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ISSUE 44.

UPDATE 57 WOLGYE-RO 45GA-G I L , NOWO N- G U, S EO UL , 0 1 87 4 , KOREA

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Fall Carnival ■ Middle School Music Concert ■ Art With a Message

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■ F. 0 2 .9 0 7 .2 7 4 2

■ WWW. A PIS .O RG

IN THIS ISSUE:

■ Fall Extracurricular Activities Elementary Chinese & Japanese ■ ■Socktober ■ Faculty Retreat ■ Oak Tree Run


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Greenhawks Football Club

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By Richard Harris, Digital Media/Art Teacher and GHFC Coach

he GHFC (Greenhawks Football Club) kick starts the season with a bang, under the new coach, Coach “History Maker” Harris. The Saturday football club caters to elementary students and helps them develop teamwork and football skills in a playful system. Players have the chance to try some professional level football drills, and with practice sessions usually finishing with mini matches at the end, players can put all that training into action. So far in the 2016-17 season, as well as football training sessions, both the lower elementary team and the grades four and five team have had the chance to enter some super jamborees hosted by Chadwick International School. The parents and players really enjoy the events, and it’s a great time for family members to have some social time while supporting their child. The players love to get involved in these events and enjoy the chance to compete against other schools. In the jamborees that GHFC has entered, both teams have played exceptionally well, setting new performance records for APIS. Furthermore, the lower elementary team currently holds an unbeaten record and has yet to let a goal in by any opposing team. If the team is not playing in a jamboree or football tournament, the sessions generally run as follows: Warm-up: Simple and fun activity to get the player accustomed to having the ball at their feet. Drill 1: A set soccer drill that uses equipment to help the player learn a particular skill, such as passing or shooting. Drill 2: A more challenging drill that builds on the first drill to help improve performance. Mini Game: Short games for fun, where scoring is not the focus and teamwork and sportsmanship are key. Coach’s Challenge: At the end of the session, the coach sets a challenge, such as trying to hit a target. Water Breaks: Water breaks are given throughout the session to help the players rehydrate in between drills. Feedback is given to players throughout the session. If you are wondering what the club is like and want to get involved in any way, please ask either Mr. Leroy or Mr. Harris how to get involved. The sessions are held in a family-orientated style to encourage parents to watch their child play as the coaching sessions are held. It is never too late to give football a try!

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Greenhawks Children’s Choir By Naarah Callender, GHCC Director

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he GHCC (Greenhawks Children’s Choir) is a brand new, fun, and interactive way for APIS elementary students to come together and make music. Saturday mornings in GHCC are filled with games, team building, and lots of singing. In the GHCC, children learn appropriate singing techniques and develop a choral community that spans across grade levels. The GHCC is made up of two ensembles: the grades 4-5 choir and the K-3 choir. Our rehearsals are scheduled with the singers age and developmental level in mind. On Saturdays, the upper elementary choir meets from 9-10:30 a.m., and the lower elementary choir meets from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Each ensemble will give multiple performances per session. Currently, our singers are working toward our winter concert on Dec. 10. The grades 4-5 choir will act as our touring choir, and is working on a repertoire to perform both at APIS and off campus.

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Warm-Ups and Team Building: We begin with activities that build a community within the choir and develop our voices. Active Singing: In this part of our session, the students learn short, fun songs with important musical concepts. By learning these songs, the students are challenged but still feel successful. Performance Pieces: We focus on the song we will be performing at our concerts. Break: A 10-minute period to go to the bathroom, drink water, and get some fresh air outside. Review: We review all that we previously worked on. Closing activity: In the last few minutes of class, we come together, reflect on our rehearsal, and play a musical game. The GHCC meets in the CLC on Saturdays. Parents are welcome to come watch our rehearsals. We would love to have you! If you would like to learn more about the Greenhawks Children’s Choir and our plans for future sessions, please email Ms. Callender at ncallender@apis.seoul.kr. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Yin Choi (Grade 2) Wins Silver Prize in 60th Korean National Student Art Contest

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elected as a silver prize winner in the lower elementary age group, Yin Choi’s (Grade 2) artwork was chosen among thousands of other submissions in the 60th Korean National Student Art Contest held over the summer. The contest, hosted by Korea Art Promotion Association and supported by National Student Art Institute, determined award winners based on artistic talent, basic skills, expression, imagination, design, and overall merit. Art teacher Anna Sea observed, "Yin is such a bright and talented artist and always enjoys doing art in and outside of the art room. I am so proud of her for taking the risk by participating in a competition on her own. Congratulations to her and her family on getting the award!" “I like flowers, and I like animals, and I like bunnies … so I made that drawing,” said Yin. When asked why she likes art so much, Yin said, “I like drawing, because drawing makes me happy.” She observed that art allows people to communicate, even if they don’t share a common language. “If we can’t talk, we can make the drawing talk.” Also, she added, “Art is kind of colorful.” Yin used oil pastels to make her artwork and worked on it over a period of two to three days. Yin commented that she has grown as an artist since she was four years old. Regular practice and positive, supportive teachers have helped her develop new skills and figure out how to design and make different types of artwork. Her passion for art and perseverance in developing her skills have clearly paid off, as demonstrated by her recent award and her continued love of art.

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Socktober Elementary SRC Leads Month of Giving

We, the elementary SRC members, are running a fantastic fundraising event called “Socktober.” Have you ever walked past a little market and seen a man or woman selling socks? Just buy at least five pairs for five 5,000 KRW. If you buy that, you are saving five people’s feet. Currently, we have 84 pairs of socks. We want to quadruple the pairs of socks. We are going to stop the sock run on Friday, Nov. 4.

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You can also bring other things like toothpaste, soap, and other toiletries. Thank you for your support. Adrian Yamanea (G5), Elementary SRC Secretary

SRC is doing charity to help the orphans because it is now fall and close to winter. Socktober is when you donate socks to the orphans. When you walk down the street, don’t you see socks everywhere? Plus, it doesn’t cost much. You should donate socks right now. We are collecting socks until Friday, Nov. 4. We have 84 pairs of socks already and we want to quadruple the number. We are also collecting toothpaste, soap, toothbrushes, towels, and many other different bathroom supplies. We want to have 320 pairs of socks. We want to collect a pair for each person in our school. We have 320 staff and students. If all our staff and students donate socks we will have 320 pairs of socks. It is easy and helpful. Please help us donate socks. Esther Kim, Elementary SRC Grade 4 Class Representative w w w. a p i s . o r g

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OCTOBER 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Middle School Fall Concert The MS band students impressed me at their performance on Tuesday evening's concert. More than ever, these students have shown great teamwork and musical skills, working together to perform as an ensemble. Our eighth grade members have demonstrated excellent leadership and serve as role models for all of us. I look forward to seeing and hearing what all these students do throughout the year. A fantastic way to kick off the 2016-2017 concert season! Sophie Holbrook, Music Department Chair/Band Director

The students have been working hard since August to prepare this music and it showed at their concert. Showing mastery of rhythm and progress on articulation, students traveled to Ireland and France to share stories and cultures with us through music. Their biggest achievement was doing this as a newly formed team - making new friendships and musical connections helps us to be successful together, and I could see their bonds strengthening on stage during the performance! Emmalee Johnson, Orchestra Director

The fall middle school concert was truly a display of how the APIS middle schoolers can come together as unified teams of mature musicians. One of the pieces that they sang, "Kusimama," spoke of standing together as one in unity. We are very proud of how they persevered through the challenges of singing in four-part harmony on a crowded stage. The students sang with enthusiasm and pride. They looked and sounded like a choir team. Melinda Baum and Naarah Callender, Choir Directors

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STEAM Cardboard Chair Construction

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By Emily Sgrignoli, Art Teacher

ver the past month, our STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) class has been hard at work creating their final chair designs that would be IKEA approved for design, eco friendliness, and comfortability. With only cardboard, hot glue, tape, and a utility knife, students were to create an aesthetically pleasing to-scale chair that could serve its function. The challenge was for each group’s chair to hold the weight of two people for two minutes and one person for an entire class period and beyond. During the final critique, students enjoyed hot tea and snacks while sharing and discussing their designs. From meticulous measurements to epic fails, this project enabled students to gain confidence and skills in solving an array of process-based problems. The question of failure never arose; but rather, the solution was frequently revisited to determine a new strategy. From an initial five-minute sketch to presenting to the group on construction plans, students were able to gain insight and experience on how to think like a designer or architect. Students practiced professionalism through formal presentations, accepted constructive criticism through group critiques, gained experience through various group roles (e.g., facilitator, resource manager, designer, artist), and collaborated on ideas. In the design phase, students considered their marketing strategy in terms of developing the aesthetic of their design. Students answered questions, such as, "How do you want the customer to feel in the chair? What will the customer use the chair for (function, e.g., reading)?” Students were challenged to collaborate in groups of three where they created a new chair encompassing all three individual designs. While utilizing their strengths and weaknesses, students had to carefully select their roles and focus on the responsibilities of that particular role. Detailed blueprint drawings followed design selections as students labeled their drawings with measurements, angles, and proportions. In the construction phase, students learned and utilized building techniques to reinforce the cardboard, such as tabs, slots, and triangular forms, as well as how to layer cardboard to achieve maximum support. Cardboard, an unforgiving medium, presented many challenges to the groups as students focused on mastering their craftsmanship through their cuts. Students worked out most of their construction flaws by creating prototypes of their final designs. However, working with the cardboard on a large scale proved to be a completely different challenge.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

In reflecting on the project, students were asked questions during the critique such as, “What unexpected barriers did you encounter? What did you learn about yourself? Others? What would you do differently next time?” By verbalizing the self-reflection process, students gained insight into themselves and one another. The critique allowed students a chance to celebrate their great feat and enjoy their cardboard creations.

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OCTOBER 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Art With a Message

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wo museums (Buk Seoul Museum of Art and ARA Modern Art Museum), many artworks, multiple reflections, and nearly two months later, the grade 8 students concluded an interdisciplinary unit on creativity and artistic messaging with an art show and publishing party, both open to the wider APIS community. Megan Vosk, middle school writer’s workshop teacher, said, "It was really interesting to see students' ideas about what constitutes art changing over the course of the unit. At the start of our study, they thought that art meant traditional portrait paintings hanging in a museum. By the end, however, they had broadened that definition to include street art, graffiti art, performance art, and many other non-traditional mediums." Not only did students’ understanding of art broaden and deepen, their appreciation for what purpose art might serve in the larger world grew as well. The idea that creative thinkers can be catalysts for change was forged over a close study of individual artists’ work, and students picking their own area of global concern to make a piece of activist art about. The unit began with a study of contemporary artists who are using their art to say something about the cultural, environmental, or political climate of today. Students quickly learned to look deeper at every element in a work of art, or text, and consider the possibility of a reason behind every detail, from color to medium, subject to scale. To introduce the unit, Carly Althauser, social studies teacher, referenced the work of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Weiwei’s work has gained worldwide recognition; his most recent work has largely centered around shedding light on the Syrian conflict and worldwide refugee crisis. Students applied thanalysis tools they were learning to consider his work and evaluate it, taking into account, for example, possible bias, perspective, culture, etc. The students engaged with the content across three courses: writer’s workshop, ELA, and social studies. Courtney Murfield, ELA teacher, worked with students on interpreting protest stories, songs, and poems, and analyzing the different themes people protest – for example, war.

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“In my class, they’re writing synthesis essays about the different art pieces they observed at the museum, or researched independently, and discerning the artistic message from each piece,” said Ms. Vosk. “Essentially, they’re analyzing in my class what they’re reading in Courtney’s class and what they’re looking at in Carly’s class.” Ms. Althauser added, “The students' analytical skills improved dramatically from the beginning to the end of the unit. They learned how to look closely at a piece of art and think deeply about choices the artist made. That thoughtfulness transferred to their own artistic decisions as well.” On Oct. 12, when the “Activist Art” show was held, kindergartners through seniors dropped by to take in the art and hear from the artists. One student, Charissa Kim, chose to write and perform a song about childhood poverty/labor, for her class activist art project. At the show, guests could watch a recording of Charissa performing her song with Orchestra Director Emmalee Johnson. Charissa said, “I feel like if more artists (musical artists) could write more songs associated with global issues like childhood poverty/labor, that would create a bigger impact because fans will listen to it and think about the lyrics. To me, I wrote this from a mother’s eyes. The way she feels the pain whenever her daughter scrapes her knee ... the way she wants her daughter to grow well in a better environment, the way she tries to comfort her daughter and give her hope, the way she promises that humans will eventually grow and stop this cycle of childhood poverty and labor… I really tried my best to put all of that in this one song.” “I was really impressed by the variety of art the students created. They were very creative and used a variety of media and styles,” said Ms. Althauser. Visitors were eager to engage with the artists and ask about the main message beyond their piece, and the artistic choices they made in design and execution.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Two days later, on Oct. 14, students had the opportunity to share their written analyses of art they had interpreted at a grade 8 publishing party that was also well attended. Over the course of the unit, grade 8 students had the opportunity to deepen their understanding of artists as activists for change, and act themselves as catalysts for change, in creating their own artistic messaging pieces. Keep your eyes out--some artwork may soon be displayed around school!

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OCTOBER 2016

SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Strong Start for APIS Forensics Team

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By Sarah McRoberts, High School English Teacher and Debate Coach

orensics is off to a great start! Mr. Sgrignoli (speech coach) and Ms. McRoberts (debate coach) have both been impressed by how motivated the students are to improve their craft and mastery this year. The skills students learn at KAIAC (Korean-American Interscholastic Activities Conference) competitions help in all facets of learning, as Cathy Lim, debate team co-captain, explains: “After multiple years of participating in debate, I realized how much debating helps in real-life situations. Often times, we hold a narrow view regarding controversial issues or arguments. Debate opens you up to different arguments that arise from various perspectives. Doing debate expands the depth and breadth of not only your knowledge, but your perspective, which is why I recommend it to others who are considering doing public speaking!” APIS faced its first competition on Oct. 15-16 at YISS. Both teams exceeded the coaches’ goals. We have had more student leadership, which fosters team camaraderie. Angelina Ahn, debate team co-captain, sums up her role: “Debate is one of the areas that I’ve persistently worked on because I had a great passion for it. I believe my biggest goal as captain is to encourage the team to push forward. This year we have many novice debaters and it’s easy to get discouraged at the tough competitions that have been scheduled throughout the year. On the other hand, the team is performing exceptionally well, with all debaters getting at least two wins at our recent tournament at YISS.” Every debate team had over 2 wins (at least a 50 percent win-loss record) with a combined team total of 16 team wins! Speech Results Award Winners: Shannon Yi (G12), 1st place, Prose Interpretation Richard Jo and Gia Kim (G11), 4th place, Duo Interpretation Debate Results Award Winners: Angelina Ahn and Cathy Lim (G12), semi-finalists in Public Forum Henry Kim and John Cheng (G10), 5th place in Public Forum Claire Lee (G10), 6th place in Lincoln-Douglas Best Speaker Round Winners: Angelina Ahn (G12)- Public Forum Cathy Lim (G12) - Public Forum Cole Kim (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure Tommy Lee (G11) - Parliamentary Procedure Sophie Yoo (G11) - Public Forum Henry Kim (G10) - Public Forum Categories and students who represented APIS over the weekend: Speech: Prose: Shannon Yi, Rose Lee Poetry: Jeff Kim, HJ Hong, Andrew Kim Duo: Richard Jo and Gia Kim Debate: Public Forum: Angelina Ahn and Cathy Lim; Sophie Yoo and Claire Shin; John Cheng and Henry Kim Parliamentary Procedure: Tommy Lee and Max Park; Cole Kim and James Park Lincoln-Douglas: Claire Lee Our next KAIAC tournament is Nov. 14-15 at SIS.

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Jeannette Kim (Grade 6) Wins Gold in the 57th Han Kook Children's Daily Art Competition

Jeannette Kim's second grade award-winning artwork.

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Jeannette Kim's recent Gold award artwork.

n the 57th Han Kook Children's Daily Art Competition, Jeannette Kim (Grade 6) was awarded the Gold award, the second highest honor one could receive in each age group. One of few selected award winners from among 95,647 submissions in 53 different participating regions of Korea, Jeannette’s artwork was recognized for its excellence by a panel of judges comprised of art professors and professional artists. “I am so proud of Jeannette's accomplishment! She always likes to challenge herself and is a great example to her class. I want to congratulate her for taking the risk by participating in an art competition on her own. I hope many of our students will be able to take the opportunity to share their great art talent with the world,” said Anna Sea, APIS art teacher.

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

The theme for the contest was free choice. Asked how she decided what to draw, Jeannette said she chose animals “because I want to be a vet when I grow up. I really like to draw animals.” Jeannette spent about three weeks working on her piece, taking constructive feedback from her art teacher as she worked. “I first tried to just do one squirrel, but changed to the fox,” Jeannette shared. Jeannette is not new to art competitions. She has been bravely submitting her work for several years, winning an award in the same competition as a second grader. A reflection of her longstanding interest in animals, that piece also has animals as the central subject. Commenting on how her art has improved over time, Jeannette observed, “The other ones, kind of sloppy. Now, it looks neater.” If a friend wanted to submit to the same, or another, competition, Jeannette said, “I would recommend something very creative,” for the artwork. Jeannette’s own creativity and artistic talent were rewarded by this most recent award. w w w. a p i s . o r g

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SECONDARY SCHOOL NEWS & EVENTS

Grade 6 Egg Drop Experiment Force and Motion in Action By Adam Nollsch, Science Teacher

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rade 6 science students have been learning about forces and motion this quarter. To demonstrate their understanding of forces, they worked in groups to design an “Egg Dropping Device” to protect an egg from a large fall. They came up with a wide variety of ideas for how best to protect their eggs. Most groups built parachutes to slow the fall of their eggs while one group decided to forgo the parachute in favor of a more stabilized design. Some groups thought the best way to protect their egg would be to have as limited contact as possible with anything else while others favored a design that had as much protection around the egg as possible.

The real highlight of the project was when we got to test their experiments on Friday, Oct. 14. Starting with Ms. Iwanuk dropping their contraptions from the top of the stairs in front of the school, we had our first casualty. The last group to go from the stairs was still working on their design moments before dropping because of some unforeseen challenges the day before. When Ms. Iwanuk dropped the contraption, it flipped over and the egg spilled out before we even had a chance to check. The other three groups had a lot more success, with their eggs remaining intact. Moving up from the top of a staircase, the next step was to drop it from Mr. Knox’s office window. No cracked eggs meant it was time to go still higher. Ms. Sea’s room was next, and nerves were mounting. “I felt as if I was the egg, and I was scared that it was going to break,” said Rin Choi. Again, no broken eggs. Then, on to the fourth floor out of Mr. Sgrignoli’s window – still, not a single crack. The final test for our eggs brought us to the gym windows on the fifth floor. Out they went, and the sixth graders were even more nervous than at any point before. Each one landed, and every remaining egg landed without breaking open. One egg had a tiny crack but no leaks. Overall, I could not be happier with the performance of the sixth graders and their egg dropping devices. They showed that they had mastered the use of forces and can solve real world engineering problems. Special thanks to Mr. Knox, Ms. Sea, Mr. Sgrignoli, and Mr. Jay for letting us use your classrooms and office for our experiment, Ms. Iwanuk for helping supervise, and Ms. Webster for supervising and taking pictures of our event!

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Principal's Note: Hope to See You Soon!

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By Andrew Murphy, High School Principal

s the leaves change color and we approach the winter season, it is hard to believe that the school year is one quarter done. It is a busy time of year for students of all ages. Our seniors busily study hard and prepare for their college applications, eagerly looking ahead to the not-so-distant future. For grades 9-11, the students are working hard trying to be as successful as possible academically to ensure future success. It seems wherever you turn and look at Asia Pacific International School, something amazing is happening and our students are as busy as bees. We have had a pep rally, a carnival, retreats, concerts, jamborees, and volleyball and soccer matches. It is truly amazing to see our students accomplish so much in just one quarter. With the year just starting to get going, the anticipation of what is to come and the great accomplishments our students will achieve can’t be overstated. It is with this in mind that I stress to all APIS stakeholders, students, parents, teachers, faculty, and loved ones, that you take the time to enjoy the Now. I encourage you to enjoy the wonderful events, games, company of friends, and events. I can’t stress enough that life can be very hectic and stressful, with grades, assignments, and tests. Make sure you take time for yourself and, while you are at, come see one of the great events going on at APIS. Come watch your fellow students play basketball, come to those wonderful concerts and drama presentations, show support to your fellow classmates in all their endeavors. I can say for certain that you won’t be disappointed because what our students are doing in the class and beyond is truly amazing, and should be celebrated by all.

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I hope to see you soon at these wonderful events coming in the second quarter. Upcoming College Visit

University of British Columbia Nov. 7, 2016 3:30-5 p.m. College Counseling Office

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Fall Extracurricular Activities Kick Off Elementary Extracurricular Activities

Lego Robotics

Kickball

Lower Elementary Art

Upper Elementary Art

secondary Extracurricular Activities

Middle School Boys Soccer

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Chamber Orchestra


Varsity Boys Volleyball

Varsity Girls Volleyball

Rock Band

A Cappella

Social Justice Missions

Jazz Band

OCTOBER 2016

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APIS Carnival

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lue sky + moon bounces + pie your teacher + face painting + cotton candy + one amazing SRC + more = A FUN-FILLED CARNIVAL DAY! On Oct. 20, APIS students, staff, and parents enjoyed a smile-filled, high-energy carnival day. From apple bobbing and pumpkin decorating to soccer goal shooting, Korean Piñata, water games, pie your teacher, and hours of bouncing, there was something for everyone to enjoy! Huge thanks go to high school SRC sponsors Sarah McRoberts and Leslie Milligan, and high school SRC members, for their leadership in coordinating and running the event. Thanks also to middle school SRC sponsors, Courtney Murfield and Megan Vosk, elementary SRC sponsor, Wendy Wilson, and middle school and elementary SRC members for their help in making carnival a huge success. Gratitude also goes out to APIS staff members for supporting and assisting at the event, with a bonus thanks to faculty members who offered to take a pie in the face as a show of school spirit, and thanks to the parent volunteers who helped manage booths and sell tickets/food, including: Ms. Myoung Joo Sim (G5 Henry Kuo’s mom), Ms. Yu-Ting Wu (G5 Selina Chung’s mom), Ms. Eun Young Kwon (G5 Andrew Kim’s mom), Ms. Bu Ja Lee (G5 Noa and G7 Neo Lee’s mom), Ms. Yun Hee Kim (Jina Wang’s mom), Ms. Katherine Choi (G8 Jeany and G12 Claire Park's mom), Ms. Jisook Han (G9 Ella Kim’s mom), Ms. Sung Im Kwon (G9 Anna Frankl’s mom), Ms. Kyoung Hee Back (G11 Jinny Choi’s mom), Ms. Yoo Joung Chai (G12 Sarah Yoon’s mom), Ms. So Young Paik (G12 Grace J. Kim’s mom), Ms. Jin Young Park (G12 Grace Y. Kim’s mom), and Ms. Jenny House (G2 teacher Kim House's sister). Donations from the school itself and all three SRCs toward carnival costs, combined with a huge level of student support and participation, led to a profit of 393,840 KRW, which was donated to Oak Tree Project. Additionally, a generous 240 books were donated to Oak Tree Project. Carnival is a perfect demonstration of our APIS community spirit – everyone pitches in to ensure fun for all!

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Parent volunteers w w w. a p i s . o r g

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Oak Tree Run APIS Community Connects Through Giving

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n Oct. 6, APIS secondary students welcomed guest chapel speaker John-Michael Becker. A friend of APIS Chaplain John Choi, Mr. Becker came to share about his work with Geon Christian Children's Home, which led to his founding Jerusalem Ministry, and, most recently, Oak Tree Project, both of which further his mission work with the orphans of Korea. God called Mr. Becker to Korea in 2005; ever since, his mission to serve the orphans and his passion for sharing the Good News has grown. In introducing Mr. Becker, Chaplain John said, “I really believe that Oak Tree Project is something our school can get behind and make a difference.” Oak Tree Run is a fundraising event, in which all money raised goes directly toward Oak Tree Project, a scholarship fund that supports orphans after they turn 18 and their access to children’s homes, and government support, is cut off. The fund and mentoring project (every participant is paired with a community mentor who aims to be like a family member to the young adults) is a lifeline for graduating orphans, who, lacking family, have no support network to fall back on while navigating higher education, work, and life’s challenges. “The kids living in orphanages are just like your friends. If they had the family that you have, they’d be right here. They’d be a fellow student. Because of different reasons, they have to live in this orphanage. Don’t treat them like poor, pitiful orphans. [This person] could have been your brother or sister … or friend,” said Mr. Becker. “Life is really hard for them when they graduate and move out. They don’t have family members to look out for them, like most APIS students do,” he added. Mr. Becker’s message struck a chord with the APIS community. In an outpouring of support, APIS staff, students, and families raised over 2 million KRW to contribute to Oak Tree Run, and had 21 students, including the entire boys volleyball team, three parents, and 21 staff members participate in Oak Tree Run, held Oct. 15.

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"It was really exciting to see so many students and staff rally together for this scholarship program. With the busyness and so many competing demands, I believe it was good for all of us to get outside and put our minds, hearts, bodies, and money to the one goal of caring for orphans," said Chaplain John. Judy Park (Grade 3 teacher) shared that on race day, “It was great to see so many people. I normally don't like crowded places, but when I got there, there was a lot of positive energy – people there for a good cause. It was nice to see APIS represented to make a difference in our community, especially as a group across all the different age groups. Usually these events are only aimed for the older students … I really enjoyed the feeling of unity for the community. Positive energy spreads. It was really fun!" Elementary through high school students attended the race and gave support to Oak Tree Project. Shinyoung Lee (Grade 12) said, "I think it’s meaningful that there is a separate organization that supports orphans in college because there's a lot of discrimination against them. It's even depicted in the Korean dramas; when someone wants to marry an orphan, the parents are like, ‘No!!!’ It's important that we support adult orphans, not just the cute baby orphans." In addition to the 45 APIS community members participating in the race and contributing 2 million KRW, the SRC voted to donate all proceeds from carnival to Oak Tree Project, a decision that will lead to more orphans receiving invaluable support as they navigate the transition to adulthood.

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Snapshots

Grades 1 and 3 field trip

to Seoul Education al Museum

ty Kindergarten publishing par

bok Palace Grade 4 field trip to Gyeong

Kindergarten bakin g

Grade 6 publishing party Grade 2 recess

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Making Kimchi in M s. Meyer's honors bio logy class

Kindergarten baking

Grade 6 publishing party

Grades 1 and 3 field trip

to Seoul Education al Museum

Greenhawks Children 's Choir

Making Kimchi in Ms. Meyer's biology class

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OCTOBER 2016

S C H O O LW I D E N E W S & E V E N T S

Librarian's Pick: Fall Into These "Delicious" Books!

F

all is here! It is time to celebrate a crystalline sky, autumn colored leaves, and the harvest season. People around the world will be celebrating the season’s bounty with diverse food festivals: seafood celebrations, barbecue events, harvest festivals, and other various food fests, too. This fall, it might be fun to create a food festival that you can enjoy with your friends and family with your own recipes! Here are some “delicious” books you might be interested in. Taste fall!

The Popcorn Book

By Tomie dePaola Did you know that it is better to keep popcorn in the refrigerator? Tony and Tiny are curious about it and, with this curiosity, they start to make some for themselves. While Tony actually makes the popcorn, Tiny searches for and studies interesting facts about popcorn. The book includes not only the procedure to make delicious popcorn, but history and facts as well. Not to mention interesting legends and additional recipes. On the last page, it shows two terrific ways to pop corn – “Everyday Way” and “Friday Night Popcorn.” Taste the difference!

The Little Red Hen (Makes a Pizza)

By Philemon Sturges

Based on the classic tale, this story follows how Little Red Hen makes a pizza pie. Soon, Hen discovers that she lacks certain necessities and ingredients, asks for help from others, including duck, dog, and cat. Being refused by them, Hen visits multiple stores to purchase things to make a pizza and also stuff that she surely does not need, such as a guidebook to sink installation. When pizza time arrived, the trio finally offered to help. And, of course, enjoyed the pizza altogether! Crisp cut-paper illustrations include clever details about the pizza recipe.

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World

By Marjorie Priceman

By looking at the world map on the first page (and also the last page), you might assume that it could be a travel book. But it isn’t! The book opens with, “Making an apple pie is really very easy.” Is it really so? Of course, when cooking, you can face obstacles, but there’s always a way out. Just follow the ingredient shopping journey, travel from one country to another, all the way from Europe to Jamaica. In the back page, this book also includes an apple pie recipe with detailed instructions.

Thunder Cake

By Patricia Polacco There are various cakes you can taste in the world: strawberry cake, chocolate cake, pecan cake, etc. But have you ever heard of Thunder Cake? The young girl in the book, Patricia, is afraid of thunderstorms. For this girl, Grandma provides a creative solution: making a Thunder Cake together! They search and prepare the ingredients near home, while counting the distance according to the thunder light and the sound. Russian folk art provides the backdrop for the story. Grandma’s Thunder Cake recipe is at the end of the book. Or, why don’t you make up a recipe by yourself!

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w w w. a p i s . o r g EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Kate Kim Art & Design Editor ■ Holli Kim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Caroline Webster Lead Writer/Editor

Issue 44 apis online update october 2016  

Issue 44 apis online update october 2016

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