling, and subsequent costs that come with vaccinations and so forth, to ensure my mare and baby are healthy. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I always consider how many horses I would be taking and would it be worth their while … does that horse really need to go that show? If there are some in-ring things we or they need practice with, then yes, depending on distance. However, if there are things that can be worked on at home, then there is no need for me to send the horses to an unnecessary show. Factors such as facility, footing, weather, distance, amenities of the town and cost are all taken into consideration too.

Ar abian Horse Times | 446 | Volume 52, No. 3


MICHELLE KIMBRO

Rooker Training Stable

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2013 was my first U.S. Nationals. The most memorable thing was making my cut and riding in the finals. I finished 11th overall. No top ten, but was still mighty proud. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Comradery. Exhibitors, trainers, show staff … everyone works together to make it a great event for all. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Everyone has a voice and perspective, and we need to listen to all if we want to grow and learn. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The sense of family. Everyone looks out for one another and supports each other in times of need. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians have so much life in their eyes and are very people-oriented. Their sense of energy and excitement is contagious.

SHEILA CURLEY

Colby Powell Performance Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first was 10 years ago in 2011. I was a new rider with a green horse, and I most memorably fell off in the line up! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Reducing the number of regions. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? I trust my trainer, but I do like to see a balanced horse with good legs and feet. Price I feel is based on the breeding and what those parents have produced in the past. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The wonderful people! There is so much good in most of the Arabian horse people I have met. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? The ones that are the most fun to be at and show at. It’s not worth it to spend a lot of money and not enjoy the fairgrounds or the way a show is run.

COLBY POWELL

Colby Powell Performance Horses

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I love how our show incorporates so many disciplines and events during the week across all arenas. I think it is great for exhibitors and spectators to be part of and see all that these horses can do. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Trainability, conformation and quality, pedigree, and program nominations are key factors. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Stan White Jr. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Show venue, level of competition, and distance are generally what determines what shows we will go to. This year, due to no qualifications, I attended three regional shows (1, 7 and 8); prior to this year, I’ve only attended one. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? We set up a “home away from home” during U.S. Nationals so people can relax: extra-large dressing rooms and a living room with all the amenities. We also have cute Corgis to hang out with. Ar abian Horse Times | 447 | Volume 52, No. 3


PAUL GLANS

Midwest Training Centre

What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? The Arabian horse community has always been one large extended family and should never waiver from this camaraderie. Sportsmanship and support should be first and foremost. We are in this together for the love of the Arabian horse. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? The Arabian breed is unique and beyond special. Unfortunately, Arabians have been perceived as a skittish horse and may not be suggested as a suitable family horse, but this perception couldn’t be farther from reality. Arabians are highly intelligent, sensitive, loyal and, of course, beautiful. Arabians are very animated and know when it is show time but also can be a kid’s best friend. Their versatility makes them stand out from all other breeds. Come meet an Arabian and you will immediately know they are so special. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? The prospect must meet the criteria for its direct purpose. We enjoy showing in the halter division, so we look for a horse that is conformationally correct, has Arabian type, movement and enjoys being a show horse—these are very important. Being in the car business, quality always factors in the price and horses are no different. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The Arabian horse community has given back to us tremendously. Sabrina and I are so thankful for this support. As mentioned, it is like our extended family. For no better words, it is just a lot of fun to be part of the whole industry. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? We are very fortunate to live in the “mecca” of the Arabian horse community … Scottsdale, AZ. The Scottsdale show is known as “The Best Show on Earth” for a very good reason, it’s a reputation well deserved. The Arabian National Breeder Finals is another top show I look forward to every year and proud to be the Chairman. These two shows are in our “backyard,” so it makes the decision easy for us to participate.

STEVE & CHRISTINA POORE

Orrion Farms

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? Our first U.S. Nationals was 2017 and sure was memorable! We left that show with three U.S. National Champions: LuLu Marajj, Queen Ayda FWM and Makayah! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? We never want the passion that our industry holds for the Arabian horse to change, and this passion is seen so well at U.S. Nationals! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? We would simply suggest that they invest a few hours of time with an Arabian horse! The character of the Arabian will do the rest! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Horses have played a small role throughout our entire lives, however, once we were introduced to the Arabian horse, we knew this was the breed for us! Their charisma, beauty and elegant ability to bond with humans made falling in love with them easy! At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? We enjoy all aspects of U.S. Nationals and the versatile Arabian horse. You will often find Orrion farms in both the performance and halter arenas. We have competed in both and plan to continue doing so!

JENNA BOLLENS Stewart Performance Horses What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? This will be my first year ever attending U.S. Nationals. So far, the most memorable thing is getting the chance to go. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I like to see how much people help out the Arabian community, especially in times of need. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I appreciate how versatile Arabians are and how eloquent they are to watch in all disciplines. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I want to do what’s in the best interest for my horse and what they need to stay healthy for the show season. With different horses comes different goals as far as what shows I want/need to take them to.

Ar abian Horse Times | 448 | Volume 52, No. 3


KATIE HULL

Rooker Training Stable

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The feeling you get trotting into the in-gate. That rush of excitement, hope and adrenaline is unlike any other. It makes the rest of the world fall away and you just focus on your ride or drive, leaving everything you have in the ring. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Change itself can be very difficult to accept or adjust to, but it is important to continually adapt and make sure that we’re moving in the right direction for the future. Our industry needs to focus more on the future and on how things could be improved rather than on the past/protecting how things have always been done. It’s important to ensure that our approach makes sense for the world we live in now and where we hope to be 10, 20 or even 50 years from now. The people are what make our industry great, so we must find ways to continue to make it fun and accessible for all, which should help to drive growth as well. While I dearly loved showing weekend after weekend at local shows as a youth, that simply isn’t feasible today. Shows require a lot of time and expense, time away from other things, including work, and it’s hard on the horses to travel and show that frequently. I have to carefully choose my shows now, and the most important factor is always what’s best for my horse. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Our community is what makes us strong and will help to bring us back together. It’s important to listen to one another, have respectful discussions and know that we’re all working towards the same goal, what’s best for our industry and the Arabian horse. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The people! We have a dedicated and passionate community who truly care about the Arabian breed, their horses and one another. It is truly an honor to be part of such a wonderful community. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? There are a lot of factors to consider but having a good group of people to show with and strong competition are what make it fun! It’s also fun to show at new venues and locations! The flexibility with qualifications this year has made it easier to plan around work and life events, so I’ve actually been able to show more than the last few years, which has been great!

GABRIEL DESOTO

Desoto Training Center

What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I think that our qualification system is a royal mess. I haven’t had the bandwidth to really get involved in this, but I will say that the past two years of no qualifications has made for some of the best horse shows I’ve seen in a long time. I think that at this point, we need to make showing Arabians as inclusive as possible. There gets to be so many barriers to entry when you have to go to X amount of Class A shows and X amount of regional shows just to even qualify for Nationals. Most of our amateurs are from out of state (even international), so the time and expense just to get qualified, not even including practice trips, becomes astronomical. I will say that I like the way the Saddlebred shows are structured. There isn’t a regional system, you can go to whatever show you want to, and it qualifies you toward World’s. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? I think that everyone needs to remember why we’re all here—we want to see the Arabian breed and our shows not just survive but thrive. Some people in the Arabian industry get so caught up in drama that it feels like they’re constantly stuck in the past, unable to move forward. I’d like to see the day where everyone cheers for each other out of a shared love and desire to see the Arabian breed move forward, not just the horses or barn they’re affiliated with. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? I look first at the breeding and then the individual to decide if they’re a good representative of their pedigree. From there, I’m looking at their specific parts and level of quality. Pricing young horses can be tricky; it’s hard for me to price young horses until I’ve actually had my hands on them for a period of time. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? I wish that I could have worked with, learned from and gotten to know John White better. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? Shows are an awesome time for our clients from all over the county (even Canada) to come together and enjoy each other’s company. We love our group of clients and try to get the whole group together as often as possible—at the farm and at horse shows. We all go out to eat together, watch each other ride and cheer each other on! Most of our clients are hands on and like to help take care of their horses as well. Ar abian Horse Times | 449 | Volume 52, No. 3


CARMELLE ROOKER

Rooker Training Stable

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? In 1978 I went with my 4-H club. We were way up at the top in Louisville. I watched one of my best friends, Molly Purdy, show in the Saddle Seat Equitation and I was hooked. At the time, I had a halfwelsh pony but knew right then that I was in love and wanted an Arab of my own. I went back in 1980 and I have not missed a U.S. Nationals since. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Their personalities are second-to-none. They can express emotion and intelligence in a way unlike any other breed I have personally worked with. Because of this, the bonds created between the horses and their riders, owners, and caretakers are truly amazing to see. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I would like to see our U.S. Nationals get moved up a couple of weeks so the weather would be more conducive for showcasing our horses. In doing this, I would also love to see the venue changed to Scottsdale or Ocala (or alternating between the two) because the facilities are amazing and the destinations are more desirable for non-horse people, allowing for family and friends to want to come to the show. Attending our U.S. Nationals is a great way to give new people the “bug”, just as it did for me many years ago. Additionally, I would love to see our schedule be adjusted to have two longer sessions as opposed to three in a day. We can still have the same number of classes and maybe even add some, while still making the schedule easier on trainers and exhibitors. This may require that we alter the ribbon presentations to make it take less time. I believe this would ultimately make it more enjoyable for spectators and less tiresome for everyone over the course of 10 days. In terms of adding classes, I am not opposed to more specific classes, with a division for every horse, followed by “grand championships” later in the week. For example, adding a class for horses under 15 hands (or whatever that number may be) would add a market for high quality horses that just don’t have the physical size to compete in the classes as they are now. Later in the week, we could take the top eight from each class and bring them together for the championship (just as we do with sections now). I believe adding divisions such as this one would make our show more inclusive for exhibitors who are just getting started or may not have the funds to purchase the highest-level horse. By adding this market, I also feel it would also encourage more breeding. All that said, U.S. Nationals is without a doubt my favorite 10 days of the year. While we are always working to improve, I am grateful for all the people behind the scenes, trainers, owners, and exhibitors that make up our incredible industry. Let us all work together to promote our wonderful breed and continue to get new faces involved!

CECILY SOTOMAYOR

Stewart Performance Horses

What year did you attend your first Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? In 2018 I attended Canadian Nationals for the first time with my trainer, Rich Doran, and won my first ever national class, HalfArabian Western Pleasure JOTR—unforgettable! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are beautiful and have huge personalities. They are smart and loyal and athletic, and there are so many different ways in which you can compete (pleasure, in-hand, working western, etc.) to keep you interested throughout your riding career. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Growing up and learning how to ride, I spent a lot of time with Dean and Sherrie Lacey and have heard countless stories about Murrel Lacey. I wish I could have met him to see his personality and training talent first-hand. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I want to build up to be competitive at the national show level with some local Class A shows and a Regional Championship show. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I compete in the reining and ranch classes, so when I have time, I love to watch my barnmates compete in the main arena and see the exciting classes like park and open English.

Ar abian Horse Times | 450 | Volume 52, No. 3


LARA AMES

Cedar Ridge Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? It was not my first Nationals, but two moments that stand out: Eternety and Jeff Schall winning National Champion Stallion; he looked amazing, and it was so exciting to see his parent’s excitement; and Bill Carrington announcing the U.S. Nationals. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I would love to see Grand Championships in the amateur classes, but for this to happen, we need to figure out a way to shorten the show and less cuts. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I do not think anyone will want me to answer this, as I have been very vocal on my thoughts, but getting back to grass roots. We need to get back to promoting the breed … not doing what is best for self or AHA, but what is best for the horse. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Let’s do what is best for the Arabian horse and not for an individual or organization. That will bring us all together. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? When the going gets tough, we all come together.

SARA SHERMAN GLASER

Lowe Show Horse Centre / Soderberg Equine

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I attended my first Nationals in 2004, and getting my show hack horse past the cattle pens was the most memorable about it! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? We need to show our horses in a more natural frame, especially in western pleasure and hunter pleasure. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Always focus on the horse’s well-being, not on winning acclaim. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Introduce them to my horses! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians exhibit a high degree of intelligence and versatility.

KENDALL CARKHUFF

Colby Powell Performance Horses / Shino Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? The first year I attended U.S. Nationals was in 2006, the last year it was held in Louisville. The first horse I owned that went to U.S. Nationals was in 2007. His name was Halston SF and he ended up going National Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure Jr. Horse! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The excitement and anticipation surrounding U.S. Nationals is something I hope never changes! There is a buzz around U.S. that I have never experienced at any other show. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I look for shows that have a good variety of classes and a high level of competition. I typically take a few horses to a show, so having a well laid out, sensible schedule can make or break a show for me! At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I try to visit other arenas as much as possible. The working western arena always provides some entertainment and shows great sportsmanship among exhibitors. And the halter arena can give a good look into the future of our breed! Ar abian Horse Times | 451 | Volume 52, No. 3


LAURA METZGER

Colonial Woods Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I first attended U.S. Nationals in the early 90s in Louisville, KY. I was amazed at how people put so much effort into the stall decorations, and the amount and variety of vendors at the show. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? This is near and dear to my heart this year, as I spent most of last year looking for that “perfect fit.” I look at how a horse moves and whether it has an appropriate energy level for the division they will be showing in. If a horse has the talent but not the drive it takes, neither of us will be happy. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I love the personality and bonding that I get with my Arabian and Half-Arabian horses. They have very unique personalities and respond differently to different people. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? My showing decisions are based on what my horse needs to get us ready to attend U.S. Nationals. If it takes a bunch of Class A shows, that is where we go. If we need tougher competition to get us ready, we will try to attend multiple regional shows. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I rarely get over to the other arenas unless someone I know is showing. We are usually in the main ring and have so much going on with people at our barn.

NORA SHAFFER

Rooker Training Stable

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I can’t remember the exact year that I first attended U.S. Nationals, however, I will forever remember the impact it had on me. The most memorable experience at U.S. Nationals was the first evening session I sat through on the final Saturday night of the horse show. The ambience of the arena, the full stands, and the spectacular caliber of horses competing was something I was instantly addicted to. My first U.S. Nationals experience was when I knew this is what I wanted to do forever! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The way in which our shows are scheduled is something that I’ve always believed is an issue. This is a difficult thing to work through due to all the different classes that need to be incorporated, however, I believe it is doable, perhaps by eliminating the afternoon session and having two longer sessions throughout the day. This is something that will make the shows significantly more enjoyable for spectators, clients and trainers. Clients often take time off work and use vacation days to attend these horse shows. Showing at 10 pm and again the next morning at 8 am is not a very enjoyable way to spend your time off. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Overall quality is something that I look for in prospects, and that in turn affects the price. To me, a young horse with good conformation, strong breeding, overall beauty, and a clear show horse attitude are all contributing factors in a horse’s quality. From my past experience, if a horse displays each of those characteristics, it will grow up to be a successful show horse. There are no promises in prospects, therefore, it is a bit of a gamble in any price point. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I think the people within the Arabian horse community are heavily devoted to the breed and dedicated to the future of our industry. Our community this past year has been outspoken and very honest about some of the changes that need to be considered in order to prosper in coming years. As we all know, there has been a lot of controversy over many topics, etc., however, I am proud to be part of a community that will put in the effort to protect the future of the breed and the functionality of our industry that we all love so much. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? I believe that having a strong sense of community within our barn and the industry is very important. At RTS we always try to incorporate a welcoming setup space that enables clients and friends to socialize and enjoy the show together. We also encourage our clients to watch each other’s classes and support one another outside of the show ring. This is something that I have personally seen make a big difference in the overall atmosphere of a horse show. Ar abian Horse Times | 452 | Volume 52, No. 3


BETSY KUBIAK

Sugar Hill Farm LLC

What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? In year one, a breeder chooses mares and stallions to cross. Year two, the foal is born and weaned. Year three, the foal is a yearling. Year four, the horse is two and perhaps begins training. Year five, you have a 3-year-old wearing tack and is ready to market. Education about this kind of investment needs to be better supported so that our industry has horses for future generations. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? After 20 years of watching horses, listening to others, and participating in this industry in many ways, I have learned a great deal. Despite ups and downs, I can honestly say how proud I am of each of the seven foals of our 2021 year! I don’t know that I can repeat this feat, but I will try my best. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? Generally, I don’t find myself following trends and I don’t always choose the most popular stallions. I purchase breedings from stallions for both my Arabian and American Saddlebred mares based on what my eyes see in the stud conformationally, and for possible improvements in what the cross might produce in order to improve the resulting performance abilities of the foal. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? 1. The shortcomings and strengths of my mares. Not one is perfect! 2. The strengths of the stallion as a choice for a particular mare. 3. Color and the associated genetics being considered for a cross. 4. Performance abilities of the stallion if they have been shown. 5. Historical results of previous or similar matings and repeat breedings.

PEGGY WEEMS AUTUMN LYNN BERTHOLDI

Stewart Performance Horses

Chrishan Park Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1987. I rode a friend’s horse to top ten in Half-Arabian English Side Saddle.

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2014. I had never been so nervous, but my horse and I survived. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The amazing riders, trainers and horses. We are all in this together. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The sense of family and the genuine love for the horse. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians are beautifully intelligent, loyal, and not to mention the most amazing athletes! They are the biggest hearted breed in the horse industry. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Location and whom from my barn is going. I love our Chrishan Park family.

What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? There are wonderful people involved! I feel so fortunate to have met many of them. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians are so intelligent and personable. When they bond with you, they love to carry out your wishes. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I attend shows where there is meaningful competition. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I always visit the trail, working western and main ring. I love seeing the outstanding performances in many disciplines.

Ar abian Horse Times | 453 | Volume 52, No. 3


ANDREA MARTOGLIO

Shamrock Farms

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I attended my first Nationals in Albuquerque in the 70s. I didn’t own Arabians at the time, but was struck by the beauty of the horses and the spectacle of the show. I was hooked on Arabians and the U.S Nationals! What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The first thing that comes to mind is the Arabian Horsemen’s Distress Fund and the people who work on its fundraisers—a truly dedicated group. The Arabian horse community has proven to come together when there is need, whether that be an individual who is ill, Arabians needing rescue, or other circumstances that arise where help is needed. The Arabian horse community is filled with caring people. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I have bred and shown Morgans and Quarter Horses at different stages of my life. My first horse was an Arabian and I always knew I’d come back to the breed. The Arabian’s beauty and personality is what I enjoy every day. I don’t think there is anything more beautiful than an elegant, athletic western pleasure Arabian. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? The decision on what shows to attend for me often depends on the age and experience of the horse. To me it makes sense to take youngsters to some Class A shows to get show ring experience before heading to regionals, etc. A seasoned show horse may have a totally different schedule as I don’t want to overshow them. I always make these decisions with my trainer. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I always visit the Pavilion to watch halter classes. I also like the trail classes and some reining classes. I never miss the AWPA, AEPA and APHA classes—they are my favorite.

MAKENNA ROOKER

Rooker Training Stable

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I love the atmosphere and excitement that comes along with the 3- and 4-year-old classes at U.S. Nationals. The trainers are excited to show off the young horses they have started, and breeders and owners are excited to see their prospects hit the ring, often for the first time. For those who do not have horses competing in these classes, I think these futurities are a great way to rally our industry together as they get people excited for the future of our breed. It is my hope that the AEPA, AWPA, AHPA, and the 3-year-old classes will never leave U.S. Nationals. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I do not believe we should have point-based qualifications. As an amateur-owner and young breeder, I will continue supporting the local shows with my horses that need that, but I personally feel that not all horses are at a point in their career where it is necessary for them to attend these shows and I think that call should be left up to the owners and trainers, not the AHA governing bodies. From the perspective of someone who attends close to ten shows a year, I have noticed a significant and positive change in the atmosphere of the horse shows over the past two seasons without qualifications. People were able to select the shows they wanted to attend based on competition, class sizes, and facilities. Without the pressure of qualifications, trainers could focus on the horses and riders instead of points. I also think it is important to highlight that horses and exhibitors were able to try out new divisions and switch those up throughout the season. I loved seeing this and hope we can continue this in the future. Plus, it’s kind of fun to not know exactly what horses will be in what classes based on who is and isn’t qualified. I also feel that a point-based qualification model is going to eliminate some great horses that are not able to qualify for reasons outside of anyone’s control. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? To me, it is not always about how high a horse trots, but rather how they trot high. The top five things I consider when making breeding decisions are quality of motion, conformation, attributes of related progeny, trainability, and disposition of the parents. I also love the traditional beauty of the Arabian horse. In this I look for big eyes, good tail carriage, tight ears, and pretty markings. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I believe this questions supports my standpoint on qualifications. For my young horses that need to gain show ring experience, I take them to smaller Class A shows, leading up to a regional, and ultimately Nationals if they are ready. I personally love going to these shows because my horses and I learn so much over the course of a weekend in a setting where the pressure is much lower than at larger shows. However, my older horse can only do so many shows a year. With that in mind, I choose to take him to shows with the best facilities for him. This includes places with the best footing in both the work and show rings, the climate, and how long the haul will be. For me personally, I like to attend shows with good competition and a fun ring to show in.

Ar abian Horse Times | 454 | Volume 52, No. 3


JENNIFER GLOMSKI

Cedar Ridge Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I first attended U.S. Nationals as a spectator in 1996. The most memorable and thrilling class was watching MHR Nobility and Gene LaCroix win Park. The excitement was palpable in Freedom Hall. I was mesmerized and hopeful to one day show in Louisville. Finally, in 2002, I was so happy to show Cat Prowler GM to a top ten in H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39. It was so exhilarating to realize a dream by showing in Freedom Hall. In a full circle moment in 2017, I was lucky enough to be coached on DA Slim Shady by the legendary Gene LaCroix—so grateful. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? It is said that happiness is meant to be shared. Our passion for horses brings us so much happiness, and ultimately, many more things unite us than divide us. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? How we come together in the highs and lows of the industry. The AHDF is a beautiful example of how we can give to those who need help. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? I feel very lucky to be working with my trainer, Laura Rodel, and my instructor, Stephanie Davisson. I have learned so much from this team at CRA. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I trust our incredible team at Cedar Ridge Arabians to choose shows that will be most beneficial to our horses. We always have a fun and challenging show season!

CLAUDIA MITCHELL

Stewart Performance Horses

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are smart, very personable and the most beautiful horses in the world. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Conformation and attitude and how that fits into the type of performance I am looking for the horse to do. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? The Arabian horse has a presence and bright attitude that makes for a beautiful and fun partner in my country division. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I need to plan my shows around my work schedule. I also try to attend shows that have a reputation of being fun for the exhibitor. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I often visit other arenas. I enjoy watching all kinds of classes (English, park, reining and ranch riding).

CINDY CRAWFORD

Chrishan Park Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1986. It was an amazing time with some of the best horses. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The enthusiasm we have for Arabian horses. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? We need to promote the Arabian to the outside world and stop all the infighting There are some tough challenges that lie ahead with our show horses in general; the fighting on social media has to stop. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Go watch Arabians in a lesson program with kids. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? The Arabian horse to me is the most personable breed. I love the saddle seat divisions the most, and the athleticism of the horses and the excitement that comes with a talented horse. Ar abian Horse Times | 455 | Volume 52, No. 3


HOLLY WOODS DILLIN

Western Cross Arabians & Pintos

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? I always invite people to my farm to walk through the barn, pet noses, and see sweet foals. As we walk through the pastures, the horses all run up for attention and I believe that’s all the convincing needed to fall in love with this amazing breed.

JILL SHERMAN

Sherman Ranch

What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Coming together is a beginning … keeping together is a progress … working together is SUCCESS! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? I don’t think you have to convince people, they just have to have a positive experience. The greatest mistake is when someone new is sold the wrong horse; misrepresented by people who should be looking out for them. If you’re honest, people will always come back and they will continue to buy horses and thank you in the end.

Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Primarily their beauty and loyalty won me over. The Arabian’s beauty and natural movement is what I believe stands out in the show ring. Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you take into account to accomplish these long-term goals? In my breeding program, I strive to combine proven pedigrees that are beautiful as well as athletic. Every foal I breed, I hope brings me one step closer to that goal. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? It definitely is a balance; I want to breed to popular stallions because the resulting foal will be marketable, but at the same time, I don’t want to breed to a stallion that doesn’t cross well with my mare. I also try to breed primarily to my own stallions to produce foals that are successful and promote them as a proven sire. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? 1. Choosing stallions to complement our mares 2. Movement 3. Type 4. Conformation 5. Neck

SARAH POST

Red Cedar Arabians Rooker Training Stable / Powell Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first U.S. Nationals as a spectator was in 2017, where I watched Hariry Al Shaqab win National Champion Stallion. This is my first U.S. Nationals as a competitor. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Remember to enjoy the ride and support each other! We are living something others only dream of. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? I regularly have people out to my farm to meet and ride my horses which range from new foals to retired former show horses. The Arabian’s amazing personality and beauty speaks for itself! What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? I look for a well-built, good-brained horse that has that wow factor. I look to the market for pricing and factor in what it costs to produce the horse. I’ve been lucky to find some nice prospects well under value by being ready to jump when an opportunity presents itself. It can be risky, but I enjoy the journey with each different one. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I try to breed something more “on trend” and something “outside the box” each year. My broodmare mix is diverse and I try to breed to a mix of big-name popular studs and lesser known unique bloodline studs. Ar abian Horse Times | 456 | Volume 52, No. 3

Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? I would have loved to be a fly on Irwin Schimmel’s barn wall; what a breeding genius! Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you take into account to accomplish these long-term goals? We are at three generations, working on four, teaching my niece Peyton Bergstad take over the reins so she can carry on the family tradition. We keep into account crossing our older ranch owned stallions on mares, hoping for fillies so we have old time pedigrees in today’s broodmares. We want to be able to use those mares on today’s stallions so we have outcrosses without as much line breeding. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I have experience with this as we own two stallions that are not within the trendsetters. For several years we bred to our stallions but soon discovered people would not buy offspring from unknown stallion sources. We then began breeding to some of the big names in the industry. We tend to go by the beat of our own drum; it’s not conventional but it has worked. We like to mix it up and now are going back to our old boys, Nicklebey Berry and Presidio CF, trying to bring back those sought-after pedigrees that are nearly extinct.


SIENNA SNELL Stewart Performance Horses What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Open and honest communication. It clearly has not happened as of recently, and it is very difficult to try and convince new people to come in with the current direction of how things are going.

RALPH W. MANNING Whistlejacket Farm

What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Quality should always be number one. I first look at the horse then I look at the pedigree. Both are equally important, however, there have been horses I loved the look of, but once I saw the pedigree, I knew it no longer fit what I was looking for, as the majority of prospects I look at are also as future breeding horses. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Their versatility. I have competed in western, hunter, English and halter, and I can’t imagine a better breed to be able to compete in that many disciplines.

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1984. Watching Orans Adagio from the rail in Freedom Hall win the Open Park with Gene LaCroix; I was 15. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Green shavings on Friday and Saturday night. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? It’s time to diversify the gene pool. It is something the Poles found necessary to do from time to time when managing their highly successful breeding programs.

When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I don’t focus too much on trends when I breed. I always think to myself, if something happened and I was stuck with all my horses, are these ones I would enjoy for myself at home.

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabian horses are living art that are as intelligent and athletic as they are beautiful. Their range of athleticism allows you to compete across diverse disciplines.

As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Time of year, location and facility.

What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The beauty, elegance, athleticism, intelligence and individual personality that sets the breed apart!

BRIAN MURCH

Strawberry Banks Farm

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1979, with my Dad at Nodoroma Farm. The most memorable was watching Gene and Ray LaCroix working horses late at night. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Years ago, everyone dressed up on Friday and Saturday nights. It was quite a gala. The Louisville venue did help with that. Stands were full, mares and stallions with 10 of the best were amazing, as well as the performance horses on those nights. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? There are many great breeds in our world. But the beauty, refinement and overall ability to do so many different disciplines is extremely special. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Quality, and overall correct conformation to be unique at their job. Neck placement, shoulder, pasterns and tail carriage. Along with attitude that can be trained to a national level, will determine the higher price point. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The horsemanship exhibited by our trainers today is at a high level. I feel confident saying more than any other breed. Ar abian Horse Times | 457 | Volume 52, No. 3


CHRISTY HIGMAN CLEMENTS

Christy Higman Clements Training

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first US. Nationals was in 1983 and I got disqualified because my horse had red slobber coming out of his mouth. I had filled him up on red apple treats before the class. Big lesson learned. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I am proud of the relationships that I have built, and I truly believe this industry is like a gigantic family. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I compete in many disciplines and I am positive that the Arabian is the most versatile, athletic and beautiful. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Absolutely, Sheila Varian. I would have loved to spend time with her at her farm. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? My kids love hanging out together and my adults might or might not enjoy a margarita or two.

GLENDA APPLE

Stewart Performance Horses

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? The breed is very passionate and instantly part of your family. The grace and beauty from their eyes, to their movement in the show ring. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Breeding, discipline and training. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? 1) My beautiful horse, DGR Maxxed Out. 2) All my friends that share the same passion as myself. 3) Sharing old and new learned experiences with equestrian friends. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? The beauty and movement of the Arabian under western is breathtaking. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Shows that friends and the training barn will be attending, and size, like the bigger shows and just getting out to the ring.

SHANNON MAY

Stewart Performance Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2001. The most memorable thing for me would be that I was riding a horse we had rescued and we were first on all three judges’ cards going into finals. Unfortunately, we had a bobble during the final ride, but still made the top ten. The other memorable thing about Nationals was the awesomeness of just being there, realizing a dream, seeing all the hard work come to fruition and admiring the quality of the horses and training. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The one thing that I find extremely difficult about our industry is the expense of showing. It is very difficult for someone with an average income to pursue dreams and goals at a higher level due to the high costs of showing. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? The Arabian horse is beautiful and kind with an amazing willingness to please. They are very family oriented and love to have their own person! They are versatile and extremely trainable. Whether you want a backyard buddy or a high- level show horse, the Arabian horse is the way to go! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? The Arabian is my choice because of their heart and soul, and they have incredible work ethic! A soft, forward, ground covering trot and balanced lofty hand gallop are all qualities I admire in the hunter pleasure division. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I visit other arenas as much as I can when my friends/teammates are competing. The reining and ranch riding draws me to other arenas. Ar abian Horse Times | 458 | Volume 52, No. 3


RODRIGO GONZALEZ

Arabian Soul Partners

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The respect for the show. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The system… it needs to add a bronze champion, URGENTLY. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Enjoy life. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The friends developed through the years. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/ learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Alcides.

LUCIANA HERNANDEZ

Christy Higman-Clements Training

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2016. To say I was starstruck would be an understatement. The quality, the energy, the fun! It was overall such an incredible experience, but I have to say my favorite part was coming home with a new horse, Titleist BF, who had just won the Arabian Country Junior Horse. Truly, I’m the luckiest girl in the world! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? My entire equestrian career has been with the Arabian horse. I could not imagine it any other way. Arabians are versatile and fiery as we all know, but the one quality that I find irreplaceable is their huge heart! As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Location is everything! A quality facility in a fun city will always attract the crowds. With a good location and facility comes the competition and big classes we all want to be in. It is a win, win, win! These are by far my biggest motivators.

DR. NANCY D. O’REILLY

Southern California Equestrian Center |

What do you think is difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Members must have ownership and voting privileges, and we must bring the public in, fill stands, increase $$ and sponsors. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? How I feel about horses: . I want everyone else to feel the same way.

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What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? I look for breeding horses, and you get what you pay for, so quality and proven mares and stallions are a must. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Sheila Varian. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I go to the bigger shows and those close, so as not to tax the horses with long distances if possible.

Ar abian Horse Times | 459 | Volume 52, No. 3


KELLY STEINHAUS

Stachowski Farms

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I first attended U.S. Nationals in 1992 in Louisville. I was 12 years old, wide eyed and I had qualified to ride in the Saddle Seat Medal Class. It was my first experience at a major horse show, and I had a lot of memories. I was able to watch memorable horses like Countess Vanessa, Red Tape and many others. I also met lifelong friends that I still have to this day. It was a great experience for a 12-year-old girl! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The accessibility for everyone to be able to compete at the national level. Sometimes competing at the national level is beyond what people can do financially and I think that somehow that needs to change. Many horses qualify at the local and regional level for nationals, but because it is an expensive venture or they don’t have time off from work, they are not able to attend national events. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians were in my family and in my blood. My mother, grandmother and aunts owned Arabian horses and I always knew that was going to be the breed I wanted to ride. I compete in country English pleasure and I love that the Arabian contributes its athleticism to that division. They have tremendous heart and truly want to please you. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? My mother and I are just starting to breed, so we are very much on a small scale. When deciding who to breed to in terms of sires, we want to make sure the sire is a good match to our mare and that her best features are balanced with the sire’s best features. I think we want to find the best sire for the mare, regardless of whether he is the most popular sire at the time or not. There are many factors to look at, and it may not necessarily always mean going with the sire who’s hot at the moment. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? For me, being an adult amateur, the most important factor is going to be what shows are going to put me and my horse in with the best competition, and what shows will be the most beneficial for us to attend. If there are not that many shows to choose from in a season, I want to make sure I put myself and my horse in the best place as possible to be competitive for Nationals.

MURRAY & SHIRLEY POPPLEWELL

Rae-Dawn Arabians

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? We think it’s very important to remember that showing and enjoying our horses is most enjoyable when our community comes together, as one—both halter and performance. It would be wonderful to condense classes and the length of show in order to be able to put our horses and disciplines in one arena, showing to stands full of our entire industry looking on. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are a very special breed of horse. They are sensitive yet inquisitive. They have a unique beauty and character that instantly captures your attention and reels you in. Each one has a personality all their own. Their versatility makes them suitable for any family endeavor, whether you enjoy showing halter, trail riding or performance competition. They truly are an all-around-horse. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? Shirley and I have always bred a horse we love and enjoy—after all, breeding horses is a competition within oneself: to do better, to be better, to see better. It’s a never-ending learning experience and the breed is ever evolving, so we don’t breed for trends per se. The horses from the Rae-Dawn program have competed at the highest of levels in halter competition as well as in the very competitive performance divisions. We strive to breed a balanced horse with characteristics that first and foremost bring us joy which transcends to bringing joy to others. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? We enjoy showing horses very much and for us, the shows need to be a balance of show and social entertainment. The Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show is a perennial event for Rae-Dawn Arabians where we can showcase up to 20 of our own horses—it is truly the finest Arabian horse show in the world. Where can you find the quality of horse any other place? We’re fortunate that the show is in Rae-Dawn’s Scottsdale farm “backyard.” What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Sometimes due to the hustle and bustle of our daily routines and involvement within the Arabian horse community, we forget that we are all in this together, one big family—sharing the love and passion of the Arabian horse together. Let us not get too blinded on our journey to forget that success for another is success for all, as it elevates the breed, and our community, for us all to enjoy. Ar abian Horse Times | 460 | Volume 52, No. 3


DOUGLAS LEADLEY

Orrion Farms

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1965, Springfield, Ill. Watching *Bask win the Park Horse Championship. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Friday night’s naming the Mare Champion and Saturday night, the Stallion. Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you take into account to accomplish these long-term goals? The magic is in the mares. I like to select a mare line that has delivered champions for several generations. This follows my predictability philosophy. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I think trends will go away. Orrion Farms is committed to breeding horses that can compete on any continent. This means we must have the entire package. Head, neck, shoulder, body, balance, movement and tail carriage. The horses winning Gold titles around the world are hitting most of these objectives. What do you consider to be the most important when making breeding decisions? Predictability. I study a stallion’s foal crops. The toughest breeding choices are the stallions that hit a home run on one in a hundred.

BRETT BECKER

Becker Stables

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? In 1983 I was a junior rider back when there was no Youth Nationals and no age group splits. I was the youngest one in the class and went top ten in the Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AOTR. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The unranked top ten. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? We need to consolidate the regional shows. We now have more nationals and the new qualification system is requiring more participation in Class A shows, all at the expense of the regionals. There is only so much and so many weeks in the calendar, rounds that a horse can do, and shows that an owner can afford. The regional shows are losing out. We need to get back to when regionals were a big deal; make them more of an “event” and less about everybody just getting a prize. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? I don’t breed for trends. I breed for what I like. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? Quality, correct conformation (as opposed to trends), disposition, athleticism/usability, and eye-appeal.

JOE RESER Shamrock Farms LLC What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1982. We came in Thursday for the final weekend, and the stands were packed. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Stanley White, Sr. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? We will either cook or bring dinner to the stalls so we can eat as a “family.” We feel this helps bring clients together and aids in barn camaraderie. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Unfortunately, I am not able to make it to any arena other than Ford.

Ar abian Horse Times | 461 | Volume 52, No. 3


LORI & PETER CONWAY

Conway Arabians

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The pomp and circumstance of being awarded a National Championship. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Work on our means of communicating with all the owners of Arabian and Half-Arabian horses. In this day and age, there is really no excuse not to solicit input from everyone. Remain open minded to accept and respect others’ suggestions. We are a breed organization of many intelligent, sophisticated, business minded people and we need to include these people and encourage them to get involved, and when they do, try not to shove them out the door at every turn. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? We don’t go for trends at all. We are not afraid to step outside of the stallions we own—Coltrane, El Ghazi, Cool River Kid and CSP Rolling Stone—and then take that resulting foal and bring it back into our breeding program. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? Phenotype (observable characteristics/conformation) Genotype (pedigree and genetic characteristics) Attitude (do we want to live with this 24/7?) Ability (it must have a job and be able to do it well) Marketability (will someone else want it and love it?) As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Distance, facility (show arena, stalls, footing), expense, classes offered.

MARTA WAZNIAK Becker Stables What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? We have the best breed of horse in the world! The experiences I have had and the friends I have gained as a result of these beautiful and intelligent animals is irreplaceable. Hands down!

JESSICA HERRBOLDT

Liberty Meadows

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2020. The most memorable thing was making our cut in the hunter pleasure select after switching disciplines to hunt only a couple months before competing at U.S. Nationals for the very first time. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The atmosphere! And, of course, where the LMTC stalls are located. :) What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? How accessible and affordable our industry is for newcomers. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Our show schedule is based on our goal for the year, whether that be to have fun, sell a horse or go to U.S. Nationals. My biggest considering factor would be competition and timing.

Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Growing up in Warsaw, Poland, I loved horses and began my experience as a teenager. I made my way to the Warsaw Racetrack, and they helped me learn. Starting daily at 5:00 am, I rode just about anything they would let me, but if I had the choice between an Arabian or Thoroughbred, I always chose an Arabian. They were softer, kinder; I simply connected better with them. They took care of me. Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you take into account to accomplish these long-term goals? One generation at a time! Breeding is a forward moving passion. By studying outcomes in the past over time, it gives you the hypothesis to follow. One generation at a time. When making breeding decisions, how do you balance trends? With an incredible love and respect of the Polish Stud farms and their example, of course the foundation of a breeding program needs to have traditional, solid conformation and Arabian type that comes from generations of good breeding. Then add in the contemporary flare of today without losing the past ... that is an important, but not always an easy practice. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I am a horse fanatic. I watch it all. A full fan of the versatility of the Arabian horse, I go back and forth to both the performance and halter arenas constantly. This year, I have a special interest in the Western Pleasure Open class, so I’ll be watching “silver” this year!

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GRANT KROHN

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I have grown up in the Arabian industry and could not tell you the first nationals that I attended, but the class that I am always excited to see year after year is the Arabian English Pleasure Open. As a son of a top breeder in our industry of saddle seat horses, that class always has a minimum of 2-3 of the top stallions our breed has to offer. Watching them all compete in the ring together helps us make decisions for the next spring and it is just so much fun to watch! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Our breed offers a wide variety of classes which is great, to an extent. In the last few years, we have added, in my opinion, far too many. I also think the divide between halter and performance has grown too big. If all the horses competed in the same ring, that divide would become much smaller. The only way we would be able to have all the horses showing in the same ring again would be to cut out a lot of extra classes. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? There are so many things to look for when looking at prospects, but the two main things that I look for are quality and balance. Quality speaks for itself, but balance is how they move back to front, how their neck comes out of their withers, and how their overall self-carriage is presented while at Liberty. Those two elements determine where a horse should be priced while still in the “prospect” stage. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? My family has been involved in the Arabian breed for four generations, so you could say it is in my blood, but the Arabian horse has so much personality and presence about them that other breeds do not have.

KELSEY FLOHR Krohn Show Horses What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? The first year I attended U.S. Nationals was 2015. The most memorable moment I have was watching Jody Strand win his 3rd consecutive win with Zefyr in the Western Open. Little did I know that years later, he would become one of my biggest mentors in this industry! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? One thing that is difficult for some is remembering that these are animals, not machines, and they need to be treated with respect. We all go there because we love to compete and we want the roses, but win or lose, you still need to love your horse. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? There is not a textbook for this industry, and I think people need to be willing to share their knowledge with younger generations to keep our world thriving. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? That’s a loaded question. First of all, conformation and movement is an obvious one. After that, I think you can tell a lot about a horse through their eyes and demeanor. If a horse has a “kind eye,” it goes a long way. Also, I research horses that have the same sire and/or dam and get information on their trainability. As a trainer, what things do you offer or encourage to make sure your clients enjoy the shows outside of the show ring? We truly love our clients. Krohn Show Horses is a family, and everyone is treated as such!

SUSAN READ

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1975. The huge classes. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I wish more exhibitors could get to know each other on a more personal level. We tend to know the people with our trainer, but not too many others. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? They do it all … ride for pleasure, compete, endurance, and lovely to look at. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Location, show management, quality of stabling and show arenas. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Rarely, but reining.

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KATIE RUSSELL

Stachowski Farms, Inc.

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first U.S. Nationals was in 1978 I believe. It was a thrill—my eyes were as big as saucers. Back then there was just AOTR—no age groups and no youth divisions—just one huge class per division (western, English, etc.). What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The pomp and circumstance! It is thrilling and magical to watch the National Champion trotting or jogging down the rail with the red roses glistening and the tri-color ribbons waving. It always makes my heart skip a beat and it’s just a magnificent sight to behold. Arabian horses wear red roses the best, for sure! What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Let’s agree to disagree when necessary and do what’s right for the breed. We need to put the Arabian horse first! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? That’s easy! There is no other breed as personable, sensitive, talented, versatile, and beautiful as the Arabian horse. By far the most loving of all breeds and so easy on the eyes. Living art! What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The people! The Arabian horse community really is family.

DIANE FRANKLIN

Franklin Farm LLC

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The joy in seeing so many people competing and the friendships Nationals brings about. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? I’d like to see better communication between the members and leadership. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are the most versatile horse there is. Their athleticism and endurance make them excel in all disciplines, and they are wonderful family horses as well. They love people and they are beautiful! What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? A horse needs to have the conformation and attitude to fit the discipline he is trained for. Price depends on suitability, how trainable he may be, and how well they may compete in their disciplines.

ASHLEY COMMISSIONG

Stachowski Farm, Inc.

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first year at U.S. Nationals was in 1988. I was only 6, but I distinctly remember being seated in the upper level of a packed Freedom Hall for stallion halter. Between the smoke machine, the spotlight, and the energy of the crowd ... it was magic. Dick Dady had helped my parents buy their first Arabians, and when Steve was named Reserve National Champion with Imperial Imdal, I was convinced I knew a real-life rock star. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I know this is an unpopular opinion, but I think that there should be fewer classes, at least at the National level. This would allow the show to be shorter in length, to combine halter and performance again, and for the numbers in our classes to return to their prior highs. Does anyone else remember when we would advertise a top twenty win at Nationals? That was a BIG DEAL because of the depth of competition. I would be excited to see us really celebrate a top ten. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? “You know what the happiest animal on Earth is? A goldfish. You know why? It’s got a 10-second memory. Be a goldfish.” Where are my fellow Ted Lasso fans? I know that it’s important to remember where we came from, but sometimes I feel like we spend so much time staring at closed doors that we miss new opportunities for growth. We are an innovative, resourceful membership, and we should start acting like it. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? This is preaching to the choir, of course, but Arabians are sensitive, curious, beautiful, loyal, courageous, proud animals, and they act not only as mirrors, but as confidantes and healers. The icing on the cake is that their owners and caretakers are a reflection of these horses and you will find yourself side by side with genuine, kind hearted individuals sharing your same passion. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Having grown up in the industry, I have been very fortunate in that I have had the opportunity to learn from a wide range of incredibly talented and generous individuals whom I love dearly: Steve Dady, Debbie Reid, Virginia Godwin, Johnny Ryan, and now Leah Beth Golladay. I don’t think there are better horsemen or people out there, but as my heart is ALWAYS galloping on a hunter, I would love some lessons from Wendy Potts. Ar abian Horse Times | 464 | Volume 52, No. 3


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TIFFANY YANCEY

Stewart Performance Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I showed at U.S. Nationals in 2008 with Trowbridge’s LTD. It was very memorable as it was my last show with my Arabian hunter gelding before retiring him. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Finals night! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I think it’s important to reconsider the recently implemented qualification system whilst under COVID times. I do not have the solution, but it seems that there are some good shortterm options that would benefit both members of AHA, as well as the industry. There needs to be more empathy to those still recovering from the ramifications of COVID. Financially, people are still hurting, and it will take a bit of time for them to get back on their feet. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? The realization that we are all in this for the same reasons. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Whatever the boss lady says. 

KIM BOND

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2020 was my first year attending Nationals as an owner. Hamilton going Reserve National Champion and sharing that with my daughter is my most memorable moment. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? The perception by other equestrian breeds that we, as a group, are elitist. We must do better with lesson programs and community outreach in order to grow our base. There needs to be more schooling shows geared towards Arabians; it provides a platform for people to get started and show Arabians at a more affordable level. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? We need to love each other like we love our horses. We need to welcome new Arabian enthusiasts the same way we get excited about each new foal! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Come to the barn with me! Our barn family is very warm, and the horses are so versatile and beautiful, they sell themselves. I think people just need more exposure and opportunities to debunk they myth that Arabians are crazy. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I started out riding hunters in Virginia and wasn’t exposed to Arabians until 1985 when I started grooming at a local farm in Texas. Their beautiful eye, extreme intelligence and charisma won me over. In a matter of weeks, I was hooked for life! Currently we compete in halter and that fire when they come in the show ring … the “IT” factor that the really exceptional halter horses possess … is breathtaking.

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JENNIFER HAGALE DRINNON

Hagale Family Arabians / ChriShan Park Arabians

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1995. Mamage winning the English Pleasure Open class with Shan. I loved the green chips and the spotlight. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The fierce competition and camaraderie. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The community and teamwork of all the barns and trainers. Everyone is always willing to help when needed even if it is other barns who compete against each other. I love how everyone cheers their competitors on and gives words of encouragement. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Their beauty. The Arabian breed is so beautiful, and they are full of so much spirit and heart. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I want to make sure I pick shows that normally have good sized classes and competition. I also consider the facility and the overall conditions of the fair grounds.

JULIA NASTRI

Stachowski Farms, Inc.

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? I attended my first U.S. nationals in 2019 in which I competed with my horses DA Avant Guardian and Wildfire LPR. The most memorable thing about it was watching my horse win a reserve national championship in the purebred open show hack with my trainer Jonathan Ramsay. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I love showing on the green shavings on finals weekend! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are such a unique and special breed because of their distinctive beauty and their ability to connect with humans. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I am most proud of the connections and friendships I have made through the Arabian horse community; one of them going from being my best friend, to now sister-in-law. I especially love that it is one of the few sports that can be enjoyed multigenerational. It has personally brought my family a lot closer together with great memories. Regarding your breeding program, how many generations down the road are you considering? What kind of things do you take into account to accomplish these long term goals? We have always admired the great breeders in the industry and last year we bred our first purebred. We are looking forward to watching our filly grow up and eventually hit the national show ring one day!

BRITTNEY BERGET

Price Performance Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first U.S. Nationals was 2004 in Louisville. I remember being blown away by the quality of horses, the number of people (both showing and spectating), and the electric atmosphere. It was unlike any show I’d ever been to and trotting down the shoot into Freedom Hall was an experience I will always treasure. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? Our industry could really benefit from having less shows and fewer classes within those shows. This would make for bigger, more fun classes, and a schedule that would be less stressful and more spectator friendly. When I first started showing, getting a ribbon at a Class A show meant something, as did making a cut at nationals; we need to get back to that. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Recently I’ve been really interested in looking at the history of the Arabian breed and how it came to prominence in the U.S. I’d love to pick the brains of Will Keith Kellogg, Shelia Varian, and Bazy Tankersley to name a few, and see what they would have to say about our current state of affairs and what advice they would give us going forward. Ar abian Horse Times | 466 | Volume 52, No. 3


GREG HARRIS

Harris Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1977, I won my first national championship. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? When I think of U.S. Nationals, I think of green shavings … that’s the one thing I don’t want to see change. What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I think that up-and-coming trainers and amateurs that are new to the breed would benefit from a Limited Pro/Amateur national show. We need them to succeed, and for the future of our breed. We need more lesson programs and more beginner/new amateur-friendly shows to give those new to the breed the opportunity to get excited. What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? Pedigree, low hocks, short cannon bones, and overall quality. Once they’re started and showing promise, will then determine price. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Three people I know well but wish I had the opportunity to work with would be Gene and Ray LaCroix and Stan White Jr.

MONICA DUMONT

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 2000, in Louisville. I remember seeing First Cyte named National Champion and I was lucky enough to breed my mare to him a few years later. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Visit a farm with Arabians and just see how they act. I love giving farm tours at my place. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Sheila Varian. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? I consider the show schedule and location, and like to know who is judging. Since I live in Connecticut and my show horses are in Texas, I must balance all factors. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I like to watch both performance and halter classes, and enjoy watching trail at USN.

LORI & NICOLE QUINN

Reed Training

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? In 2017; the elaborate stall set ups and the sheer depth and quality of the competition in every discipline. What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The green shavings! What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Being Canadian, we appreciate being able to attend this show. Let’s leave the drama and politics at home, and just enjoy our beautiful Arabian horses! What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? When someone has experienced some type of hardship, I love how our Arabian community rallies around them and supports them. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? We love visiting all of the other arenas to watch the divisions we don’t compete in! It’s great to see the best of the best compete in all! Ar abian Horse Times | 467 | Volume 52, No. 3


KEVIN MCBRIDE

Vicki Humphrey Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1978. The unbelievable feel of Freedom Hall, especially with green shavings! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I love all breeds, but especially American Saddlebreds and Arabians. I have loved and stayed with the breed because of the owners and exhibitors I love. Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? I wish I had gotten to spend more time learning from Gene and Ray LaCroix. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? What shows and locations work best with my work schedule. The ultimate goal for me is to for sure, be at Nationals every year. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Honestly, not very often. I do miss the days when we were able to see most finals in the main arena. I do enjoy seeing other disciplines.

KRYSTAL MCCULLOCH

Vicki Humphrey Training Center

What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? That is easy … take them to a barn and get them on an Arab! Hit a show and let a person see the classes, horses and people. The caveat: be sure this person has the free time and expendable income to play in this arena. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? That snort! Everyone knows that look on a saucy Arab’s face when they are feeling fine; then you get the snort! Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Tom McNair. When Rita and he were showing, I was a kid. Just to see him on those gorgeous Arabians was breathtaking, especially in costume. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? A regional show always gets my attention because the competition will be challenging. Additionally, I like a good arena with superb footing. A fantastic location (Ocala, Lexington, etc.) is always a plus. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? I try to get over to see the halter horses, because they are so exquisite, and the people who show them are a whole different clan than performance—that is fun because I meet new owners. I am definitely going to see the reiners this year!

JENNY LAU

Vicki Humphrey Training Center

What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The atmosphere in the arena during a particularly exciting class! What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? We’re all here because we share the same passion and same love for the Arabian horse. We need to unite around our love for the horses and what is best for them. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians are such a beautiful and versatile breed! Plus, they have incredible personalities. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? How much everyone supports each other. It’s a second family to me. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? First and foremost, I consult with my trainer on what will be the best environment for my horse at the stage they are in. Then I look at scheduling and time off of work needed to attend.


ANNE SPERTE

Vicki Humphrey Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first U.S. Nationals was the first year it was held in Tulsa. I remember being in awe of the absolute beauty of these amazing horses competing at the highest level. Attending U.S. Nationals had been on my bucket list since I was 6 years old! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? The high level of competition! To be named National Champion, I would want to know that I competed against the best of the best. That is what drives me to train as hard as I can to be prepared physically, mentally and to be in sync with my horse. I know we must bring our A game! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I would love to see more Arabian participation at all-breed shows. We need to showcase our breed. Every time I’ve brought Arabs to a local, all-breed show, people fall in love with our beautiful Arabians. Additionally, we can show that Arabians are very smart, versatile, and do their job. They are not just “high strung!” What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Not only are Arabians beautiful, but they are the most versatile breed. An adult or child starting out in one discipline may decide they want to try something different, and Arabians can do it all! As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Based on the shows my trainer is attending, I like to attend the bigger, more competitive regional shows. Out of those shows, I choose shows that are in desirable locations (nice grounds, availability of good restaurants, nicer hotel options), and have a fun atmosphere (exhibitor/barn parties, fun activities, etc.).

SHEA KRACHECK

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? About 8 years ago. I just remember all of the stunning horses and riders there. It was exciting seeing and experiencing the competition. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The people. I paused being actively involved for several years and when I came back, it was like I never left. The people are so welcoming and kind. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Their beauty and personality! I love that my horses are so sweet and yet can have so much sass. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Location, class options, and financial considerations. My biggest motivating factor is the class options available for my horses to show. At Nationals, how often do you visit the other arenas to watch classes outside of the ring(s) you primarily compete in? What class(es) draw you to a different arena? Pretty often! I love watching disciplines in which I personally haven’t experienced, like reining!

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ANDIE SZABO

Krohn Show Horses

What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Making sure each horse show is fair, fun and inviting to everyone. Comradery is of the utmost importance. Never forget to cheer and support each other, including your competition. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? The Arabian horse is the most breathtaking animal anyone would be lucky to have. They will instantly become a part of your family. Their unique personalities transcend beyond their striking beauty, talent and love they share. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I know this is the silliest answer to give, but here’s the honest truth. My mother read The Black Stallion as a young child and always wanted to have her own Arabian. When I was 5, she made her dream come true. In our opinion, the Arabian horse’s versatility is unmatched by any other breed. As a child, we did it all with just one incredible horse named Faaraff. He did competitive trail, hunter, halter, jumping, western, saddle seat and costume. Now as an adult, I cannot imagine having the incredible childhood I had, without my Arabian horse. Starting with the most important, what are the top five things you consider when making breeding decisions? 1. Ask Grant; 2. Follow up with Grant; 3. Agree with Grant; 4. Do what Grant suggests; and 5. Take credit for all breeding decisions! As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Location, size of the show, and judging help decide where we want to compete.

JO-ANN L. LANDRY

Krohn Show Horses LLC

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first time attending was 2019. Most memorable was watching my horse trainer, Grant Krohn, showing my beautiful Arabian horse, Koweta Verdict, in the Futurity Gelding class and placing in the top ten. What words of wisdom do you have for us to come together? Continue to communicate, share ideas and recommendations, and learn from each other. Keep an open mind and be willing to make changes when necessary. What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? I would tell them that Arabian horses are very intelligent and are always willing to please their owners. They are beautiful animals and a pleasure to own and ride. I would also tell them that Arabian horses are versatile in many disciplines such as English pleasure, dressage, hunt seat, western pleasure and racing. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I enjoy meeting and socializing with the Arabian horse community, and I love sharing information about my experiences with these amazing Arabian horses. It makes me proud when the community is willing to share their knowledge, and willing to help each other make the right decisions relating to the Arabian horse. Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? I have owned many Half-Arabians and other breeds of horse, but my Half-Arabian horses have always had the right qualities I needed to show in the disciplines I was interested in, such as hunter and dressage. After purchasing Koweta Verdict a couple of years ago, Grant and I agreed because of his unique qualities, such as a beautiful headset and the way he presents himself, he should be shown in halter and hunter pleasure classes.

Ar abian Horse Times | 470 | Volume 52, No. 3


ISABELLE MORGAN

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? My first time attending was last year in 2020, but this is my first year bringing a horse. I loved the energy of the show; it made watching as a visitor such an exciting experience! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? Green shavings! What do you think is one thing that’s difficult, but needs to change within our industry? I think we need to continue to promote the Arabian breed, removing the stigma that riding, owning, and showing a horse are only for the elite. There are so many opportunities to get involved in the Arabian breed! What would you say/do to convince someone interested in getting involved with horses that Arabians are the way to go? Arabians have immense personalities, and they challenge us daily, making us better owners and riders. They are incredibly loyal and kind. That type of reward is unparalleled to the Arabian breed vs. any other breed.

ROBIN MANFIELD

Liberty Meadows Training Center

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1994. I made a cut and wore my pink ribbon on my butt all day! What do you look for in a prospect and how do you determine how it should be priced? A good mind and conformation which makes the horse’s job easy to do. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? The horses and people, of course! Who’s one person in the industry you never had the opportunity to work with/ learn from or get to know better, that you wish you could have? Gene LaCroix. As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? The venue, footing and competition.

CHRISTINE HANSEN

Krohn Show Horses

What year did you attend your first U.S. Nationals? What was the most memorable thing about it? 1995. The green shavings and how everyone dressed up the last two nights! What do you never want to see change as it relates to U.S. Nationals? I like the fact that you don’t have to qualify for Nationals. What makes you the proudest to be part of the Arabian horse community? I have met some of my best friends since owning an Arabian. No matter what trainer I am with, we all become a family! Why the Arabian horse over other breeds? What unique qualities does that Arabian contribute to the division you compete in? Arabians are versatile. I show in country pleasure and show hack; sometimes both of these on the same day. Not many breeds could perform both disciplines, nor the same day! As an owner, what factors do you consider when deciding what shows to attend for the year? What is the biggest motivating factor for you personally? Distance, facility, and frankly, how well I did at that particular show in past years. The past couple years, my focus has been on regional shows, especially since there were no qualifications. ■ Ar abian Horse Times | 471 | Volume 52, No. 3


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AT THEIR BEAUTIFUL BOUTIQUE RANCH IN RIDGEFIELD, WA ON AUGUST 28, 2021. It was from stories shared by fellow friends and breeders—both triumph and tragedy—that led Joe and Kim Orr to create an event where all could gather to share their commonalities with zero agenda. Be it finally achieving that first quality stallion after years of breeding or losing a long-awaited foal to birthing difficulties, these stories of pride and adversity touch every breeder, and sharing both excitement and sorrow with fellow breeders allows for shared appreciation and admiration, as well as a letting go of the pain to move forward with renewed enthusiasm and delight for what is to come. With no hot topics or any end in mind but simply enjoying each other and each other’s beautiful programs, Kim went all out to spoil everyone who attended. From a wonderful meal with Breeders Talking Points on every table (some pretty darn entertaining), to special breeder emoji cookies for dessert that had every emotion you can image, every detail was created with great thought and beautiful intention. Kimmy Rivero set up a special Lebron James tequila-tasting station to celebrate his new LOBOS 1707. The EXTRA ANEJO was a personal favorite and all comped by the company in trade for some great pics. After a small presentation of breeding mares and foals, and a surprise appearance of Karen Ringquist’s trick horse SA Cavalli with dear friend Luke Bardue, an Extreme Trail Course Exhibition followed on the Orrs newly built Mark Boulander Extreme Trail Course, and all had a blast. The evening concluded with live entertainment from American Idol finalist Brittany Kellogg and WOW … she’s comin’ back! The 2022 Breeders Celebration is on the creative table and the title looks to be “Concert In The Park,” including Brazilian flamingo guitarists, the return of Brittany Kellogg (all present agreed to boycott unless she was brought back), and perhaps a surprise or two. The Orrs are thankful to all the beautiful breeders from across the country who came to celebrate with them, and they hope all enjoyed it as much as they did. “Breeders are some crazy, wonderful, peops!”

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By CATHERINE COLE FERANDELLI

The love affair between Holly Hill Farm’s owners, Renee Pelzman and Morgan Runyon, and their burnished copper stallion, Fire And Goldd (Afire Bey V x Brassmis), continues to flourish. After acquiring Goldd in 2019, the mother/daughter team witnessed last year, their first foal crop of six purebred and four Half-Arabian babies. “We were so thrilled with Goldd’s babies! Two of his Half-Arabians, Fools Goldd and Heart of Goldd, we have bred back to give us full siblings,” says Morgan. “The mares had been leased to a friend for the 2021 season and are now checked back in foal for us for 2022 and we could not be more excited!” Two Saddlebred mares, The Sun’s Out and El Baile, have also been key components to Holly Hill Farms’ breeding success. Morgan continues, “The Sun’s Out (Sunny) is by CF First Night Out and out of a magnificent Radiant Sultan daughter, with lines going back to Valley View Supreme, Status Symbol, New Yorker, Supreme Sultan, and Glenview Radiance. El Baile (Honey) is by Kalarama’s Spanish Dancer and out of a spectacular daughter by CH Talk of the Town. Within her bloodlines are six Broodmare Hall of Fame dams: Duchess of Grandview, Oman’s Anacacho Maytime, Crebilly’s Plumb Beautiful, Putting on Airs, Melody O’Lee and CH Supreme Airs. Her pedigree is also chock-full of world class sires including CH Yorktown, New Yorker, CH Valley View Supreme, CH Wing Commander, Supreme Sultan, and Harlem Globetrotter. These Saddlebred crosses with Goldd have been absolutely out of this world, so I decided to add another mare to our group, with our purchase of Landmark’s Dolly Parton (Dolly) who is sired by the great (SA) Tomcat. Dolly is exceptionally refined and easygoing and if you didn’t know better, you’d think she’s Half-Arabian herself! We’re anticipating an exceptionally beautiful and talented 2022 baby.” After purchasing Goldd from world-class breeder Marty Shea, his first foal crop with Renee and Morgan was the product of a bit of experimentation. Long-time Arabian horse lovers, owners and amateur show exhibitors, the duo had never owned a breeding stallion of Goldd’s caliber. Fortunately, their experiment was a resounding success. “We knew Goldd produced great progeny, having already sired national champions,” Morgan smiles. “What we didn’t know was how he would mesh with our mares and those of the wonderful mare owners who chose to breed to him for the first time. I can’t say we were totally surprised, but we were really thrilled with Goldd’s 2020 crop. They were all so exceptional that we chose to keep some and sell a few to show horse owners who we knew would give them not just a quality

life, but the opportunity to blossom and time to grow into great show horses.” Katie Burr-Solek (Burrline, LLC) of Temecula, California, purchased the then-weanling Half-Arabian chestnut colt, Fools Goldd (x The Sun’s Out), as a future show prospect. Morgan and Renee couldn’t be happier for Katie in joining the ‘Goldden Family’. Heart of Goldd was also sold as a weanling to a new owner in the Midwest. “We can’t wait to see these two dynamic boys in the show ring one day . . . it will be hard not to cry when we get to see them again,” shares Morgan. Another new owner/breeder to the family last year was Brooksley Sheehe of Tshampagne Arabians. Brooksley is a longtime friend and fellow breeder and now, a true believer in Goldd. “Fire and Goldd complements my mares by throwing stretch, phenomenal attitudes, beauty and athleticism in both purebreds and Half-Arabians. I am so pleased with his foals, I intend to reproduce the same crosses I bred. I adore my Goldd babies!” Now 14 years old, Goldd is seeing the rise of his second-generation progeny. Boisvert Farms, LLC’s 6-year-old stallion, Barcelona BF, is a national champion park, English pleasure and driving horse with ten young offspring of his own and more to arrive in 2022. Many other Goldden children have also made their mark in the show ring and Goldd is booked to a number of mares who themselves are national champions and national champion producers. Holly Hill Farms has a strong lineup to represent Goldd at the 2021 U.S. Nationals, including their National Champion, Goldd Standard showing in the Open and AAOTH Half-Arabian Saddle Type Gelding 3 & Over, with Morgan and Steve Heathcott, as well as Open and AATD Pleasure Driving, with trainer Dwane Hankins in the Open. Their reserve national champion Glitter and Goldd will compete in the Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Dwane and Morgan in the Maturity, and Goldden Girl will represent in the Half-Arabian Saddle Type Mares 3 & Over, both in Open and AAOTH, as well as English Pleasure Junior Horse with Dwane. “I’ve waited a long time to show these fillies,” says Morgan, “it’s going to be an exciting end to the year!”

2020 H/A Filly (Fire And Goldd x x First Lady Ana)


Multi-National Champion Barcelona BF (Fire And Goldd x Cordoba BF)

Holly Hill Farm’s owners are happy to carry the mantle of being curators and While show ring success is powerful proof of Goldd’s prowess as a breeding ambassadors for the Arabian horse breed and, especially, for Goldd. They stallion, Morgan and Renee are equally committed to their belief in his excepwelcome visitors to see Goldd and his babies and love making new friends tionalism and treat each of his progeny as its own individual. Morgan examples, who share their passion for great horses. “When we bought Goldd, Tim Shea “I bought Glitter and Goldd basically sight-unseen from Marty Shea; all I saw said he ‘finally has his own statue and spotlight.’ We intend to keep that light was a quick snippet of a video. I brought her home and let her take her time burning brightly!”q growing up. That seemed to be the right recipe for her. Dwane started her slowly, and we didn’t show her under saddle until very recently. At age five, she #StayGoldden has really grown into herself; a big, incredibly bold, ultra-confident mare that possesses all the English pleasure thrills. She personifies why people fall in love with ‘red-headed’ saddle seat horses!” Ar abian Horse Times | 477 | Volume 52, No. 3


By SARAH JAYNE JOHNSON

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Dr. Nancy O’Reilly, the face of Amazing Horse Woman LLC feeds her passion for Arabian horses through her growing breeding program. From humble beginnings of showing in liberty classes to riding and driving multiple Arabians and Half-Arabians, O’Reilly moved up from owning a couple of horses to buying breeding stallions, and her love for the breed finally led to her purchase of what is now Southern California Equestrian Center. Prominent fixtures this upcoming breeding season, are O’Reilly’s stallions, Life Inthe Fazt Lane (Vegaz x River Dance NA) and Affliction (Mamage x PSI Love U), as well as the remaining straws of the great English stallion Mamage (Zodiac Matador x CF Fire Magic) she purchased from his owner, Beth Jupp, in 2020. Each stallion brings a different legacy and mechanics to its progeny. Starting with Mamage, a legend in his own right both in the show ring and breeding barn, he brings in older aspects of the industry that are hard to find in today’s English prospects. He passes down one of his best features, his trainability and powerful hind end, which Affliction inherited. Regarding Affliction, his manager, Jim Lowe, names the four best aspects of this black stallion: his hind end, trainability, elegance, and natural stretch in body and stride which he inherited from his father and his dam’s sire, Allience. If there is anything the English performance horses lack these days. Lowe sees diminished power in the horse’s hind end. “With Affliction,” Lowe says, “he brings the snappy, strong hind end that has been missing.” As for his trainability, Lowe says it is second to none. “A horse with a great mind and a willingness to learn is what every trainer and breeder wants in a horse. Affliction has always been well behaved since he was young and never shied away from training.” O’Reilly agrees with Lowe’s breeding assessment. “It’s all in the breeding and having a great daddy does not hurt!” Life Inthe Fazt Lane has been busy making his own mark in the arena. He and Lowe earned back-to-back reserve championships in the Open English at U.S. Nationals, and 2020 saw some of Life inthe Fazt Lane’s first babies in the arena as well. All were a sight to behold, exhibiting beauty, mind, and trainability at just three years old. When it comes to what is expected from his babies, Lowe has nothing but praise for their sire. “Life Inthe Fazt Lane is going to do great things for our breed.” Highlighting his best features, Lowe continues, “’Eddie’ has an unbelievable amount of talent. He is kind, hardworking, beautiful, and trains like a million bucks. I am excited to see his babies on the ground and performing now. I think they’re going to be just as special.”

Greatness must be seen, and O’Reilly has it in spades. Her impressive lineup of horses at this year’s U.S. Nationals in October includes the incredibly talented Life Inthe Fazt Lane, Affliction, CSP Hennessy, Phi Beta Kappah, Marilyn Monroe AHW, and more. If it is greatness you are seeking, choose to breed to O’Reilly’s top-notch stars, all who pass on qualities sought after in today’s champion show arenas. q Life Inthe Fazt Lane (left), Affliction (top) and Phi Beta Kappah+// (bottom).

Schatzberg photo

It takes two to tango, however, and O’Reilly has not just invested in her stallions but her broodmares. Equally as important in the breeding process, mares such as CSP Gossip Girl (Vegaz x La Pistola) and Marilyn Monroe AHW (Afires Heir x Social Light) are both beautiful and foaling top-quality foals. O’Reilly’s goal is to bring in more broodmares and recipient mares to create a unique breeding program for years to come.

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EQUINE TIPS Liability Releases ... Tips For Enforceability by Johanna Sheehe, ESQ.

Risk is an inherent component of participating in any equine related activity. For equine business owners, that risk includes potential liability and legal action if someone is injured at their place of business. For this reason, many equestrian facilities require all clients, riders and visitors to sign liability releases, or waivers. But are these really necessary? In a word, yes. All businesses engaged in equinerelated services should require their clients, guests and spectators sign a properly drafted liability release. This article will discuss the importance of liability releases and offer tips for drafting an enforceable waiver. WHAT ARE LIABILITY RELEASES? Liability releases, also called waivers, are contracts intended to excuse a person or business from certain types of liabilities, such as negligence. In other words, they are agreements that waive a person’s right to bring a lawsuit in the event they are harmed.

WHY ARE LIABILITY RELEASES IMPORTANT? Some business owners might wonder why a liability release is necessary if their state has enacted an equine liability statute. Although almost all states have enacted some type of equine liability law, none of these laws can eliminate all risk of liability. While each state’s law is different, the common thread is a desire to limit liability for personal injuries arising from equine activities. The beneficiaries of these laws are typically stables, equine professionals, and horse owners. While these laws can offer strong protection against liability, they have limits. Liability releases can provide business owners with an extra layer of protection to guard against potential liability. For example, a properly worded and executed release serves as a written indicator that a guest or visitor understood and agreed to accept the stable’s policy of

limiting its liability. A release can also provide an opportunity to educate guests about the risks of equine related activities. Although a release is not a complete bar to a lawsuit, it can be part of a strong defense.

ARE LIABILITY RELEASES ENFORCEABLE? A written contract is only effective if it is enforceable. Because liability releases interfere with an individual’s access to the justice system, courts often scrutinize these types of agreements carefully, and sometimes decline to enforce them. There are several reasons that a liability release might be deemed unenforceable. For example, a handful of states have enacted statutes that invalidate releases in certain settings for public policy reasons. Alternatively, a liability release could be held unenforceable because of defects in its drafting or execution. Accordingly, it is important that business owners take special care when drafting these documents. Although generic releases found on the internet can serve as helpful templates, they often contain broad language that might not comply with your state’s law, and therefore will be found unenforceable by the courts.

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TIPS FOR DRAFTING EQUINE LIABILITY RELEASES The enforcement of liability releases generally stems from the principle of freedom of contract. But if a lawsuit does arise, a court will be required to determine whether a release is enforceable. To make this determination, a court will scrutinize every word of the release. Therefore, a business is well-advised to take care in drafting its liability releases. The following pointers should help in crafting a thorough and well-considered liability release.

Clarity and Readability A document that is written in straightforward and clear language is easy to understand. It is a good idea to avoid “legalese” and write in plain language.

Exculpatory Language The heart of a liability release is the promise that the signer will waive their legal right to sue. This promise is commonly referred to as exculpatory language. Because there is no nationwide consensus on what qualifies as enforceable exculpatory language, it is advisable to consult your own state’s laws. Nonetheless, it is a good idea to explicitly articulate what types of circumstances the parties intend for the release to apply. More specifically, some courts suggest that a liability release should explicitly state that the signer intends to release the person (or facility) from liability arising from “ordinary negligence.” Ordinary negligence is a failure to use the level of care or caution that an ordinary person in similar circumstances would have used. Typically, this type of negligence results from a mistake, or carelessness. In contrast, “gross negligence” is the reckless or deliberate and reckless disregard for another’s well-being. Keep in mind that most states will not enforce any provision which releases another from intentional or willful conduct, or gross negligence.

What are the Risks? It is important that the signer understand the inherent risks posed by the equine activity. A generic statement explaining that an equine activity “can be dangerous” does not adequately spell out the risks. Therefore, consider describing some of the risks and the dangers of engaging in the activity. For example, you could state that a horse can kick, bite, or spook. Although this may seem like common sense, these risks might not be apparent to all newcomers to the equine industry. A good starting point may be your state’s equine activity statute, which may list some risks for you. Be sure to include a statement that your list of examples is

not exclusive; instead, you are only providing some examples of risks associated with equine activities.

Who is Being Released? An important component of any release is a statement explaining who is being released from liability. Carefully consider who this should include. It is common to release not only a horse owner, but also the stable, equine professionals, and people associated with them. For example, a release might include the owner’s employees, agents, and representatives, or a company’s officers, directors, and sponsors.

Who is Signing? It is essential that the proper parties sign the liability release. A person signing a liability release can only sign away his or her own rights. Therefore, other family members and guests should sign a liability release on their own behalf. But what about children and minors? Children cannot sign away their legal rights and most courts decline to enforce liability waivers signed by children. However, a few states have enforced liability waivers co-signed by a parent. Consider, therefore, including an indemnification provision in the release. Such a provision would obligate the signer to pay for your legal costs in the event you are sued.

Equine Liability Act Language Most states have enacted equine liability laws. Many of these laws set forth precise language that must be included in equine activity contracts and releases. Be sure to check your state’s statute to determine whether your liability release complies with the law.

Signature A signature is an essential component of any release. The area above the signature block is a good space to include an acknowledgment that the signer has read and understands the release before signing it. Some states require liability releases to also be signed by a witness. Be sure to consult your own state’s law for this requirement.

*** A properly drafted liability release can be a powerful defense for equine owners and professionals. But a liability release must be enforceable to be effective. Carefully review your liability release with a knowledgeable attorney to ensure compliance with state laws and optimal protection from liability.

Johanna Sheehe is a commercial and equine law trial attorney at Sheehe & Associates, P.A. in Miami, Florida. She is a lifelong equestrian and lover of Arabian horses. Ms. Sheehe can be reached at: jsheehe@sheeheandassociates.com.

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AHT took the liberty of conducting an independent survey of its readers and followers to solicit their opinions as to the proposed AHA qualification changes. In the interest of understanding the varying opinions of those impacted by these proposed changes, we have elected to publish these results. As of this printing, the Arabian Horse Association has not returned our request for a response to these findings. Ar abian Horse Times | 482 | Volume 52, No. 3


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Egan

Egan

Randy Meyer Ghazimoto Charlie Watts (1996-2021) (1941-2021) Egan

C A Ultimo+// Ron Rhodes (1995-2021) (1941-2021)

Egan

RandyJoanne MeyerCrockett (1936-2021)

C A Ultimo+ (1995-2021

Egan

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A long-time loverCrockett, of Arabian horses, Bred by Priscilla lovinglyAHeights, owned long-timeCaliforlover Ghazimoto of Arabian horses, wasGhazimoto no Randy stranger to the horse Bred show by Priscilla an Joanne 85, of Randy Pilot Point, Texas Ron Rhodes, 80, ofand La Habra Charles “Charlie “Robert Watts, cherished Randy Meyer CNormington A Ultimo+// Randy Meyer CNormington A Ultimo+ worked passed passionately to promote the breed for by John and Sheryl Yochum, this beautiful worked chestnut passionately world. to promote Bred by the esteemed breed for breeder and by trainer John and Sheryl Yochum, this away on September 22, 2021. nia, passed away on August 18, 2021. husband, father and grandfather, and best (1995-2021 decades. Randy fought a long and valiant battle gelding (C(1995-2021) A Hermoso x Citation decades. Of Randy fought Michael a long Byatt, and (1996-2021) valiant thethe bay battle Half-Arabian geldinggelding A Hermoso x known as prolific drummer for the(Crock with cancer,Horses passingwere peacefully on July 5th, with his Merit) since 2000, honored his trustees with with cancer, the passing peacefully (El Ghazi x on Princess July 5th, Greystone) with his was a 14x Merit) Regional since 2000, his Joanne’s life, her family, her kids. Ron was involved in the horse industry for band The Rolling Stones for more than half honored a A long-time lover of Arabian horses, Randy Bred by Priscilla Normington and lovingly Aowned long-time lover Ghazimoto of Arabian horses, was Reserve no Randy stranger to the horse Bred show by Priscilla Normington an wife, Leigh, by his side. well-earned title of all-time most winningest wife, Leigh, Champion by his side. and winner, 2x Scottsdale well-earned title of all-time m She and husband Bruce owned, bred, trained overSheryl 65 years. A this steward since 1972, he wasworld. century, has died. He wasand 80. worked passionately to promote the breed for by John and Yochum, beautiful worked chestnut passionately to promote Bred by the esteemed breed for breeder by trainer John and Sheryl Yochum, this Hunter Pleasure horse with 41 National titles in Champion and 3x National Champion/Reserve Hunter in Pleasure horse with 41 and judged horses. very (Cactive in both hunter/jumper, breed decades. Randy fought a long and valiant battle gelding AHorse Hermoso x Citation decades. Of trained Randy fought Michael a long Byatt, and valiant the bay battle Half-Arabian gelding gelding (C AHorse Hermoso x Having trained and shown Arabians since the early Open, Junior and Amateur/Youth Having and English shown Arabians Pleasure Open, since the AOTR/JOTR early dressedfor multiple Open, Junior and Am shows, and national championships and finals The quiet, elegantly Watts liked to colwith cancer, passing peacefully on July 5th, with his Merit) since 2000, honored his trustees with with cancer, the passing peacefully (El Ghazi x on Princess July 5th, Greystone) with his was a 14x Merit) Regional since 2000, honored his 70s, Randy, a respected trainer among in Gay Lor(12x Champion/9x Reserve and 20x Top 70s, Randy, respected owners trainer before among finding trainers his final inrelatively resting place (12xwith Champion/9x Reserve an Her firstLeigh, Arabian horse wastrainers Lazy Acres for many breeds, as Ten). well asawife, having cars and was content in his wife, by his side. well-earned title ofdifferent most winningest Leigh, Champion bylect his Meyer side. and Reserve winner, 2x Scottsdale well-earned titlepriofCall-time m Randy Meyer Call-time A Ultimo+// Randy Ghazimoto A Ulti main ring halter and performance, with his wife ran main ring halter and performance, Lian with Oteiza his wife in ran 2012. vate life, happily tending withHunter his wife, Shirley, rene in 1958. She bred 18 horses in a 20-year been thehorse Chiefwith Steward for the 1984 Olympics Hunter Pleasure 41 National titles in Champion and 3x National Champion/Reserve in Pleasure horse with 41 (1995-2021) (1996-2021) Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody Blue Stables as on their estate in rural (1995-2 span, with mainly Crabbet andearly Polish lines, Open, in Junior Los Angeles. their inArabian horses Having trained and shown Arabians since the Horse and Amateur/Youth Having trained and English shown Arabians Pleasure Open, since the AOTR/JOTR early foryoumultiple Open, Junior Horse and Am a chiefincluding program consultant and and a chief program “…consultant my barn aisle andwill farm not and be the Halsdon same without in themoriginally Rafsi Tu,among whofarm she rodein to national Devon, England. Arabians, 70s, Randy, a respected trainer trainers (12x Champion/9x Reserve and 20x Top 70s, Ten). Randy, a respected owners trainer before among finding trainers his final in resting place (12x with Champion/9x an Awins long-time lover ofdisciplines. Arabian horses, Priscilla to Normington andRon lovingly owned long-time lover Ghazimoto of Arabian horses, was no Randy stranger to the Bred show byswelled PriscillaReserve Norming breeding manager. breeding … thosemanager. big, kind, loving eyes. You are horse a legend in multiple SheRandy competed in Bred In by addition officiating, wasA highly inplanned asOteiza a expressive small breeding farm, soon main ringworked halter and performance, with his wife ran main ring halter and performance, Lian with his wife in ran 2012. passionately toPleasure, promote Costume, the breed for John andinSheryl this beautiful worked chestnut passionately world. to who promote Bred by theesteemed breed forIbreeder and bytrainer John Sheryl Yochum and everyone knew you loved you. cherish my most English, Country and later byvolved the Yochum, governance of the sport. He from horses toas hundreds, with overand 340+ Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in20 Blue Stables decades. Randy fought a long and valiant battle gelding (C A Hermoso x Citation decades. Of Randy fought Michael a long Byatt, and valiant the bay battle Half-Arabian gelding gelding (C A Herm memorable moments in the show ring with you. The energy registered bred. life, Working Western. She and Bruce are served on and often chaired several USEF and a with chiefin program consultant and farm and a chief program “… consultant my barn aisle and will farm not and be the same without you in them cancer, passing peacefully on July 5th, with his since 2000, honored his trustees with with cancer, the passing peacefully (Elinto Ghazi xon Princess July 5th, Greystone) hisgate waswas a 14x Merit) Regional you brought the arena when youwith hit the like no since 2000, honor known to have helped Dan Gainey Sr. estab- Merit) Arabian Horse Association committees and was breeding manager. … those manager. big, kind, loving expressive eyes. Youdefinition are legend wife, Leigh, by his side. well-earned title of all-time most winningest breeding wife, Leigh, Champion byone his side. andthe Reserve winner, 2x aScottsdale other … always with crowd. The true ofwell-earned title of all-t Thewhoson ofyoua loved lorryyou.driver and a housewife, lish his Arabian ranch. elected into the AHA Hall of Fame in 2015. everyone Ieasy.” cherish~ my most Hunter Pleasure horse with 41 National titles in anda show Champion andyou 3xbig National Hunter in Pleasure horse w horse. I knew love boy, rest Champion/Reserve Lian Charlie bornringinwithNeasden, London, on memorable moments inwas the Open, show Having trained and shown Arabians since the early Open, Junior Horse and Amateur/Youth Having trained andEnglish shown Arabians Pleasure since the AOTR/JOTR earlyyou. The energy for multiple Open, Junior Horse a She enjoyed working with children, helping Ron was a school psychologist when he wasn’t June 2, arena 1941.when From childhood, was passionbrought into the youhis hitfinal the washe like no with 70s, Randy, a respected trainer among trainers in (12x Champion/9x Reserve and 20x Top 70s, Ten). Randy, you a respected owners trainer before among finding trainers in gate resting place (12x Champion/9x Rese many junior riders achieve wins with their at horse shows and his strongest interest in the ate about music. He fell in love with the drums other …performance, always one withLian the crowd. The true definition of main ring halter and performance, with his wife ran main ring halter and with Oteiza his wife inran 2012. taught himself to play by listening to reArabians, but she is best known for dedicating horse world was in education. Every licenseda showand I love you big boy, rest easy.” Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as Meyer Show Horses at horse. Rhapsody in Blue Stables as ~ Lian her time and skills to judging. Her respected steward today has been influenced in some way cords by Johnny Dodds, Charlie Parker, Duke a chief program consultant and farm and a chief program “…consultant my barn aisle andwill farm not and be the same without you in them judgement was requested at U.S., Canadian by Ron’s work from his authoring many stewEllington and other jazz giants. breeding manager. breeding … thosemanager. big, kind, loving expressive eyes. You are a legend and Youth Nationals, and throughout Region ard and judge training manuals at USEF, most and everyone who knew you loved you. I cherish my most He worked for a London advertising firm after 9. Joanne was invited to judge internationally still in use today. memorable moments in the show ring with you. The energy as well, in Australia, Brazil and England. In adattending Harrow Art College, playing drums you brought into the arena when you hit the gate was like no dition to Arabians, she judged miniature horse Always professional in appearance and bearin his spare time. After playing with Alexis other … always one with the crowd. The true definition of Korner’s Blues Incorporated, for whom Jagger competitions, as well as Morgans, Friesans and ing, those who knew Ron knew two things a show horse. I love you big boy, rest easy.” ~ Lian

Gypsy Vanners. In 1991, Joanne and Bruce were both inducted into AHA’s Judges Hall of Fame.

about him: he had a wicked sense of humor and an inordinate love for ice cream.

also performed, Charlie was encouraged by Korner to join the Stones in 1963.

Joanne dreamed of calling her next home Once Again Ranch, but left too soon, and is surely doing now, her last words spoke, “I’m not feeling well, I would like to ride my horse.”

Ron is survived by his wife, Joan, children Katie and Rod, and son-in-law, Neal.

“Every band I’d ever been in had lasted a week,” Charlie once said. “I always thought the Stones would last a week, then a fortnight, and then suddenly, it’s 30 years.”

Ar abian Horse Times | 490 | Volume 52, No. 3


Egan

Ultimo+// 95-2021)

Vickey Bowman Ghazimoto

Orans Continuo

Randy Meyer (1996-2021) (1947-2021)

C A Ultimo+// (1993-2021) (1995-2021)

Rohara Americanlegend++++// Ghazimoto (2003-2021) (1996-2021)

mington and lovingly throughout owned noofstranger the horse show Revered theGhazimoto world as was one the toOrans Continuo’s pedigree was rare. Bred by Rohara Americanlegend (Justafire DGL x Miz Ultimo+// Ghazimoto A long-time lover of Arabian horses, Randy Bred Priscilla Normington andbylovingly owned American Ghazimoto no stranger to the horse show chum, this beautiful chestnut world. Bred by esteemed breeder and trainer Arabian horse’s most respected professional L. Dwayne by Thorson, he was sired NationPie) is awas two-time National Cham95-2021) (1996-2021) worked passionately to promote the breed for by John and Sheryl Yochum, this beautiful chestnut world. Bred by esteemed breeder and trainer ermoso x Citation Of Michael Byatt, the bay Half-Arabian gelding

pion and five-time Reserve in Half-Arabian Egan

al Champion sire Oran Van Bandy, and was Egan

trainers, coaches and breeders, Vickey Bow-

Egan

Egan

decades. fought a longxand valiant battle was a 14x Regional gelding (C A Hermoso x Citation Of the bay Half-Arabian gelding nored his trustees with theRandy (El Horsemen’s Ghazi Princess Greystone) man, an 8-time APAHA Award the last living grandson of the immortal *Oran Gelding Michael Halter Byatt, and Country Pleasure Drivmington and lovingly owned Ghazimoto was no stranger to the horse show with cancer, passing peacefully onand JulyReserve 5th, with his 2x Scottsdale Merit) since 2000, honored his trustees with the (El Ghazi x Princess Greystone) was a 14x Regional all-time most winningest Champion winner, winner, Hall of Fame Horsewoman of the Year Van Crabbet. Even the great Gene LaCroix ing AAOTD. In Country Pleasure alone, he chum, chestnut world. Bred by esteemed breeder and trainer wife, Leigh, by his side. well-earned of all-time most winningest Champion and Reserve winner, 2x Scottsdale se withthis 41 beautiful National titlesSeat in Trainer Champion and 3x National Champion/Reserve in on title and Saddle of the Year Inductee, once remarked how special the extremely earned 10 national top tens with youth and Randy Meyer C A with Ultimo+// Randy Ghazimoto CAU ermoso x Citation Of Michael Byatt,Open, the bay Half-Arabianfor gelding Hunter Pleasure horse 41 National titles in ChampionMeyer and 3x National Champion/Reserve in se and Amateur/Youth English Pleasure AOTR/JOTR multiple and a 2-time Hunter Trainer of the Year winbeautiful Continue was. amateur riders, while also excelling in junior nored his trustees with the (El Ghazi x Princess Greystone) a 14xplace Regional Having trained and shown Arabians since the Open, and Amateur/Youth English Pleasure Open, AOTR/JOTR for multiple (1995-2021) (1996-2021) (199 Reserve and 20xpassed Top Ten). owners finding his early final was resting with Junior Horse ner, away on August 19,before 2021 following horseRandy competition. BredGhazimoto by Rohara Arabians most winningest Champion and Reserve winner, 2x Scottsdale Call-time A Ultimo+// Randy Meyer Ghazimoto C A Ultimo+// Meyer C AU 70s, Randy, a respected trainer among trainersinin2012. (12x Champion/9x Reserve and 20x Top Ten). owners before finding his final resting place with Lian Oteiza an inoperable cancer diagnosis over a3xyear ago. Champion/Reserve Owned by David & Cindy Bandy since 1996, and Maddy Winer, Rohara Americanlegend’s se(1995-2021) with 41 National titles in Champion and National in main ring halter andlover performance, with his(1996-2021) wife ran Lian in 2012. A long-time of Arabian horses, Randy Bred by Priscilla (1995-2021) Normington and lovinglyAowned long-time lover Ghazimoto of Arabian horses, wasOteiza no Randy stranger to the horse Bred show by Priscilla (199 Nor (1996-2021) She continued showing successfully at multithe stallion earned multi-Regional Reserve caretakers included Barabara Jarabek, Linda se and Amateur/Youth English Pleasure Open, AOTR/JOTR for multiple Meyerworked Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as passionately to promote the breed for by John and Sheryl Yochum, this beautiful worked chestnut passionately world. to promote Bred by the esteemed breed for breeder and by trainer John and Sheryl Yo “… my barn aisle willher notway. be the sameChampionships without you in them in Country Pleasure ple horse shows, successfully living life Crank and Karen Havice before finding his Reserve and 20x Top Ten). owners before finding his final resting place with a chief program consultant and farm and “… my barn aisle will not be the same without you in them decades. Randy fought a long and valiant battle gelding (C A Hermoso x Citation decades. Of Randy fought Michael a long Byatt, and valiant the bay battle Half-Arabian gelding gelding (C A H a Normington lovingly A owned lover of Ghazimoto Arabian horses, was no Randy stranger to the horse by show Priscilla Normington and lovinglyAowned long-time Ghazimoto of with Arabian horses, was no Randy stranger to the horse Bred show by Priscilla Nor … those big, kind, loving expressive eyes. You are Bred a legend Sheand loved herlong-time life, horses, friends and family foreverlover home Hadley Ames. Lian Oteiza in 2012. breeding manager. … those kind, loving expressive eyes. Youaand are aMerit) legend with cancer, passing July 5th, with hisIbreeder Merit) sinceSheryl 2000, honoredthis his beautiful trustees with with cancer, thepassionately passing peacefully (El Ghazi xon Princess July 5th, Greystone) with hiswas 14xby Regional 2000,Yo h ryl Yochum,too thismuch beautiful worked chestnut passionately toworld. promote Bred theby breed esteemed for and by John trainer worked chestnut world. tobig, promote Bred by theesteemed breed forbreeder trainer John since and Sheryl andpeacefully everyone whoon knew you loved you. my most to consider doing anything else. “Hecherish brought a lotand of joy toYochum, my life personally,” and everyone who knew you loved you. I cherish my most wife, Leigh,aMichael by hisand side. well-earned title of all-timexmost winningest wife, Leigh, Champion by hisByatt, side. andvaliant Reserve winner, 2x Scottsdale well-earned title of C A Hermoso x Citation decades. Of Randy fought long Byatt, thebattle bay gelding gelding (C A Hermoso Citation decades. Of Randy fought Michael a long and the bay battle Half-Arabian gelding gelding (C A H memorable moments in valiant the show ring Half-Arabian with you. The energy says Rachel Bandy Witt. “I won my first three Cedar Ridge Arabians Instructor, Stephanie “… my barn aisle will not be the same without you in them memorable moments in the show ring with you. The energy Hunter Pleasure horse with 41 National titles in Champion and 3x National Champion/Reserve Hunter in Pleasure hor 00, honored his trustees cancer, with thepassing peacefully (Elinto onarena xJuly Princess 5th, with waswas a 14x Merit) with with cancer, the passing peacefully xon Princess July 5th, Greystone) with hiswas a 14x Merit) since 2000, h brought the when Greystone) you hithisthe gate likeRegional nosince 2000, honored his trustees Born inwith Lehi, Utah toyou Carlile andGhazi Elsie Worrel regional reserve championships on him (one Davisson, (El putGhazi it best, “’Legend’ was the bestRegional … those kind, loving expressive eyes. Youdefinition are legend you English brought into theside. arena whenthe youwinner, hit the gate was no Junior trainedwife, and shown Arabians since the early Open, Junior and Amateur/Youth Having trainedwife, and shown Arabians Pleasure Open, since AOTR/JOTR early forlike multiple Open, itle of all-time mostHaving winningest Champion by his and Reserve winner, 2x aScottsdale well-earned titleHorse of all-time most winningest Leigh, Champion by his and Reserve 2x Scottsdale well-earned titleHo of otherLeigh, … big, always oneside. with the crowd. The true of Simmons, Vickey was and known among her leofI cherish them my while working him myself as a teen). teacher, a beautiful animal, and the kindest everyone who knew you loved you. most otherChampion … always one with thetrainers crowd. The true definition 70s, Randy, trainer in Champion/Reserve (12x Champion/9x Reserve and 20x Top 70s, Ten). Randy, owners trainer before among finding his final in resting place (12xofwith Champion/9x e horse with 41 National titles ina respected Champion andyou 3xtrainers National Hunter Pleasure in horse with 41 National titles in a respected and 3x National Champion/Reserve Hunter in Pleasure hor a show horse. Iamong love big boy, rest easy.” ~ Lian gions of peers as “Thememorable Wise Woman”, the go- ring with For a stallion, he was the perfect gentleman. horse. Hea show introduced Hadley to the show ring moments in the show horse. I love you bigthe boy, rest easy.” ~ for Lian main ringtrained halterand andshown performance, with his wifeAOTR/JOTR ran you. The energy main ringtrained halterand andEnglish performance, Lian with Oteiza his wife in ran 2012. or Horse and Amateur/Youth Having English Arabians Pleasure since Open, the early forOpen, multiple Junior Horse and Amateur/Youth Having shown Arabians Pleasure Open, since AOTR/JOTR early multiple Open, Junior Ho to person both professionally and as a friend He always took care of me; that was one of his and taught so many others confidence, payou brought into the arena when you hit the gate was like no Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as Meyer Show Horses at Rhapsody in Blue Stables as n/9x Reserve and 20x 70s, Top Randy, Ten).a respected owners trainerbefore amongfinding trainers hisinfinal resting(12x placeChampion/9x with Reserve and 20x Top 70s, Ten). Randy, a respected owners trainer before among finding trainers his final in resting place (12xwith Champion/9x for anyone in need,program much loved foroneher frank best traits. Heofwas always the best boy, so safe, a chief tience and consultant fun. He was always atheblast to ride, otherperformance, … always with thehiscrowd. definition chief consultant and farm and program my barn aisle and will farm not be same without you in them main aring halter and with Lian Oteiza wife The ran in true 2012. main ring halter and“… performance, Lian with Oteiza hisand wife inran 2012. honesty, integrity and breeding incomparable work soeasy.” gentle, so beautiful … the perfect example of and hebreeding loved his job. He wasexpressive a once-in-a-lifeshow horse. I love youethbigStables boy, rest ~ Lian manager. … manager. big, kind, lovingStables Meyer Show Horsesa at Rhapsody in Blue as Meyer Show Horses at those Rhapsody in Blue as eyes. You are a legend ic, talent, and knowledge in all things relating a true Crabbet Arabian.” time horseand foreveryone a lot of people and weyou. will miss my most who knew I cherishyou a chief program consultant “… my barnand aislefarm will not andbe the same without you in them a chief program “…consultant my barn aisle andwill farm notyou and be loved the same without in them to the Arabian breed. him everymemorable single day.” moments in the show ring with you. The breeding … those manager. big, kind, loving expressive eyes. You are a legend breeding … thosemanager. big, kind, loving expressive eyes. You are a energy legend The Bandys have some beautiful daughters by you brought intowho theknew arenayou when youyou. hit the gate was and everyone who knew you loved you. I cherish my most and everyone loved I cherish my like mostno Vickey was most proud of her daughter, Devin, him to “continue” his legacy, including a foal other … always one with crowd. of memorable moments in the show ring with you. The energy memorable moments in thetheshow ringThe withtrue you.definition The energy also a professional horsewoman who shares expected next year out of Read My Mind. a show horse. I love youwhen big boy, easy.” Lian you brought into the arena when you hit the gate was like no you brought into the arena you rest hit the gate~was like no her mother’s indomitable will, strength and other … always one with the crowd. The true definition of other … always one with the crowd. The true definition of talent. She was preceded in death by her husa show horse. I love you big boy, rest easy.” ~ Lian a show horse. I love you big boy, rest easy.” ~ Lian

band, Wayne Bowman, and is survived by her sister Carrie Smith, stepdaughter Paige Adams and husband, Randy. In honor of Vickey, please consider donating to AHDF’s Vickey’s Gift, a continuing educational grant for adults.

Ar abian Horse Times | 491 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 492 | Volume 52, No. 3


R.O. LERVICK ARABIANS Home of Cytosk+++ & Out Of Cyte Halter & Performance Horses For Sale

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Call Bob Wilkins BREEDINGS AND HORSES FOR SALE Owned by: Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. 800-826-9441

Standing at: Shea Stables ~ 1925 Bartlett Rd., St. Clair, MI 48079 bob@wilkinslivestock.com www.livestockinsurance.biz (810) 329-6392 ~ www.AfireBeyV.com

Ar abian Ar abianHorse HorseTimes Times| |161 | 493| Volume || Volume51, 52, 51,No. No.5 35


Ar abian Horse Times | 494 | Volume 52, No. 3


Kayleigh Meyer 12975 North Territorial Road Dexter, MI 48130 (734) 808-1982 kayleigh@signatureoakstables.com signatureoakstables.com Specialize in Training, Showing and Breeding National Quality English Horses

MISSOURI

Mike Grimm 19121 South School Road Raymore, MO 64083 (617) 429-1732 mike@mikegrimmtraining.com mikegrimmtraining.com

MINNESOTA

MISSOURI

Laura Rodel & Cory Byrne Laura Rodel & Kenny McDonald 20335 Sawmill Rd. Jordan, MN 55352 (952) 492-6590 Stephanie@cedarridgearabians.com cedar-ridge.com

C hri S han P ark

National Level Saddle Seat Performance and Halter Training | Lessons

NEVADA

Bridget Fitzpatrick 1350 State Route 88, Suite C Minden, NV 89423 (775) 721-3855 fpharabians@gmail.com fitzpatrickperformancehorses.com

Full-Service Training and Showing for English and Specialty Disciplines

Training | Lessons | Breeding | Sales

PENNSYLVANIA

UTAH

Tim Phelan 273 Clonmell Upland Rd, West Grove, PA 19390 (585) 943-4333 tim@kyiearabians.com kyriearabians.com

Elizabeth Marie DeSarle 5156 W Ashfield Dr Herriman, UT 84096 (440) 212-5778 Arabian1203@gmail.com grkfarms.com

Training | Marketing | Sales

Teaching | Training | Showing Ar abian Horse Times | 495 | Volume 52, No. 3

ARABIANS

TRAINER & FARM directory

MICHIGAN

Chris Wilson 2655 E State Highway AA Springfield, MO 65803 (417) 761-2031 chris@chrishanpark.com chrishanpark.com

Training | Marketing | Breeding

OHIO

Jennifer Sharpnack and Kelley Bitter 9761 Bell Rd. Newbury, OH 44065 (330) 701-6227 Buckeyeperformancehorsecenter@gmail.com Buckeyeperformancehorsecenter.com The Place for Western Dressage

WISCONSIN

Dan McConaughey 932 Labarge Road Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 222-9528 Danmcconaughey@yahoo.com Training and Showing in All Pleasure Disciplines


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Ar abian Horse Times | 496 | Volume 52, No. 3


SINCERE THANKS TO ALL OF OUR CLIENTS for their continued support! Best of luck to those that are competing at U.S. Nationals; we look forward to cheering you on...

www.RoyalArabians.com Cindy McGown & Mark Davis Scottsdale, Rio Verde & Mesa, Arizona 480.361.6926 | info@royalarabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 497 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. & CANADIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION | ABWC SILVER SUPREME CHAMPION | U.S. RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION Shangrila Baltazar x RD Tora | Represented by Royal Arabians | www.RoyalArabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 498 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN JUNIOR STALLIONS presented by Mr. Rodolfo Guzzo

Proudly owned by Shellbird Inc. Ms. Michele Pfeifer & Mr. Kent Scheel 970.456.5177 | www.shellbird.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 499 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN YEARLING COLTS presented by Mr. Rodolfo Guzzo

Proudly bred & owned by Beni Hashim Arabians Scottsdale, AZ | www.benihashim.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 500 | Volume 52, No. 3


Marwan Al Shaqab x Amalie Beni Hashim Represented by Royal Arabians | www.RoyalArabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 501 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN JUNIOR MARES Presented by Mr. Rodolfo Guzzo Proudly owned by Arabian Soul Partners LTD. @arabiansoulpartners

Ar abian Horse Times | 502 | Volume 52, No. 3


QR Marc x Felisha Valentine BHF | Represented by Royal Arabians | www.RoyalArabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 503 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN 2-YEAR-OLD FILLIES Presented by Mr. Rodolfo Guzzo 2021 Scottsdale Unanimous Junior Champion Filly Brazilian National Gold Champion Junior Filly

Proudly owned by Eric & Karen England | Provo, UT

Ar abian Horse Times | 504 | Volume 52, No. 3


OFW Magic Wan x Sahara Daghirah | Represented by Royal Arabians | www.RoyalArabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 505 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN YEARLING FILLIES Presented by Mr. Rodolfo Guzzo 2021 Scottsdale Champion Yearling Filly, Senior Division

Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea Proudly owned by Royal Silver Box LLC

Ar abian Horse Times | 506 | Volume 52, No. 3


Represented by Royal Arabians

www.RoyalArabians.com


Royal Asad x Royal Dyana

ARABIAN YEARLING GELDINGS with João Carlos Silvestre de Souza

ARABIAN YEARLING GELDINGS AAOTH with Amanda Pagan

Proudly owned by ROYAL ARABIANS Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

Apalo x Emahlee IA ARABIAN SENIOR GELDINGS with João Carlos Silvestre de Souza ARABIAN GELDINGS AAOTH with Amanda Pagan

Conquest BR x Baviera HVP

ARABIAN 2-YEAR-OLD GELDINGS with João Carlos Silvestre de Souza

Ar abian Horse Times | 508 | Volume 52, No. 3


Proudly owned by ROYAL ARABIANS Cindy McGown & Mark Davis

El Tino x Yasmin HWM

ARABIAN JUNIOR MARES Presented by João Carlos Silvestre de Souza

ARABIAN MARES AAOTH Presented by Amanda Pagan


december The year in review n at i o n a l a n d r e g i o n a l competition highlights & Leaders

e q u i tat i o n r i d e r s o f t h e y e a r

Ar abian Horse Times | 510 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONAL FUTURITY FILLY CONTENDER

MD

Presented by Austin Colangelo Truest x Anastasiaa (ATA Bey Starr x Showgirl SP)

Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Champion AHBA Auction Futurity Yearling Filly

Proudly owned by ISRA ARABIANS, The Glover Family Valley View, Texas • www.ISRAarabians.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 511 | Volume 52, No. 3


INDEX of Advertisers

401K Arabians......................................................................................................................85-87

L

A

Liberty Meadows.............................................................................................................. 311-329

Adeptus Nutrtion...................................................................................................................... 43

Lindmark Family, The........................................................................................................... 295

AHA of AZ........................................................................................................................... 38, 61 Al Shaqab..............................................................................................................................44-47

Lowe Show Horse Centre................................................................................................143-147

M

Algood/Ted Carson............................................................................................................ 28-37

Magnolia Farm Arabians........................................................................................................155

Alistar Arabians.................................................................................................................. 22, 23

Maroon Fire Arabians............................................................................................................ 493

Amazing Horse Woman LLC......................................................................................... 125-141 Anivia Equine......................................................................................16-17Midwest (384-385)

B Becker Stables.......................................................................................................... 2, 3, 170-173 Beloved Farm......................................................................................................................IFC, 1

C Cedar Ridge Arabians.............................................. 20-21Midwest (388, 389), 513-532, IBC ChriShan Park ................................................................................................................ 205-214 Christy Higman Clements Training................................................................................. 90-91 Colby Powell Performance Horses................................................................................ 270-277 Colonial Downs Training Center...................................................................................152-155 Colonial Wood Training Center....................................................................................241-247 Conway Arabians................................................................................................................ 76, 77

Midwest.................................................................. 367, 368, 1-48Midwest (369-416), 417, 418

O

Oak Ridge Arabians....4-5Midwest (372, 373), 32-33Midwest (400, 401), 41Midwest (409) Orrion Farms............................................................................................................... 78-84, BC

P Perfect Products...................................................................................................................... 362 Powell Training Center....................................................................................................187-189 Price Performance Horses......................................................................................................163 Pyranha, Inc........................................................................................................................ 24, 25

R

R.O. Lervick Arabians............................................................................................................ 493 Rae-Dawn Arabian....................................................................................................... FC, 14-18 Randy Sullivan’s Training Center...........................................................................................70 Rannenberg Show Horses....................................................................................................... 94

D

Reed Training................................................................................................................. 156, 157

DePaolo Equine Concepts..............................................................................................8-9, 356

Rooker Training Stable.................................................................................................... 96-103

DeRegaucourt, Ltd................................................................................................................. 358

Royal Arabians.............................................................................................................5, 497-509

Desoto Training Center..................................................................................................259-269

E Earthquake Arabians......................................................................................................234-239 Equidont.............................................................................................................................. 20, 21

F Freedman’s Harness............................................................................................................... 360

S

Scion Arabians.....................................................................................................................40-42 Shamrock Farms........................................................................................................................19 Shea Stables............................................................................................................................. 493 Shino Training Center.................................................................................................... 215-223 Show Season............................................................................................................................ 364 Siemon Stables.......................................................................................................................... 85

Frierson Atkinson................................................................................................................... 493

Signature Oak Stables..................................................................................................... 224-233

G

Springwater Farms...........................................................................................................174-185

GRK Farms............................................................................................................................71-75

H Hagale Family Arabians.....................................................................................................49-60 Haras La Catalina...............................................................................34-35Midwest (402, 403) Harris Show Horses.........................................................................................................296-309 Hegg, Mrs. Mickey.................................................................................................................. 493 Hoffman Realty............................................................................................................... 159-162 Holly Hill Farm............................................................................................................... 153, 154

I Isra Arabians............................................................................................................................511

Stachowski Farm, Inc...................................................................................................... 105-123 Stewart Performance Horses......................................................................................... 249-257 Stone Ridge Arabians......................................... 7, 6-7Midwest (374, 375), 36Midwest (404) Strand’s Arabian Stables.......................................................................................................... 39 Strawberry Banks Farm...................................................................................................... 62-69 Sugar Hill Farm............................................................................................................... 166-169

T

The Hat Lady.......................................................................................................................... 493

U Urban Arabians...................................................................................................................... 158 Urban Equestrian........................................................................................................... 164, 165

J

V

Josie Pakula Realty............................................................................................................. 26, 27

Vicki Humphrey Training Center................................................................................. 331-355

K

W

Kiesner Training..............................................................................................................279-295

Whistlejacket Farm...........................................................................................................148-151

Krohn Show Horses.........................................................................................................190-204

Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc............................................................................................ 493


The Ames Family Jordan, Minnesota www.Cedar-Ridge.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 1 | Volume 52, No. 3


One team... One dream...

Laura Rodel, Performance Trainer | Kenny McDonald, Halter Trainer | Stephanie Davisson, Instructor | www.Cedar-Ridge.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 2 | Volume 52, No. 3


All for the LOVE of the Arabian Horse.

SINCERE THANKS to our amazing team and our loyal clients for your dedication. Best of luck to all in Tulsa! ~Lollie & Lara


ROL Divine Style+ x Julietta Ames

U.S. NATIONAL ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY WITH LARA AMES ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING WITH TOM MOORE Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 516 | Volume 52, No. 3


3x U.S. Reserve National Champion

Ar abian Horse Times | 517 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONALS

CRF

HALF-ARABIAN 2-YEAR-OLD GELDINGS WITH KENNY MCDONALD SF Afterschoc x Isabella Davinci | Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 518 | Volume 52, No. 3


CRF HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR 40-59 WITH LARA AMES HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE JR. HORSE WITH LAURA RODEL Arrowhead’s Unlike Any Other x Ames Patina | Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 519 | Volume 52, No. 3



SHF

U.S. NATIONAL AEPA ARABIAN SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY WITH LAURA RODEL 2020 U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Futurity SF Aftershoc x Merry Magnifire | Owned & bred by Tom & Elizabeth Moore

Ar abian Horse Times | 521 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONALS

CRF

ARABIAN YEARLING GELDINGS WITH KENNY MCDONALD ARABIAN YEARLING GELDINGS AAOTH WITH LARA AMES El Tino x Perfirka | Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 522 | Volume 52, No. 3


CRF HALF-ARABIAN 2-YEAR-OLD FILLIES WITH KENNY MCDONALD Nutcracker’s Nirvana x Marion Ames | Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 523 | Volume 52, No. 3


CRF

Baskghazi x Queen Of Gotham

U.S. NATIONAL AEPA HALF-ARABIAN SADDLE SEAT FUTURITY WITH LAURA RODEL Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 524 | Volume 52, No. 3


Ar abian Horse Times | 525 | Volume 52, No. 3


U.S. NATIONALS

WP HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY AND 50 & OVER WITH JEN GLOMSKI WP Corporate Image x WP Rosanna Orana | Bred by David & Cindy Bandy Owned by Hidden Hollow Farm Ar abian Horse Times | 526 | Volume 52, No. 3


CCF+/ ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 50 & OVER AND JACKPOT ARABIAN PARK AAOTR WITH ROBERTA LEMBKE National Champion | Afire Bey V x JR Briar Rose | Bred by Robin Porter Owned by Roberta & Dean Lembke Ar abian Horse Times | 527 | Volume 52, No. 3


CRF

Arrowhead’s Unlike Any Other x HA Sahara Afire

U.S. NATIONAL HALF-ARABIAN YEARLING FILLIES WITH KENNY MCDONALD Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians

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Mid Summer National Champion

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PASSIONETTE KISSES

SF Aftershoc x Passionelle 2019 H/A Mare

LABELLA AMES SF Aftershoc x Isabella Divinci | 2018 H/A Mare

AMES TRILOGY SM Azraff x Perfirka | 2018 Arabian Stallion

TOHOTT TO TOUCH CRF Nutcracker’s Nirvana x Marion Ames 2019 H/A Mare

PATTIS GIRL CRF (pending) HA Toskcan Sun x Marion Ames 2021 Arabian Filly

IN STYLE CRF

ROL Divine Style x Julietta Ames 2020 Arabian Mare

WIEZA SUPREME CRF, pending

Supreme Justice ORA x Wieza Bella 2021 Arabian Filly

MOZARTS SNAPSHOT RA

TA Mozart x Minding Ps And Qs 2017 Arabian Mare

SHEZ GOTTHE LOOK RA

TA Mozart x TRR Echos Of Dun It 2018 H/A Mare

ATOMIC BLONDE RA

Yellow Jersey x Minding Ps And Qs 2018 H/A Mare

GREY JERSEY RA

Yellow Jersey x AM Thorny Rose 2019 H/A Gelding

NPSIREDBYHOLLYWOOD RA

Hollywood Dun It x Nspired By Mozart RA 2019 H/A Gelding

GUNNIN FOR MOZART RA TA Mozart x Customized Gunner 2019 H/A Gelding

RHYTHMAEIC MELODY RA

TA Mozart x AM Thorny Rose 2020 Arabian Mare

STARWHIZ RA, pending

Star Spangled Whiz x Minding Ps And Qs 2021 H/A Gelding

AM THORNY ROSE

AM Power Raid x Al-Marah Capricorn) 2008 Arabian Mare | In Foal to TA Mozart

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CHARLOTTE AMES Afires Heir x Colette Ames | 2018 Arabian Mare

WIEZA BELLA Pogrom x Wieza Mocy | 2015 Arabian Mare

JAKUB CRF Kahil Al Shaqab x Perfirka | 2017 Arabian Stallion

For more information Contact Laura Rodel (320) 522-2169 or Stephanie Davisson (815) 354-2466 The Ames Family Jordan, MN Farm: (952) 492-6590 www.Cedar-Ridge.com

BETH DUTTON RA (pending) Hollywood Dun It x Minding Ps And Qs 2021 H/A Filly

PARTY PERFECT CRF (pending) Arrowhead’s Unlike Any Other x Ames Patina 2021 H/A Filly

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www.Cedar-Ridge.com


SF Aftershoc x Isabella Davinci

U.S. NATIONAL HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE JR. HORSE WITH LAURA RODEL HALF-ARABIAN GELDINGS SADDLE/PLEASURE 3 & OVER WITH KENNY MCDONALD HALF-ARABIAN GELDINGS AAOTH WITH LARA AMES Owned & bred by Cedar Ridge Arabians