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Join the Experts in Toronto This sixth-annual gathering of industry and academic experts from around the world will again offer unparalleled insight to modern maintenance and asset-management techniques for plant and facility professionals. Hosted by Dr. Andrew Jardine of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering, and co-produced with Maintenance Technology magazine, IMEC 2010 offers two days of keynote presentations and one day of in-depth workshops at the University’s conference venue in the heart of downtown Toronto. With a dinner at the famed CN Tower included, and unlimited opportunity to discuss the issues with international experts, IMEC 2010 provides a well-rounded, exciting learning opportunity for maintenance professionals everywhere. For more information about IMEC 2010, please contact Bill Kiesel at bill@imec.ca / 847-382-8100, ext. 116 Registration online at www.imec.ca IMEC is organized by:

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Contents

M A I N T E N A N C E

TECHNOLOGY

®

AUGUST 2010 • VOL 23, NO 8 • www.MT-ONLINE.com

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

FEATURES INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010 13

A Special Executive Roundtable Jay A. Burnette, Vice President, Sales & Engineering, Waukesha Bearings Corporation Terry Buzbee, President, Emerson Process Management, Fisher Division Brian Gleason, President, Des-Case Corporation Mike Hawkins, Global Brand Manager, Mobil SHC Brand, ExxonMobil Lubricants & Specialties Barbara Hulit, President, Fluke Corporation Poul Jeppesen, President and CEO, SKF USA Inc. Tony Martell, Vice President and General Manager, Aftermarket Business Unit, NSK Brian O’Donnell, President & CEO, A. W. Chesterton Brian Palmer, CEO, Measurement and Control Solutions, GE Energy Michael A. Pulick, President, Grainger U.S. Enrique Santacana, President and CEO, ABB Inc. Steven J. Smidler, President, Kaman Industrial Technologies Corporation Andrew Teich, President, Commercial Systems, FLIR Systems, Inc.

THE FUNDAMENTALS 28

A Snowball’s Chance In Maintenance Think in terms of the snowball effect to do lots more with lots less. Daniel J. Erwin, CMRP, The Dow Chemical Company

30

Part I: How To Begin Maintenance Planning Does your team really need a planner, and who should it be? Raymond L. Atkins, Contributing Editor

CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK 34 35 36 38 39 40 42 42 44

DEPARTMENTS 6 8 11 27 45 47 47 48

My Take Uptime For On The Floor Lubrication Checkup Marketplace Classified Information Highway Supplier Index

Automation And Control Electrical Systems Testing And Analysis Lubrication, Lubricants And Other Fluids Information Technology Mechanical And Hydraulic Equipment Maintenance Equipment Maintenance Management MRO Equipment & Supplies

AUGUST 2010

GI Bill

Will Pay For CMRP Certification Exams The Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals Certifying Organization (SMRPCO) has announced that the Certified Maintenance and Reliability Professional (CMRP) certification program has been approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs, and will be added to the list of certification exams for which military personnel and veterans are eligible to receive reimbursement. For more information, visit www.smrp.org

MT-ONLINE.COM | 3


M A I N T E N A N C E

TECHNOLOGY

®

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

August 2010 • Volume 23, No. 8 ARTHUR L. RICE President/CEO arice@atpnetwork.com

Changed basketball.

BILL KIESEL Executive Vice President/Publisher bkiesel@atpnetwork.com

JANE ALEXANDER

Editor-In-Chief jalexander@atpnetwork.com

RICK CARTER

Executive Editor rcarter@atpnetwork.com

ROBERT “BOB” WILLIAMSON KENNETH E. BANNISTER RAYMOND L. ATKINS Contributing Editors

RANDY BUTTSTADT

Director of Creative Services rbuttstadt@atpnetwork.com

GREG PIETRAS

Editorial/Production Assistant gpietras@atpnetwork.com

ELLEN SANDKAM

Changed contamination control. Small changes can make a big difference in how you play the game. Des-Case Corporation pioneered breather technology, making it easier to keep dirt and water out of oil and extend the life of industrial lubricants and equipment.

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EDWARD KANE

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Editorial Office: 1300 South Grove Ave., Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 847-382-8100 / FAX 847-304-8603 WWW.MT-ONLINE.COM

Subscriptions: FOR INQUIRIES OR CHANGES CONTACT JEFFREY HEINE, 630-739-0900 EXT. 204 / FAX 630-739-7967

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www.MT-online.com Your Source For

Capacity Assurance Solutions

• 4|

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

exclusive online-only content • late-breaking industry news • 12 years of article archives • comprehensive events calendar • enhanced training pages business directory

Maintenance Technology® (ISSN 0899-5729) is published monthly by Applied Technology Publications, Inc., 1300 S. Grove Avenue, Barrington, IL 60010. Periodicals postage paid at Barrington, Illinois and additional offices. Arthur L. Rice, III, President. Circulation records are maintained at Maintenance Technology®, Creative Data, 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite E, Bolingbrook, IL 60440. Maintenance Technology® copyright 2010 by Applied Technology Publications, Inc. Annual subscription rates for nonqualified people: North America, $140; all others, $280 (air). No subscription agency is authorized by us to solicit or take orders for subscriptions. Postmaster: Please send address changes to Maintenance Technology®, Creative Data, 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite E, Bolingbrook, IL 60440. Please indicate position, title, company name, company address. For other circulation information call (630) 739-0900. Canadian Publications agreement No. 40886011. Canada Post returns: IMEX, Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5, or email: cpcreturns@ wdsmail.com. Submissions Policy: Maintenance Technology® gladly welcomes submissions. By sending us your submission, unless otherwise negotiated in writing with our editor(s), you grant Applied Technology Publications, Inc. permission, by an irrevocable license, to edit, reproduce, distribute, publish, and adapt your submission in any medium, including via Internet, on multiple occasions. You are, of course, free to publish your submission yourself or to allow others to republish your submission. Submissions will not be returned. “Maintenance Technology®” is a registered trademark of Applied Technology Publications, Inc. Printed in U.S.A.

AUGUST 2010


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Š 2010 by Eventure Events, LLC. All rights reserved. Eventure and SAP for Utilities logos are trademarks of Eventure Events, LLC. The SAP logo is a trademark or registered trademark of SAP AG in Germany and several other countries and is reproduced with the permission of SAP AG. All other products and service names mentioned are the trademarks of their respective companies.


MY TAKE

Jane Alexander, Editor-In-Chief

Taking The Wild Ride

Y

ou know how it is when you can’t get a song out of your head? Often, it’s just a tune and pieces of lyrics that loop through your subconscious, over and over and over again. Something causes them to get stuck inside your brain and you find yourself singing along in spite of yourself. That’s what’s been happening to me lately. I’ve not been able to remove bits of Dwight Yoakim’s Wild Ride* from my internal audio system for quite a while: …“you ready for the wild ride…can you make it on the wild ride…don’t go shakin’ on the wild ride…things start breakin’ on the wild ride…” To be perfectly clear, the suggestive nature of the actual song has nothing to do with the fact that a truncated version of it has been on continuous replay in my mind for way too long. As I recall, the problem first emerged in my head several weeks ago, shortly after we finished formulating the questions around which this year’s “Industry Outlook” section is focused. In late May, those questions had seemed entirely reasonable to ask of executives with leading suppliers to our industry. (Last year, in the midst of the recession, we had wanted to know what suppliers were doing to help end-user companies survive the downturn.) This year, we asked the following: “With the economy apparently improving for many sectors, what are providers of products and services to our industry doing to help their customers return to normalcy/stability/growth? How is that helping end-users address their reliability, safety and sustainability concerns?” Invitations to participate in this special section (by answering our questions in 550 words or less) started going out to a select group of company executives in early June. Rancor and gridlock in Washington, aside, until that time, the stock market and various business reports had been looking up/ sounding pretty good. The economy was mending. Confidence was building. Enthusiasm was growing. Who could have thunk that by early July the stock market would have taken the hair-raising plunge that it did (carrying the relevancy of this year’s Industry Outlook focus down with it)? Today, as I finish up this column, it’s early August. The stock market, despite a few dips and wobbles, seems to be slowly cranking back up (hauling a lot of hope along with it). My take on things is that whether or not we intended to buy tickets, everybody—end-users, suppliers and others—are going to be passengers on a doozy of a wild ride for a long, long time. When it stops, nobody knows. Having managed to catch my breath for a minute, though, I’m relieved to report that this year’s “Industry Outlook” question is still relevant. As most of our executive participants note, the economy hasn’t yet recovered completely, but we’re making progress. To learn more about what their organizations are doing to help make the wild ride easier for your organization, please turn to page 13. MT jalexander@atpnetwork.com

* Dwight Yoakim, “Wild Ride,” This Time, 1993, Reprise.

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maintenance technology

AUGUST 2010


If you’ve paid for automatic control valves, none of your loops should have to be in manual mode. There must be a better way.

Loops in manual mode due to poor-performing rotary valves require constant operator attention. And they cost you process efficiency. You can expect better control from the new Fisher® Control-Disk™ valve from Emerson. The Control-Disk valve has double the control range of traditional butterfly valves to allow control closer to the target set point, regardless of process disturbances. You can keep your loop in automatic mode. With low maintenance requirements and availability to ship in two weeks, it’s time to put a Control-Disk valve in your loop. Visit www.Fisher.com/bettercontrolFC to watch an animation video or download a brochure. ani

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UPTIME

Bob Williamson, Contributing Editor

Billy Ray Motorsports: A Parable…Part I “RACE TEAM FOR SALE: Complete shop, racecars, hauler and staff. Currently competing. Active sponsors. Owner forced to sell due to health reasons. Please call (555) 123-4567 for more information. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY.” What a sad little ad. This race team had started out with such hope and promise. Let’s go back to the beginning of the story… Billy Ray had always dreamed of owning a racing business. This was his BIG chance. The budding entrepreneur met with a few of his buddies already in the business; did his homework; invited some investor friends to join him. He flaunted all of the perks in their direction: race-day passes, hospitality suites, celebrations at the tracks. “The thrill of the racing business is like no other,” he told them, “and you can make some real good money.” Before long, 10 investors had caught Billy Ray’s enthusiasm. Although they realized finances would be tight for a while, they all agreed the risk was well worth the likely results. Billy Ray’s race-team dream was finally coming true! The new Billy Ray Motorsports signs he ordered looked so impressive! “Now, let’s race to the checkered flag!” he cheered. Billy Ray’s pit crew was really focused: extensive training, practice and drill. Man, were they fired up! Crew members spent 40 hours a week training and fine-tuning their pit-stop techniques. Ready with all the right moves, they had the potential to be awesome! Without missing a beat, the Billy Ray Motorsports team began qualifying and finishing races with no big problems. Coming in at 33rd, 25th and 20th is not too shabby. As for the investors, they didn’t miss a beat, either. They were enjoying the race-day activities and the thrill of the chase. The race gods were clearly smiling (at least for a little while). Sliding back in the field After several months of racing—including good races and a few unfortunate wrecks—the financial manager announced that funds were running low and the team had to cut back. Billy Ray and the new owners/investors said they would do their part and only use the corporate jet for the most distant races. (They would take corporate 8|

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

motor homes to all the others.) The team execs also agreed to conserve on travel expenses. Race-team management rallied as well. The race shop would rein in overtime hours, and a few of the newer people would be let go—temporarily, of course. Time spent in meetings would be shifted to time spent on racecars. Some of the work done by outside shops was brought in-house and performed by the team’s fabricators. And the hundreds of man-hours devoted to detailed post-race vehicle inspection were cut back a bit and refocused on obvious repairs just to ensure that the racecar was safe. In the process, the team’s management structure was also changed. Engineering was downsized and began reporting to the finance manager—as did the parts room and fab and paint shops. After all, the executives agreed, here’s where lots of money was going. “They (the personnel in these areas) needed watching.” The race-ready shop (the individuals who put the racecars together for each race, the ones who set up the engines, the drive train and the suspension) would continue to report to the team manager/crew chief. As usual, this group’s entire job was to focus on assembling competitive racecars. Going forward, though, the pit crews would only practice three days a week, NOT every day. So what? How difficult could it be to remove and replace lug nuts, jack up cars, fill them with gas and make a few adjustments? Anyway, as the execs put it, “They (the crews) spend too much time watching movies and working out. They needed watching.” Furthermore, the pit crew coach would start reporting to human resources. That’s because the “team things” that the crew did might fuel potential “personnel issues.” Physical abilities were no longer to be considered when deciding who would do which jobs. “They (those typically involved in such decisions) needed watching.” Changes were being implemented throughout the Billy Ray Motorsports operations. It seemed that no area was to go untouched. Take recordkeeping. It had been a big deal early on. Equipment changes were documented, parts carefully tracked, vendor quality verified and track setups noted in great detail. Compliance with all the rules and AUGUST 2010


UPTIME

Costs finally appeared to be under control. In very short order, though, the team’s performance at the track began to show signs of serious decline. regulation changes, of course, was essential, and could never be compromised. Not any more! In this era of cost cutting, the time it took for managers and engineers to analyze all of the data had to be reduced. There was an easy and cheap solution. Why hadn’t anyone thought of it before? An engineering intern from a local university took on the data analysis task, allowing the managers and engineers to focus on the “actual” racecar. The inventory of parts used on the racecar—repair parts, build parts and spares—also had to be slashed. This caused considerable concern among those in the raceready shop, not to mention those in the fab, drivetrain and suspension shops. The cuts still came. Moreover, purchasing found different suppliers that offered lower prices and could “guarantee” overnight delivery. This would help cut inventory in the on-site parts room– significantly freeing up cash. As changes took hold, the team’s troubles intensified, starting with the fact that it now took longer to complete the racecar in the shop. Sometimes it had to be finished in the track garage. Structured weekly shop schedules suffered greatly. The driver was becoming irritated with the way the vehicle handled AND lost precious practice time at the track because the “guys” were still working to set up and finish the car. Tempers were short. To help minimize and/or eliminate shouting matches, the team manager/crew chief took on the role of a “buffer” between the driver and the rest of the team. Friction was everywhere. For example, despite racecar engine oil being very costly, the engine guys knew that different oils were needed for qualifying and racing, and that fresh oil and filters needed to be installed several times during a race weekend. “Times are tough,” the financial manager countered, “we have to reduce the amount of oil and filters we use, not to mention our oil disposal costs.” This meant that the traditional five oil changes per race weekend would be cut to a maximum of two. Lest we forget, an order also came down to drastically cut time spent on the backup racecar. This backup was to be thought of as something akin to a spare tire—“just in case you need it,” in the words of the financial manager. His directive? “The team’s emphasis now had to be on the primary racecar, not on a car that would sit on the transport truck the entire race weekend.” AUGUST 2010

Struggling to compete In light of these operational “improvements,” costs finally appeared to be under control. That made the owners/ investors (and financial manager) very happy. Theirs was now a “lean race team,” destined to show others how they could be competitive with less overhead. In very short order, though, the team’s performance at the track began to show signs of serious decline. “How could this be?” everyone asked. The Billy Ray car struggled just to qualify. In some races, it “broke” and failed to finish. At one track, when the primary racecar wrecked during practice, the team turned to its backup. To get that vehicle running, however, required “borrowing” parts off the wrecked car. Even then, it was pathetic—barely able to keep up with the slowest racecar on the track. Sponsors started complaining. They put pressure on Billy Ray Motorsports executives to get better racecar performance OR ELSE their contracts would not be renewed. Fans stopped visiting the race shop and small gift shop. Merchandise sales plummeted. Overnight shipping costs for parts and supplies were enormous! And, the quality of the parts from the new “cheaper” suppliers was NOT as promised—parts were wearing out faster and failing frequently. What was going on? Hadn’t the new suppliers said their parts “were the same as what we used to use here?” Some of its top mechanics and fabricators left the team for jobs with competitor teams that were losing some of their senior staff to retirement. Several of Billy Ray’s engineers moved into key positions with other teams as well—it was easy, given the fact that engineers are in short supply across the entire race business. Team performance dropped when experienced people departed and a few replacements filled their positions. Task schedules slipped, and the cutback in work hours and overtime, coupled with in-sourced work, led to shortcuts. Pride in workmanship evaporated. The shop was a mess. The pit crew was in disarray. The front-tire changer and carrier left, and the new-hires didn’t quite gel with the rest of the crew. Pit stops were awful—which made the driver even angrier than he already was. Pit-stop times and accuracy also suffered. To make matters worse, because of mistakes in the pit, penalties mounted. mt-online.com | 9


UPTIME

It had not taken long for the team’s sliding back in the field and off the track to turn into a plunge over a cliff. How could this “wreck” have happened? What had gone wrong with Billy Ray’s racing dream?

Communications were hurt as barriers grew from disagreements and arguments that infected the organization. Enthusiasm turned into frustration. Excitement turned into boredom. Lessons learned It had not taken long for the team’s sliding back in the field and off the track to turn into a plunge over a cliff. While the new “lean” Billy Ray Motorsports business was certainly SAVING on various things, team performance had fallen drastically— so much that the operation was actually LOSING money. The hard truth of an old racing adage was finally hitting home: “If you want to make a small fortune in racing you have to start out with a BIG fortune.”

Billy Ray was very embarrassed and deeply puzzled. How could this “wreck” have happened? What had gone wrong with his racing dream? Truth be told, it’s not easy to stay on top in the highly competitive racing business. Success doesn’t just happen overnight. The same could be said about ANY business—especially one that relies on high-performing and reliable equipment to compete. How could Billy Ray have avoided the mistakes that led him to put his team up for sale? Should he have learned and applied the “secrets” of top-performing race organizations? And what if WE were to apply these “secret” formulas for success to OUR own workplaces? Tune in next month for the rest of the story. MT RobertMW2@cs.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


FOR ON THE FLOOR An outlet for the views of today’s capacity assurance professionals Rick Carter, Executive Editor

What To Do When You Run Out Of People What happens when staff cuts reduce your ability to get the job done? What’s the solution when workload increases, but staff size does not? Our Reader Panelists and their employers address these challenges through automation, outsourcing, cross-training, reduced PMs and other means. How well they’re doing is mixed: Tough times have inspired some to go lean with great success, while others find it still harder to meet their goals. Some acknowledge there’s an even more pressing staffrelated issue whose full impact is now beginning to be felt. It’s the shortage of qualified workers. When down is up A heavy-industry facilities manager in the Midwest says recent maintenance-staff reductions at his operation have helped him streamline. “It improved our productivity because we kept our ‘A’ players,” he says, “and it improved our preventive, corrective and predictive maintenance program.” He adds that he “found idle time that was not being managed properly and work assignments not focused on the high-priority jobs that affect equipment reliability.” Thanks to these productive changes, this Panelist has not needed to rehire. “We have reduced our labor cost by over $100K and reduced downtime by over 20% in the last 12 months,” he notes. “We did this through good training and improved best-engineering practices when making repairs. We have also reduced our use of outside contractors in the last 12 months, and now use them on special jobs or those where they are more cost-effective.” Training is this Panelist’s preferred weapon against the potential disruption of staff cuts. He cites a cross-training program he implemented for electricians and millwrights as being especially valuable. Ensuring that programs like this continue is his biggest challenge. “(We need to) train our team to be effective through cross-training, and build the entire team together to give us the flexibility to maintain

AUGUST 2010

proficiency when schedules change,” he says. “Too many times we find ourselves short-handed or with only one person who knows how to fix a specific machine or piece of equipment. Cross-training reduces those incidents.” Outsourcing, for better or worse Despite lean times, staff cuts have not been universal. Many Panelists say their headcounts have not changed in the past 12 months— some even report increases. A utility-sector maintenance team leader in the upper South, for example, was allowed to add to his maintenance crew when scrubbers were installed at his generating station. “If it weren’t for that,” he predicts, “we would have stayed at the old level.” But while staying at the old level is nominally preferred over cutbacks, in cases where upgrades or expansions take place, the effect can be the same. “We are currently understaffed due to a plant expansion and more machinery,” says an engineer at a manufacturing facility in New England. “The new equipment is PLC-controlled, and includes a smart conveyor with traffic control and other sophisticated machinery.” With more automation comes more maintenance outsourcing, he says. “Outside contractors are needed due to our new installations and because our in-house maintenance staff must maintain the existing plant,” he reports, adding that the arrangement has worked well, in light of the site’s good rapport with its outside contractors. Not all Panelists are as fortunate in their dealings with outside contractors. “My opinion is you better watch them very closely,” says the utilitysector Panelist from the South who “sends out certain equipment for rebuilds, (mostly) during major outages.” His maintenance crew authorizes the equipment that is to be sent out, and when that occurs, he ensures that “it goes to a quality repair specialist with shop visits. This is the least I would do.”

MT-ONLINE.COM | 11


FOR ON THE FLOOR

Outsourcing can also be expensive. “I recently used an outside contractor for maintenance on our plant air compressor that would have previously been done by our in-house staff,” recalls a maintenance supervisor in the Northeast. “And boy did I have sticker shock! I have a renewed respect for the value of a talented multi-craft maintenance mechanic. Sticker shock aside,” he continues, “I do not see the use of outside contractors decreasing. As larger repairs and projects arise I can only see their use going up.” In his case, severe staff cuts led him to the practice. “My staff was reduced within the last year and was reduced previous to that,” he says. “To say I am working with a skeleton crew would be an understatement.” In addition to outsourcing, this Panelist survives by scaling back PM and routine maintenance. He explains that breakdowns have been minimal because of his past meticulous PMs, but he’s concerned management will take the recent history of a few machines as a sign that he doesn’t need more staff, despite his warnings to the contrary. Evidence of this, he notes, “is that talk of replacing the laid-off maintenance people has ceased.” Though work orders at his site have been rising, he thinks management is looking at ways to increase productivity other than by adding workers. “Where this leaves my staffing levels,” he worries, “remains to be seen.” Another Panelist would be happy with any crew, skeleton or otherwise. “My staff was completely eliminated,” says a maintenance manager for an upper-Midwest engineering service. “(I lost) three full-time employees and one part-time employee over the last 14 months.” One quit; two “were let go;” one retired. “That leaves me to take care of three buildings and all the machinery. So I farm out all welder and burn-table repair and the more heavy machine repair because I don’t have time to do it. Our PM program is out the window, too,” he laments. “Our two production people are just refilling oil levels once a week.” With no one else for this Panelist to turn to, outsourcing has become necessary. “I just had Siemens and Fanuc in to work on controls for our VMCs because I didn’t have the time,” he says. This year, he’s even outsourcing his grounds work. Making matters worse, he tells us, is the fact that the entire company just took a 10% pay cut, making it impossible to find a qualified maintenance person at what the company is

12 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

willing to pay. “When I took over as maintenance manager three years ago,” he adds, “we had six people in our department. Now it’s just me with the same amount of machinery, so I see a lot more outsourcing coming.” Where are the workers? A maintenance team leader in New England has been fortunate not to have had staff cuts over the past 12 months. Still, when an employee left recently, it was difficult to replace him. “Our biggest hurdle when looking for a replacement is the lack of qualified candidates applying,” this Panelist notes. Another Panelist agrees: His top staff challenge is “finding qualified people who are willing to work with their hands.” For yet another, it’s “the quantity and quality of available candidates. Many do not have the fundamentals for the crafts.” Available candidates are missing other fundamentals as well, reports a Canada-based Panelist. As a consultant, he believes managers who are assessing new talent often overlook the absence of vital skills such as quality discrimination, handeye coordination, dexterity, spatial perception, problem-solving and judgment. “Manufacturers are guilty of downplaying these technical skills,” he asserts, “because they do not test for them at the interview. Not only does this hamper the needs of industry, the message does not get back to the education system.” The result, he adds, “is that these skills are not developed at the stage when learners are most receptive.” MT

Join the MT Reader Panel! Have your comments and observations included in this column by joining the Maintenance Technology Reader Panel. Send an e-mail to rcarter@atpnetwork.com with the following: your name, title, contact information, years of professional experience, and the name and location of your company. If qualified, you’ll be admitted to the Reader Panel, and will receive requests for your thoughts on industry topics approximately every other month. After one year of active participation, you’ll be entered into a drawing for a cash prize, as a token of our thanks.

AUGUST 2010


With the economy apparently improving for many sectors, what are providers of products and services to our industry doing to help their customers return to normalcy/stability/growth? Moreover, how is that helping you, the end-user, address your reliability, safety and sustainability concerns? To learn what executives of 13 leading supplier organizations told us, read on‌


INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

From Trough To Peak: Preparing For Growth Jay A. Burnette, Vice President, Sales & Engineering, Waukesha Bearings Corporation

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here’s a fairly consistent reality in business: When times are good, management focuses on growth. In tough times, it’s natural to focus more on survival and ensuring a business remains viable. During the past downturn, Inpro/Seal (a subsidiary of Waukesha Bearings Corporation) took a different tack. We chose to invest in the future and structure for growth, recognizing that the fundamentals of strong market conditions were still in play. It was apparent to us that companies unprepared for historical upturns missed opportunities, incurred increased costs and, above all, disappointed customers. For Inpro/Seal, this simply was not an option. Since a key part of our business centers on customer service and responsiveness, we realized that we had to make investments during the downturn to ensure that we could maintain the core of our value proposition and support our customers as markets returned. One of the three main areas we identified for investment was human capital. In an organization known for problem-solving and innovative solutions, it’s essential that we develop the people and skill-sets that make our leadership in this area possible. While human capital has always been key to our long-term strategy, we have increased our emphasis on it over the past two years— i.e., identifying and developing (or acquiring) the talent necessary to solve customer problems. We’ve also invested operationally: in higher technology, more productive machines and lean improvements. Our customers operate in environments with significant downtime costs, so a cornerstone of our business has always been to provide the solutions they need—right when they need them. This means we must have processes in place to provide same-day shipments, even on new and custom-designed products. The investments we made in our tools and processes on the shop floor during the downturn have had a positive impact on both the speed of response and quality of product our customers are seeing now.

In addition to its human capital, Inpro/Seal has always placed great value on innovation. Our philosophy on this did not change during the downturn. Rather, we increased our focus on advancing our technology to address the challenges facing our customers across diverse industries. While we’re best known as the originator of Bearing Isolator technology, we have since developed two additional product lines to combat pervasive issues related to product sealing and shaft current mitigation. These technologies have helped increase the reliability of our customers’ equipment during a time when decreasing maintenance costs and improving ROI have been critical to survival.

We chose to invest in the future and structure for growth. Companies unprepared for upturns disappoint their customers. Finally, as part of Waukesha Bearings, we are expanding our successful North American business model to meet the needs of a more global customer base. This means committing the resources necessary to grow our global sales, distribution and manufacturing footprint. For more than 30 years, Inpro/Seal has put the customer first. During the downturn, instead of retrenching for survival, we “stayed the course” toward growth, investing in the future and preparing our business for the return to market growth. We are absolutely committed to maintaining the capacity to be responsive to customer needs, improving our speed and quality and developing innovative products that increase the reliability of rotating equipment…period. MT For more info, enter 1 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Capturing Growth As The Economy Improves Terry Buzbee, President, Emerson Process Management, Fisher Division

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egardless of sector, industries everywhere experienced a major reset as the global economy suffered one of the worst recessions in terms of scope and severity. Fortunately, recent economic indicators point to a recovery, albeit a slow and jittery one. Companies that have survived the downturn need to act early to place themselves in the best position possible to capture the growth that this recovery will bring. I see companies that are willing to invest in people, technology, safety and service as the potential winners in this reviving market. It may sound counter-intuitive, but we at Emerson continued to invest over the last couple years while the market weakened. As a result of this investment, we have the expertise, products and solutions to help our customers maximize their growth and profitability. Take the issue of diagnostics as an example. Proper diagnostics—integrated from control systems to field devices on through to final control elements—are critical to optimizing process efficiencies and safety. Furthermore, diagnostics will help companies that are now running with a leaner or a less-experienced workforce to better operate their plants and processes. In Emerson’s PlantWeb™ integrated digital plant architecture, today’s process plants have a proven concept that delivers results. With WirelessHART standard in place, it is both easier and more economical to take plant diagnostics to a new level. End-users can now take full advantage of PlantWeb’s many wireless devices, including wireless adaptors, wireless pressure and temperature transmitters, wireless vibration monitors, wireless valve-position monitors and more. Safety is another critical factor for business success in the process industry. As process safety often has direct consequences on personnel and the environment, it is of paramount importance to Emerson. Natural resources are under increased demand as global demand continues to grow. Oil and gas companies are drilling deeper

Companies willing to invest in people, technology, safety and service are the potential winners in this reviving market. these days. Power and process plants have scaled up. Operating conditions are more demanding than ever. Clearly, while we need new products and technologies to answer these macro trends, we also need the ability to test and prove out new technologies and products under real operating conditions to ensure safe and sound operations. To that end, Emerson recently opened our new $30 million Emerson Innovation Center, in Marshalltown, IA. It’s capable of high-capacity testing with flow lines to 36”, complete with performance diagnostics, interoperability and other support labs to ensure that products work as designed and reliably. We can do all of the above correctly—and plants can take advantage of it—but without proper and regular maintenance service in these plants by qualified personnel, even the bestmanufactured assets will age and deteriorate. The inevitable results are reduced returns on initial investments on one hand, and greater potential for safety-related incidents on the other. Here again, Emerson is offering a practical, valueadded solution: Every day, our well-trained, certified service technicians are helping end-users unlock the potential of the equipment installed throughout their facilities, and proactively identify optimization and maintenance issues that must be addressed in order to ensure the sustainability of their operations. MT For more info, enter 2 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

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INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Tapping Into Reliability Brian Gleason, President, Des-Case Corporation

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e’ve long believed that reliability is an excellent and still under-tapped source of increased profitability. In good times and bad, that hasn’t changed. When capital expense budgets are cut, maintenance professionals are charged with stretching the life of equipment. When budget constraints ease, as they have in recent months, those professionals are charged with the continued protection of these very important investments. In either case, these professionals are looking at root causes of contamination—one of the prime culprits in short-lived assets. As they begin to understand these root causes, they employ solutions for exclusion and control. In our space, we focus on contamination control to extend the life of lubricants, and, as a result, the life of the equipment that uses them. As the economy entered recession, numerous companies took capacity off-line. As their assets became dormant, it was critical to protect them. That way, when the equipment was re-employed, there would be a smooth startup. Many of our clients called on us to provide filtration systems and desiccant breathers to ensure that the headspace of the equipment would remain free of moisture and particulate ingress and the lubricants would remain at specified cleanliness levels. During the recession, many companies took the opportunity to further train their staff on reliability best practices. We, too, added additional technical support and educational tools to help our distribution partners and end-users learn more about how reliability practices can improve their businesses. We added several new products to our portfolio as well—solutions to help endusers protect and monitor equipment in new ways. Now, as we’ve begun to emerge from recession and capacity has been brought back on-line, proactive protection in dormancy has helped smooth the transition. With capacity being brought back very deliberately, uptime is as critical as ever. As a result, use of proactive maintenance tools like

desiccant breathers and filtration systems is more prevalent than ever. Reliability also makes perfect sense from a sustainability perspective. Extending the life of lubricants decreases consumption and disposition. If you can implement solutions to extend the life of a lubricant by five times, and extrapolate that across all equipment using it, there are tremendous environmental “savings”— a powerful “sustainability” message. At the same time, if you improve equipment performance and efficiency, you exploit the under-tapped profit potential of reliability: a clear example of how the goals of corporate sustainability and profitability can run on parallel tracks.

Reliability is an excellent and still under-tapped source of profitability. It also makes perfect sense from a sustainability perspective. From a safety perspective, we make a similar argument. Many of the solutions we recommend start with understanding how systems become contaminated, and how they can contaminate the workplace. Simple solutions like controlling leaks, controlling contaminant ingress and controlling oil mist keep equipment and workplace contamination minimized, keeping oil where it needs to be—in the machine. These solutions are designed to align the goals of sustainability with those of safety and profitability. If you control contamination, in many cases, with simple equipment modifications and good housekeeping, you do just that. MT For more info, enter 3 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Maximizing Manufacturer Productivity Mike Hawkins, Global Brand Manager, Mobil SHC Brand, ExxonMobil Lubricants & Specialties

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rganizations across the industrial landscape rely on ExxonMobil’s Mobil-branded industrial lubricants to maximize their productivity and ensure equipment runs smoothly. For example, through our extensive Equipment Builder Group, we work side-by-side with customers and the world’s leading equipment manufacturers to engineer high-performance greases, cutting and hydraulic fluids and gear and slide-way oils that not only meet, but in many cases exceed, the requirements of today’s advanced machinery. By leveraging our exceptional application-specific expertise and close partnerships with leading OEMs, we continue to set new benchmarks in lubrication excellence, helping customers realize benefits such as: ◆ Enhanced energy efficiency ◆ Optimized lubricant consumption ◆ Reduced equipment downtime ◆ Minimized maintenance costs and, most importantly, ◆ Higher productivity With our legacy of developing high-performance lubricants that enable equipment to operate under some of the most extreme conditions, it’s no surprise that Mobil-branded oils and greases are used extensively in nearly every type of manufacturing application and machinery on the planet. As a pioneer in synthetic lubricant technology, we are proud to know that every day, around the globe, companies rely on our Mobil SHC brand of synthetic industrial lubricants, to deliver exceptional protection for equipment operating in the most challenging environments. From power generation to general manufacturing, forest products to cement, steel to construction, companies in nearly every industry utilize and benefit from the performance benefits that our Mobil SHC lubricants deliver— helping to ensure trouble-free operation.

Along with our Mobil SHC family of lubricants, ExxonMobil offers a series of highperformance hydraulic oils designed specifically to handle the lubrication requirements of both industrial and mobile high-pressure hydraulic systems. Well-suited for countless applications, our latest generation of hydraulic oils exceed major industry specifications, deliver keepclean performance, long-life and durability, and potential energy-efficiency benefits. In addition to developing and supplying premium lubricants, however, we also offer a wide range of aftermarket services that provide companies with dedicated, hands-on support to better manage their equipment maintenance needs.

We’re working side-by-side with our customers and leading OEMs. For instance, technical experts from our Field Engineering Services (FES) team are available to work closely with end-user companies and empower them with invaluable, authoritative advice on best-in-class lubrication and maintenance practices. Our proprietary online oil analysis program—which allows end-users to easily expand their predictive maintenance programs and closely track equipment reliability—is yet another example our company’s commitment to strong customer-support. Industries recovering from the recent downturn are finding themselves in an extremely competitive environment (i.e. a tough, continuously evolving global marketplace). Reliability, safety, efficiency and sustainability are more important than ever to these industries. At every step of the way, successful companies are looking to the products and services of ExxonMobil— as they have for more than 100 years—to help them meet their most significant challenges and maximize their productivity. MT For more info, enter 4 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

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INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Here’s To All The ‘Survivors’ Barbara Hulit, President, Fluke Corporation

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hile Fluke customers seem to be enjoying 2010 more than 2009, they can’t really say the falling knife isn’t still falling. Most are seeing growth— though not at the production levels they had in early 2008. They tell us they’re being hit from all sides. Orders are up and they’re working hard to meet demand. Resources are down, however, and supply chains must be rebuilt. Technicians laid off in the recession have frequently moved on, taking years of experience with them. Those who are left have no time for preventive maintenance. They’re too busy keeping things running, up to three shifts a day. This dynamic isn’t going to change overnight. There’s a lot of talk about a “New Normal” across all aspects of the economy, where we don’t ever return to “The Way Things Were.” Executives remain cautious about building headcount, as indicated by still high unemployment numbers. For manufacturers, the new model means sustained high productivity and lean operations. “But wait,” you say. “Lean isn’t a new concept. Many of us in the U.S. have been running lean for decades, in order to stay competitive in a global market. What’s different?” Take a look at the survivors. The survivors are those who invested in sound practices up front, from routine maintenance to training to safety. Plant managers, however, have been relying heavily on that operational backbone for many years now; it’s stretched pretty thin. At the same time, market share is switching hands, going to those who can produce high-quality goods on time in this environment. Uptime and reliability are now crucial. So how do plant managers maintain their high productivity and quality levels while increasing output? Yes, they are investing—in both human and mechanical resources—but they’re doing so very strategically. Things are still uncertain. Profits have not fully returned. These facilities need productivity gains on the scale that accountants achieved when they replaced green eyeshades with Excel spreadsheets.

The survivors are also typically those who believe in innovation—and practice it daily. If that meant investing in R&D during the recession, they did it. If that meant finding new markets, they went there. Fluke’s own experience as a manufacturer has been no different. We’ve survived not just because we make great tools, but also because we’re lean, productive, strategic and innovative. And it shows in the tools we created during the recession.

Survivors invested in sound practices up front, from routine maintenance to training to safety. They also believe in innovation and practice it daily. The latest Fluke test tools now do things that were impossible to do before. We are continuing to innovate, designing ever-easier-to-use solutions that drive productivity. As an example, we’ve recently introduced a new tool that crunches thousands of pieces of vibration data to produce a diagnosis that previously only a highly trained expert could achieve. Another product created during the recession, a multimeter with a detachable wireless display, allows tests that once required two technicians—one to operate the controls and another to read the meter at a distant location—to be done by just one. All of these tools were designed with input from the survivors: our customers. These are the people who are running hard and lean; who need to do more with less and who will continue to succeed. We’re right there with you. MT For more info, enter 5 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Partners In Progress Poul Jeppesen, President and CEO, SKF USA Inc.

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lowly and steadily, the business prospects for our customers in virtually every industry have brightened after the prolonged global economic downturn that challenged so many organizations. Most customers have benefited from taking a closer look at their priorities in this increasingly competitive and still relatively unsettled business environment. In many cases, maintenance strategies are being newly revisited with an eye toward improving asset performance, reliability and dependability. Operations also are taking greater advantage of the wide array of knowledge-based services and expertise offered by qualified outsourced professionals. During the past couple of years, customers generally have shifted their emphasis away from maximizing production output (due to less demand in the marketplace) toward improving asset efficiency and reducing operating costs. In this regard, the overarching goal is to eliminate “non-value added” maintenance, rework and scrap, while minimizing energy use, saving time and money in the process. In many ways, we have been able to contribute positively by providing support and solutions for customers traveling the road to improved profitability and growth. One example to illustrate this point is the SKF® Asset Efficiency Optimization (AEO) program, which is unique in offering our customers the opportunity to pick up where traditional plant asset-management programs typically may fall short. In simplest terms, the various programs and solutions under the AEO umbrella focus on enhancing the efficiency of plant and machinery assets at the heart of production processes. An AEO program tailors a company’s maintenance and reliability strategy to meet an organization’s specific business goals—things that continually change due to market or economic conditions. The intent is to clarify existing reliability and maintenance practices and then move procedures upward on the efficiency scale toward optimum levels.

The first step is assessing the overall effectiveness of a reliability maintenance program and determining how well it aligns with current business objectives. An SKF team of specialists works with plant personnel to identify potential improvements that will yield the greatest returns. A comprehensive report provides improvement opportunities and a detailed strategy lays out recommended action steps.

Operations are looking more to services and expertise offered by outsourced professionals. Our experts then partner with the customer’s maintenance and reliability professionals to help implement a viable plan and deliver the appropriate products and support, whether they’re predictive or preventive maintenance practices, machine-condition monitoring, decision-support systems or any number of other capabilities in our toolbox. All are aimed to fine-tune reliability maintenance processes, reinforce an operation’s overall business objectives, and carry maintenance activities to higher ground. The AEO concept is just one in a portfolio of reliability-centered solutions uniquely developed by SKF to maximize operations for customers in all the various industries that we serve. For us through the years, helping to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of customer assets has become a highly worthwhile, valued and satisfying endeavor. We have learned much from solving customer challenges and then equipping customers with the knowledge and the tools that will benefit their operations in the long run. In turn, we have found that customer relationships have grown ever stronger with deepening roots during our journey as partners in progress. MT For more info, enter 6 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

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INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Maximizing Performance Tony Martell, Vice President and General Manager, Aftermarket Business Unit, NSK

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s NSK customers focus on working to full capacity and ensuring their facilities operate at optimum efficiency, equipment that is reliable and cost-effective to maintain is more important than ever. Motion and control products play a vital role. In fact, how these systems are selected, installed and maintained can dramatically affect overall efficiency, reliability and performance. We work to ensure that our customers not only have world-class products, but the services they need to help them identify areas of failure risk, the causes of premature failures and ways in which they can avoid them. Innovative thinking and proactive attention to an entire machine—rather than just its components— is saving companies across the country hundreds of thousands, even millions, of dollars each year. In many cases, identifying the correct motion and control product for an application can make a significant difference in productivity levels. It can also substantially reduce maintenance costs. For example, when a concrete-floor manufacturer was experiencing excessive downtime due to recurring bearing failure on manufacturing cassettes, a situational analysis by NSK engineers identified a combination of contributing factors. These included the wheel design, the bearing selection and contamination. Thinking beyond the scope of just the NSK component involved, our solution prescribed a new wheel-hub design, combined with a new specification for the bearing and on-site training in re-lubrication and operating practices. The result was dramatically improved productivity, reduced maintenance and significant cost savings. Preventive maintenance programs are another proactive way to reduce the risk of unscheduled downtime due to bearing failure. Yet, in many facilities these types of programs are not in place. At NSK, we understand that when production time suffers, so do profits. We work with our authorized distributors to show customers correct maintenance techniques that will maximize

bearing service life and reduce the risk of failure. We also help them design preventive maintenance programs that lower risk, improve productivity and dramatically reduce costs. This was the case for a U.S. steel manufacturer that realized considerable cost savings, thanks to an NSK-recommended preventive maintenance program.

Being proactive about training is another key element in maximizing productivity and efficiency. Machinery and components aren’t the only areas where being proactive can maximize productivity and efficiency in production environments— training is another key element. Knowledgeable staff plays a pivotal role, and it is important to continually build employees’ technical expertise. Doing so empowers employees to identify issues, and address them, before downtime occurs. NSK works with our distributors and customers to provide training on areas such as best practices in bearing fitting, bearing removal, bearing diagnostics, etc. For customers looking to improve productivity and efficiency to maximize performance, NSK’s comprehensive Asset Improvement Program (AIP) is a vital resource. AIP helps companies achieve significant improvements in profitability through technical, consulting, analytical and commercial value-added services. NSK works with our customers to improve machine reliability, increase the knowledge of engineering and maintenance personnel and reduce working capital. That translates into improved market competitiveness and profitability—exactly what every company needs to build for the future. MT For more info, enter 7 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Adjusting The Sails Brian O’Donnell, President & CEO, A. W. Chesterton

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hile it is difficult to determine how quickly the overall economy will improve, it’s clear that improvement will come—but perhaps only for those who understand the structural changes that have occurred and must now be dealt with. As the writer William Arthur Ward noted: “The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.” The challenge for many process-industry end users today is to compete in a more constrained marketplace than in the past, and at the same time improve profitability and grow. The focus has shifted from survival, or just getting through the downturn, to making the real business changes needed to compete effectively as the economy improves. That requires a realist’s view of what has to be adjusted to meet today’s specific needs. For many companies, the competitive difference will be in how they address plant performance (and, specifically, how to improve reliability and productivity). The difficulty is that these goals require a longer-term view than many companies take these days. The real improvements start with long-term planning in how to meet reliability and productivity goals, and improve safety and sustainability initiatives—not just because they’re the right things to do, but because they drive long-term performance. For the past 125 years, the A.W. Chesterton Company has worked directly with our customers to help them operate more reliably, efficiently and economically. Our focus has been to increase the competitiveness of our customers by continuously improving their plant performance and, more importantly, by providing them the type of knowledge that will help them improve. How can product and service providers like Chesterton help? By supplying programs and services directly related to the plant areas that need improvement or that make a big impact on the overall operations of the facility. In process plants, that will often be related to reducing

energy or raw material usage, boosting plant output or improving compliance. Process-waterand energy-reduction programs can have great impact on improved plant performance. Based on practical experience gained from working in process plants around the world, suppliers like Chesterton can offer “best practice” knowledge to help identify where there is a real return on implementing those types of efficiency efforts. By reviewing current plant practices and reducing process waste, there can be substantial cost savings and improvements in meeting compliance goals.

Pessimists complain about the wind. Optimists expect it to change. Realists adjust their sails. Interestingly, by looking at plant safety or sustainability goals and compliance data— and the issues that arise daily to affect them—we can usually identify many of the real drivers to lower plant efficiencies and productivity. Armed with that information, we can target specific processes and equipment to address and improve, along with the needed products and support to help with the implementation. Going forward, meeting the end users’ challenge of effectively competing and growing in the years to come will require them to look critically at their internal processes, and tap into the knowledge that key suppliers can bring to help identify and implement improvements. By addressing reliability, safety and sustainability issues, significant positive impacts can be made in the area of plant productivity and performance. Finding the right partners with the appropriate knowledge and experience is key—not just for survival, but for ongoing profitability and success. MT For more info, enter 8 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

MT-ONLINE.COM | 21


INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Maintaining Current Assets Brian Palmer, CEO, Measurement and Control Solutions, GE Energy

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s demand for a cleaner, smarter and moreefficient planet increases, the need for a holistic solution to address growing energy demand, fuel costs and limited capital is more crucial than ever. That’s why GE Energy is making big investments in technologies to deal with these challenges in creative, efficient and sustainable ways. Industries everywhere are assessing their position in the economic recovery. Countless companies are looking for new ways to address old challenges by proceeding cautiously with capital spending. For instance, when it comes to critical equipment in plants, many managers conclude that it’s more fiscally sound to maintain current assets than invest in new ones. In order to care for those assets for a longer period of time, companies should keep in mind that the most efficient maintenance strategies are based on predictive plans—not reactive ones. Predicting potential problems and activating timely solutions protect bottom lines far better than reacting to breakdowns. For example, unscheduled downtime due to broken or malfunctioning equipment or assets can cost a business thousands of dollars, aside from possible safety issues. Another way to look at predictive maintenance programs is to compare them to human health care: Just as a person partners with a physician to increase life span, plant managers who have a proper predictive maintenance program with a properly qualified partner can maximize the value of their assets. As one can see, developing proactive maintenance programs that ensure safe, profitable and reliable operations has become a crucial concern for operations around the globe. GE Energy’s Measurement and Control Solutions business provides industries of all kinds with the expertise and tools necessary to effectively monitor, measure and test critical equipment—even when that equipment is located in remote and, sometimes, harsh locations. Wind power is a case in point.

Working with our customers in the windpower industry, we realized that gathering data and distilling it into manageable, actionable formats for preventive maintenance can be a huge undertaking. The wind-power boom began before the economic crisis, thus a massive fleet of wind turbines is now coming off manufacturer warranty. Recognizing that many wind-asset owners would be facing this issue, GE developed the Advanced Distributed Architecture Platform Technology (ADAPT™.wind) solution.

The right partner will help companies operate cleaner, smarter and more efficiently. ADAPT.wind allows operators to plan for maintenance and coordinate outages for closely clustered units. With tools like these, wind-farm operators can monitor their assets remotely, understand the severity of defects, make corrections and continue to generate revenue if the problem is insignificant. This, however, is just one example of a solution GE has created to help its customers capitalize on assets and shift mindsets from a reactive approach to maintenance to a predictive strategy. While the shifting of mindsets doesn’t happen overnight, it helps alleviate many burdens associated with unplanned downtime and improve reliability. Providing predictive maintenance solutions requires an understanding of customers’ unique needs and challenges. The right partner will help companies operate cleaner, smarter and more efficiently in a world where reliability and financial security are challenged by shrinking resources, fewer expenditures and more attention to sustainable solutions. MT For more info, enter 9 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Productivity Is Here To Stay Michael A. Pulick, President, Grainger U.S.

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ne of the best things about my job is getting to interact one-on-one with customers. Grainger’s annual Total MRO Solutions Customer Show that brings customers, suppliers and industry experts together provides a great opportunity for me to do this, allowing me to learn in an up-close and personal way about the driving concerns of the industries we serve. At this year’s event, I had the pleasure of speaking with a purchasing manager who told me he now has three times the work and less than a third of his original staff—not an uncommon situation today. As a matter of survival, he has dramatically consolidated the number of MRO suppliers he uses. That’s not unusual, either. These days, we’re seeing businesses embrace a more strategic approach to managing MRO inventory, focusing on total cost. In the past, they had not understood the MRO procurement process— leaving them unaware of how many vendors they used or even how much they were spending. In today’s economic environment, companies realize there are great savings opportunities once they better understand the total cost of their MRO purchases. Grainger’s research suggests that two-thirds of U.S. businesses are not effectively managing their MRO materials once purchased. Our analysis of more than 200 organizations across various industries found: ◆ On average, MRO inventory turns one time annually. ◆ Less than 25% of MRO inventory items turn more than four times annually. ◆ More than 50% of MRO inventory items are “inactive,” with no usage for at least 12 months. Our Inventory Solutions program (www. grainger.com/inventory) is geared to address these troubling statistics. Quite simply, it helps busi-

nesses manage and reduce the amount of their on-site inventories. This significantly reduces procurement costs and boosts the productivity of a facility’s staff by providing full visibility into what is being spent on maintenance supplies. In turn, procurement efficiencies help drive workplace productivity by allowing employees to return to the core activities of their operations. Our broad product offering allows us to help our customers increase their productivity over a large portion of their MRO spend. In addition, Internet procurement of MRO supplies allows customers to find and obtain solutions more efficiently and effectively than ever before. Safety and sustainability are also areas of focus for businesses. As North America’s largest distributor of safety products, Grainger provides expertise, resources and products that help businesses manage safe and healthy workplaces by helping customers maintain regulatory compliance, reduce accident rates, prepare for emergencies and disasters and decrease operating costs. We also carry thousands of products that can help organizations achieve their sustainability goals, as well as solutions to educate businesses on how to run more energy-efficient facilities. Through our supplier partnerships and recent acquisition of Alliance Energy Solutions, we are able to offer training, needs assessments and audits in areas such as energy, water, green cleaning and waste reduction to help “green” our customers’ facilities, while saving them time and money in the process. To remain competitive in a global marketplace, businesses need to continue to find ways to operate in the most productive way possible. Countless companies took drastic measures during the economic downturn to remain efficient. Even as the economy shows signs of recovery, I firmly believe they will continue to do the small things differently—the very types of things that pay off big time for the long-term health and vitality of their organizations. MT For more info, enter 10 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

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INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Priorities In A New Business Environment Enrique Santacana, President and CEO, ABB Inc.

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s we look ahead to a return to economic stability and growth, one trend is sure to continue: the rising demand for energy. More specifically, it’s the rising demand for electricity. Electric power is poised to be the energy source of the future, driven by the continued proliferation of electronic devices and by the electrification of the transportation sector. According to IEA estimates, energy consumption in North America and Europe will rise by 5% over the next 20 years. That may not sound like much, but the same study calls for electricity demand to increase by 26% (and 76% globally) over the same period. Energy costs are still rising despite economic headwinds and the return to more robust growth combined with potential new regulation (e.g., on carbon emissions) will only fuel this trend. In such an environment, eliminating energy waste and doing more with less will be vital for all businesses, but especially for energy-intensive operations such as metals and cement production. At ABB, we’re focused on energy efficiency because we see tremendous potential in this area. One example lies in the electric motors that run compressors, pumps, fans, heaters and many of the other basic components found in any industrial operation. An 11kW motor, for example, that achieves just 2% greater efficiency than a comparable motor will use 33,600 kWh less power over a 15-year lifetime. That equates to a savings of over $2100* and more than 17,000 kg of CO2. Again, this may not sound like much, but if you consider a large pulp and paper facility running more than 2000 motors day and night, the impact of a seemingly small gain in efficiency becomes clear. Efficiency is also often linked to reliability— and nowhere is this more apparent than in the electric utility sector. One major Texas utility is now installing static VAr compensators that will not only increase the capacity of existing transmission lines (i.e., boost efficiency), but also strengthen the local grid against disruptions (i.e., increase reliability). Installations like these

defer the cost of building additional generating capacity and can even replace existing generation for voltage support. To bring things full circle, reliability is also linked to safety. ABB introduced the first line of arc-resistant switchgear designed from scratch in 1994, and it now outsells our conventional switchgear. Arc-resistant gear provides a higher level of safety for workers, and also reduces damage to electronic components in the event of a failure, so there’s an even more compelling business case.

Efficiency is often linked to reliability. To bring things full circle, reliability is also linked to safety. Finally, the importance of energy efficiency has been elevated with recent developments regarding the emerging “smart grid.” ABB is at the forefront of these discussions, and our engineers are helping to create intelligent new solutions that will improve efficiency, reliability, safety, environmental issues and end-user choices. The smart grid will have a positive impact on both industrial and utility sectors, and will eventually touch everyone in the U.S., Canada and around the globe. We are entering into a new business environment—one where economic considerations must be balanced more evenly with environmental and safety concerns. Our experience at ABB has shown, though, that these interests need not compete with one another, and often the best solutions are those that reveal the synergies among them. MT *Based on average power costs for industrial sector, EIA Electric Power Monthly, June 2010 For more info, enter 11 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

What’s So Great About Normal? Steven J. Smidler, President, Kaman Industrial Technologies Corporation

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was somewhat stunned when asked what Kaman is doing to help our customers return to “normal.” Wasn’t this the “normal” that played a role in sending the economy into a recent tailspin? Frankly, maintaining the status quo has never been a goal of Kaman Industrial Technologies. We know that the industrial distribution business is not typically viewed as the bellwether of change in American manufacturing. Still, it’s always been our mission to re-examine our operating assumptions and to encourage our customers to do the same. We’ve recently been driving a LOT of change at Kaman, by our own design—not the economy’s. We’re creating new ways to: ◆ Elevate customer service through dramatically improved operating efficiencies. ◆ Bring new brands and technologies to our customers. ◆ Support energy-efficiency and sustainability objectives, both here and with customers. ◆ Make manufacturing reliability rather than downtime recovery the new measure of success. So, what’s the new normal that manufacturers should be striving toward? One aspect is that in order to stay competitive, they will need to drive more output with fewer resources. Most of our customers are expected to keep their staffs lean and rely more on distributors, OEMs, integrators and contractors to fill the gaps of lost knowledge due to reductions in the workforce. We are well-positioned to accept this responsibility: Our focus has consistently been on value-added selling and application-engineering support. One of the more significant changes taking place at Kaman relates to our recent acquisi-

tion of Minarik Automation and Control. This acquisition has the potential to alter the way we serve our customers and creates an ability for Kaman to serve manufacturer’s operating needs from end-to-end. The combination of Minarik’s focus on automation and controlsystems engineering with Kaman’s expertise in plant maintenance and reliability creates a supply resource that understands the current operational needs of our customers, as well as the processing needs of the future—and helps draw a roadmap for getting there. We’re working with manufacturers in ways that were never possible before to assess the value of new technologies. We’re taking advantage of both planned and unscheduled downtime to re-examine complete systems from basic power transmission and motor and drive packages to sophisticated process controls and complete energy-management strategies. Our success in helping develop measurable results in traditional areas is pulling us into uncharted territories and is spurring innovations that can be translated globally into other operations and business units. And our in-depth exposure to the heart of what drives our customers’ success is teaching us to be better supply partners going forward. Kaman embraces the notion of challenging everything, including our own organizational structure and approach to creating customer value. We’re constantly working toward a better normal—not resting on the success of past paradigms. If recent events have taught us anything, it’s the lesson that waiting until it breaks to fix things is too late. We want our customers to get ahead of the curve and avoid the unplanned. With Kaman as a supply-chain and plant-reliability partner, air leaks, wasted energy, duplicate inventories, patchwork solutions and quality problems become a thing of the past. Being more productive, more competitive and more profitable is what the new normal looks like. MT For more info, enter 12 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

AUGUST 2010

MT-ONLINE.COM | 25


INDUSTRY OUTLOOK 2010

Improving Our Customers’ ROI Andrew Teich, President, Commercial Systems, FLIR Systems, Inc.

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ith all the talk about the “new normal” in today’s economy, one can not only appreciate that times are indeed tough, but that much of the news media is still trading in yesterday’s headlines. As Warren Buffett has observed, “The investor of today does not profit from yesterday’s growth.” Perhaps more than ever before, we are all investors: buyers and sellers engaged in pursuing a better product or service, building a better brand or achieving long-term financial success. In many ways, the “new normal” has refocused attention on a primary performance metric ubiquitous across all businesses, all industries and all job functions: return on investment (ROI). (It’s not unusual for such a “back-to-the-basics” trend to emerge at this stage in the business cycle.) Studies have shown that thermal imaging—or infrared inspection—has an ROI of 4-to-1. That is, on average, for every $1 spent on infrared electrical inspections, there’s a $4 return on investment for materials and labor associated with fixing a problem before it results in some type of equipment or system failure. That’s an exceptional payback, but not too long ago, only a relative few owned an infrared camera. Today, we see infrared everywhere. With a mindset toward improving our customers’ ROI, FLIR has led on two main fronts: cost and innovation. At under $1600, our new generation of ultra-affordable thermal imagers offers an exceptional price-to-value ratio. True to the nature of many innovations— just look at Apple’s success—we find that most customers, regardless of industry or application, get excited when new technologies are intuitive and easy to use. That’s why we conduct focus groups and one-on-one interviews with end-users each year at InfraMation (www.inframation.com), the world’s largest infrared camera applications conference. FLIR’s low-cost and ease-of-use advantages deliver breakthrough ROI technology to in-house

maintenance, engineering and electrical staff. This 24/7 access to infrared is ideal whether personnel are trying to extend the life of capital equipment; reduce energy loss from the building envelope; inspect HVAC, roofing or electrical systems; or monitor problematic equipment such as pumps and motors. It’s also ideal for inspecting another vendor’s installation or repair work. In fact, FLIR infrared cameras often pay for themselves with just a few uses.

The “new normal” is refocusing attention on ROI, a primary and very basic performance metric. Familiarity with thermal imaging also allows workers to tap into our rental pool of specialty thermal imagers. For example, FLIR’s “optical gas imaging” cameras can detect small gas leaks with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and any number of other industrial chemicals— i.e., greenhouse gas emissions. Our thermal imagers can see clearly through flames in high-temperature industrial furnace applications, highlighting the “scaling” or “coking” that greatly reduces efficiency. They also can see clearly through darkness, smoke or fog. FLIR also offers night-vision-enabled perimeter security—a “thermal fence” if you will—for chemical, nuclear, biological and other sensitive facilities. We can even set up a thermal inspection system to monitor product quality or catch manufacturing defects. We’re on a never-ending mission at FLIR: a mission to make our end-users successful by helping them achieve exceptional ROI through thermal imaging. MT For more info, enter 13 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

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AUGUST 2010


Lubrication Checkup

More than an oil. A business tool.

By Dr. Lube, aka Ken Bannister

Symptom: “In a recent annual safety inspection of wire ropes, I was surprised to find a number of them failed due to rusting from the inside out. All of our wire ropes are on a regular lubrication PM. Can you suggest how to address this issue in the future?”

Diagnosis: Your type of wire-rope failure is all too common and largely attributable to use of the wrong lubricant and/or incorrect application frequency (PM schedule). Choosing the right product and application frequency will depend on the rope’s function. Wire ropes on derricks and cranes on ships, marine docks, oil rigs or in chemical environments typically fail due to corrosion. Those used in mining and subjected to heavy wear typically fail due to abrasion. Wire ropes for suspension lifting and friction windings bend as they work over their pulley sheaves; they typically fail due to a combination of fatigue and corrosion.

Prescription: Rope dressing (or lubricant) can be packaged and applied by aerosol spray cans, manually by oilcan and wipe rag or mechanically by drip oil or spray systems. Consult with your lubricant supplier regarding the correct application method for a recommended product. Wire-rope lubricants must contain anti-corrosion properties; be able to “creep” through the strands into the center of the rope and displace moisture; and facilitate the adjustment of individual strands as they rub over one another to equalize stress under bending and load conditions. In most cases, petroleum-based products are preferred. They provide up to a 300% increase in fatigue life over non-lubricated applications. The exception is standing ropes used for guy wires or pendant ropes: They’re usually coated with a bituminous base lubricant. Where abrasion and heavy wear are factors, lubricants may contain anti-wear additives along with agents that allow the lube to “stick.” In such applications, lubricants are usually applied on a weekly basis. Where fatigue and corrosion are issues, lubricants usually contain a solvent that allows the product to penetrate the wire core. (For ropes that work over sheaves, the ideal lubrication point is as the rope passes over the sheave, when the wire strands work through the bend and open slightly, allowing the lubricant to work through the strands more easily.) When determining application frequency, factors such as lubricant type, application method, hours/duration of operation, environment and consequence of failure must be taken into account for individual ropes. To determine initial frequency, I strongly recommend working with a lubrication application specialist and your lubricant manufacturer. MT Lube questions? Ask Dr. Lube, aka Ken Bannister, author of the book Lubrication for Industry and the Lubrication section of the 28th edition Machinery’s Handbook. He’s also a contributing editor for Maintenance Technology and Lubrication Management & Technology. E-mail: doctorlube@atpnetwork.com. For more info, enter 14 at www.MT-freeinfo.com AUGUST 2010

Which brings us to Mobil SHC. A full family of scientifically engineered supreme-performance lubricants designed to stay on the job 6 to 8 times longer than mineral oils in severe conditions. Developed to provide better protection of your capital investment; extend machine life; and reduce energy consumption. All of which adds up to one thing: increased productivity. Mobil SHC products are endorsed for use in over 5,800 applications by more than 1,100 major equipment builders around the world. They’re backed by state-of-the-art services and technical support. And they’re reason enough to rethink the role lubricants play in your operation. Don’t just make it run. Make it fly. For more information on Mobil SHC, go to mobilindustrial.com.

SHC

©2009 Exxon Mobil Corporation. The Mobil logotype, Mobil SHC and the Pegasus design are registered trademarks of Exxon Mobil Corporation or one of its subsidiaries.

Wire-Rope Concerns

If you think of oil as a line item, or simply an operating cost, perhaps it’s time to think of it as something more: an opportunity. Better lubricants can smooth the way to maximized productivity, reduced expenses and less down time.

For more info, enter 68 at www.MT-freeinfo.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 27


A Snowball’s Chance In Maintenance Still looking for ways to do more with less? Here’s a personal perspective on how to start things rolling in a big way. Daniel J. Erwin, CMRP The Dow Chemical Company

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nyone involved in maintenance and reliability knows that for every issue, there are probably one or more programs, tests, techniques, acronyms and/or buzzwords, among other things, that should remedy the problem. For example, reliability engineers are expected to: find the root cause of failures; increase MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure); decrease MTTR (Mean Time To Repair); boost equipment output; reduce maintenance spending; improve OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness)…These types of things reflect the technical aspects of our business; they’re our focus. If, however, you’re working on the managerial side of maintenance and reliability, you have a number of other things on your mind as well.

Besides managing the technical side of maintenance and reliability (see above), you’re also probably managing budgets and people, or, to be more specific, managing the allocation of maintenance hours. That’s a game-changer. While the overall goal may be the same— increase reliability, fix things faster, spend less, etc.— the buzzwords are different. The key phrase? “Do more with less.” I speak from experience. During my stint in a managerial role, I dealt with personnel cuts, resource reallocation and bringing on new hires. In light of market conditions at the time, overtime was essentially not allowed. Pieces of equipment were temporarily taken off-line, which meant the other equipment had to run more reliably in order to meet the required production. To top it off, the mix of product steadily increased in size and weight, putting more strain on our already stressed, older equipment. I quickly realized that too much work was left at the end of my available maintenance craftsman hours. I was pushing people to not only fight all the fires, but to make things better. Still, there were just too many equipment failures to deal with. For us, time to make improvements was much like the Loch Ness Monster—it rarely surfaced, and when it did, only a few people were around to see it. Those lucky enough to “catch a glimpse” were rarely prepared to deal with it. That’s when it hit me: My singular goal was not just to extend the time between failures (or engage in some other narrowly focused mission). It was to somehow “steal” craftsman hours back from the inef28 | MAINTENANCE

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ficiency of firefighting, and use those hours to begin building a snowball of progressive improvements. The snowball effect Times are tough all over. The economic slump has hurt most sectors. Those of us in the maintenance arena need to ensure that we’re using those resources that we have managed to retain in the most efficient and effective way possible. All the acronyms, programs, techniques and technologies need to be viewed in the perspective of the “snowball effect.” If you can implement a technology that makes a piece of equipment run just one hour longer between failures, that one craftsman hour may be used to implement an equipment modification that leads to increased production capacity. The increased production capacity may allow slightly more production flexibility and, combined with the available craftsman hour, may allow for more in-depth and/or more accurate preventive maintenance (PM) tasks—even, perhaps, open up an opportunity to just do a PM. You can see the pattern. Where to start If your maintenance department is like most, trying to squeeze some time out of your team’s days to implement some great new “something or other” might seem virtually impossible. It’s not. AUGUST 2010


A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

To start, put your attention on items that don’t require much in terms of workforce time-input or budgetary expenditures. As improvements are made and the results realized, more time- and dollar-intensive projects can be implemented. For example, if your MRO stores have always just “been there,” you may be paying unneeded up-charges to “overnight” parts when critical machinery fails. A review of your critical equipment with respect to spare parts may reveal some glaring discrepancies that could lead to large, unnecessary costs in the form of lost production, downtime and the price of and/or expediting of parts. Savings from those things alone would most likely pay to ensure that the parts are in stores when you need them. That said, what are some things you can do to help boost the effectiveness and efficiency of your maintenance workforce? First, know your equipment. This is essential in being able to concentrate your efforts where they make the greatest impact. After that, the possibilities are virtually endless. It all depends on how “outside the box” you can and are willing to think—and how far outside that box you are allowed to go. Here are a few idea generators: n A thorough analysis of PM tasks can help eliminate antiquated, unneeded and, in some cases, “kneejerk” tasks. Such an analysis can also help ensure that any missing tasks that would add value are put into the system. n As mentioned previously, a project that ensures the right number of the right kind of critical spare parts are on hand can eliminate a lot of unneeded resource expenditures and unnecessary loss of production. n Automating aspects of maintenance through the use of tools such as automatic lubricators can recoup small amounts of man-hours that will add up to a sizeable amount of “extra” maintenance time per year. n A more costly example would be installing real-time analytical tools, such as vibration transmitters, temperature probes/monitors, flow and/or pressure switches or on-stream lubricant moisture sensors. The real-time analysis can help an organization catch and/or track undesirable conditions, a slow-progressing failure, a major upset or an impending catastrophic event. This allows for the repair or replacement of equipment before an unexpected failure occurs—or, at least, allows for a plan to be developed to calmly and systematically handle a failure should it happen. n Transforming small maintenance inspections and tasks into operator-based maintenance tasks (with necessary training) not only can get craftsman man-hours back, it could also lead to improved information collection— AUGUST 2010

operators typically being in day-to-day contact with their equipment. Such tasks could include checking oil levels, match marks, alignment settings, etc., as well as making minor adjustments, adding oil or grease and tracking machine conditions through the use of analytical tools. This approach can be taken in both union and nonunion environments. The previous bullet points are just a start. The list of strategies for capturing and eliminating inefficiencies goes on and on. Like anything, the more you put in, the more you get out. If resources are limited, focus on the biggest bang for your buck—and know the initial returns may be small or slow. This is the snowball effect… Start rolling You just need to get your snowball rolling. Over time, it will develop into an avalanche of recovered man-hours, reduced costs and improved production. With limited resources, make sure you don’t waste your time on the smaller things, or on trying to perfect a project like a PM task or spare-part optimization to the nth degree. Also remember that you can’t do this alone. The phrase “pushing a rope” is very apt. You must have buy-in from all parts of the organization. If management doesn’t buy in, you’ll have no backing. If the operations or production side of your business doesn’t buy in, you’ll have a hard time implementing anything at best, and may create an adversary at worst. Finally, if the maintenance organization doesn’t buy in, implementation of anything could be difficult and slow—and improvements could be doomed to failure. Develop a plan. Think into the future, as far you can with what you know. Envision your defined goal, and tailor the actions to achieve it despite your work constraints. As you develop your plan, make sure you are working with all stakeholders in the organization to promote understanding, build relationships and gather input. A little “politicking” goes a long way. Present the goal so that those affected by it want to follow you­— that’s true leadership. Remember, typically the less a project costs in terms of craftsman hours and maintenance dollars, the more time and energy it requires of the reliability engineer and supporting staff. Steel yourself. It may take lots of personal input to propel your small snowball in the right direction. Still, if you stick with it and bring the organization along, the result will be of a size, shape and momentum of which you can be proud. MT Dan Erwin has spent the last nine years serving in a number of maintenance and reliability roles. He currently is a reliability engineering specialist with Dow Chemical’s Union Carbide Cellosize and Polyox Production Units, in Institute, WV. A Certified Maintenance & Reliability Professional, Erwin holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from The University of Wisconsin - Platteville. Telephone: (304) 747-1045; e-mail: djerwin@dow.com. MT-ONLINE.COM | 29


Part I:

How To Begin Maintenance Planning This month, the author takes an in-depth look at why you need a planner and who it should be. Raymond L. Atkins Contributing Editor

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hen my children were small, Santa Claus—yours truly—liked to assemble presents late on Christmas Eve. Once the kids were asleep, I would get out my trusty pliers, adjustable wrench, two screwdrivers and, in light of the festive nature of the enterprise, perhaps a cup of eggnog. Mrs. Claus would put on some holiday music and bring out a plate of cookies, at which point I would get to work. I always enjoyed great success with this process…that is, until I encountered the Big Red Playhouse.

Let’s get this out of the way up front: The Big Red Playhouse job went south because I wasn’t prepared. I didn’t have a plan. I got off to a late start putting the thing together. Then, once I opened that large cardboard box, I was confronted with dozens of oddly shaped pieces of red and yellow plastic—but no instruction manual. Yup, the unexpected had occurred (as it tends to do). Looking at all those little pieces, fasteners and clips, I knew common sense couldn’t save me. Even worse, I realized that I needed four different sizes of Allen wrenches. I didn’t have any Allen wrenches. Pressure was added when upper management—Mrs. Claus—advised me of the disaster in store for us if the gift recipients awoke to learn that Santa had failed them. So, for the next six hours, I did the best I could with what I had, finishing up right around sunrise. While the playhouse didn’t look like the picture on the box (and several pieces of red plastic were left over), at least it held together. Of course, if it hadn’t been for the fact that the kids ran right by the playhouse on their way to play in the box it came in, I would have been in serious trouble. Lessons learned I’ve thought about the Big Red Playhouse—not fondly—many times since that night. An amusing story, it’s also a very real example of what can go wrong when a job isn’t planned. 30 | MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

To begin, I was overconfident the project would get done—I had always managed to finish it in the past. As it turned out, I really didn’t have enough time to do the job (but I didn’t know it). Since this was the first time I had ever tried to build a Big Red Playhouse, I was unfamiliar with the correct procedure. I had no written instructions, parts list or bill of material. To add insult to injury, I lacked the correct tools. Adding injury to insult, I cut my hand on a screw around 3 a.m. (which just goes to show what can happen when you get in a hurry and don’t know what you’re doing). And finally—once it had become apparent that the deadline might not be met—management added to my stress by pointedly reminding me of my obligations. No matter. I plowed ahead. The job had to get done. What this means to you If my Big Red Playhouse experience doesn’t strike a chord with you, I submit that a) you don’t have children yet, and/or b) you are new to the maintenance trade. What happened to me that long-ago Christmas Eve happens every day in hundreds, if not thousands, of maintenance organizations around the world. Technicians are sent out to perform tasks for which they are not prepared. Jobs are guaranteed to go wrong because mainAUGUST 2010


A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

tenance personnel don’t have enough time to complete them. Projects are doomed to fail because millwrights lack written instructions, comprehensive illustrations and diagrams and/ or adequate parts lists. Work schedules and productivity are jeopardized because multi-crafts don’t have access to the proper tools and are unfamiliar with specific procedures. Worker well-being is put at risk because safety protocols aren’t clear. Last but not least, good employees are subjected to undue pressure when the schedule begins to lag and the search for the guilty begins. Once this scenario is set into motion, we sit back and hope for yet another miracle. Sometimes we get one; more often, we don’t. We end up over budget and behind schedule for a task that may have to be done again because it was performed incorrectly the first time. (If we were lucky, no one got hurt in this mayhem.) Remember the old adage: “When it comes to maintenance management, we are only as good as our last 30 days.” Who among us wants to base our maintenance strategy on luck? What we need is good planning. Gearing up If you’re going to succeed as a maintenance manager, YOU MUST PLAN YOUR WORK. Unfortunately, in a sluggish economy, management may be hesitant to approve the expense associated with adding positions—even one as crucial as a maintenance planner. The prevailing mind-set in hard times seems to be that the maintenance department should just buckle down and work harder and longer. Positions such as planner, scheduler, maintenance clerk and even reliability engineer all pay for themselves in very short order. As such, they are a wise investment, rather than an unnecessary expense. It isn’t a case that a maintenance department ought to have such positions staffed. Rather, it is a documented fact that no maintenance organization can be completely successful without filling these roles. Once the decision has been made to begin planning your work, the first step is to select and train a planner. Often a maintenance organization will promote from within and select one of its better millwrights or technicians for the job. This promotion structure is good for morale and laudable for that very reason, but ultimately the success or failure of this approach depends entirely on the individual qualities of the chosen candidate. Maintenance managers and HR professionals should keep in mind that the skills and talents that make for an excellent maintenance professional out on the plant floor may not always translate well into an office setting. Innate knowledge of the plant’s processes and machine centers is not necessarily a guarantee of success. A good candidate for the planner position will be a person with a passion for details—not necessarily a perfectionist, but close to it. At a minimum, this individual will realize the importance of the accuracy of information and the clarity of its presentation. AUGUST 2010

The job also calls for someone with excellent organizational skills, who can “see” the big picture and convey its elements onto a written page in the chronological order in which the job steps should occur. This critical component means the planner must be an effective writer. Moreover, the planner must have the ability to view the job as a contiguous whole and envision what might go wrong, then must be able to allow for those potential pitfalls and have the appropriate contingency plans prepared. The chosen candidate also must be capable of reading, understanding and distilling technical information down to its essence. He/she should be familiar with the manufacturing process, but not necessarily have come from the maintenance organization—or even from the plant— to be a success. Capturing the benefits For planning to become a successful part of your maintenance strategy, it must become part of your maintenance culture. This enculturation cannot take place if it appears that planning is only being done when it’s convenient for management—or because it’s what the home office wants. Consequently, planners can’t be pulled away from their duties and assigned to other tasks, such as supervision, scheduling or even general maintenance. Maintenance planning will fail under these conditions. More importantly, management will assume planning is being performed because the job has been filled. In other words, the function of planning will be seen as having had no effect on reliability. Keep in mind that planning will have little benefit for your organization if it’s viewed as a nuisance by the maintenance staff—i.e., just more paperwork that “they” have come up with to keep the “suits” happy—and is only done by rote. Everyone in the department must own the concept of planned work and understand its importance. ■ They must be educated to appreciate both the function and the purpose of planning, as well as the fact that it is not simply another flavor of the week. ■ They need to understand and appreciate the company’s expectation that assigned work is done according to plan. ■ They must also come to realize that both the work order and the written job plan are living documents, and that if an error is discovered or a better method envisioned, then this information must be shared with the planner. You now have information you need to make the case for a planner. Next time, we will revisit the specifics of the process and how to write a good job plan. MT Ray Atkins is a retired maintenance professional (and awardwinning author), based in Rome, GA. He spent his last five years in industry as a maintenance supervisor with Temple-Inland. Web: www.raymondlatkins.com; e-mail: raymondlatkins@aol.com. MT-ONLINE.COM | 31


For more info, enter 80 at www.MT-freeinfo.com


1 AUTOMATION AND CONTROL PAGE 34

2 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS PAGE 35

3 TESTING AND ANALYSIS PAGE 36

4 LUBRICATION, LUBRICANTS AND OTHER FLUIDS PAGE 38

5 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PAGE 39

6 MECHANICAL AND HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT PAGE 40

7 MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT PAGE 42

8 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT PAGE 42

9 MRO EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES PAGE 44


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

1 AUTOMATION AND CONTROL The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Electronic components B. Process controls C. Sensors, transducers, transmitters D. Recording instruments E. Motion control F. Other

Baldor Electric Co. 5711 R. S. Boreham, Jr. St. Fort Smith, AR 72901 (479) 646-4711 www.baldor.com Categories: E Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. Categories: E, F

CyberMetrics Corporation 4545 E. Shea Blvd., #250 Phoenix, AZ 85028 (800) 776-3090 www.cybermetrics.com Categories: B, C

Emerson Process Management 835 Innovation Dr. Knoxville, TN 37932 (865) 675-2400 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: B, C, F

LUDECA, INC. 1425 NW. 88th Ave. Doral, FL 33172 (305) 591-8935 www.ludeca.com Categories: C Motion Industries Categories: A, B, C, E

Emerson Process Management 205 S. Center St. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (641) 754-2492 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: B

FLIR Systems, Inc. 25 Esquire Rd. North Billerica, MA 01862 (800) 464-6372 www.flir.com Categories: C

Process Industry Practices

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: B, C, F Rockwell Automation Categories: A, B, C, E Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Categories: B

Siemens Energy, Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical 1345 Ridgeland Pkwy., Suite 116 Alpharetta, GA 30004 (678) 256-1500 www.siemens.com/energy/ controls Categories: B, C, D

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: C, D

SPM Instrument, Inc. 780 Bailey Hill Rd. #3 Eugene, OR 97402 (546) 687-6869 www.spminstrument.us Categories: C, D

Fluke Corporation 6920 Seaway Blvd. Everett, WA 98203 (800) 44-FLUKE www.fluke.com Categories: B, D

Sealeze, A Unit of Jason Incorporated 8000 Whitepine Rd. Richmond, VA 23237 (804) 743-0982 www.sealeze.com Categories: E

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: F

IOtech Categories: D

Sensor Products Inc. Categories: C

The Timken Company Categories: C

Delta T Eng. 136 Main St. Metuchen, NJ 08840 (732) 321-0560 www.deltatengineering.com Categories: A, C, D

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AUGUST 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK 2010

2 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Electric power and distribution B. Electrical control and protection C. Motors D. Generation and conversion E. Wiring and other devices and accessories F. Enclosures G. Other

Fasteral Categories: E, F Process Industry Practices

High Voltage Maintenance Corp. 5100 Energy Dr. Dayton, OH 45414 (866) 486-8326 www.hvmcorp.com Categories: A, B, D, E, F

Inpro/Seal 4221-81st Ave. West Rock Island, IL 61201 (800) 447-0524 www.inpro-seal.com Categories: G Baldor Electric Co. 5711 R. S. Boreham, Jr. St. Fort Smith, AR 72901 (479) 646-4711 www.baldor.com Categories: C, G

Delta T Eng. 136 Main St. Metuchen, NJ 08840 (732) 321-0560 www.deltatengineering.com Categories: A, B, F

Electrical Reliability Services 610 Executive Campus Dr. Westerville, OH 43082 (877) 468-6384 www.electricalreliability.com Categories: A, B, D, E, F

AUGUST 2010

IRD, LLC Categories: G

IRISS, Inc. 4914 Lena Rd., Suite 105-106 Bradenton, FL 34211 (941) 907-9128 www.iriss.com Categories: A, B, C, E, F Motion Industries Categories: B, C, F OMDEC (Optimal Maintenance Decisions) Categories: G

PdMA Corporation 5909-C Hampton Oaks Pkwy. Tampa, FL 33610 (813) 621-6463 www.pdma.com Categories: A, C

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: B, C, E, F, G Rockwell Automation Categories: C, F

The RĂŠsumĂŠ Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: G Toolmex Corporation (Elektrim & Elektrimax Motors) Categories: C Tycon Power Systems Categories: A, D

SAP for Utilities North American Conference Categories: A Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Categories: A, B, D, E, F Sealeze, A Unit of Jason Incorporated 8000 Whitepine Rd. Richmond, VA 23237 (804) 743-0982 www.sealeze.com Categories: B, E, F

Siemens Energy, Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical 1345 Ridgeland Pkwy., Suite 116 Alpharetta, GA 30004 (678) 256-1500 www.siemens.com/energy/ controls Categories: A, B, D

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: B, C, E, F MT-ONLINE.COM | 35


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

3 TESTING AND ANALYSIS The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Instruments, analyzers, measurement equipment B. Test equipment C. Infrared and thermography D. Vibration E. Ultrasound and ultrasonic F. Condition monitoring software G. Alignment H. Balancing I. Destructive and nondestructive testing services J. Other

Delta T Eng. 136 Main St. Metuchen, NJ 08840 (732) 321-0560 www.deltatengineering.com Categories: A, B, C, F, I

Baker/SKF 4812 McMurry Ave. Ft. Collins, CO 80526 (970) 282-1200 www.bakerinst.com Categories: A, B, F Balmac Inc. Categories: A, D, H Checkfluid Inc. Categories: B

Electrical Reliability Services 610 Executive Campus Dr. Westerville, OH 43082 (877) 468-6384 www.electricalreliability.com Categories: C, E, I

High Voltage Maintenance Corp. 5100 Energy Dr. Dayton, OH 45414 (866) 486-8326 www.hvmcorp.com Categories: C, E, I

Mr. Shims Categories: G, H OMDEC (Optimal Maintenance Decisions) Categories: F

IOtech Categories: A, D, F, H, I IRD, LLC Categories: A, B, D, H

Emerson Process Management 835 Innovation Dr. Knoxville, TN 37932 (865) 675-2400 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: A, C, D, F, G, H, I EXAIR Corporation 11510 Goldcoast Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45249 (513) 671-3322 www.exair.com Categories: A

IRISS, Inc. 4914 Lena Rd., Suite 105-106 Bradenton, FL 34211 (941) 907-9128 www.iriss.com Categories: A, B, C, E, I

PdMA Corporation 5909-C Hampton Oaks Pkwy. Tampa, FL 33610 (813) 621-6463 www.pdma.com Categories: B, F Philadelphia Gear Corporation Categories: B, D, F, G, H Posi Lock Puller, Inc. Categories: G

LAI Reliability Categories: E Process Industry Practices

FLIR Systems, Inc. 25 Esquire Rd. North Billerica, MA 01862 (800) 464-6372 www.flir.com Categories: C

Commtest, Inc. Categories: A, D, F, G, H 36 |

Mobius Institute 6216 Banbury Station Brentwood, TN 37027 (877) 550-3400 www.mobiusinstitute.com Categories: D, G, H Motion Industries Categories: A, C, D, F, G

Alignment Supplies, Inc. Categories: A, D, G Azima DLI 300 Trade Center Suite 4610 Woburn, MA 01801 (781) 938-0707 www.azimadli.com Categories: A, C, D, F, G, H

Fluke Corporation 6920 Seaway Blvd. Everett, WA 98203 (800) 44-FLUKE www.fluke.com Categories: A, B, C, F

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

LUDECA, INC. 1425 NW. 88th Ave. Doral, FL 33172 (305) 591-8935 www.ludeca.com Categories: A, D, F, G, H

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: A, D, I, J Rockwell Automation Categories: A, C, D, E, F, I

AUGUST 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK 2010 CONTINUED

Sealeze, A Unit of Jason Incorporated 8000 Whitepine Rd. Richmond, VA 23237 (804) 743-0982 www.sealeze.com Categories: D Sensor Products Inc. Categories: A, B, I, J

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J

TESTING AND ANALYSIS 3

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: J The Timken Company Categories: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H

Siemens Energy, Instrumentation, Controls & Electrical 1345 Ridgeland Pkwy., Suite 116 Alpharetta, GA 30004 (678) 256-1500 www.siemens.com/energy/ controls Categories: A, B, D, F

SPM Instrument, Inc. 780 Bailey Hill Rd. #3 Eugene, OR 97402 (546) 687-6869 www.spminstrument.us Categories: A, B, D, F, G, H, I

Vibration Specialty Corporation 100 Geiger Rd. Philadelphia, PA 19111 (215) 698-0800 www.vib.com Categories: A, B, D, F, H

VibrAlign, Inc. 530G Southlake Blvd. Richmond, VA 23236 (800) 379-2250 www.vibralign.com Categories: D, G

WATCHMAN™ Plus Six Sign up for any level WATCHMAN Reliability Service Plan and receive 6 additional months of services at no cost! OffErS ENd SEPTEMbEr 30, 2010

Quickstart™ Express Now is your chance to try our Condition Monitoring Program at no risk before you commit. Includes complete setup and onsite training. Limited time offer. ™

WATCHMAN

· No capital investment · Reliability DCA-60 Data Collector included Service Plans · Expert mentorship / analysis included

Professional Insight Select

For more info, enter 72 at www.MT-freeinfo.com AUGUST 2010

Call us today at (800) 654-2844 WATCHMAN™ Reliability For more information visit us online at www.AzimaDLI.com.

© 2010 Azima DLI | All Rights Reserved

Circle 67 or visit www.MT-freeinfo.com For more info, enter 69 at www.MT-freeinfo.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 37


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

4 LUBRICATION, LUBRICANTS AND OTHER FLUIDS The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Oil, grease and fluid analysis B. Contamination analysis and control C. Lubricating oils and greases D. Lubrication systems and equipment E. Coolants and other fluids F. Filtration G. Other

Azima DLI 300 Trade Center Suite 4610 Woburn, MA 01801 (781) 938-0707 www.azimadli.com Categories: C Checkfluid Inc. Categories: D Cleanitup Technologies Categories: F

Motion Industries Categories: A, B, C, D, E, F

Emerson Process Management 835 Innovation Dr. Knoxville, TN 37932 (865) 675-2400 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: A Fasteral Categories: A, C, E, F Herguth Laboratories Inc. 101 Corporate Place Vallejo, CA 94590 (800) 645-5227 www.herguth.com Categories: A

Oil-Rite Corporation P.O. Box 1207 Manitowoc, WI 54221-1207 (920) 682-6173 www.oilrite.com Categories: D OMDEC (Optimal Maintenance Decisions) Categories: A

Insight Services 20338 Progress Dr. Cleveland, OH 44149 (216) 251-2510 www.testoil.com Categories: A, B

Orival Water Filters 213 S. Van Brunt St. Englewood, NJ 07631 (201) 568-3311 www.orival.com Categories: F

LAI Reliability Categories: D

Philadelphia Gear Corporation Categories: A, B, D, F

CRC Industries 885 Louis Dr. Warminster, PA 18974 (215) 674-4300 www.crcindustries.com/ei Categories: C Des-Case Corporation Categories: A, B, F 38 |

Lincoln Industrial 1 Lincoln Way St. Louis, MO 63120 (314) 679-4286 www.lincolnindustrial.com Categories: D Lubegard by International Lubricants, Inc. Categories: C, E, G Lubrication Engineers, Inc. Categories: A, B, C, D, F, G Memolub/PLI, LLC Categories: D

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Sealeze, A Unit of Jason Incorporated 8000 Whitepine Rd. Richmond, VA 23237 (804) 743-0982 www.sealeze.com Categories: G

One Eye Industries, Inc. Categories: B, F

Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. Categories: F, G COT-PURITECH Categories: A, B, D, F, G

Royal Purple, Inc. 1 Royal Purple Lane Porter, TX 77365 (281) 354-8600 www.royal-purpleindustrial.com Categories: C

Process Industry Practices

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: D, F, G

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A, B, C, D

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: G The Timken Company Categories: A, C, D

R&G Laboratories, Inc. 217 Hobbs St., Suite 105 Tampa, FL 33619 (813) 643-3513 www.randglabs.com Categories: A, B, D AUGUST 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK 2010

5 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Maintenance software programs and systems B. EAM C. Networks D. Computers, hardware and accessories E. Other

Commtest, Inc. Categories: A

MPulse Maintenance Software P.O. Box 22906/555 Conger St. Eugene, OR 97402 (800) 944-1796 www.mpulsesoftware.com Categories: A CyberMetrics Corporation 4545 E. Shea Blvd., #250 Phoenix, AZ 85028 (800) 776-3090 www.cybermetrics.com Categories: A, B

Emerson Process Management 205 S. Center St. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (641) 754-2492 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: C HK Systems Categories: A

ABB Reliability Services Categories: B Azima DLI 300 Trade Center Suite 4610 Woburn, MA 01801 (781) 938-0707 www.azimadli.com Categories: A

Eagle Technology, Inc. Categories: A, B

Delta T Eng. 136 Main St. Metuchen, NJ 08840 (732) 321-0560 www.deltatengineering.com Categories: A

LAI Reliability Categories: A Motion Industries Categories: A

OMDEC (Optimal Maintenance Decisions) Categories: A, B People and Processes, Inc. Categories: A, B, E Rockwell Automation Categories: A, B, C SAP-Centric EAM Conference Categories: A, B INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY continued on the next page

A Leader in Electric Motor Testing

Circle 68 or visit www.MT-freeinfo.com For For more more info, info, enter enter 73 70 at at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.MT-freeinfo.com AUGUST 2010

MT-ONLINE.COM | 39


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

5 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CONTINUED SAP for Utilities North American Conference Categories: A, E Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Categories: D

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: E

SPM Instrument, Inc. 780 Bailey Hill Rd. #3 Eugene, OR 97402 (546) 687-6869 www.spminstrument.us Categories: A

Tycon Power Systems Categories: C Ventyx, an ABB Company Categories: A, B

6 MECHANICAL AND HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer Baldor Electric Co. 5711 R. S. Boreham, Jr. St. to the category notation. Fort Smith, AR 72901 (479) 646-4711 www.baldor.com A. Power transmission Categories: A, B B. Bearings, seals and couplings BakerCorp C. Hydraulics and Categories: H, L pneumatics D. HVACR Checkfluid Inc. Categories: E E. Fluid handling F. Compressed air Cleanitup Technologies Categories: E, G, H G. Material handling and equipment Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. H. Filtration Categories: C, L I. Fans and blowers COT-PURITECH J. Process heating and Categories: E, H cooling K. System integrators L. Other

Des-Case Corporation Categories: E, H

Emerson Process Management 205 S. Center St. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (641) 754-2492 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: C, E EXAIR Corporation 11510 Goldcoast Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45249 (513) 671-3322 www.exair.com Categories: F, G, L Fasteral Categories: B, C, G, I

Atlas Copco Compressors 1800 Overview Dr. Rock Hill, SC 29730 (866) 688-9611 www.atlascopco.us Categories: F 40 |

CyberMetrics Corporation 4545 E. Shea Blvd., #250 Phoenix, AZ 85028 (800) 776-3090 www.cybermetrics.com Categories: K

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Gardner Denver Categories: C, F, I HK Systems Categories: G

Inpro/Seal 4221-81st Ave. West Rock Island, IL 61201 (800) 447-0524 www.inpro-seal.com Categories: B, L

IRISS, Inc. 4914 Lena Rd., Suite 105-106 Bradenton, FL 34211 (941) 907-9128 www.iriss.com Categories: J

KE-Burgmann EJS (a div. of KE-Burgmann USA, Inc.) 10035 Prospect Ave. Santee, CA 92071 (619) 562-6083 www.keb-ejs.com Categories: B, L Lyon Workspace Products Categories: G Martin Sprocket & Gear, Inc. Categories: A, G AUGUST 2010


6 MECHANICAL AND HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT CONTINUED Motion Industries Categories: A, B, C, E, F, G, H, I One Eye Industries, Inc. Categories: H Orival Water Filters 213 S. Van Brunt St. Englewood, NJ 07631 (201) 568-3311 www.orival.com Categories: H Philadelphia Gear Corporation Categories: B Posi Lock Puller, Inc. Categories: L

R&G Laboratories, Inc. 217 Hobbs St., Suite 105 Tampa, FL 33619 (813) 643-3513 www.randglabs.com Categories: E Rockwell Automation Categories: D, K

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: L The Timken Company Categories: B

SAP for Utilities North American Conference Categories: A Sealeze, A Unit of Jason Incorporated 8000 Whitepine Rd. Richmond, VA 23237 (804) 743-0982 www.sealeze.com Categories: B, E, G, H

Process Industry Practices

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: B, G, I, J, L

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A, B

It’s like having a night watchman. 24 hours a day. Rockwell Automation Services & Support. Providing comprehensive automation services 24/7. Global support. Local address.

Visit The Sourcebook Online

Peace of mind. For information, visit RockwellAutomation.com/ services

Easily find the product or service you’re looking for with

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY’S streamlined online business directory.

Search by category or dig deeper with the new, advanced search option. To access, log on to www.MT-online.com and look for the SourceBook tab.

www.MT-online.com AUGUST 2010

Copyright © 2010 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. AD RS2174-R1/3P

For more info, enter 71 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

1007833-2 AD RS2175-R1-3P.indd 1

MT-ONLINE.COM | 41

7/15/10 3:20:38 PM


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

7 MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Tools and joining B. Storage C. Shop Equipment D. Other

Baldor Electric Co. 5711 R. S. Boreham, Jr. St. Fort Smith, AR 72901 (479) 646-4711 www.baldor.com Categories: D BakerCorp Categories: D Cleanitup Technologies Categories: B

Fasteral Categories: B

Martin Sprocket & Gear, Inc. Categories: A

Gardner Denver Categories: C

Motion Industries Categories: A, B, C Posi Lock Puller, Inc. Categories: A, C

Inpro/Seal 4221-81st Ave. West Rock Island, IL 61201 (800) 447-0524 www.inpro-seal.com Categories: D

Lincoln Industrial 1 Lincoln Way St. Louis, MO 63120 (314) 679-4286 www.lincolnindustrial.com Categories: C Lyon Workspace Products Categories: B, C

The RĂŠsumĂŠ Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: D The Timken Company Categories: A

R&G Laboratories, Inc. 217 Hobbs St., Suite 105 Tampa, FL 33619 (813) 643-3513 www.randglabs.com Categories: B

U.S. Chemical Storage 355 Industrial Park Dr. Boone, NC 28607 (800) 233-1480 www.uschemicalstorage.com Categories: B

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A

8 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Training and professional development B. Safety, health and environment C. Engineering and consulting services D. Facilities services E. Maintenance, repair, overhaul services F. Energy services G. Process safety H. Communication equipment I. Other

42 |

ABB Reliability Services Categories: A, C, I Alignment Supplies, Inc. Categories: A Azima DLI 300 Trade Center Suite 4610 Woburn, MA 01801 (781) 938-0707 www.azimadli.com Categories: C, D Cleanitup Technologies Categories: I Commtest, Inc. Categories: A

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

CyberMetrics Corporation 4545 E. Shea Blvd., #250 Phoenix, AZ 85028 (800) 776-3090 www.cybermetrics.com Categories: A, B, C, D, E, F

Electrical Reliability Services 610 Executive Campus Dr. Westerville, OH 43082 (877) 468-6384 www.electricalreliability.com Categories: A, B, C, D, E

Emerson Process Management 835 Innovation Dr. Knoxville, TN 37932 (865) 675-2400 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: A

Emerson Process Management 205 S. Center St. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (641) 754-2492 www.emersonprocess.com Categories: A, D, E AUGUST 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK 2010

8 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT CONTINUED Fasteral Categories: C, F, I

Fluke Corporation 6920 Seaway Blvd. Everett, WA 98203 (800) 44-FLUKE www.fluke.com Categories: A, B

HK Systems Categories: C, D

IDCON, INC 7200 Falls of Neuse Rd. Raleigh, NC 27615 (919) 723-2682 www.idcon.com Categories: A, C, I

Lubrication Engineers, Inc. Categories: A KE-Burgmann EJS (a div. of KE-Burgmann USA, Inc.) 10035 Prospect Ave. Santee, CA 92071 (619) 562-6083 www.keb-ejs.com Categories: C, E LAI Reliability Categories: A, C, D

LUDECA, INC. 1425 NW. 88th Ave. Doral, FL 33172 (305) 591-8935 www.ludeca.com Categories: A, C Motion Industries Categories: A

High Voltage Maintenance Corp. 5100 Energy Dr. Dayton, OH 45414 (866) 486-8326 www.hvmcorp.com Categories: A, B, C, D, E

IRISS, Inc. 4914 Lena Rd. Suite 105-106 Bradenton, FL 34211 (941) 907-9128 www.iriss.com Categories: A, B, C, D, F, G

For more info, enter 72 at www.MT-freeinfo.com AUGUST 2010

Life Cycle Engineering 4360 Corporate Rd. Charleston, SC 29405 (843) 744-7110 www.lce.com Categories: A, C, E

MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT continued on the next page

Circle 73 or visit www.MT-freeinfo.com

MT-ONLINE.COM | 43


2010 CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOURCEBOOK

8 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT CONTINUED OMDEC (Optimal Maintenance Decisions) Categories: A, C, F One Eye Industries, Inc. Categories: B

PdMA Corporation 5909-C Hampton Oaks Pkwy. Tampa, FL 33610 (813) 621-6463 www.pdma.com Categories: C, D, E, F

The Timken Company Categories: C, E Process Industry Practices

Process Industry Practices (PIP) 3925 W. Braker Lane Austin, TX 78759 (512) 232-3040 www.pip.org Categories: I Rockwell Automation Categories: A, B, C, D, E, F, G SAP-Centric EAM Conference Categories: A

People and Processes, Inc. Categories: A, C, I

SAP for Utilities North American Conference Categories: A, F

Philadelphia Gear Corporation Categories: C, E

Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Categories: A, C, F, H

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A, B, C, E, F

SPM Instrument, Inc. 780 Bailey Hill Rd. #3 Eugene, OR 97402 (546) 687-6869 www.spminstrument.us Categories: A STO - Shutdowns, Turnarounds, Outages Categories: A, B, C, D, E, G

The Résumé Lady 636 Long Point Rd. #G8 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 284-8316 www.myresumelady.com Categories: I

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville - Reliability & Maintainability Engineering Categories: A Tycon Power Systems Categories: H

U.S. Chemical Storage 355 Industrial Park Dr. Boone, NC 28607 (800) 233-1480 www.uschemicalstorage.com Categories: B

Vibration Specialty Corporation 100 Geiger Rd. Philadelphia, PA 19111 (215) 698-0800 www.vib.com Categories: A, C

9 MRO EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES The following categories fall under this section. For individual company offerings, please refer to the category notation. A. Tools B. Equipment C. Absorbents, Cleaners, Degreasers D. Remediation Products E. Misc. Supplies

CRC Industries 885 Louis Dr. Warminster, PA 18974 (215) 674-4300 www.crcindustries.com/ei Categories: C Fasteral Categories: A, B, C, E

Alignment Supplies, Inc. Categories: A, E BakerCorp Categories: B, D Cleanitup Technologies Categories: C, D, E 44 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

Kafko Intl. Ltd. 3555 W. Howard Skokie, IL 60076 (800) 528-0334 www.oileater.com Categories: B, C Martin Sprocket & Gear, Inc. Categories: A Motion Industries Categories: A, B, C One Eye Industries, Inc. Categories: E

SKF USA Inc. 890 Forty Foot Rd. Lansdale, PA 19446 (267) 436-6000 www.skf.com Categories: A, B

Vibration Specialty Corporation 100 Geiger Rd. Philadelphia, PA 19111 (215) 698-0800 www.vib.com Categories: B

AUGUST 2010


CAPACITY ASSURANCE MARKETPLACE

Cool & Purge Electrical Control Panels

E

XAIR’s new CE (European conformity) compliant Cabinet Coolers convert an ordinary supply of compressed air to cold (20 F) air without refrigerants or CFCs, then circulates it through an electrical enclosure to eliminate heat damage and control shutdown. A compressed air filter in the Cooler system ensures that no moisture or dust is introduced into the panel. Independent laboratory testing certifies that these compact Cabinet Coolers meet appropriate CE safety requirements, making them suitable for a wide range of enclosure-cooling applications. EXAIR Corp. Cincinnati, OH For more info, enter 30 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

Fluid & Air Nozzle For High-Temp PD Pumps

O

il-Rite’s spray nozzle for the PurgeX® positive displacement pump allows for use near machinery operating at high temperatures. Co-axial tubing delivers both fluid and air to the target area, but keeps the dispensing mechanism at a safe distance from the heat source. The PurgeX is integrated into machinery as a lubrication system, where it can create an adjustable spray without the use of multiple lines and an air regulator. Oil-Rite Corp. Manitowoc, WI For more info, enter 32 at www.MT-freeinfo.com AUGUST 2010

Low-Profile, High-Impact Tools For Tight Spaces

I

ngersoll Rand’s new 2015MAX and 2025MAX Hammerhead low-profile Impactools™ are designed for optimal performance, even in extremely tight spaces. According to the manufacturer, these products incorporate the power and speed of an impact tool and reach of a ratchet. The Hammerhead has a h ead - h eig h t of less than 2,” maximum torque of 180 ft-lbs and 7100 rpm of speed. It also features a convenient forward/reverse collar allows unrestricted access and the ability to easily change the direction of the tool in confined spots where traditional tools often jam. Knuckle-saver reactionless torque eliminates kickback and further protects users’ hands. A two-position power regulator and feather-touch trigger provide maximum control in even the most demanding applications. Ingersoll Rand Annandale, NJ For more info, enter 31 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

EAM Software Solution For Small- & Medium-Size Plants

T

abWare Express is a new Enterprise Asset Management solution designed for small- and medium-size operations. According to AssetPoint, this offering draws on the company’s 30 years in the EAM field to deliver an easy-to-use system at an affordable price. TabWare Express is available in three simple modules: work orders, spare-parts inventory management and purchasing. It’s offered on a Software as a Service (SaaS) monthlyfee/per-user basis. AssetPoint Greenville, SC For more info, enter 33 at www.MT-freeinfo.com MT-ONLINE.COM | 45


CAPACITY ASSURANCE MARKETPLACE

Ultrasonics For Flaw-Detection

O

lympus NDT has rolled out its new EPOCH 600 digital ultrasonic flaw detector that combines conventional ultrasonic capabilities with the efficiency of a highly portable, intuitive instrument. The compact, lightweight (under 4 lbs.) EPOCH 600 incorporates a full range of standard and optional flaw-detection features, as well as several methods for storing, archiving and reporting of inspection and calibration data. It has an onboard memory up to 50,000 individual waveform files (500MB), augmented by an additional 2 GBs of removable memory and is fully compatible with Olympus NDT’s PC interface program, GageView™ Pro.

2 New Energy-Efficient Motors Hit The Market

W

EG Electric is launching two new energyefficient motors. Quattro, a line-start permanent magnet motor, is a hybrid featuring a 3-phase distributed winding in the stator. Operating at IEC-established IE4 efficiency levels, it is said to be more efficient than NEMA Premium® efficiency induction units. It runs at synchronous speed regardless of the load, providing no I2R losses in the aluminum cage. According to WEG, its new W22 Super Premium motor is the most efficient in the company’s W22 product line, exceeding NEMA Premium levels with 20% fewer losses. When paired with an electronic soft starter, it’s capable of even greater efficiencies. Both of these new motors will be available for order by September 2010.

WEG Electric Corp. Duluth, GA

Olympus NDT Waltham, MA For more info, enter 34 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

For more info, enter 35 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

7-Step Best Practice Lubrication Program Professional Self-Directed Implementation ToolKit

Tap into your Liquid Gold for less than $20 per day!* Whether you’re looking to increase asset utilization and maintainability, reduce contamination, downtime, energy consumption and/or your carbon footprint, or simply cut your maintenance and operating costs, you’re ready for a 7-Step Best Practice lubrication program! For more information on this “expert in a box” approach to successful lubrication programs, contact ENGTECH Industries at 519.469.9173 or email info@engtechindustries.com * Amortized over one year

For more info, enter 74 at www.MT-freeinfo.com

46 | MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

AUGUST 2010


INFORMATION HIGHWAY For rate information on advertising in the Information Highway Section, contact your Sales Rep or JERRY PRESTON at: Phone: (480) 396-9585 / E-mail: jpreston@atpnetwork.com Web Spotlight: IMEC

2010

PIP is a consortium of process plant owners and engineering construction contractors harmonizing member’s internal standards for design, procurement, construction, and maintenance into industry-wide Practices. PIP has published over 450 Practices. A current listing of published Practices is available on the PIP website at: http://pip.org/practices/index.asp. For more info, enter 76 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.pip.org

Your source for information about the sixth-annual International Maintenance Excellence Conference, to be held Sept. 21-24, 2010, in Toronto, Canada, www.imec.ca contains schedules, speaker backgrounds, registration details, lodging guidance and tourist information. IMEC’s four days of Conferences and Workshops, as well as its all-attendee dinner at Toronto’s famed CN Tower, attract industry and academic maintenance and reliability experts from around the world. IMEC is hosted by the University of Toronto’s Centre for Maintenance Optimization & Reliability Engineering, and co-produced with Maintenance Technology magazine. For more info, enter 75 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.IMEC.ca

LUDECA, INC. - Preventive, Predictive and Corrective Maintenance Solutions including laser shaft alignment, pulley alignment, bore alignment, straightness and flatness measurement, monitoring of thermal growth, online condition monitoring, vibration analysis and balancing equipment as well as software, services and training. For more info, enter 77 at www.MT-freeinfo.com www.ludeca.com

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Customized, Targeted Lists For Your Marketing Needs www.atplists.com Contact: Ellen Sandkam 847-382-8100 x110 800-223-3423 x110 info@atplists.com esandkam@atplists.com 1300 S. Grove Ave., Suite 105, Barrington, IL 60010

OFF Button Provides push button circuit disconnections Arc Flash Chambers Prevent Exposure to Arc Flash Safety Shutter Simplifies NFPA 70E compliance

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For rate information on advertising in the Classified Section Contact your Sales Rep or JERRY PRESTON at: Phone: (480) 396-9585 e-mail: jpreston@atpnetwork.com

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY | 47


Index ADVERTISER

20 YEARS

M A I NM TA EI NNT EAN N A NCC EE

TECHNOLOGY TECHNOLOGY

®

®

August 2010 Volume 23, No. 8 •

WEB

YEARS

Suite SOLUTIONS 105, Your1300 Source S. For Grove CAPACITYAve., ASSURANCE Barrington, IL 60010 1300 South847-382-8100 Grove Avenue, Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 FAX 847-304-8603 RS #

PAGE #

PH 847-382-8100

FX 847-304-8603

A2 Technologies.......................................www.a2technologies.com .....................................79 ............BC Azima DLI ................................................www.azimadli.com .................................................69 .............37 Des-Case Corporation............................www.descase.com/sample ....................................64 ............... 4 Emerson Process Management ..........www.fisher.com/bettercontrolifc .......................66 ............... 7 Engtech Industries Inc. ...........................www.engtechindustries.com ...............................74 .............46 Eventure Events - SAP ............................www.sap-for-utilities.com ...................................65 ............... 5 Int’l Maintenance Excellence Conf.......www.imec.ca .............................................................63 ............... 2 Mainnovation ..........................................www.mainnovation.com ......................................62 ............... 1 Mobil Industrial Lubricants...................www.mobilindustrial.com ...................................68 .............27 NSK Corporation....................................www.nskamericas.com ..........................................67 .............10 PdMA Corp..............................................www.pdma.com .......................................................70 .............39 Process Industries Practices ................www.pip.org ..............................................................73 .............43 Rockwell Automation ...........................www.rockwellautomation.com ..........................71 .............41 SMRP.........................................................www.smrp.org/conference/2010........................80 .............32 Strategic Work Systems, Inc...............www.swspitcrew.com...................................................72 .............43 Turbomachinery Lab ..........................http://turbolab.tamu.edu............................................78 .......... IBC VibrAlign, Inc. ......................................www.vibralign.com .......................................................61 ...........IFC

Access MT-freeinfo.com and enter the reader service number of the product in which you are interested, or you can search even deeper and link directly to the advertiser’s Website. Submissions Policy: M T gladly welcomes submissions. By sending us your submission, unless otherwise negotiated in writing with our editor(s), you grant Applied Technology Publications, Inc., permission, by an irrevocable license, to edit, reproduce, distribute, publish, and adapt your submission in any medium, including via Internet, on multiple occasions. You are, of course, free to publish your submission yourself or to allow others to republish your submission. Submissions will not be returned. Reproduction of Materials: Materials produced by Maintenance Technology may not be reproduced in any form for any purpose without permission. For Reprints: Contact the publisher, Bill Kiesel - (847) 382-8100 ext. 116.

M A I N T E N A N C E

TECHNOLOGY

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY/JANUARY 2007

®

YEARS

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS 48 |

MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY

ARTHUR L. RICE

SALES STAFF President/CEO arice@atpnetwork.com

OH, KY, TN MADDING 135 N. Rocky River Road Vice OH President Berea, 44017 tmadding@atpnetwork.com 440-463-0907; Fax 440-891-1254 JOHN DAVIS BILL KIESEL jdavis@atpnetwork.com Vice President, Publisher bkiesel@atpnetwork.com

AL, CA, CO, DE, FL, GA, MD, MS, Business NC, NJ, SC, PA, VA,Staff WV, DC 1750 Holmes Drive TERRI WYMORE West Chester, PA 19382 Director of Creative Services/Production 610-793-3093; Fax 610-793-3094 twymore@atpnetwork.com JIM HANLEY jhanley@atpnetwork.com ELLEN SANDKAM Direct Mail esandkam@atplists.com

AR, AZ, NV, NM, OK, UT 3629 N.Sonoran Heights Sales Staff Mesa, AZ 85207 480-396-9585 AL, AR, FL, GA, IA, IL, IN, KS, LA, JERRY MI, MN, MO,PRESTON MS, NC, ND, NE, OK, SC, SD, TX, WI, Ontario Canada jpreston@atpnetwork.com 1300 South Grove Avenue, Suite 105 Barrington, IL 60010 847-382-8100; Fax 847-304-8603 CT, ME, MA,BILL NH, KIESEL NY, RI, VT, ON, QC P.O.atpnetwork Box 1059.com bkiesel@ Osterville, MA 02655 KY, OH, TN 508-428-3331; Fax 508-428-2545 135 N. Rocky River Road VINCENT LeGENDRE Berea, OH 44017 vlegendre@atpnetwork.com 440-463-0907; Fax 440-891-1254 JOHN DAVIS jdavis@atpnetwork.com IL, IN, KS, LA, MI, MN, AK, AZ, CA,OR, CO,TX, ID,WA,WI, MT, NM,BC NV, OR, MO, UT, WA,WY, British Columbia Canada 1300 South 1300 South Grove Grove Avenue, Avenue, Suite Suite 105 105 Barrington, Barrington, IL IL 60010 60010 847-382-8100; FaxFax 847-304-8603 847-382-8100 x108; 847-304-8603 TOM MADDING MADDING TOM tmadding@atpnetwork.com tmadding@atpnetwork.com CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, VA, VT, WV, Quebec Canada, IA, MT, NE, SD,Street WY, Space Age, 225ND, Fuller Brookline, MASK 02446 AB, MB, 617-232-2000; Fax 617-232-2951 1300 South Grove Avenue, Suite 105 VINCE CAVASENO Barrington, IL 60010 vcavaseno@atpnetwork.com 847-382-8100 x106; Fax 847-304-8603 L. RICE Classified ARTHUR Advertising/Electronic Sales: 1300 South Grove Avenue, Suite 105 arice@atpnetwork.com Barrington, IL 60010 847-382-8100; Fax 847-304-8603 TRACY RYLE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING tryle@atpnetwork.com 3629 N.Sonoran Heights Mesa, AZ 85207 480-396-9585 JERRY PRESTON jpreston@atpnetwork.com

87

AUGUST 2010


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For more information or to join our mail list – email or call now.

Sponsored by The Turbomachinery Laboratory • Texas A&M University 3254 TAMU • College Station, TX 77843-3254 Ph: 979-845-7417 • Fx: 979-845-1835 inquiry@turbo-lab.tamu.edu • http://turbolab.tamu.edu For more info, enter 78 at www.MT-freeinfo.com


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Maintenance Technology August 2010  

Your Source For CAPACITY ASSURANCE SOLUTIONS

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