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ISSUE 48.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Spring Concerts ■ Japan GCP 2017 ■ Spring Soccer Outlook

■ T. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 7

■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ ■International Day Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■AMIS Festivals Faculty Retreat ■ MS Journalism Project


MARCH 2017

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Kindergarten City Planners

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By Catherine Gassner, Kindergarten Teacher

uring the third quarter, the kindergarten class examined what it means to be a good citizen in our community. To learn about good citizenship they interviewed several teachers, high school students, and middle school students at APIS. The students went even further and ventured out into the community to interview members of the community about what they do and how they are good citizens as well. They visited the fire station, post office, police station, animal hospital, doctor’s office, and a local grocery store. They even had a few police officers come to our school to teach us how good citizens walk through crosswalks safely! After conducting research and compiling all their information, they thought about how they, as a kindergarten class, could be good citizens in the community. The class decided that being good citizens means we help others, we share, we are kind, and we are respectful. The next step was to put what they learned into action and create their own city where they can practice good citizenship. Emily Sgrignoli, high school art teacher, taught the class about blueprints and showed them examples of planned cities, such as Shanghai. The class then had a Skype session with Mr. Knox’s brother-in-law who is a real-life city planner! He taught students about different types of buildings and where to place them. The students then used recycled boxes, construction paper, and paint to create their buildings. They planned roads, built cars, and made “people” in the community. Finally, the kindergarten enlisted the help of Mr. Knox to make a short movie where they give a tour of their city. The kindergarten class worked hard on their integrated unit and had many memorable experiences that are sure to last a lifetime! For a virtual tour of Super Awesome Kindergarten City, please visit: Seoul by Aaradhya Hong Kong by Helen Tokyo by Minh

“I liked

making the city. It was fun!”

- Minh Nguyen

“It was really exciting because it took a really long time to make.” - Helen Kweon

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“Making the city was fun because you can learn about new types of cities.” - Aaradhya Bhaskar


Reacting to Chemicals in Grade 5 By Henry Kuo, Grade 5 Student

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n fifth grade, we have explored chemistry in a variety of ways. We experimented with copper coins mixed with salt and white vinegar. We put the salt into the bowl. Next, we poured in vinegar and stirred until the salt dissolved. Finally, we dipped a penny into the solution and held it there for about 20 seconds. The results astonished us with how lustrous the penny became in a short matter of time caused by a chemical reaction.

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E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

On another day, we made fizzy lemonade to discover what chemical reaction it would have. We mixed lemonade with baking soda to make it fizz. We all drank the appetizing lemonade. We had a great time mixing the ingredients and watching the outcome. In addition, fifth grade made toffee in the school kitchen and observed what happened when we cooked it. The toffee had to boil at an exact temperature in order for the chemical change to take place. We all had samples and it was delicious. We served the toffee at the element baby shower with the fizzy lemonade. Our class researched elements and each Grade 5 student chose one to study. We studied the uses, discovery date, and structural makeup of the atom. We pretended that the elements were our babies and made them baby books. We displayed the baby books, pictures, and an atom model in our classroom. On Feb. 27, APIS staff and faculty, and our parents, were invited to see our proud display of our element baby atoms. Everyone had a great time at the event and asked us lots of intriguing questions. This study of chemistry is the beginning of a journey to learn more and more. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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MARCH 2017

E L E M E N TA R Y S C H O O L N E W S & E V E N T S

Grade 2 Art Walk A Photographic Journey Through Hyehwa Art Village and Woo-e Stream

By Anna Sea, Art Teacher

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ince we planned field trips to places with great installations and murals, I wanted to give students a lesson on different photographic techniques. They learned about rule of thirds, emphasis, contrast, and using light and shadow. We used our iPads to walk around the school to practice taking interesting photographs. The exercise really helped students understand the techniques, and apply them on our Feb. 17 outings to Hyehwa Art Village and the local Woo-e stream. We were able to take pictures of the artworks in a natural environment (near Woo-e stream) and the artworks in a constructed environment (Hyehwa Art Village). I am so proud of the students and can't wait to share more of their photos during the Pacific Pencil Art Exhibition on May 18.

Anna Choi

Suki Park

Yurina Kimura

Sunon Jones

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Bao Do

Luca Magnone

Yin Choi


Spring Soccer Outlook I am very excited about the opportunity to work with such great young men this year. We are a young team with tons of talent and nowhere to go but up this season. The boys are working hard on becoming one team with a strong team mentality and attitude: one family that trusts each other on and off the pitch. The wins will come if we hold to this mentality, the goal is to improve every game and keep doing the things that we know work. The outlook for this team is very bright, and I look forward to seeing what they are capable of accomplishing this year and especially moving forward in the next couple years. - Brett Askinas, Varsity Boys Coach I am honored to be working with such a great group of female athletes. We have a large squad and are progressively developing as a unit; showing that positive attitude and hard work will make great strides in outcomes. As a team we are hoping for great outcomes this year and want to put forward a realistic challenge for the title. I am proud that the girls play with pride and are great role models in sportsmanship and determination. I look forward to one day holding a trophy with this team of talented individuals. - Richard Harris, Varsity Girls Coach

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MARCH 2017

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

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MARCH 2017

H AWA I I C A M P U S

The Great Outdoors By Chris Stapleton, ELA/Social Studies Teacher

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s spring approaches and seasons change in Seoul, the seasonal shifts in Hawaii are more subtle. Sure, there may be smaller waves, or hotter days, but there isn’t as visible a shift as in Korea. This allows students at APIS Hawaii to explore, appreciate, and interact with the outdoors all year. It’s one of the prime benefits of living in Hawaii. The outdoors is beautiful, safe, and always accommodating. During the 2016-2017 school year, the APIS community established the outdoors not only as a place of relaxation and leisure, but also as an extension of the classroom. Global Issues and Action (GIA) students study solar panels to understand power usage. The biology class regularly tends to the gardens on property to study ecology and genetic breeding. Just this past week, the GIA class visited Hearts for Animals to tend to the needs of horses. Every day, these high school students gain a new appreciation for the outdoors. Ms. Allison Manley (science and math teacher) said, “Living in Hawaii creates opportunities for students to push themselves to develop perseverance and grit in unique and distinct environments. It allows students to connect to science concepts in new ways – through developing observation skills and deepening their appreciation for nature, whether as artists or citizens of the world they live in.” The middle school offers a project based learning (PBL) class that integrates science and the humanities. Students have learned about soil samples, visited aqua agricultural sites and cultural fishponds, and developed aquaponics on campus. At lunch time, the aquaponics’ vegetables regularly supply the salad bar. On Wednesday of each week, the middle schoolers set aside time to collect compost, continuing an ecological initiative they began in the fall.

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“By composting, we are doing our part in saving the planet,” Hannah Todd (Grade 6) stated during PBL class. Over the course of the year, the students have chosen to be outdoors more and more. From trailblazing projects to beach cleanups, the students are finding new value in extending the walls of the classroom. Rylan Asher (Grade 8) said, “Learning outside and just engaging with the outdoors makes me more active, and allows for me to learn a lot about safety. There is more to learn than just from PowerPoints. Being outside lets you do, not just learn.” Soleil Worrell (Grade 6) added on, “I love being outside. Whether it’s through the pond project or any of our PBL activities, it’s more hands-on. We’re just using a different set of skills than kids who don’t have this experience.” On Feb. 10, the APIS community and students hiked to a campsite that was discovered by middle schoolers when they were trailblazing. The community hiked together, learned about the work that was put into clearing the land, and, in the evening, sat around the fire and shared stories. When the stars lit up the skies, the middle schoolers took out their phones and identified the constellations they had learned about in PBL class. It was a time of deep bonding and real-life learning.

MARCH 2017

H AWA I I C A M P U S

John Dewey famously stated, “Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” This is a statement that we hold true at APIS. Learning doesn’t start when class begins, and learning doesn’t end with the classroom walls. Learning is the essence of every aspect of life. There is no better way of building this in our students than by giving them opportunities to explore the incredible world they live in.

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APIS Future Business Leaders Bring Home Success By Michelle Choi, Grade 11 Student and APIS Business Club Co-President

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omprised of both Business Plan Competitions and Case Study Competitions, the KAIAC Business Competition (KBC) is a student-run, interscholastic, biannual business competition league. Participating schools include APIS, YISS, SIS, KIS, GSIS, SFS, CI, TCIS, and CDS. Executives from each school gather to plan and organize the event. This year, Paul Lee (Grade 12, APIS Business Club co-president), who has served on the KBC committee for four years and as committee chair for two years, and Michelle Choi (Grade 11), the new APIS Business Club (ABC) co-president, represented APIS on the committee. At this year’s 2017 KAIAC Case Study Competition, held March 11 at Cheongna Dalton International School, APIS Team 3 achieved second place, and APIS Team 2 won the Best Q & A Award. Ward Milligan (director of Christian Life Department) served as faculty supervisor for the APIS team and said, “APIS should be proud of the warmth and professionalism the ABC group members exhibited during the multi-school competition. ABC Co-President Michelle Choi did an amazing job working with the leaders from other schools to organize the draws, arrange judges, and keep people informed, on track, and looked after throughout the day. Hats off also to Paul Lee who, as committee president/chairperson, combined professionalism with excellent social skills to lead the year and the event.”

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Additional club members who were unable to attend: Seojung Park (Grade 10) Henry Kim (Grade 10)

ar ti

nts pa ci

Dae Ho Ha (Grade 9) Eunice Kim (Grade 10) Iris Jeong (Grade 10) Dan Suh (Grade 10) Daniel Koo (Grade 10) Jennifer Lee (Grade 11) Michelle Choi (Grade 11) Sean Hong (Grade 11) Jocelyn Kim (Grade 11) Jeff Kim (Grade 11) Jenna Lee (Grade 11) Claire Shin (Grade 11) Charity McClure (Grade 11) Richard Jo (Grade 11) Daniel Bae (Grade 12) Paul Lee (Grade 12) Sungjae Park (Grade 12) Kevin Jang (Grade 12)

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KBC Committee Chair and ABC Co-President Paul Lee said, “I will never be able to talk about my high school life without mentioning this organization. As much as I hope I did for KBC, it has given me so much. See you in 10 years KBC! I’ll be back as a special judge. And to APIS Business Club and its future business leaders, congratulations on another successful year. I have faith in all of you and believe that we can do even better next competition.”

API

MARCH 2017

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS


Forensics Ends with a Record-Breaking Year By Sarah McRoberts, ELA Teacher

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n March 10-11, the varsity speech and debate teams competed in the championship round at GSIS. Even though it was the toughest competition the teams had faced, APIS continued to show great improvement, had excellent sportsmanship, and even achieved new personal and schoolwide milestones. The speech team had multiple finalists, including winning a silver medal while the debate team ended the season by setting a new APIS season-high record of 41 wins as a team! Richard Jo (Grade 11), silver medal winner, reflected on his great season: “I have been in varsity speech for three years, and I have seen everyone improve a lot in rankings and confidence this season. Our coach, Tyler Sgrignoli, gave us a lot of advice and activities to help us shine this season. Without him, we wouldn’t have been as successful. I am looking forward to next year’s competition, and I hope that it’s as successful as this season’s ending.” Tommy Lee (Grade 11), debate team captain and honorable mention earner, summed up the season: “I really enjoy being a parliamentary debater because I get to explore interesting topics, and I get to test my skills by developing a speech in under 20 minutes. This season found our team winning more than losing. It really motivated us to acquire a winning mentality. I hope everyone in our debate team continues to enjoy debating and building their experience.”

APIS varsity speech team with Coach Sgrignoli Speech, Coached by Mr. Sgrignoli (English teacher) • Silver Medalists: Gia Kim (Grade 11) and Richard Jo (Grade 11) in Duo Interpretation • Finalist and Earning 4th Place: Rose Lee (Grade 11) in Prose • Additional Qualifiers: Andrew Kim (Grade 12) in Prose, HJ Hong (Grade 11) in Poetry, and Jeff Kim (Grade 11) in Poetry

MARCH 2017

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

APIS varsity debate team

Debate, Coached by Ms. McRoberts (ELA teacher) • Honorable Mention: Tommy Lee (Grade 11) and Max Park (Grade 11) in Parliamentary • Top Speaker Award Winners: Max Park (Grade 11)* in Parliamentary, Henry Kim (Grade 10)* in Public Forum, Tommy Lee (Grade 11) in Parliamentary, James Park (Grade 11) in Parliamentary, and Cole Kim (Grade 11) in Parliamentary. *denotes highest ranking in multiple rounds

• Additional Qualifiers: Seojung Park (Grade 10) in Public Forum, Jina Kwon (Grade 10) in Public Forum, and Claire Lee (Grade 10) in Lincoln Douglas. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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MARCH 2017

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Grade 8 Students Investigate the Gentrification of Wolgye-dong By Megan Vosk, Middle School Writer’s Workshop Teacher

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rade 8 Writer’s Workshop classes took on the role of news journalists this quarter. They investigated the transformations going on in the Wolgye neighborhood near the school. Megan Vosk (MS writer’s workshop teacher) was inspired to send students out into the neighborhood to investigate after hearing reports of protests taking place last spring in response to many local businesses and residents being forced out of the area. “I walk down Wolgye-ro every day on my way home from work. I wanted to know more about what was going on there – especially after seeing posters in shop windows of people who had been injured in the protests. I thought the students could help me find out what was going on, and they did.” Old buildings were bulldozed to make way for new construction. Modern apartment buildings and stores are being built by the Hyundai corporation in a plan to revitalize the neighborhood and boost the economy. The gentrification project has been controversial, as many students found out during their research. Pastor John Choi accompanied the students on their field research. When asked his thoughts on the project he said, “The field investigation was a great learning opportunity for the kids on multiple levels. It demonstrated to them that though they're young students, they are actual citizens in society and have the ability to speak to adults. The students were able to practice interviewing, gathering information, synthesizing that information, and formulating theories and conclusions.” 10

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Carly Althauser (middle school social studies teacher) also supported the students in their field research. She agreed with Pastor Choi about the benefits of the project. “The field investigations,” Ms. Althauser said, “provided students with an opportunity to go beyond being regular students and to become actual journalists. They interacted with lots of people outside of the school and really had to push themselves and take risks to interview them. They sometimes were uncomfortable and struggled, but they learned so much more because of that.” When asked to reflect on the project, student Jeany Park (Grade 8) said that the investigation helped her to realize that some issues are very complex.“I learned that gentrification can benefit some people and disappoint other people. I am still not sure if the construction in Wolgye is good or bad. It really depends on whose perspective you are looking at it from." Student journalist Kimberly Ho (Grade 8) echoed the sentiments of her classmate. She said, “I liked the project because we got to interview different people. I realized that different people had different opinions on what they thought about the transformation.” The pictures accompanying this article were taken by students in the field. They paint a picture of a rapidly changing Wolgye-Dong.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

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MARCH 2017

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College Counseling Column

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By Susan Carlson, Director of College Counseling

any thanks to everyone for the warm welcome that was extended to me since I joined APIS as the new Director of College Counseling. Since my arrival here at the end of January, the seniors have begun to receive news from the colleges that they have applied to, although most are still awaiting their decisions; and the juniors have begun their college search in earnest. Each month, this newsletter will serve as a reminder of where students should be in the process, as well as an announcement of upcoming events. To Members of the Class of 2017: • Please keep me aware of decisions you receive from colleges and remember to update Naviance. • As you weigh and consider your options, don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with me to discuss them should you find yourself feeling confused about what to choose. I can help sort out which school might make the best fit for you. Moreover, if you need help understanding financial aid packages, I can help sort that out as well. Just let me know. • Please remember that May 1 is National College Decision Day for all schools in the U.S. You must deposit at your college of choice by that day. Depositing at more than one college is not allowed, and doing so risks your status at the college you hope to attend. • If you are waitlisted at a college, you may choose to remain on its waitlist. You may stay on the waitlist at multiple colleges. If you do opt to stay on a waitlist, please see me to discuss how you can optimize your chances for getting off the waitlist if the college actually does go to its waitlist. You must deposit at one of the colleges to which you were accepted in order to ensure your place in the class. • If you are an international student, after depositing (and sometimes before), you will begin to receive requests for financial documentation, because the college will want to start the visa process. If you have any questions about what to provide, please do not hesitate to see me to discuss. To the Parents of the Class of 2017: • There will be an informal coffee hour on Wed, April 12 at 2 p.m. in the Faculty Lounge. Come and get your questions answered about evaluating college offers, as well as how to start the transition from high school to college for your child.

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To Members of the Class of 2018: • Students have begun meeting individually with me to discuss the tasks that need to be attended to in order to make their applications in the fall. Topics discussed are setting up a standardized testing plan, including the TOEFL, discussing the self-reflection questionnaire, as well as beginning to build a college list. If you have not scheduled a meeting with me, yet, please email me to set one up. • All students will tackle building a working resume and complete some career exploration during the seminar time scheduled after March break. We will also explore how to best evaluate a college, whether through online research or during a college visit. Lastly, you can look forward to preparing for the college interview.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

To the Parents of the Class of 2018: • There will be an informal coffee hour on Wed, April 19 at 2 p.m. in the Faculty Lounge. Come and get your questions answered about standardized testing, holistic admissions, summer activities, as well as making college visits.

At any time during your child’s college process, please know my door is open to you. Feel free to reach out to me via email, susan.carlson@apis.seoul.kr, or telephone, 070-7435-5167, in order to set up a meeting. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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MARCH 2017

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Make Music: Travel the World By Sophie Holbrook and Melinda Baum, Music Teachers

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usic is a universal language. That is part of our teaching philosophy here at APIS and we truly believe that through music, we can all connect and find likenesses within each other. In a world that is too often pushing others away, music strives to bring people together to create a more beautiful place. The perfect example of this belief is felt strongly at AMIS, The Association of Music in International Schools. The acronym itself means “friend” in French and the organization was started to promote world friendship through music. Over the years it has become more and more competitive to be accepted, yet each year we have several outstanding students selected to perform with the international honor ensembles. This year, APIS celebrated a record number of high school choir students participating: Mei-Mei Timpson (Grade 9), Eugenie Kwon (Grade 11), Tim Lee (Grade 11), Gyu Young Lee (Grade 11), Brandon Sohn (Grade 12), Andrew Kang (Grade 12), and Joonwoo Kang (Grade 12). These students along with their choral teacher, Melinda Baum, traveled to Abu Dhabi March 1-5 where they spent three days rehearsing and performing with other choir students from all over the world. The band and orchestra festival was held in Luxembourg March 15-19 and our student musicians were David Kim (Grade 11), Shinyoung Lee (Grade 12), and Grace Y. Kim (Grade 12), with APIS Band Director Sophie Holbrook traveling with the students. Shinyoung and Grace received the coveted “4-year pin,” which means they have attended four AMIS festivals throughout their school music career. In past years, our APIS music students have traveled to Myanmar, England, Singapore, Qatar, and Luxembourg to participate in other AMIS festivals. Musicians come togethDavid Kim (Grade 11)

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“Music is special because it enables musicians to communicate regardless of one’s religion, colour, and gender. Because we were passionate to make great music, we were able to share our common feelings while we were playing.”


er from 40+ international schools to create ensembles composed of students from dozens of host countries. During break times, you hear many European and Asian languages being spoken. However, when the students return to their rehearsals, everyone speaks the same language of music. Students breathe together and must listen to one another in rehearsal to learn where their part fits in balance with everyone else. These are valuable skills on and off the musical stage. To watch the students over the three-day festival is a powerful reminder of why we are teachers and musicians; the ability to put aside differences and befriend new people from different backgrounds through the commonality of music is breathtaking. Congratulations to our student musicians. Thank you for representing the APIS Music Department with integrity and greatness.

Eugenie Kwon (Grade 11)

Andrew Kang (Grade 12)

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

“Overall, AMIS gave me the experience that would last for a lifetime. From the music we created together to the friendships I made. I heard that music is the universal language, and I can now confidently agree with that claim after this festival.”

“The conductor was excellent and had us engaged with his humor and wide range of talents … as well as doing a phenomenal job in uniting us.” w w w. a p i s . o r g

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MARCH 2017

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

GCP Japan It was my pleasure to coordinate the APIS GCP (Global Citizens Program) trips this year. In what proved to be a fantastic opportunity to extend the great learning happening at APIS, 10 students travelled to Japan to immerse themselves in the culture and language of Japan. Through visiting culturally significant sites, attending a Japanese high school, and spending a night in a Japanese family’s home, our students were able to extend their learning and truly achieve the goals of the GCP program. A big thank you to Junko Sensei and Naomi Sensei for their fantastic leadership of the trip. - Bruce Knox, Elementary School Principal and GCP Coordinator DAY 1

DAY 2

Students arrived at Fukuoka Airport and traveled to Hita, a town referred to as “small Kyoto,” by bus. Students checked into a Ryokan (traditional Japanese Inn), wore yukatas, experienced onsen, and enjoyed a traditional Japanese meal.

Students visited a local Japanese home and learned how to cook a traditional meal, including chicken teriyaki, egg roll, tempura, and miso soup.

Students wore kimonos and enjoyed a walk and visit to the Kushida Shrine.

DAY 3

Visit to Hakata High School in Fukuoka “My favorite part about the GCP trip was visiting Hakata High School. They welcomed us with a performance of taiko drums. Each member of the group was so in sync, and it was really cool. Also, we got to experience a traditional Japanese tea ceremony with the tea-making club they had at the school. It was interesting and immersive to see how different their school activities, buildings, etc. are different from APIS. We have things such as THEIA or cooking club, while they have sumo wrestling and traditional tea-making clubs. After observ-

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ing some of their classes and clubs, we got the opportunity to talk to students there, and they were all so nice and warm, which was a really fulfilling experience for me considering we were from such different places. I love the whole experience I had in Hakata high school.” - Juhyun Oh (Grade 10)

DAY 4

Students visited Huis Ten Bosch, the biggest, theme park in Japan.

DAY 5

Students visited Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine, a shrine dedicated to the Japanese deity of education, before departing for Seoul.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

“The trip made me experience things that I would never be able to experience if it was a personal trip. Rather than going to public places that are famous, it was more valuable to go deeper and meet actual Japanese town people, go to a Japanese school, and visit a Japanese traditional house. My most memorable time was when a 60-year-old grandfather in Hakata town sang “Edelweiss” to us, saying that his hobby is singing. Going to Huis Ten Bosch was fabulous, too, but having an experience that cannot be purchased was much more memorable to me.” - Grace Kim (Grade 10) It was such a memorable trip to go with my friends to Japan. It was very fun and I got to experience many different things, such as going into onsen and a homestay night. It was fun staying at Japan for 5 days, and it was very unfortunate that I couldn't stay longer in Japan. I would like to go on an another trip to Japan. - Seong Heon Rho (Grade 10)

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MARCH 2017

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Snapshots

18. March n o e re jambo soccer S E n osts a APIS h

Grade 3 host s a book sale to raise mon through Kiva ey to donate .

High school pho school photo tography students pre pare for an graphy exhib inition. wands in the lps third graders craft he ox Kn e uc Br l ipa ES Princ woodshop.

volleycipate in a rti a p rs e y all pla ool Volleyb arch 4. Middle Sch hosted by SFS on M e re ball jambo

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Middle scho ol students studying Ja Japaness co paness prep splay Intern are for a ational Day booth.


Principal’s Note

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By Andrew Murphy, High School Principal

rowing up in Canada, I have always felt spring to be a point in the year where we begin anew. As the snow would melt, there was hope for the fresh new start spring would bring. This spring, I find myself inspired again. However, it is not the beautiful cherry blossom trees that have caught my eye. It is the blossoming creativity and ingenuity coming from our wonderful students. Students like Charissa Kim (Grade 8), who is exploring education through a new fascinating lens, and in doing so is demonstrating 21st century skills. As we embrace this fresh new start spring has brought us, please read Charissa's refreshing vision for education. My Vision for Education By Charissa Kim, Grade 8 “Everybody’s a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it’s stupid.” Prince Ea, an American spoken word artist, quoted Einstein in his viral video where he “sues the school system.” I found myself nodding along to a lot of the thoughts he shared, and I began thinking about what I would change about education around the world. 1. Increase Integrated Learning Opportunities We can more easily make connections to the real world when we study subjects such as art, history, and ELA together. According to research, "Integrated studies enable subjects to be investigated using many forms of knowledge and expression, as literacy skills are expanded beyond the traditional focus on words and numbers to include graphics, color, music, and motion." (1)

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2. Start School Later I have to wake up at 6 o'clock and be on the bus by 7. Dr. James Maas, a well-respected sleep researcher, revealed that adolescent sleep cycles tend to begin at 3 a.m. and end at 11 a.m. What if we started school at around 10 a.m.? Then, we could go to bed at 12 a.m. (as many often do), wake up at around 9 a.m., and go to school with nine, rather than five, hours of sleep. This way, we won’t “become walking zombies because we are getting far too little sleep,” as Dr. Maas described. (5) 3. Institute Homework-Free Weekends and Holidays People are more productive when they have breaks. Also, weekends off would give us time to be involved in extracurricular activities and spend some family time without our work suffering. Kids learn better when they go beyond rules and restrictions and are able to focus on learning according to their interests and passions. It’s important to give students a normal life and some freedom. Our school has many bright sides: We start at 8:10 instead of 7:30, teachers really care about students as individuals, and teachers try out new forms of teaching. Using my suggestions will help students engage in their learning even more. I am incredibly grateful for all the amazing and outgoing teachers we have at our school, and I wish I could thank every single teacher for what they do – even the teachers I don’t know!

Sources: (1) https://www.edutopia.org/big-ideas-better-schools (2) https://www.reference.com/education/shouldn-t-students-homework-weekends-1e0036c3efaaf9c2# (3) http://www.teenink.com/opinion/school_college/article/722379/No-Homework-on-Weekends/ (4) http://www.teachthought.com/uncategorized/20-reasons-you-shouldnt-assign-homework-over-the-holidays/ (5) http://www.apa.org/monitor/oct01/sleepteen.aspx (6) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqTTojTija8&t=25s w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Sounds of Spring Band and Orchestra Spring Concerts

Congratulations to all of the grades 5-12 string players at APIS. At our spring concert, we had 58 students performing, which means we had 232 instrument strings vibrating in the auditorium! It was exciting to see you all work together and listen to each group, remembering what it was like to play when you were a beginner or look forward to what it will be like when you're more advanced. Congratulations on your inspiring performance! - Emmalee Johnson, Orchestra Director

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On Thursday, March 23 I had the joy to conduct all my band students in grades 5-12. During the concert, the audience heard 10 pieces by James Swearingen, a composer whom we have studied this quarter. Through his music, the students were able to learn about his compositional process and find similarities in the music. I am very proud of the Grand Band Finale, which included all the performers. It was heartwarming to see all my students on stage together, and I thank all of the musicians for their individual contributions to the band program at APIS. - Sophie Holbrook, Music Department Chair/Band Director

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A Trip Around the World International Day 2017

Thank you APIS PTO!

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n March 24, the final school day before spring break, students, faculty, and family members gathered in the APIS gymnasium to celebrate the school’s fifth annual International Day. According to Megan Vosk, middle school writer’s workshop teacher and International Day committee chair, "This year's international day was a huge success! We had 26 booths, and students from all three sub schools participated. It was great to see everyone from the APIS community come together to celebrate the diversity and beauty of world cultures." Building off last year’s trend to increase student participation, almost all booths this year were run by students, with kids taking the lead in selecting topics and deciding on activities. New additions this year included the World Music Cafe, led by Robert Sim (ELA and recording arts teacher) and his high school recording studio students, and the LEGO League booth, where elementary students who participated in this year’s extracurricular LEGO robotics class had the opportunity to share their learning with peers and secondary students through an interactive LEGO robotics display. Amanda Meyer, high school biology teacher and afterschool LEGO robotics teacher, said, “International Day was an opportunity for APIS students to interact across all grade levels. It was empowering for the elementary students to share their knowledge with high school students, who were genuinely interested in their projects. At the same time, it was a wonderful experience for the high school presenters to be challenged to teach younger students in a positive way. The fair reinforced APIS as a community of learners.” From lounging in the World Music Cafe and listening to tunes recorded and performed by fellow APIS students to learning about water issues in different countries, to experiencing Japanese cosplay firsthand, learning Irish step dancing, or sampling foods from Saudi Arabia, Ireland, Italy, and Thailand, there was something for everyone.

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Lulu Timpson (Grade 5) observed, "International Day was so much fun! It was hard to choose which booth to visit because of all the cool activities." For the benefit of presenters and visitors, International Day was broken into three periods, with each subschool having one period to visit booths and experience the special day to the fullest. Each visitor received a “passport” on which they could receive stamps for participating in activities set up at the different countries/booths. Students with a minimum of five passport stamps could visit the food center and sample foods from around the world. Those with eight or more passport stamps were also eligible for a raffle ticket, which entered them to win one of many fabulous prizes kindly donated by the APIS PTO. In addition to instrumental music performed by middle school students throughout the event, the elementary school period kicked off with elementary students performing "Sasha," a Russian folk song/dance, and "Boot Scootin' Boogie," an American country song and dance. “International Day is so valuable,” said Carly Althauser (middle school social studies teacher). “It gives students a way to use their learning to make a unique and creative product, and it provides them an opportunity to share their learning with a wider audience and in a festive environment.” “My favorite part of the day,” concluded Ms. Vosk, “was when the ES kids performed. It was fun to see them stomping, clapping, and shouting out loud. There was so much laughter and joy in the room at that moment." Margaret Cheon (Grade 5) agreed. She said, “International Day was like a sparkling disco ball taking you around the world." APIS wishes to thank International Day committee members: Megan Vosk, Catherine Gassner, and Wendy Wilson. APIS also extends heartfelt thanks to the APIS PTO, who kindly donated raffle prizes and time, helping International Day offer students another fabulous trip around the world.

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Librarian's Picks By Jin Yu, School Librarian When Will It Be Spring? By Catherine Walters

L E V E L: K-G1

Alfie's mother is trying to settle him down for his winter's sleep. She tells her little bear that when he wakes up, it will be spring. He asks, "And how will I know when it's here?" Mother Bear's answer is, "When the butterflies float by looking for new flowers." The cub wakes up early, mistakes snowflakes for butterflies, and wakes up his mother to show her. She explains that it is still winter, and, like a mother trying to keep her child in bed for the night, mother bear patiently persuades her little bear back to bed for the winter. Reluctant sleepers will sympathize with the determined Alfie, even as they are lulled to rest by this gentle, charming tale.

City Green By DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan

L E V E L: G3-6

This book emphasizes the importance of preserving our environment and making something beautiful out of something that's not so beautiful. There is a garbage-filled, vacant lot on the street where Marcy lives. Instead of growing flowers in coffee cans like they usually do each spring, she and her friend Miss Rosa decide to plant a garden there. Old Man Hammer believes that they're getting their hopes up for nothing. Eventually, the enthusiasm and energy spreads, and everyone joins together to create an urban oasis. Even Old Man Hammer sneaks into it at night and secretly plants seeds that grow into bright sunflowers. An entire community comes together to bring beauty to their block. Filled with sunflowers, the last page will bring you the warmth of summer and leave you hopeful.

The Gardener By Sarah Stewart

L E V E L: G3-6

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Against the backdrop of the Great Depression, this story, told through tender letters written by Lydia Grace to her Grandma, Papa, and Mama, follows Lydia’s stay with her uncle (who doesn't like to smile) and illustrates her efforts to liven up the apartment and bakery with her gardening skills. Lydia discovers a secret place, the building’s rooftop, where she uses her gardening skills to turn the space into a colorful oasis in the middle of a concrete jungle. Almost a year after she left her house in the country, Uncle Jim surprises Lydia on the rooftop with a cake covered with flowers and a letter telling her that she would be going home. This book highlights the sacrifices people had to make during this difficult time in U.S. history. The illustrations’ muted backgrounds convey the urban 1930s setting where most of the story takes place. This charming story is not only a good snapshot of history but also an ode to those with green thumbs.

w w w. a p i s . o r g EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Lily Jung Art & Design Editor ■ Sunok Nam Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Caroline Webster Lead Writer/Editor

Issue 48 Apis Online Update March 2017  
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