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PORTFOLIO ALEX PAUL JASKOWIAK


CONTENTS ABOUT ME ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// PROJECT REDHAWK ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// LONGHORN STATION ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ST CROIX LABORATORIES ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// IN(TENSION)AL DIMENSION ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// PARASITIC HOUSE ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// APERIODICITY Masters Thesis /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

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30

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ABOUT ME CONTACT PHONE 740.649.2392 EMAIL JASKOWAP@MIAMIOH.EDU

Alex was born in Columbus and grew up in Southern Ohio. From a young age he expressed interest in mechanical engineering and computer science. Whether it was breaking down an automobile or personal computer, his inquisitiveness took charge. He observed the world through a lens of curiosity which usually led to the destruction and dismantling of his household in an effort to understand how things were put together. Drawing was another means of exploring his surroundings, which the young Alex combined with his adolescent imagination inspired by science fiction. Alex veered off the creative path and began studying accounting following High school. He quickly realized that this didn’t satisfy or offer any permanency. Returning to his childhood interests, he pursued Architecture at Ohio State University and found a life path which offered daily challenges, but pointed to a life worth living.

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ALEX PAUL JASKOWIAK EDUCATION

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

2014

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE

2012

Miami University – School of Creative Arts Oxford, OH The Ohio State University - Knowlton School of Architecture Columbus, OH

AWARDS & HONORS 2014 Association of Licensed Architects (ALA) Student Merit Award

2014

Recognition from the ALA for students who exhibited exemplary achievement throughout the year.

Warren & Nancy Howard Memorial Scholarship

2013-2014

School of Creative Art’s scholarship awarded to a rising student on the basis of merit.

SPECIAL MENTION

16th Annual James E. Gui Competition

Graphic Representation

A 4th year studio design competition, held during the winter term. The competition challenges teams of students to understand the importance of a clear concept presentation for a project with a complex program.

2nd Place

IMI/OSU Masonry Design Competition

2012

2011

A competition held at The Knowlton School of Architecture by The International Masonry Institute of Columbus, in conjunction with a 3rd year construction course. Awarded to individuals whose final project show exceptional design and construction soundness.

EXPERIENCE GRADUATE ASSISTANT Miami University - School of Creative Arts Oxford, OH

Aug. 2013 - May 2014

Teaching assistant for ARC 213 Graphics Media III & ARC 214 Graphics Media IV. Planning class lessons and assignments. Instruction & critique of rendering skills and drawing techniques ranging from analog to digital mediums.

ARCHITECTURAL INTERN RGB Architect Inc. Worthington, OH

Jan. - April 2008

Preparing construction documents using AutoCad 2007 MEP Software. Presentation preparation for clients and state inspection. Clerical work & miscellaneous office duties.

PROFICIENCY | | | | | | |

AutoCad Architecture 2013 Revit 2013 Rhinoceros 4/5 Flamingo nXt Rendering Engine Brazil 2.0 Rendering Engine Grasshopper Parametric Modeling vRay Rendering Engine for Rhino 5

| | | | | | |

Photoshop CS6 Illustrator CS6 InDesign CS6 Word Powerpoint Excel SketchUp

REFERENCES Craig Hinrichs - Associate Professor, Director of Architecture Graduate Studies Miami University (513) 529-7036 hinriccl@miamioh.edu Dr. Sergio Sanabria - Associate Professor Miami University (2014 Masters Thesis Chair) (513) 529-6426 sanabrsl@miamioh.edu Jan Wampler - Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology & University of South Florida (2014 Masters Thesis Respondent) The moment a recommendation is required please contact me to coordinate the exchange. 5


PROJECT REDHAWK SPRING 2013 LOCATION OXFORD, OH INSTRUCTOR STEPHEN BROWN

Project Redhawk was the result of a comprehensive studio project that was designed to replicate the realities of the office environment. The course went through stages of schematic design, design development, and completed with an introduction into construction documents. The location for this project is at the core of Oxford’s uptown - the intersection of High & Main. For the exterior expression, a prefabricated brick facade flows with neighboring context on High St while a shearing effect occurs on the Main St facade. This shearing is the result of a design opportunity created by the physical break between buildings. Exemplifying the physical break and shearing affect, rectilinear shards emerge from the buttglazed facade to provide shading during the afternoon hours. Reflective glass is used to provide an additional effect of sharp red shadows that change over the course of the day.


Coworking Lobby Atrium Retail Restaurant

VOLUME

LOADING DOCK

SHEAR

PROGRAM To adhere to building code for a commercial space, two egress stair towers were required to accommodate capacity requirements of program. This was used as an opportunity to create an atypical expression of life-safety elements - converse to the typical design purely for function and economy.

LP 8" VALVE

12" RCP

LP

197.2' ~1.04%

8"X8" TAP SLEEVE

12" CON 6" MAIN IN 7"

MH

FIRE LINE

BELOW 10" CAST

CHAM.

High Street 6" VALVE AND ANCHOR TEE

12" WATER LINE 6" VALVE AND ANCHOR TEE

GRIP TITE GASKET

6" VALVE

LP

4" VALVE

LP

12" VALVE

6" SOLID SPOOL

80' - 6"

8" VALVE

8" VALVE 4'2" COVER 8"X8" TAP SLEEVE

@CL MAIN ST.

MAN HL 152

C.O.

T

AN

8" DR HY ' 3.5

130' - 1 9/16"

Main Street

12" VALVE W/ PLUG

Proposed Building

4" PVC

MH S

SITE PLAN

143.7 8" VCP @ 1.80% 7


A

B

B.1

B.2

C

D

1

1

1

A302

A303

A404

26' - 6"

1 A510

26' - 6"

26' - 6"

101A

1 North Egress Stair 101 128 SF

3' - 8 1' 15/32" - 3 17/32"

21' - 0"

UP

Restaurant

2

100 3698 SF

9' - 1"

Sprinkler Room 103

103A

Women's RR 104

15' - 3 7/32"

21' - 0"

2 A401 100B

Janitorial Closet 13' - 10"

9' - 9"

75 SF 112A

183 SF

111A

15' - 8"

110A

109A

110

Kitchen 109 874 SF

10' - 0"

1438 SF

Restroom

10' - 0"

49' - 4 7/16"

White Box Retail 113

114

1 A401

Mechanical Room 107

Electrical/IT Room

18' - 6 13/32"

108

13' - 0"

5' - 11 9/32"

114A

5

115A 109B

100C

Janitorial Closet 113B

115 21' - 0"

106

108A

113A 2

A404

DN

1 A301

Men's RR

107A

30' - 10 7/16"

26' - 6"

21' - 0"

Cold Storage

9' - 0"

4

5' - 8"

111

11' - 9 13/32"

Break Room

112

0' - 6"

Office

105

105A 106A

9' - 0"

21' - 0"

11' - 9 13/32"

2

4' - 6"

16' - 6"

16' - 8 11/32"

7' - 0"

12' - 0"

15' - 8"

3' - 8" 3' - 11 19/32"

104A

3

DN

Elevator Mech. Room

102A UP

117

117A

6

116A

Office Lobby

116B

33' - 10 1/8"

24' - 1 9/16"

UP

116 18' - 6 3/4"

5' - 0 13/16"

1556 SF

3' - 0"

7

First Floor Plan

B

A

B.1

B.2

D

C

1

1

1

A303

A302

A404

26' - 6"

26' - 6"

26' - 6"

1

North Egress Stair 301 UP

21' - 0"

DN 301A

9' - 0 9/16"

4' - 0"

Sprinkler Room 5' - 0" 4' - 9" 0' - 6"

16' - 0"

304

304A

Closet

0' - 6" 4' - 9"

21' - 0"

6' - 2 1/16"

14' - 9"

6' - 11"

2

305 305A

3' - 8"

300D

3

12' - 9 3/32"

Women's RR 306

Janitorial Closet 307

4' - 6"

14' - 10"

306A 307A

1 A301

4

3' - 8"

Open Office

Conference Room

300

303

6439 SF

372 SF

300C

2 A407

Men's RR

12' - 2 15/16"

21' - 0"

308A

308

Mechanical Room

309A

309

21' - 0"

21' - 10"

12' - 0"

303A

310A 1' - 6" 4' - 9"

3' - 8"

10' - 6"

14' - 0"

300B

Electrical/IT Room

12' - 3 15/16"

4' - 9" 1' - 6" 2 A404

310

DN

10' - 0 13/32"

302A

4' - 7 3/4"

Copy Room

4' - 6"

300A

312 DN

311 166 SF

137 SF

24' - 1 9/16"

UP

311A

Break Room

312A

302

6

8' - 4"

16' - 6 3/16"

UP

South Egress Stair

3' - 5 27/32"

10' - 10 27/32"

21' - 0"

7' - 8"

5

7

Typ. Office Floor Plan 8


7

6

5

4

3

2

1

1 A301

Roof Plan 56' - 0"

4th Floor Plan 42' - 0"

3rd Floor Plan 28' - 0" 2 A403

1 A403

2nd Floor Plan 14' - 0"

1st Floor Plan 0' - 0" Foundation Plan -3' - 0" Level -2 -10' - 0"

Longitudinal Section The central element binding the office floors adheres to the theme continuity through the coworking environment. A unified chunk is created using an extruded metal frame, anchored at every floor system and clad with red anodized aluminum panels.

9


D

C

B.2

26'-6"

B.1

B

26'-6"

A 26'-6"

Roof Plan 56' - 0"

4th Floor Plan 42' - 0"

3rd Floor Plan 28' - 0"

2nd Floor Plan 14' - 0"

1st Floor Plan 0' - 0"

North Elevation 1

2 21' - 0"

3 21' - 0"

4 21' - 0"

5 21' - 0"

6 21'-0"

7 24'-1 9/16"

Roof Plan 56' - 0"

4th Floor Plan 42' - 0"

3rd Floor Plan 28' - 0"

2nd Floor Plan 14' - 0"

1st Floor Plan

West Elevation

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Cast-In-Place Concrete 121" Steel Furring Strips Red Anodized Aluminum

Typ. Stair Tower Construction

Taking full advantage of the comprehensive studio, exploration of program interoperability between Rhinoceros 5.0 and Revit was used to create the sculptural egress stair towers.

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1

Egress Stair Wall Detail 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

12" Cast-in-Place Concrete

1 1/4" Steel Furring

#7 Reinforcement Bar

Red Anodized Aluminum Cladding

2

3' - 0"

Foundation Wall Detail (Typ) 3/4" = 1'-0"

Two-Way Slab and Beam Detail 3/4" = 1'-0"

5

0' - 10 3/8"

1' - 0"

Sealant

1" Structural Glass Floor

3

#4 Reinforcing Bar

(4) #5 Vertical Reinforcing Bar

#3 Horizontal Ties @ 16" OC

#5 Reinforcing Bar

Conference Room Floor Support (Typ.) 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

2"x6" Metal Stud with Reinforcement

5/8" Straight Bolt

5/8" Expansion Bolt

4 1/2" x 1'-0" Steel Support Beam

Minimum 3'-0" Bar Lap

1' - 0"

0' - 1 1/16" 0' - 4 1/2"

12 B.1

Steel Support Angle

Glass Floor Connection A (Typ) 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

Tensile Reinforcement

6

3/8" Expansion Bolt

Floor Frame

Sealant w/Cushion

1" Structural Glass Flooring

1' - 0"

4

Isolated Pier (Typ) 3/4" = 1'-0"

#4 Reinforcing Bars @ 6" OC

6" Two-Way Cast-in-Place Concrete Slab

Typical Glass Floor Connection on Convex Side (Width of Glass Varies)

3rd Floor Plan 28' - 0"

Minimum 3'-0" Bar Lap #3 Horizontal Ties @ 16" OC (4) #5 Vertical Reinforcing Bars

1' - 3 3/8"

4' - 0"

1' - 0"

4th Floor Plan 42' - 0"

1' - 0" Steel C-Channel w/Reinforcing

Date

Scale

A505

Date

As indicated

Project Number 3/25/2013 Author Checker

Project Redhawk Details

Checked by

Drawn by

1 E. High St. Oxford, OH 45056 Owner

Description

Project Redhawk Project number

No.

5/5/2013 5:04:21 PM


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5

#3 Reinforcing Bar

5" Compact Earth Fill

5" Gravel Fill

Cast-in-Place Anchor

1/2" Expansion Joint

2 1/2" x 5 7/8" Mullion Sill

High Performance Glazing (Kawneer Clear Wall System)

West Wall Section Detail - Roof 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

West Wall Section Detail - Ground 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

Footer

#5 Reinforcing Bar

4" Perforated Drain Pipe

1'-0" Concrete Foundation Wall

1

Cap Flashing 5/8" Straight Bolt

2 1/2" x 5 7/8" Structural Mullion

5/8" Straight Bolt

3/8" Expansion Bolt

8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angle

4" Cast-in-Place Concrete Roof Slab

Smooth Troweled Finish for Insulation/Roofing

Cast-in-Place Anchor

Rigid Insulation (Varied Thickness)

EPDM Membrane

2" x 4" Steel Channel

Spandrel Glazing

Base Flashing

Batt Insulation

3/4" Straight Bolt

Foundation Plan -3' - 0"

1st Floor Plan 0' - 0"

Roof Plan 56' - 0"

4

3

2

West Wall Section Detail - 2nd Floor 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

West Wall Section Detail - 3rd Floor 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

West Wall Section Detail - 4th Floor 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

2 1/2" x 5 7/8" Structural Mullion

#5 Reinforcing Bar

3/8" Expansion Bolt

Spandrel Glazing

Composite Fire Stop

12" x 24" Cast-in-Place Concrete Beam

6" Cast-in-Place Two Way Concrete Slab

8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angle

5/8" Straight Bolt

Vertical Glass Solar Shade

2 1/2" x 5 7/8" Structural Mullion

#5 Reinforcing Bar

3/8" Expansion Bolt

Spandrel Glazing

Composite Fire Stop

12" x 24" Cast-in-Place Concrete Beam

6" Cast-in-Place Two Way Concrete Slab

8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angle

5/8" Straight Bolt

Vertical Glass Solar Shade

2 1/2" x 5 7/8" Structural Mullion

#5 Reinforcing Bar

3/8" Expansion Bolt

Spandrel Glazing

Composite Fire Stop

12" x 24" Cast-in-Place Concrete Beam

6" Cast-in-Place Two Way Concrete Slab

8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angle

5/8" Straight Bolt

Vertical Glass Solar Shade

2nd Floor Plan 14' - 0"

3rd Floor Plan 28' - 0"

4th Floor Plan 42' - 0"

Scale

Checked by

A504

Date

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

Project Number 3/25/2013 Author Checker

Project Redhawk West Wall Details

Drawn by

Date

1 E. High St. Oxford, OH 45056 Owner

Description

Project Redhawk Project number

No.

5/5/2013 5:04:15 PM


LONGHORN STATION FALL 2012 LOCATION HISTORIC WEST END, DALLAS, TX INSTRUCTOR CRAIG HINRICHS

The primary concept of this project is to revitalize the West End by creating a new iconic location of Dallas. Dynamic public spaces are created by the intervention of fantastical and unconventional structural methods while maintaining a cohesive dialog between historic context and the greater Dallas area. This is accomplished by the creation of a new object form unprecedented in the greater West End. The overall form of the project is driven by the existing city grid of the central superblock and then later being driven by the converging grid that occurs on parcel D of the proposed project at the intersection of Corbin and Market Street. The street-facing elements of the building adhere to the west-end ordinance while the interior surfaces strive to create an environment and surface expressive of progressive building method, creating a duality of the historical and contemporary.


The formality of volumes on parcel A is implicit of site context and designed to maximize surface area for residential units while maintaining a compact, dense FAR.

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Residential 441,842 SQ/FT Retail 47,946 SQ/FT Parking 213,750 SQ/FT (Below Grade) FAR 3.66

Parcel B

Residential 441,842 SQ/FT Retail 47,946 SQ/FT Parking 213,750 SQ/FT (Below Grade) FAR 3.66

Parcel C

Residential 102,430 SQ/FT Retail 41,880 SQ/FT Parking 99,893 SQ/FT (Below Grade) FAR 4.003

Parcel D

Residential 107,534 SQ/FT Retail 13,638 SQ/FT Market 10,431 SQ/FT Parking 73,571 SQ/FT (21,421 SQ/FT Below Grade) FAR 3.66

Second Floor Plan Parcel A

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The iconic event occurring on parcel A is the immense cantilever protruding over the southern portion of the site. At a height of 40 feet, a phenomenal entrance is created to the internal public space, drawing the public to the interior.

A diagrid motif emerges from the phenomenal transparency of the cantilever’s truss. Relating to multiple levels of human interaction, the diagrid occurs at three multiplicities. (Left) The ground level consists of a dense meshwork comprised of the three superimposed layers. (Middle) On the second story retail, the most dense layer is removed. (Right) For the residential levels only one grid creates the diaphanous surface treatment.

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Fenestration adheres to the historical context via play on zoning ordinances. The Historic West End ordinance specifies openings must be reasonably compatible with other buildings in the district, thus standard rectilinear openings were generated. The conspicuous grid indicative of interior spaces was manipulated by a randomizingalgorithm to further create identity.

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Enlarged Residential Plan


West Elevation

East Elevation

Longitudinal Section

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ST CROIX LABORATORIES WINTER 2012 LOCATION ST CROIX, US VIRGIN ISLANDS INSTRUCTOR KAY BEA JONES TEAM ALBERT KOS

The entirety of this project is to portray a duality between stages of scientific knowledge - established knowledge and the search for new knowledge. Neither of the two can stand on their own as both are inherently linked. This relationship is accomplished through a formal and theoretical dialogue between two independent buildings. The Knowledge Vessel is a symbol of the propagation knowledge. While the Knowledge Bank is a container of old knowledge, this lab is where knowledge is created. The building form is inspired by a marine research vessel and can be interpreted as returning from its voyage or setting out to sea. But rather than literally being a sea vessel, it becomes a vessel for the acquisition of knowledge. Its jagged exterior geometry is a visual translation of the radical and open-minded ideas that are occurring inside. On the interior, there is a dry lab and wet lab that sits on opposing sides of the building - one on land, one on water. In the middle lies circulation, as well as a coral rejuvenation space. This space serves as the heart of the building and signifies its intent, which is to expand upon our understanding of the biological system that dominates the globe.


Circulatory paths through the housing complex resolves a tension created between the laboratories and knowledge bank. Direct paths connect an organic array of housing while a contemplative labyrinth. Inspired by brain coral, coils throughout direct access ways.

Primary Circulation

Stage 1

Contemplative Labyrinth

Stage 2

The labyrinth serves as an interstitial space. This is where scientists and visitors have an opportunity to meditate, relax and be free of the stress of thought. The winding form of the labyrinth suggests that the journey between research and reveal is no straight route. Two winding but intersecting paths allow visitors to move in an interesting yet more so direct path while exploring the possibility of intimate interaction with those clearing their mind to better unravel the mysteries of our world.

Stage 3

KNOWLEDGE VESSEL

KNOWLEDGE BANK

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Knowledge Bank Section

Third Floor Plan 22

Second Floor Plan


Knowledge Vessel Section

Ground Floor Plan Site Information Shown

First Submerged Plan

Second Submerged Plan 23


IN(TENSION)AL DIMENSION SPRING 2009 LOCATION KNOWLTON HALL, COLUMBUS, OH INSTRUCTOR BETH BLOSTEIN TEAM JOSH KUHR, NATE SPAYDE, BRITTA WANGSTAD

A self supporting structural system that disrupts sensory experiences on the primary circulation ramp of the architecture building on The Ohio State University campus; Knowlton Hall. The inhabitant will succumb to changing spatial conditions while maintaining different levels of transparency while acquiescing the system. The narrative power of the materials revealed through a basic condition of architecture as an influence of local atmospheres through material means. The intersecting and overlapping planes of material registers an inconclusive depth revealing its phenomenal transparency thus becoming homogenous with Knowlton. This system produces temperate environments and luminous atmospheres that drift dynamically with daylight. This narrates a landscape of light, color, and spatial environments that create temporary atmospheres for contemplative and collective occupation.


Primary Secondary Egress

Precedent

Structure

Territory

Installation

Primary

=

Occupational

Secondary Egress

Circulation =

Installation Plan 25


TWINE LASHING

TO JOIN THE CROSS-BRACING TO O LASHING WAS IMPLEMENTED.

WOOD BUTT-CONNECTION

WOODEN DOWELS WERE USED IN THE EXTENSION OF PVC PIPING BEYOND 10 FEET.

ORANGE RUBBERBANDS

RUBBERBANDS WERE THREADED INTO PRE-DRILLED HOLES.

2” DRY-WALL SCREWS

TO PROVIDE SUPPORT AND RESISTANCE TO FLEXING, DRY-WALL SCREWS JOINED CROSS-BRACING INTO THE MAIN STRUCTURE.

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ONE ANOTHER,

ARCHWAY

ENTRY INTO EACH TRIPOD IS CREATED BY TWINE THREADED ARCHWAY.

INITIAL TRAINGULAR SUPPORT

THE INTITAL SUPPORT FOR THE TRIPODS CONSIST OF 1/2” PVC TRIANGULAR GEOMETERY, SECURED WITH 2” DRY-WALL SCREWS.

ORANGE RUBBERBANDS

THREADED RUBBERBANDS SUPPLY A CONSTANT STATE OF TENSION FOR THE TWINE.

FLUSHED STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

WHEN MEETING THE FLOOR, A SEAMLESS CONNECTION TO THE FLOOR IS CREATED BY CUTTING THE PVC FLUSH WITH THE ANGLE OF THE FLOOR. FOLLOWING THE ANGULAR CUTS, THE STRUCTURES ARE HOT-GLUED TO THE FLOOR FOR MAXIMUM STABILITY.

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process lots of pvc to clean...

Ah, popcicle sticks for a snug fit.

hole number 896 complete.

needs more structure!

TIGHTER... TIGHTER...

GOOD!

another hole, another rubberband.

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... d n e e th


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PARASITIC HOUSE WINTER 2009 LOCATION CONCEPTUAL INSTRUCTOR SANDYA KOCHAR

The Parasitic House is located on the top floor of a mid-rise host with a conceptual design that is based on the theme of instability. Visual cues are distorted being executed through the elimination of perpendicular connection of floor and wall. This phenomena creates a condition where the occupant is unable to create points of reference that contribute to the feeling of stability. The stair plays an important role in the execution of this effect - similar to the floor/wall connection, uniformity is nonexistent creating a dynamic procession through space. The skewed floor plans result in a complicated envelope composition, leading to an unconventional structural system consisting of point connections of triangulated surfaces. These surfaces are based on the principal of perpendicularity elimination, supporting the underlying concept. The entirety of the house is placed beyond the edge of the host to become an expression on instability in a more literal sense as the structure figuratively protrudes from the host.


Themes of instability drove the design process and simply manipulations of floor plates acted as an initiator to the notion of perpindicularity-elimination.

Envelope conditions followed functional refinements to the parti . Point-connections were used to define triangulations that composed the parasitic shape further removing floor-wall connections from rational rectilinear construction.

1

+259’0”

1

+259’0”

1

1

1

UP

+259’0”

1

1

UP

Living Room

+260’0”(650 Sq.Ft.)

DN

Open Above

DN

+270’0”(330 Sq.Ft.)

DN

Garden

Garden

+270’0”(330 Sq.Ft.) +270’0”(330 Sq.Ft.)

Master Bedroom

+280’6”(490 Sq.Ft.)

Master Bedroom Master Bedroom

+280’6”(490 +280’6”(490 Sq.Ft.) MasterSq.Ft.) Bath

Open Above

+260’0”(568 Sq.Ft.)

Patio

+260’0”(568 Sq.Ft.) +260’0”(568 Sq.Ft.)

+260’0”

+280’6”(70 Sq.Ft.) Open Above

Open Above

UP

UP

Walk-In Closet

UP

Walk-In ClosetWalk-In Closet

+280’6”(50 Sq.Ft.)

DN Open Above

DN

Open Above

DN

2

2

+280’6”(50 Sq.Ft.)+280’6”(50 Sq.Ft.)

2

2 UP

Void Host

2 DN

N

N

Foyer UP

DN

+265’0”(232 Sq.Ft.)

UP

DN UP

Foyer

UP

Foyer

Void Host

2

Void Host

2

Kitchen & Dining

+268’6”(397 Sq.Ft.)

+268’6”(397 Sq.Ft.) +268’6”(397 Sq.Ft.) Open Below

UP

Open Below

DN

UP

UP

Open Below

UP

Open Above

DN

DN

UP

Kitchen & Dining Kitchen & Dining

+265’0”(232 Sq.Ft.) +265’0”(232 Sq.Ft.)

N DN

Master Bath Master Bath

+280’6”(70 Sq.Ft.)+280’6”(70 Sq.Ft.)

+260’0”

Open Above

UP

DN

Open Above

Garden

Patio +260’0”

DN UP

DN

UP

Living Room Living Room Open Above

+260’0”(650 Sq.Ft.) +260’0”(650 Sq.Ft.)

DN

Patio

1

UP

UP

DN UP

1

Open Above

DN

Open Above

DN

DN

Studio/Workspace +288’6”(330 Sq.Ft.)

Studio/Workspace Studio/Worksp

DN

Void

First Floor Plan

Void

Second Floor Plan

+288’6”(330 Sq.Ft.) +288’6”(330 Sq. DN

Void

Third Floor Plan

31

DN


Studio

Master Bedroom

Garden

Kitchen & Dining

Living Room

Patio

32


+268’6”

+260’0”

+245’0”

Section 1

+288’6”

+280’6”

+270’0”

+259’0”

Section 2

33


APERIODICITY ENGAGING SOCIETY AS CREATORS THROUGH INTERACTIVITY AND INSTRUMENTATION MASTERS THESIS SPRING 2014 LOCATION LOS ANGELES, CA CHAIR SERGIO SANABRIA

How can the principles of robotics be applied to an architectural model to engage society as creators? Aperiodicity is concerned with this question and seeks to resolve it using instrumentation and interactivity. The result is an architecture that has spatial qualities constantly in a state of flux, as the definition indicates. Spatial qualities and temporal understanding are to be skewed in an irregular fashion as the users dictate how the space is to be used. Like the intentions of Cedric Price’s Fun Palace, one can use the infrastructure provided to create, display their creation, or simply come to enjoy what others have created. A complex pattern adapted from Islamic Girih tiling provide a framework which allows the automation and control of space that again refers back to the aperiodic nature of the concept.


the fun palace

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Cedric Price collaborated with Joan Littlewood, the theatre director and founder of the innovative Theatre Workshop in east London, the idea was to build a ‘laboratory of fun’ with facilities for dancing, music, drama and fireworks. Central to Price’s practice was the belief that through the correct use of new technology the public could have unprecedented control over their environment, resulting in a building which could be responsive to visitors’ needs and the many activities intended to take place there.

PRECEDENT

35


tiling exploration

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tartan grid contiguous rail diagram Planning of the rail system diagram had to simply meet two primary criteria - maximize configurability and be aesthetically pleasing. Exploring patterning was a means of achieving both of these criteria. Cedric Price used a tartan grid which provided an infrastructure of nearly infinite possibility. However, this project differs as the configuring of space is to be done automatically, rather than with manual labor; therefor a more contiguous infrastructure would need to be imposed on site in order to achieve the desired flexibility.

Exploration began with a tartan grid in mind as the final result. A grid emerged when rotating the golden rectangle 360 degrees by intervals of 30 degrees and arcs imposed to satisfy continuity between perpindicular grid lines. This gave the system a modular bay that was aesthetically interesting and contiguous, but didn’t provide a feasible solution due to complexity.

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Peter J. Lu researched the topic of the “zig-zag” patterning of Islamic Architecture and provided valuable findings within the field. He brought to light the method that was potentially used when constructing the periodic patterns by simply using four tiles which he calls the “girih” tiles. These four tiles (decagon, pentagon, elongated hexagon and rhombus) were found in a number of Islamic works such as Timurid shrine of Khwaja Abdullah Ansari at Gazargah in Herat, Afghanistan (1425 to 1429 C.E.) and the Topkapi Scrolls that exhibited these principles of tessellation. By aligning these tiles in a tightly packed formation, it became clear how such patterns were derived. Additionally, the interior decoration of the girih tiles provide a continuous, coherent pattern when packed in entirety and consists of no voids.

Early Islamic Architecture and Girih Tiling provided a promising diagram that was complex, but not so complicated that a rail system couldn’t be imposed upon it. Digital Artist Joe Batholomew extended the girih tiling set by eliminating the periodic rule used by Islamic architects, furthering the complexity while maintaing a continuous interior decoration. By using the principles of extended girih, a logical system emerged which immediately satisfied the two primary criteria of this exploration. 37


extended Girih set

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To extend the Girih set into an aperiodic pattern - an elongated rhombus and two irregular polygons to increase the number of possible vertices. These irregular polygons are divided in such a way that x/y=phi, allowing for inflation/deflation. All interior angles are a multiplier of phi/5 and include the Girih decoration to provide a continuous “knot� pattern. In addition to the decoration, arcs were imposed within the polygons to provide a means of smooth transitions for which panels can move upon.


site selection

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DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

A project with ambition such as this demands a location that fosters progressive ideologies. Generally, Los Angeles offered this for my thesis. The downtown area, Bunker Hill specifically, has been experiencing a gentrification of sorts - the 70’s and 80’s brought new development of public spaces acting as a buffer between building and street scape. Further, the Disney Concert Hall was commissioned to act as an icon of LA’s downtown, bringing new life and vision to Bunker Hill. Additionally, recent renovations to Grand Park and neighborhood initiatives have created an opportunity for an interactive public space empowering and celebrating the citizens of Los Angeles as creators. 39


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Zoomed Portion of Longitudinal Section 41


Directed Movement

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System Control Points


Structural Detail

Electromagnetic Rail Detail

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Objects move about the tracks developed from the “smart diagram� of the extend Girih tiling set - thus empowering citizens to create as they desire.

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Zoomed Portion of Exploded Axonometric


THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION.


Architecture Portfolio  

Select academic work from undergraduate and graduate school.

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