Page 1

Winter 2014/2015

APIS UPDATE

Address: 57 Wolgye-ro 45ga-gil, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139-852, Korea Website: www.apis.seoul.kr

In this issue

First Semester Highlights Student Achievements Alumni Class Notes Capital Campaign


WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

From

Dr.Kim’s Desk Euysung Kim, Ph.D. Director How Can Parents Make Students Study; Better Yet, Learn?

How many of you feel it is a challenge making your child study? Before you answer that question, recall your own experience of “studying” at school. Did you enjoy it? If you did study hard (or not study), why did you do it (or not do it)? Did you study hard because good grades were necessary to get into top universities? Or, was it because you obeyed your parents and teachers like any “good” child should? I have somewhat deceivingly led you into thinking about these questions because, if you think about education in this way, you are missing the essence of what education for the 21st century (or the New Pacific Century) should be: learning. There can be a big difference between studying and learning. Back in the day when education was all about passing key examinations and getting good grades, perhaps it did not matter whether studying induced any real learning at all. Success in the New Pacific Century, however, will no longer be defined by whether one passes more exams but by whether one creatively solves challenging problems. To prepare our children for that kind of new world, the challenge that teachers and parents face today is not how we can make our children study, but how to make our children learn. A recent article from Educational Leadership features an interview with Daniel Pink that offers some insights into what makes students want to learn: How effective are external awards (or punishments) in getting kids to do something? Example: A parent rewards a child if the child gets all A’s. Daniel Pink says “if-then” motivators (if you do this, then you get that) are effective only with simple, short-term, algorithmic tasks like stuffing envelopes or turning a screw on an assembly line. They are far less effective for complex, creative tasks that more people are doing in the 21st century – for example, designing software or inventing a new product. According to Pink, the problem is that we tend to use those if-then rewards for everything rather than for the areas in which they work. Twenty-first century education requires us to focus less on those routine kinds of skills and more on work that requires greater judgment, creativity, and discernment. Another important point Pink makes about “if-then” rewards is that it gets our children’s attention, but it gets their attention in a narrow way. Say if you promise your child the freedom to play video games if he or she gets all A’s. Not only ineffective, the approach also makes the child focus simply on grades. When you only care about grades, you could end up missing many “sidetrack” opportunities to develop problem-solving skills and creativity. Students may easily give in to the temptation of cheating and resort to shortcuts. In other words, because the “if-then” reward approach focuses on performance goals (I want to get an A in algebra) rather than learning goals (I want to master algebra), it does a poor job of helping students retain what’s learned, persist when difficulties are encountered, and understand the subject’s importance. Grades and scores (performance goals) should only be used as feedback as the student works toward mastery (learning goals).

2

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


From Dr. Kim’s Desk

How important is compliance, in other words, doing the work (i.e. doing all the homework and assignments) for success in learning? The short answer is, of course, yes, it is important. But there’s a huge difference between compliant behavior and engaged behavior, according to Pink. With engagement, you’re doing something because you truly want to do it, because you see the virtues of doing it. Compliant students may be easier to manage but they’re not necessarily engaged and learning. To get them engaged, we have to find the right amount of autonomy over what, where, how, and with whom students learn. We need to create an atmosphere in which students have a sufficient degree of freedom; can move toward mastery on something that matters; and know why they’re doing something, not just how to do it. This is the reason why we believe inquiry-based and project-based learning approaches need to be emphasized in 21st century education. How much challenge is optimal in learning? (Should I encourage my child to load up with 10 different AP courses? – By the way, our school policy does not allow this.) According to Pink, if a task is too easy, students will get bored. If it is too hard, they will get anxious or frustrated. What you want is that sweet spot, where something is within our range of challenge – not too easy, not too hard, but just challenging enough that we are engaged and being pushed to a slightly higher level. Pink calls the right amount of challenges, the Goldilocks challenges, where one is constantly challenged to improve and yet the challenge is not too tough to discourage oneself. What we have to also recognize is that one student’s Goldilocks level is different from another’s, creating a customization challenge for teachers and parents. The keyword here is differentiation – what works for other successful children will not necessarily work for your child. We need differentiation in course load, instruction, assessment, curriculum, etc. If we truly believe in the uniqueness of our children, we need to move away from thinking that one size fits all, especially in education.

WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

Can learning be fun and yet be rigorous? Should learning be fun? According to Pink, rigor and playfulness pair much more smoothly than we think they do and pairing can have some pretty spectacular results. For example, in science, research shows that a lot of discoveries were made when people had more playful mindsets. In 2010, a pair of scientists won the Nobel Prize in physics for isolating a material called graphene, the thinnest, strongest, most conductive material in existence. They did this during what they called “Friday evening experiments,” a regularly scheduled two- or three- hour session apart from their regular work week, when they just tested out stuff they thought was cool. They ended up making one of the greatest breakthroughs in material science in the last 50 years, basically during a physicists’ recess. In the same light, one can understand why we take students out of valuable “study” time and take them on a weeklong GCP trip. We need to take learning out of the classroom and make it fun. An opportunity like GCP is, in fact, all about flow and engagement in learning. How prepared are you to answer, “why do I have to study X?” Pink notes that research shows that people do better at a task – whether that task is spelling, hitting a curve ball, or playing the viola – if they know why they’re doing it in the first place. In education, we often focus too much on “how” but not “why.” How much time, for example, do we spend on why it matters to solve quadratic equations? We often dismiss the “why” question as an annoying question when, in fact, it is quite important to our children. According to Pink, knowing why they are learning something greatly enhances performance. Further, we need something more than “because it’s on the test.” If we, teachers and parents, cannot come up with a good, solid reason, then it raises the question, should we be teaching it in the first place?

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

3


WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

From Dr. Kim’s Desk Why do some kids do well just on their own? How can we help our children fuel their own drive? When people have their own reasons for doing something, they believe the reasons more deeply and adhere to the behavior more strongly. Yes, as teachers and parents, we must have good answers when our children ask the “why” questions. But, that is not enough, according to Pink. We need to help them develop a reflective capacity to come up with their own reason for doing something. Instead of the hectoring, demanding, commanding our children, teachers and parents must be reflective mirrors for our children. That is, we must help them to draw out and articulate their own reasons for doing something. This means our children must have some degree of say or freedom. If we simply feed our children with good reasons for learning, our children can, at best, be compliant. With the freedom to come up with their own reasons, they will be engaged. Pink suggests a neat two-part questioning technique, which was originally developed by Mike Pantalon from Yale, to nurture self-motivation in our children. For example, if a student is reluctant to do his homework, Pink suggests asking, “On a scale of one to ten, how ready are you to do your homework?” If the student responds, “Two,” you ask, “Why didn’t you choose a lower number?” The second question of this kind often throws the child and often gets the child talking about their own reasons for persisting. Give this technique a try at home! In conclusion, Daniel Pink reminds us that as parents, as teachers, and as a school, our instinct is toward greater control. We think control is going to make something better. But people have only two reactions to control – they comply, or they defy. We don’t want defiant kids, but we also don’t want compliant kids. We want kids who are engaged. If you truly want to engage kids, you have to pull back on control and create the conditions in which they can tap their own inner motivations. Reference: Azzam, A. (2014, September). Motivated to Learn: A Conversation with Daniel Pink, Educational Leadership, Vol. 72, #1, pp. 12-17

어떻게 하면 자녀를 공부하게 할 수 있을까요? - 핵심은

공부가

아니라

배움입니다

-

한 번쯤 누구나 자녀에게 “공부해라”라고 말해본 경험이 있을 것입니다. 공부해야 하는 이유는 무엇인가요? 학부모님 여러분은 왜 공부를 하셨나요? 과거와 달리 21세기 혹은 New Pacific Century에서의 “성공”은 누가 더 좋은 점수를 받느냐보다 누가 창의적으 로 문제를 해결하느냐로 평가되기 때문에 교육의 핵심은 이젠 더 이상 공부가 아닙니다. 배움입니다. 최근 Daniel Pink와의 인터뷰 가 실린 Educational Leadership의 기사를 통해 학생을 배움에 이르게 하는 방법에 대해 살펴보고자 합니다. 학생을 공부시킬 때 보상(또는 벌)이 얼마나 효과적일까요? Daniel Pink는 “if-then” 접근법이 (만약 이것을 하면 저것을 해줄게) 편지 봉투 작업이나 나사를 조이는 일과 같이 단순 반복적 일 에만 효과적이라고 합니다. 즉, 소프트웨어나 신제품 개발과 같이 복잡하고 창의력을 필요로 하는 21세기형 인재에게는 if-then 보상 방식이 효과적이지 못합니다. If-then 보상의 또 한가지 문제점은 자녀의 시야가 좁아진다는 것입니다. 전과목 A를 받으면 게임을 할 수 있게 해주겠다고 약속하면 자녀가 오로지 게임을 하기 위해 공부하고 높은 점수를 따 려고 커닝과 같이 수단과 방법을 가리지 않을 수도 있습니다. 이렇듯 if-then 접근법은 배움(예: 나는 Algebra 를 마스터 하고 싶어)에 초점을 맞추기보다 성과(예: 나는 Algebra 과목에서 A를 받고 싶어)에 중점을 두기 때문에 학생은 배운 내용을 오래 기억하지 못하고, 어려운 문제를 해결하려고 노력하지 않게 되며, 과목의 중 요성을 모르고 지나치게 됩니다. 점수는 목표가 아닌, 학생이 배움을 향해 가는 과정에서 피드백으로만 생각 해야 합니다.

4

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


From Dr. Kim’s Desk 선생님 말씀을 잘 듣는 학생이 좋은 학생인가요? Pink는 선생님 말씀을 잘 듣고 충실히 과제를 하는 학생도 물론 좋지만 무조건 순응하는 학생과 학습에 몰입하는 학생은 엄연히 다르다고 지적합니다. 무언가에 몰입한다는 것은 스스로 하고 싶 어서 하는 행동이기 때문에 더 큰 학업성취로 이어집니다. 따라 서 궁극적으로는 학생들이 “몰입”할 수 있도록 도와주어야 하는 데 “몰입”은 자유로운 교육 환경 및 학습 분위기 속에서 가능합 니다. 자유로운 분위기 속에서 학생들은 공부하는 이유나 목적 을 알아갈 수 있고 목적이 뚜렷하므로 하고 싶은 공부를 파고들 어 마스터할 수 있는 것입니다. 이러한 이유로 APIS는 탐구 기반 학습과 프로젝트 기반 학습이 21세기 교육에서 강조되어야 한다 고 생각합니다. 도전적인 것이 좋은가요? (자녀가 AP 과목을 10개까지 수강하도록 할까요? - 참고로 APIS 학교 규정상 이를 허용하지 않습니다.) 배우는 내용이 쉬우면 학생들은 쉽게 질리고, 너무 어려우면 좌절감을 느낄 수 있습니다. 쉽지도 어렵지도 않으면서 학생이 학습 하는 내용에 몰입하여 한 단계 더 생각할 수 있도록 동기부여 해줄 수 있는 수준이 적당한데, Pink는 이 수준을 Goldilocks challenges라고 부릅니다. 다만, 학생마다 Goldilocks level이 다르므로 개인에 따라 학습량, 평가 방법, 커리큘럼, 등을 차별화시키는 것이 중요합니다. 특정 교육 방법이 다른 학생에게 잘 맞는다고 해서 내 자녀에게도 반드시 맞는 것은 아닙니다. 우리는 천편일률 적인 교육에서 벗어나고 개인 맞춤형 교육을 지향해야 합니다. 공부가 어려우면서도 재미있을 수 있나요? Pink는 배움에 재미가 더해지면 놀라운 결과를 낳게 된다고 합니다. 실제로 2010년 물리학 부문 노벨상을 받은 과학자들은 현존 하는 소재 중에서 가장 얇고 강하며 전도성이 높은 graphene이라는 물질을 발견하였습니다. 이는 최근 50년 동안 물리학계에서

WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

가장 위대한 업적으로 평가받고 있는데, 재미있는 사실은 물리학자들의 쉬는 시간에 재미삼아 실험한 것에서 이 물질을 발견한 것 입니다. 학생들이 교실에 수업을 받는 시간을 쪼개면서까지 1주일간 GCP를 보내는 이유도 바로 여기에 있습니다. GCP는 교실 안 에서 이루어지는 교육을 밖으로 끌고 나와 학생들이 즐겁게 배울 수 있는 또 하나의 수업이며 중요한 교육과정입니다. “나는 왜 이것을 배워야 하나요?”라는 질문에 대답할 준비가 되어 있나요? 왜 공부해야 하는지 이유를 알고 이해하면 효과적인 학습이 이루어지기 때문에 학생들에게 “왜”라는 질문이 굉장히 중요하다고 Pink는 주장합니다. 하지만 우리는 여태까지 “어떻게”에만 집중을 했지 “왜”에 대한 질문은 하찮게 여기고 무시하는 경우가 많습니 다. 단순히 “시험에 나오니깐”이라는 대답보다 더 깊이 있는 대답을 할 수 있어야 합니다. 학생에게 왜 배워야 하는지에 대한 타당 한 이유를 주지 못한다면 그 과목을 가르쳐야 하는 이유가 정말 있을까요? 어떻게 하면 자녀가 스스로 할 수 있을까요? 더 나아가 Pink는 자유로운 분위기 속에서 학생들이 스스로 학습 동기를 찾아 배움에 몰입할 수 있도록 학부모와 교사들에게 거울 과 같은 역할을 해줄 것을 말합니다. Pink는 예일대학교의 Mike Pantalon 교수가 고안한 two-part questioning technique를 사 용해 보도록 권유합니다. 예를 들어, 학생이 숙제하기 싫어한다면 Pink는 “숙제할 준비가 어느 정도 되어 있니? 1에서 10단계 사 이에서 표현한다면?” 라고 물어봅니다. 만약 자녀가 “2단계”라고 대답한다면 “왜 더 낮은 단계를 고르지 않았니?”라고 다시 물어 보는 것입니다. 이 질문은 자녀가 말한 “2단계”에 대해 대변하도록 유도하기 때문에 본인이 조금이라도 왜 숙제를 해야 하는지 말 을 하게 될 것입니다. 가정에서도 한 번쯤 이 방법을 활용해보시기 바랍니다. Daniel Pink의 글은 우리가 학부모 또는 교육자로서 은연중에 자녀를 통제하려고 한다는 것을 깨닫게 해줍니다. 하지만 통제는 순 응이나 반항이라는 결론을 낳게 됩니다. 우리는 반항적인 학생이나 무조건 순응하는 학생보다 몰입하는 학생을 원합니다. 배움에 몰입할 수 있는 학생을 기르기 위해 우리는 한 발짝 물러서서 학생이 스스로 배움에 대한 동기를 찾아낼 수 있도록 모두 함께 노력 해야 합니다.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

5


WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

From the

Deputy Head of Academics Scott Paulin Deputy Head of Academics The first record I bought on my own was “Rumors,” by Fleetwood Mac. I can still remember the excitement as I placed it on the turntable and cranked up the volume and the words and music of “Second Hand News” sprang to life from my stereo speakers. I was starting my collection of records much like teens from generations before mine had done. First marketed in 1889, the “record” was the standard medium for music distribution for nearly a century.

Then innovation in digital recording changed everything. Billy Joel’s “52nd Street” was released in 1982 as the first commercial CD, and hundreds of billions of CDs have been sold since then. Joel has stopped recording pop music and the music enthusiast has moved on to even newer mediums such as the MP3 player and digital streaming. The music industry had to adapt and change in order to survive. The bulky, analog records that were such a passionate part of my childhood became “second hand news.” As we consider such changes and realize that the rate of innovation and significant change happening worldwide is increasing exponentially, educators must look beyond the traditional medium for distribution of learning that has been the standard for the past century as well. According to the MIT Sloan Management Review, no more than 10% of the individuals in a typical organization or commercial enterprise today possess the ability to look beyond existing rules and goals to create new directions. Therefore, 21st-century managers seeking high-performing employees will value:

· · · · ·

Intelligence more than mere experience Commitment and loyalty to organization and task ownership Work ethic, including a desire to lead Personal integrity—particularly when facing difficult ethical dilemmas Teamwork and likability—smart, hard-working people who like to work with other smart, hard-working people

The changes APIS has been putting in place and will continue to develop are targeted at preparing our students for success in this rapidly changing world. The goal is for our students to build the ability to look beyond what currently exists and apply their learning in creative ways. Courses like STEAM combine science and technology with design to foster these skills. Problem-based mathematics requires students to think critically and apply mathematical reasoning rather than just solve algorithms. Humanities courses ask students to think conceptually and connect content across disciplines to make meaning. Change is inevitable, but our commitment to students of APIS is to keep them on the forefront, challenging the status quo, and nurturing them to become leaders in the New Pacific Century. Who knows, perhaps a graduate of APIS will dream up the next great innovation that changes our world.

6

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


From the

Principal of Instruction & Assessment Bruce Knox Principal of Instruction & Assessment When we consider the definition of “achievement” it is very easy to confuse measurements of achievement in the definition. When we define achievement as a grade, we overlook everything that a student has worked at, struggled with, overcome, understood, and excelled in. We overlook the most important elements, the efforts to earn that grade.

As the end of the first semester approached, I asked teachers to share with each other the achievements of their students, which I have copied below. (While the teachers identified their students and classes specifically, the comments are shared without these specifics.) Teachers wrote: “[These three students] have all shown a genuine love of learning and have consistently demonstrated humility, perseverance, and positive mental attitudes that have allowed them to successfully address challenges they have encountered.” “[He] is almost always on task, he makes good choices, he can solve his own problems, he is confident, he’s not scared to take risks, he has fun, works hard, encourages others to do the same, and he is successful in his learning.”

WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

“She comes to class more willing to take risks, persevere and face challenges with optimism.” “[These three students] have all made such amazing progress this year in my class. They have moved to a place where they are taking initiative for their learning by becoming more independent and solving problems that arise with each new assignment.” “As far as endeavour is concerned, she is second to none. Her passion for learning was amazing and her persistence and resilience are great.” “[My student] is not receiving outside help in the college process and has been working so hard to complete his applications entirely on his own. He is putting every ounce of his being into his essays and I’m so proud of how hard he has been working.” At APIS we teach our students to Aspire, Persevere, show Integrity and be Spiritually Grounded because we know that only through achievement in these areas will they be encouraged with academic success. The teachers know that achievement in these areas is key, and when asked to share, every single comment spoke about these fantastic qualities of APIS students. The future leaders of the New Pacific Century will need to exemplify these qualities as they bridge the gap between the East and the West!

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

7


WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

From the

Principal of Research & Studies Elaine Park Principal of Research & Studies This year, we continue to focus on using assessments to improve student learning, ensure progress and develop self-reliant learners. Different assessment practices lead to different types of student learning and to different attitudes toward that learning. In other words, methods of assessment are determined by our beliefs about learning. At APIS, we believe it is important to continue establishing and monitoring assessment practices based on current research to develop independent and confident lifelong learners.

According to early theories of learning, complex higher-order skills had to be acquired bit-by-bit by breaking learning down into a series of prerequisite skills — a building-blocks-of-knowledge approach. It was believed that after basic skills had been learned by rote, they could be assembled into complex understanding and insight. However, evidence from contemporary cognitive psychology indicates that learning requires the learner to think and actively construct evolving mental models. An article co-written by Dr. R.J. Dietel, J.L. Herman, and R.A. Knuth of the North Central Regional Education Laboratory, noted cognitive psychology findings that support the need for assessment to be more than a symbol that represents achievement at the end of a chunk learning. For example, instead of testing whether a student knows a set of algebraic equations, current research would suggest that it is imperative that we also test the student’s understanding of key concepts and ability to apply knowledge in varying applications. From today’s cognitive perspective, meaningful learning is reflective, constructive, and self-monitored. Students should be seen not as recorders of factual information but as creators of their own unique knowledge structures. To know something is not just about receiving information but interpreting it and relating it to other knowledge one already has. In addition, we now recognize the importance of knowing not just how to perform, but also when to perform and how to adapt that performance to new situations. Thus, the presence of discrete bits of information is not the single goal in the assessment of meaningful learning. It is also significant how and whether students organize, structure, and use that information in context to solve complex problems. The continued focus at APIS is to provide varying assessment types — sometimes called authentic assessment or performance assessment — and to include a variety of strategies such as open-ended questions, exhibits, demonstrations, hands-on execution of experiments, computer simulations, writing in many disciplines, and portfolios of student work over time. These assessment strategies provide for more meaningful assessments that better capture the significant outcomes we want our students to achieve and better match the kinds of tasks they will need to accomplish to meet the challenges as leaders of the New Pacific Century.

8

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


From the

Dean of Students Andrew Murphy Dean of Students

One of the most exciting times of year for me is the late fall and winter. Although the energy of a new school has faded, excitement is building for the holidays that are just around the corner. Students are abuzz as special events approach that are just over the horizon, concerts, dances, Christmas holidays and even the first snowfall. As well, it is always nice to learn how students and teachers have settled into their new classes and the stress of the new school year has dissipated. It is great to see the students smile and laugh, enjoying being youthful, ready for the challenges that lay ahead; either in their next class, over the weekend, or the more distant future of university. But with this time brings a new stress to our high school students. With exams in December, college applications due, SAT exams, and some major concerts and drama performances as well, the stress level has risen a notch or two. It is during these stressful times that I would like to remind our students to keep in mind the present and focus on the “here and now” and to find positive ways to relieve their stress. Please take the time to enjoy family and friends, and enjoy this special time of year as a student at Asia Pacific International School. To ensure that students are adhering to different policies and procedures, I not only remind students of the proper uniform, in particular wearing the proper winter uniform — including the jacket — to school, but I also monitor student grades and attendance to ensure that students are on task and reaching their maximum potential throughout the school day.

WINTER 2014

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

Please keep in mind the attendance policy as the first semester has come to an end and the new semester approaches. Students are expected to show up on time and be present for all classes. Our attendance policy in secondary states that “accumulating in excess of nine period-absences in a class per semester, whether excused or unexcused, will result in a loss of credit for the course or courses involved.” With all this being said, I encourage students and parents to stop by my office as often as possible to share their thoughts and ideas on how we, as a school community, can positively contribute to the spirit and culture of APIS. I wish all students, teachers, staff, parents, and the greater APIS community a happy winter season.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

9


WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

Aspiring to Be Better

A

sia Pacific International School is growing. Not only have scores of new students joined the student body this year, the facilities at APIS have expanded and been enhanced. “The expansion of the new wing on the fourth floor with the college counseling center, professional recording studio, and new classrooms has opened up exciting possibilities,” said Scott Paulin, deputy head of academics.”I am also thrilled to see students take advantage of the new woodworking lab to develop their creativity and have the experience of designing things and actually bringing them into existence.” Also, on the first floor, the counseling department in the lower level was enlarged, and the chaplain’s office was moved next door to the counseling department to better facilitate student access and pastoral care. A capital campaign that allowed APIS to create the school’s new woodshop is now focused on creating a cooking/multipurpose lab on the first floor. Programs available to students have also expanded this year, with perhaps the most notable change being the addition of the optional ninth period in middle and high school, which has given students greater opportunity for more diversity and choice in their schedule. Another welcome addition this year has been the Saturday Elementary Sports Program, which provides athletic training on Saturdays at the school. The program started this fall with a focus on soccer, with 40 students participating. 올해 APIS에서는 많은 변화가 있었습니다. APIS는 많은 신입생을 환영하였으며 교내 시설을 확장하고 다양한 프로그램 도 도입하였습니다. 이러한 변화에 대해 Scott Paulin 총교장은 “4층에 새로 확보한 교실과 확장된 college counseling center, 그리고 전문 recording studio에서 학생들이 가진 잠재력을 펼칠 수 있어 기대가 큽니다. 특히, 새로 지은 woodworking lab에서 학생들이 상상력을 발휘하여 목공품을 구상하고 제작할 수 있습니다.”라며 기쁘다고 전했습니다. 카페테리아 옆에는 학생 카운슬링 공간으로 자리 잡았습니다. 카운슬링 부서는 올해 확장되었을 뿐만 아니라 학생들이 School Chaplain과도 언제든지 상담할 수 있도록 교목실을 카운슬링 부서 옆에 배치하였습니다. 또한, APIS에서 진행 중 인 2014 모금 운동을 통하여 1층의 woodshop은 완성되고 있으며 모금 운동에 동참해주신 학부모님들 덕분에 새로운 cooking/multipurpose lab을 마련하는 데에도 큰 도움이 되고 있습니다. 교육 프로그램 측면에서는 중고등부에 “선택적 9교시” 시행 덕분에 학생들은 폭넓게 교과목을 선택하고 관심 분야를 더 깊 이 공부할 수 있게 되었습니다. 초등부는 이번 학기에 처음으로 토요일 스포츠 프로그램을 시작하였으며, 신청한 40여 명 의 학생들이 가을 학기 동안 열심히 축구를 배우고 연습하였습니다.

4th Floor

BEFO RE

10

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

AFTER


ing Record Studio

! New It’s

Saturday Sports Camp

Chaplain’s Office

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

College Counseling Center

Wood Working Lab

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

11


Events-In-Brief

5. Fall into Fun at the Fall Carnival! The third annual APIS fall carnival was held on October 9. APIS holds carnivals each year for a good cause, and this year’s carnival was about donating books and fundraising for a mission school in the Philippines. A total of 1,157 books were collected and sent to the mission school Books 4 Bethany!

1. Back to School Night APIS celebrated the beginning of a new school year on August 29 with Back-toSchool Night. The event began with visits to homerooms and ended with a convocation service. A separate meeting was arranged for senior parents to walk them through the college application process. 8월 29일에 Back to School Night을 개최함으로 새 학 기의 시작을 축하하였습니다. 학부모님들은 교실을 방 문하여 담임 선생님을 만나뵙고 나서 대강당에 모여 이 번년도의 새로운 변화에 관해 이야기를 들을 수 있었습 니다. Mrs. Russell은 12학년 학부모님들을 모시고 대학

On September 15, the extracurricular activities of the fall season began. Among the various activities offered, including mathematical olympics, a capella, table tennis club, some of the popular activities were soccer and elementary art.

10월 9일에 APIS의 제3회 가을 carnival이 열렸습 니다. 올해 carnival에서 학생들은 즐거운 시간을 보 냈을 뿐만 아니라 필리핀 소재 미션스쿨인 Books 4 Bethany로 기부할 책 1,157권과 후원금을 모금하 였습니다.

9월 15일 가을 시즌 Extracurricular Activities가 시 작되었습니다. 수학 올림픽, 아카펠라, 탁구 클럽 등 다양한 수업 가운데 축구와 저학년 미술 수업은 특히

5

인기가 많았습니다.

9 Fall Car Oct. niv al

9 Back to S g.2 ch oo Au

ta ry

4

2. Saturday Elementary Sports Program Kicks Off!

t.6

Oc

Se en m pt. 6 Satu day Ele r

4

2

Season all rF la

3

15 Extracu pt. rri cu Se

So ccer

1

입시 준비에 대해 점검하는 시간도 가졌습니다.

3. Extracurricular Activities: Fall

t igh lN

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

St ud ar ent C lub Baza

4. Student Club Bazaar

새롭게 개설된 초등부 토요일 축구 캠프가 8월 23일에 첫 수업을 시

The Student Club Bazaar on October 6 attracted a lot of attention from high school students as 34 clubs were represented in the CLC. There were long-surviving clubs such as THEIA Missions and PAIN, and there were new clubs that covered many areas such as sports, cooking, and even Korean culture.

작하여 13주간 진행되었습니다. 축구 캠프는 매주 토요일 학생들이 즐

올해 34개의 APIS 학생 동아리가 멤버 모집을 위해 10월 6일

겁게 운동하면서 실력을 쌓을 수 있는 게임 및 훈련으로 구성되어 있

에 동아리 홍보에 나섰습니다. THEIA Missions와 PAIN과 같

었습니다.

이 수년간 지속되어 온 동아리도 있는 한편, 스포츠, 요리, 그

The Elementary Saturday Soccer Camp started the first session on August 23. Each practice included games/drills, which have an objective and are the right mix of structure and fun. The first session of the Elementary Sports Program ended on November 22.

리고 한국 문화 등 새로운 분야의 신생 동아리도 많았습니다.

12

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


7. University of Notre Dame Holds Master Class at APIS Three music professors from the University of Notre Dame visited APIS on October 14. The professors performed for students and encouraged students to consider studying music at Notre Dame. Two APIS students, Jenny Jeon (Grade 12) and John Kim (Grade 12) were part of a master class put on by the visiting professors.

10. Varsity Volleyball Tournament

여 학생들 앞에서 연주하고 Notre Dame 대학의 음악 프로그램을 소개하였습

The varsity teams put together an incredible effort at the tournament this year on October 25. The varsity boys, while losing to SIS in a 5-set close match, beat GSIS in a thriller! The Lady Hawks played strong while focusing on their individual and team goals. Many games this volleyball season were action-packed with some dominant spikes and awesome digs. Well done, everyone!

니다. Jenny Jeon (12학년)과 John Kim (12학년) 학생은 청중 및 방문 교수님

8월 말부터 시작된 Varsity 배구 시즌은 10월 25일 드디어 막을 내렸습니

앞에서 연주하고 피드백을 받는 마스터 클래스에 참여하였습니다.

다. 이번 Varsity 배구 시즌은 모두가 한 단계 성장하는 시간이었으며 경기

10월 14일에 University of Notre Dame의 음악 교수 세 분이 APIS를 방문하

10 Oc t.2 5

re at

ee tin g

lle ge

9

Fai r

7

ass Cl

6. Linden College Fair Held at APIS

ct M .1 4P ee arent Coff

O

Co

8

6

n nde Oct.14 Li

lleyball T y Vo ou sit rn r a V

t en am

otre Dame M as 4N 1 te . ct

r

O

중에 크고 작은 성취감이 많았습니다. 모두 수고했습니다!

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

t Oc Re t.1 y r 5-1 7 Seconda

8. Parent Coffee Meeting

The Linden College Fair was held October 14 in the APIS gym. Representatives from more than 30 colleges and universities from across the United States came to encourage students to consider applying to their institution. This was the first time the Linden College Fair had included APIS in one of its stops.

On October 14, the first parent coffee meeting of the year was held. Principal Bruce Knox and Principal of Research and Studies Elaine Park emphasized that grading only reflects a small part of student learning while feedback is crucial for improvement.

처음으로 Linden College Fair가 10월 14일

14일에 개최되었습니다. 이날 Bruce Knox 교장

APIS에서 개최되었습니다. 30여 명의 미국 대

선생님과 Elaine Park 교장 선생님은 “성적은 배

학 입시 관계자들은 APIS에서 부스를 설치하여

움의 일부에 불과하며 학생에게 지속적인 피드백

학생들에게 대학 및 입시 관련 정보를 제공하였

을 제공하는 것이 학습 능력 향상에 중요하다”고

습니다.

강조하였습니다.

이번 학기의 첫 학부모 Coffee Meeting은 10월

9. Secondary Retreat “Inside Out” The Inside Out School Retreat held October 15 to 17 was designed to be full of challenges — physical, spiritual and light-hearted. The event included a special chapel presentation from Pastor J.C. Park of Kindred Image, middle school/faculty soccer matches, a high school pep rally for a volleyball game versus GSIS, an all-day hike on Dobong-san, a live performance by the B4UB band (comprised of school staff and faculty) and a talk by Scott Paulin, deputy head of academics. The retreat ended with a chicken and pizza feast. 10월 15일에서 17일까지 진행되었던 Inside Out School Retreat에서 는 Kindred Image의 J.C. Park 목사님의 특별한 채플뿐만 아니라 중등 부 대 선생님 축구 시합, GSIS를 상대로 한 고등부 배구 시합, 도봉산 등 산, 교직원으로 구성된 B4UB 밴드 공연, Scott Paulin 총교장의 말씀 등 다양한 프로그램이 진행되었습니다.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

13


13. Secondary Spirit Week 11. Middle School Fall Concert Parents, teachers, and students gathered at the APIS auditorium on October 28 to hear the sounds of the middle school students. One of the highlights of the concert was the body percussion performance led by Mrs. Baum in complete darkness. 10월 28일에는 APIS 소강당에서 중등부 학생들의 가을 음악회가 열렸습니다. 이날의 하이라이트는 불이 꺼진 깜깜한 강당에서 중등부 학생들이 몸을 두드리면서 소 리를 내는 body percussion이었습니다!

Spirit Week was held from November 17 to 21 at APIS, an event sponsored by the secondary Student Representative Councils. Each day during the week, secondary students wore different clothes than school uniforms following a special theme — pajamas, clothes with a college logo, twin day. The highlight of the week was a pep rally just before the Green Hawks basketball teams took on the Korea Kent Foreign School Merlions in three pre-season games, all of which the Green Hawks won.

15. Winter Extracurricular Program The winter session of extracurricular activites kicked off on December 1. Creative games, a new activity this season led by Principal Bruce Knox, was one of the most popular activities with 19 elementary students signing up! 겨울 시즌 Extracurricular Activities는 12월1일 시작되었습니다. Bruce Knox 교장 선생님이 가 르치는 “창의적인 게임”에는 무려 19명의 초등학 생이 신청했습니다!

11

비한 Spirit Week이 진행되었습니다. 매일 주어진 테 마에 맞춰 옷을 입고 학교에 대한 spirit을 높였으며, 에 모든 경기에서 승리를 거두었습니다.

13

-21 Spirit W .17 ee v k No

De c

수요일 농구 홈경기에서는 학생들의 열띤 응원 덕분

curricular Ac tra tiv Ex iti .1

15

dle School Mid Fa ll 28 C . t

r inte :W es

Oc

11월 17일에서 21일까지 중고등부 SRC 학생들이 준

rt ce on

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

4

12

No v. 7 -8 PTC

14

al sic u Nov.26 G5 M

12. Parent Teacher Conferences The fifth-graders presented “Geology Rocks!”, a musical by Ron Fink and John Heath, on November 26 in the APIS auditorium. The musical is about three students who are trying to find their professor, and, in the process of their search, they learn something about geology.

11월 7일과 8일에 개최된 Parent Teacher Conference에서는 학생,

Rocks” 뮤지컬 공연을 11월 26일 수많은 관중 앞에서 선보였습

학부모, 그리고 선생님이 함께 학생의 학교생활 및 학업 성취도에 대한

니다. 세 학생이 주인공으로 등장하여 실종된 Professor Rock을

이야기를 나누었습니다. 활발한 의견 교환을 통해 학부모님들은 자녀

찾는 과정에서 지질학에 관한 여러 가지를 배우게 되는 내용의 유

의 학업 성취도뿐만 아니라 자녀의 관점에서도 학교생활을 바라볼 수

익한 뮤지컬이었습니다.

있는 좋은 기회였습니다.

14

14. Fifth-graders Rock!

On November 7 and 8, students, parents, and teachers had a chance to communicate with one another regarding the students’ academic progress through the Parent Teacher Conferences. As the students led these conferences, parents not only were able to better understand the progress their child was making but they had an opportunity to see from their child’s perspective as well.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

5학년 학생들은 Ron Fink와 John Heath가 제작한 “Geology


18. First Annual History Conference .APIS

seventh- and eighth-grade students presented their National History Day research projects, which were a semester-long effort, at the school’s Middle School History Conference on Dec. 17.

20. Drama Class’ First Performance The annual Christmas all-school chapel was held Dec. 19 in the gymnasium and featured the high school drama class’ first public performance, “Christmas Unwrapped” by Michelle R. Davis. The play focused on the idea of the free gift from God as being the central reason to celebrate at Christmas.

처음으로 Middle School History Conference가 12월17일 개최되었습니다. 이날 7,8학년 학생들 이 National History Day 대회를 위해 한 학기 동안

12월 19일에 진행된 전 학년 크리스마스 채플에서는 드라마 수업 학생들의 첫 공식 연극인

준비해온 역사 관련 프로젝트를 학생들과 선생님들

Michelle R. Davis 작품 “Christmas Unwrapped” 공연이 있었습니다. 아기 예수의 탄생과 하

앞에 선보였습니다.

합의 기회를 가졌습니다. 12월 8일 부터 12일까 지 학생들은 파자마, 책 속의 등장인물, 스포츠, 좋 아하는 색깔, 그리고 미스매치 테마에 맞춰 옷을 입고 즐거운 시간을 보냈습니다.

De

nc er t

8 c.1 De

초등학생들도 Wicked Wacky Week을 통해 단

17. Secondary Christmas Concert

19

Elementary school had their turn of celebrating school spirit from December 8 to 12. Students came to school in their pajamas on Monday, dressed as book characters on Tuesday, looked all sporty on Wednesday, wore their favorite colors on Thursday, and finally enjoyed wearing unmatching clothes on Friday.

m

ec t .17 ris Secondary Ch

D

16. Wicked Wacky Week

20

as Co ncert

ick ed Wac ky Week W

y ar nt e Dec.8 -12 Elem

17

16

ma Class’ Pe Dra 9 rfo 1 . c

ce an rm

rence nfe Co

18

7

le School His dd to Mi r

y

De c.1

나님이 주신 선물이 크리스마스를 기념하는 참된 이유임을 깨달을 수 있는 시간이었습니다.

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

El Co em s a ent ary Christm

The APIS secondary Christmas concert was held the evening of Dec. 17 and featured the middle and high school bands, orchestra and choruses performing seasonal music. The event ended in a grand finale that included all the secondary music students and some faculty members joining together to present the “Hallelujah Chorus” from Handel’s Messiah.

Winter Lights!, the annual elementary winter concert, was presented Dec. 18 in the gymnasium. The concert celebrated the lights of Christmas with students singing and playing instruments alongside a slideshow of students’ artwork that matched the music theme.

12월17일 저녁에 중고등학교의 밴드, 오케스트라, 합

초등학생들은 12월18일 크리스마스 콘서트때 연주 및 노래 실력을 뽐

창부 학생들이 오래동안 준비한 크리스마스 콘서트가

냈습니다. 이번 콘서트의 테마는 Winter Lights으로 아름다운 영상과

열렸습니다. 이날의 피날레는 교사들도 함께 참여한 헨

함께 연주가 진행되었습니다.

19. Elementary Christmas Concert

델 메시야의 “할렐루야” 합창으로, 콘서트의 화려한 막 을 내렸습니다. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

15


WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

APIS Celebrates Reason for the Season

The elementary students launch colorful paper airplanes during a Korean music performance on December 18.

T

he Christmas tree decorated with white lights and glittering decorations was set up in the school lobby in mid-November, officially kicking off the celebration of Christmas at APIS. Soon, preparations for the holiday were apparent throughout the school. Students in the school’s new drama class studiously practiced their lines for their upcoming Christmas performance. The sound of Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus” and other holiday classics being practiced by music students could be heard in the school halls, as the music students prepared for their Christmas concerts. Teachers hummed carols and finalized travel plans for the long winter break. Lights and other decorations started turning up in every corner. Staff and faculty celebrated the season with a special dinner held at the school. Following another tradition, a chorus of faculty and staff welcomed the students by singing a collection of Christmas carols to the students as they entered the school on the last day before the long break. At APIS, the annual Christmas chapel always serves as the focal point of the school’s Christmas celebration. Held December 19, this year’s all-school chapel event featured the drama class’ first public performance, “Christmas Unwrapped” by Michelle R. Davis. The play focuses on the idea of the free gift from God as being the central reason to celebrate at Christmas. The play’s message was an apt reminder of what all the decorations, special music and holiday dinners are really about. 11월 중순에 접어들자 APIS 로비에 반짝이는 불빛과 화려한 장식으로 꾸며진 크리스마스 트리가 세워지며 공식적으로 크리스마스 시즌을 알렸 습니다. 이후 학교는 크리스마스를 기념하기 위한 행사들이 가득 찼습니다. 올해 새로 개설된 드라마 수업의 학생들은 분주하게 크리스마스 연극을 준비하였으며 중고등부 학생들이 크리스마스 음악 콘서트에 연주할 “Hallelujah Chorus”와 같은 성탄절 곡들이 학교에 울려 퍼졌습니다. 선생님들은 겨울 방학을 기대하며 크리스마스 캐롤을 흥얼거렸고, 교내 구 석구석 크리스마스 분위기를 살리는 불빛과 장식이 빛났습니다. APIS에서 모든 선생님과 교직원들은 크리스마스를 기념하여 특별한 저녁 식사 도 함께하였습니다. 그리고 마지막 날, APIS에서 매년 준비해온 것과 같이 모든 선생님이 학교 입구에 서서 크리스마스 캐롤을 부르며 등교하는 학생들을 맞이하였습니다. APIS 크리스마스의 중심에는 언제나 크리스마스 채플이 자리 잡고 있습니다. 12월 19일에 진행된 전 학년 크리스마스 채플에서는 드라마 수업 학생들의 첫 공식 연극인 Michelle R. Davis 작품 “Christmas Unwrapped” 공연이 있었습니다. 하나님이 주신 선물이 바로 크리스마스를 기념 하는 이유임을 되새기고 크리스마스의 진정한 의미가 무엇인지 생각해볼 수 있는 시간이었습니다.

16

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Fifth-grade students perform “Aurora Borealis.”

The elementary band students perform!

“Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open sleigh, hey!”

Mrs. Holbrook, music dept. chair, announces the grand finale.

Santa drops by APIS on his way to the North Pole!

Teachers Tammi Wenzig, Emmalee Johnson, and Zachary Luginbill, school chaplain, lead the singing of carols at the Christmas dinner held Dec. 15 at APIS.

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

The scene is set in the first public performance by the APIS drama class, “Christmas Unwrapped,” presented Dec. 19 during the all-school chapel. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

17


WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

W here have you Traveled? APIS is staffed by a group of world travelers. A poll of faculty and staff members (with 31 responding) shows that they have visited 140 different countries. The average number of countries visited was 22 per respondent. Three respondents stood out as particularly devoted travelers — APIS Director Euysung Kim, who has logged 61 countries; and teachers Pat Hallinan, with 73, and Derek O’Malley, with 54. Ms. Hallinan calls travel addictive. “I think all your senses are stimulated,” she said. For those who are inspired to add to their own countries-visited list, Dr. Kim suggests Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park or Yemen. “The whole of Sanaa, Yemen’s capital, is basically UNESCO World Heritage Centre.” Ms. Hallinan recommends Laos and Bhutan to see their way of life “before it no longer exists.” Mr. O’Malley suggested Cambodia. “Korean businesses, money, tourists, and workers are helping to transform Cambodia,” he said. But transformation can come at a cost. “Knowing how Korea affects other countries helps students make informed and empathetic life-choices.”

Mr. Kirkwood

in Ms. Hallinan

Morocco -- phenomenal diversity in a very small, easy-totravel country. People are friendly, food is great and local artisans make very, very reasonably priced carpets, wood items and jewelry. Marrakesh is a phenomenally beautiful, intriguing, exotic city.

Bhutan

Mr O’Ma lley in Ca mbodia

Ms. Furusawa

The flags on this map are placed in countries where at least one respondent to the APIS poll has visited. The number on the flags indicates how many respondents have visited that country. In the large text fields, the eight top travelers offer their recommendation on a place to visit.

18

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

Chobe is a great national park with huge amounts of wildlife. The river cruise at sunset was great as we saw hippos right next to our boat and families of elephants enjoying the river with us. This is an adventure everyone should experience.


글로벌 시티즌답게 APIS에는 여행을 좋아하는 선생님들이 참 많습니다. 최근 교내에서 실시한 설문조사에 의하면 응답자 31 명의 선생님이 총 140여 개의 나라를 다녀왔습니다. (1인당 평균 22개국 방문!) 이 가운데 Pat Hallinan 선생님은 73개국, 김 의성 이사장님은 61개국을 방문하였으며 Derek O’Malley 선생님은 54개국을 여행해 눈길을 끌었습니다. 여행에 대해 Ms. Hallinan은 “중독성”이 있다고 표현하며 “각 나라마다 소리, 향기, 그리고 맛도 모두 다르기 때문에 여행은 오감을 자극하는 경 험”이라고 했습니다. 그렇다면 이들이 생각하는 최고의 여행지는 어디일까요? 새로운 여행지를 찾는 사람들에게 김의성 이사 장님은 탄자니아의 세렌게티 국립공원 또는 예멘을 추천합니다. “ 예멘의 수도인 Sanaa 도시 전체가 유네스코의 세계 문화유 산 센터 같습니다.” Ms. Hallinan은 라오스와 부탄 사람들의 삶의 방식이 “사라지기 전에” 꼭 한번 가보기를 추천합니다. Mr. O’Malley는 캄보디아를 추천하며 “한국 기업, 자본, 관광객이 캄보디아를 변화시키고 있습니다. 물론, 변화라고 해서 전부 좋다 고 할 수는 없지만, 한국이 다른 나라에 끼치는 영향을 통해 학생들이 많은 것을 배울 수 있으리라 생각한다”고 했습니다. *아래 지도에 나타난 깃발 및 숫자는 우리 선생님들이 여행한 나라입니다. Mr. Stapleton

Ms. Hallinan

During one summer in college I worked at a youth hostel in Bergen, Norway. I enjoyed every moment of trekking across the surrounding seven mountains, and soaking in the stunning Norwegian fjords.

Mr. Knox Luang Prabang, the ancient royal capital of Laos, is one of those small towns that finds you, rather than you finding it. While most guidebooks suggest two to three days, stay for a week and you will never want to leave. Old temples, great food, beautiful scenery, all with a short walk means there is always something interesting just around the corner.

Ms. Anno When I visited Sigiriya, I couldn’t stop [imagining]“Laputa; Castle in the Sky,” which is one of my favorite Japanese Giburi movies. That place was really mysterious and inexplicable.

Dr. Kim Ta n z a n i a’s Serengeti National Park. It is an “animal kingdom”au naturel - you cannot possibly observe so many species in such a great number in just one place.

Bhutan is one of the smallest countries in the world, tucked away at the eastern end of the Himalayas. It is protecting its culture and traditions by limiting tourism, but if you are lucky enough to have the opportunity to travel there, you will find a country where traditional culture and lifestyle are still very visible. The scenery is stunning.

WINTER 2014

FIRST SEMESTER HIGHLIGHTS

Mr. O’Malley A five-hour flight from Seoul, Cambodia, the ‘Kingdom of Wonder,’ has been voted as the ‘Friendliest Country’ in the world by several travel magazines and organizations. Its people welcome travelers with ready smiles, delicious food, and a relaxed view of life. Cambodia is home to ancient ruins, pristine rivers and beaches, and the vibrant culinary city of Phnom Penh.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

19


WINTER 2014

SS T TU UD D EE N NT T A AC CH H II EE V V EE M M EE N NT T SS

Student Achievements

W

e are pleased to congratulate numerous students on special accomplishments in music and art and literacy this semester. At APIS, we are very proud of all our students’ efforts!

Sarah Koo (Grade 5) won a “most

outstanding award” for her artwork on October 6 at the 2014 Korea Children’s Fall Art Festival, which was sponsored by the Korea Children Artistic Culture Association. Sarah was also awarded a bronze award on April 25 in the Korea Children’s Art Competition, which was also sponsored by the Korea Children Artistic Culture Association. The title of Sarah’s work that won the bronze award is “Starry Night,” which was inspired by Vincent van Gogh.

Jakin Jeong (Grade 8) earned the silver award in

the final rounds of the IET-RC (International English Test Reading Contest). The IET-RC is a nationwide contest sponsored by the International Language Institute of Seoul National University and other education-related corporations. In this contest, elementary, middle, and high school students from all over Korea compete with each other by writing English essays on books they have read.

David Kim (Grade 9) and Jeewon Kim (Grade 11) were selected to participate in the AMIS (Association for Music in International Schools) International Honor Orchestra and Honor Band, which will be held at Singapore American School on March 18 to 22. The honor orchestra will perform String Quartet No. 8 by Dmitri Shostakovich, arr. Drew, Irish Tune from County Derry by Percy Grainger and Marche Slave by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

Justin Um (Grade 10) won a gold prize in the Korea National Art Competition, sponsored by the Korean Arts Association, which was held November 17. The title of Justin’s work that won gold is “Dirty.”

20

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Student Achievements Charlie Cho (Grade 10) and Lia Kim (Grade 10) were both selected for the prestigious

AMIS International Honor Choir, which will be held March 25-28 at the International School of Luxembourg. Noah Kim (Grade 9) was selected as an alternate. The festival consists of three choirs, Men’s Choir, Women’s Choir, and Mixed Choir. Both APIS students were accepted into the Mixed Choir. The mixed choir repertoire includes “Alleluia” by Paul Basler, (from left to right) Charlie Cho, Lia Kim, and Noah Kim. “Die Nachtigall” by Felix Mendelssohn, “Little Birds” by Eric Whitacre, “How Still, How Happy” by Ola Gjeilo (world premiere), “Jenga Imani Yako” by Israel Kagaruki, and “I Sing Because I’m Happy” arr. Dilworth, and all choirs will combine to sing “Barter” by Mark Sirett (world premiere). The Mixed Choir will be conducted by Dr. Eugene Rogers of The University of Michigan.

WINTER 2014

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Jeho Hahm (Grade 11, Band) and Charlie Cho (Grade 10, Chorus) received KAIAC Adjudication Awards at the KAIAC Large-Ensemble Music Festival, held November 4 at Seoul International School for their leadership and musicianship within their ensemble.

Nineteen APIS high school student

were selected through an audition process to participate in the KIMEA National Honor Festival for Band, Orchestra, and Chorus, which will be held February 14-15 at Seoul Foreign School.

APIS high school orchestra, chorus and band groups were awarded unanimous gold ratings when the APIS high school music department traveled to Seoul International School on November 4 to participate in the KAIAC Large-Ensemble Music Festival. One hundred APIS high school students participated.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

21


WINTER 2014

ALUMNI CLASS NOTES

Alumni Class Notes WHAT ARE YOU UP To THESE DAYS? JIMIN CHUNG Jimin Chung (Class of 2012), majoring in actuarial sciences, is taking her time off from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently, she is preparing for the actuarial exam.

Nadan Cho Besides being a full-time student at the University of British Columbia, Nadan Cho (Class of 2012) also worked as an intern/interpreter for the Samsung Medical Center’s Ophthalmology branch from 2013. In the same year, he went to the American Society of Ocularist conference, which is co-held with the American Association of Ophthalmology (AAO) in New Orleans. In 2014, he went on a business trip to the States in California, Arizona, and Illinois and learned about Maxillofacial Rehabilitation Prosthetics with silicones. He also attended the 2014 Annual American Society of Ocularists (ASO) and the American Association of Ophthalmology in Chicago.

RICKY LEE Ricky Lee (Class of 2012) is currently studying biology at Washington University in St. Louis. He served as a research intern at Brigham and Women’s Hospital Radiology Lab located in Boston. He also spent this past summer gaining work experience at Lundbeck Korea, a global pharmaceutical company, and the National Forensic Services (NFS). At the end of his internship at Lundbeck Korea, he had an opportunity to visit the Lundbeck headquarters in Copenhagen, Denmark. According to Ricky, some of the most memorable experiences as an intern include participating in post-mortem autopsies at the NFS and assisting with the release and marketing of a new anti-Parkinson’s disease medication in the Korean market called “Azilect.”

EUNBEE JUNG Eunbee Jung (Class of 2012) is attending Yonsei University. She is currently taking courses on economics and business. To continue her interest in sports, she has joined the tennis club at her university. Not only does she enjoy being active in her community at university, but also she continues to try new challenges such as participating in the Nike We Run Seoul 21k. She is involved in various part-time jobs such as teaching English and is planning to do internships and other activities next year in college.

I AM... 22

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

SEND


Alumni Class Notes JESSICA LEE Jessica Lee (Class of 2012) worked as an intern at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade over the summer in Korea. She also volunteered near her school, University of Southern California. She helped out to organize a blood drive event at the school club.

DONG HOON HAM Dong Hoon Ham (Class of 2012) spent last year at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He declared his first major as business (operation management, finance) and second major as chemistry. Over the summer, he served as an intern at various corporations, including KPMG (Strategic Consulting Group), Carlsberg (Marketing) and UBS (Investment banking). He still enjoys playing soccer and is a part of the varsity soccer team at HKUST.

GRACE KIM Grace Kim (Class of 2012) is currently attending UC Berkeley on a full scholarship through the NROTC (Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps) program. Upon commissioning in 2016, she will serve on active duty for five years. Class of 2014 BJ Kim who is studying at Northeastern University, Chris Kim from Boston College, and Jeremiah Kim from Williams College get together in Boston for a mini reunion.

Both former APIS class reps, NYU freshman Daniel Suh and Dartmouth freshman Hannah Nam get together in New York. Two leaders, one huge city.

WINTER 2014

ALUMNI CLASS NOTES

Ben Oh (Middle-

bury College, Class of 2013), Peter Kim (Emory University, Class of 2014), Chris Kim (Boston College, Class of 2014) and BJ Kim (Northeastern University, Class of 2014) get together for a nice Thanksgiving dinner.

Cornell freshmen Brayden Lee and Chris DH Kim fly over to Canada to meet with Jeewoo Han, who is studying at Queen’s University.

*These notes have been compiled by Jenny Ji-hyun Lee (Class of 2012) and Brian Kim (Class of 2014) W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

23


WINTER 2014

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Alumni Spotlight: Brian Kim 1. Where are you going to school now? I am currently attending Johns Hopkins University, which was well known for its medical and science studies. I love this school as it offers a lot of opportunities. There is a lot of resources for history studies, such as the archaeological museums in campus and even Baltimore itself, an early city of colonial America. There are even chances to go on an intersession abroad to Ireland for more historic studies. Countless events happen on and off campus that keep students pumped up and excited with college life. 2. What is your daily schedule like? My schedule might surprise my fellow secondary school students. I could choose classes I want to take. I don’t have to wake up at 6:30 Brian Kim (Class of 2014) is a freshman at Johns a.m. like I did back in high school. I don’t have to stay in classrooms for Hopkins University. He is majoring in history. the whole day. Some days I would have 3-4 classes, and sometimes I have just one! College life is indeed different than I expected. I find myself taking more responsibility with my own life. At the same time, hey, I got to play some video games on consoles I was never allowed to play on in my entire life – Xbox 360. 3. What are some of your memorable moments at APIS? I have so many memorable moments. Among them was studying AP World History with Sandra, whom I now even call as my own sister, in a small session after school. We talked and laughed away the hours as we studied. I loved practicing in worship band with everyone as well. Lia and Jackie would provide their amazing voices, Jeho on the bass, Chris on the drums, and Grace, David, Nick, and Gloria played the guitar. I would roll along with them, playing the piano. Finally, I remember my first/last prom. It was my first time to actually dance with someone, and I am always thankful to Lina for the great fun I had. 4. What was the most challenging part in preparing for college applications? I really found the testing and essays difficult. I missed a lot of days of SAT IIs because I felt ill prepared. I took SATs during my senior year when application deadlines were creeping in. Essays were challenging because it required not only a lot of editing, but also introspection. I had to look back at my past and learn how I changed. This process actually gives you a chance to mature and grow. But the hardest part of all? Honestly, it was parental expectations. I don’t have a particular formula in managing the stress. I just took the tests, wrote essays reflecting my thoughts and experiences, hoped for good results, and gave myself some time alone. 5. What programs at APIS were helpful in preparing for college applications? I liked how college representatives visited for short information sessions. I even made friends with the admissions officer of Notre Dame and learned more about how the application process works. The seminars with the college counselor was very helpful, too. Mrs. Shana Russell was very supportive with the process, and gave me the info needed for applications. 6. Lastly, what advice do you have for our seniors and juniors? Your application process will have unexpected twists and turns. Having a plan is great, but just remember that there will be stumbling blocks. And it is okay if it doesn’t go according to plan. A mind is a powerful ally and your worst enemy. Keep your heart faithful to yourself, and believe in yourself. If you don’t believe, who else will? It is strong enough to turn the tides. Your passion will not go unnoticed even if you think it is hidden. It speaks for itself, and it will go in your favor if you just believe that.

24

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


From the

School Chaplain Zachary Luginbill School Chaplain This year’s Christian Life Department theme for secondary students is to live life from the “Inside Out.” The Bible verse that goes along with this challenge is found in 1 Samuel 16:7 and can be seen printed on the backs of our themed T-shirts that students wear, which was designed by Mr. Woodrow. It says: “The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” So all year long our focus should not only be on the things we do, how we look, and what we try to accomplish in life, but also on who God made us to be on the inside, where we make our decisions and where true character comes from.

The first chapel series for secondary back in August was called “Questions We all Need to Ask,” and we began the year thinking about the important questions of life and faith. Jesus said that when it comes to faith as we grow up, we can learn from the example of a child. Children understand what it means to trust, and they aren’t afraid to ask questions about the world, which means we should be curious about life and never lose that childlike wonder when it comes to faith. Then, our next chapel series for middle school and high school was called “Extraordinary,” as we looked at ordinary people in the Bible who did amazing things — not because they were great, but because of our extraordinary God. Noah, Abraham, and Moses were people just like us with struggles and weaknesses; however, God showed them grace and communicated some important things about how to live and love others in simple ways. The Bible is an amazing gift where we can learn from the example of what God did all throughout history and how that still applies today to our lives. Our third chapel series in 2014 was called, “Everything is not OK,” because even though there are great things in life to enjoy and celebrate, at times we all experience hurt, which is why grace and forgiveness are powerful and needed things in our lives.

WINTER 2014

CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER

Elementary chapels every Thursday are one of my favorite times in the week. It is so much fun to sing and dance together and to learn more about Jesus through interactive Bible stories. So far this year we’ve talked about “Respect,” which is showing others they are important by what you say and do. Then our theme was “Responsibility,” which shows others you can be trusted with what’s expected. And then our chapel theme was “Gratitude,” which is letting others know you see how they’ve helped you. To finish out 2014 our elementary chapel theme is “Generosity,” which is just to remember this Christmas it is important to give to others because God gave us the greatest gift ever; his son Jesus! It has been a great school year so far, and there are still plenty of opportunities to consider how much God loves us and has blessed us here at APIS. If you would like more information about the Christian Life Department, please contact me at zluginbill@apis.seoul.kr.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

25


WINTER 2014

F O R E I G N L A N G UA G E S

From the

Foreign Language Department The Korean, Chinese, and Japanese departments welcomed the first semester with many new changes and exciting events. The Korean department is now offering two new courses to secondary students: Korean Modern History & Literature for grade 11 and Korean Studies & Comparative Perspective of East Asia course for grade 12. These courses have been made available to help our students better understand Korea in the context of East Asia.

One of the biggest changes in the Chinese department this year is that teachers have been creating lessons directly aligned to our adopted proficiency-based standards. The STAMP test is also given twice a year so teachers can check the progress and ensure that students are meeting their learning goals. STAMP is an external assessment that is adaptive and measures the student’s proficiency in listening, reading, writing, and speaking based on the standards. The addition of 9th period to the regular school schedule this year has enabled the Japanese department to provide instruction to students at more advanced levels of Japanese. High school students preparing for the JLPT, Japanese SAT, and EJU (Examination for Japanese University Admission for International Students) have been working hard in these classes after school, and we hope to see successful results. Throughout the semester, numerous special events were also held by the three language departments to make learning more enjoyable. Just before the Chuseok holidays or “mid-autumn days” in China, the Chinese classes celebrated the Moon Festival by staging a play in class and enjoying delicious moon cakes. In celebration of the 568th Hangeul Proclamation Day (한글날) on October 9, the Korean department created a display of the verses Psalm 23 and 27 from the Bible. Students in all the Korean classes each designed one letter to form a beautiful piece of art. There were also fun activities carried out in the Japanese classes. Students learned how to cook Gyuudon (beef and rice bowl) in class. They have also been learning to sing and dance to the theme song of “Youkai Watch,” one of the most popular animations this year in Japan. Also this year, the Korean, Chinese, and Japanese departments have been working together on two collaborative projects: a publication and a speech contest. Led by the Korean department (which has also put together the third edition of the Korean language arts’ collection of literary works), a compilation of students’ works from KAL, Chinese, and Japanese classes was published in December for the first time. The three language departments are also very excited about the 2nd Annual Asian Language Speech Contest coming up in April! We look forward to another exciting semester ahead.

A display celebrating Hangeul Day

26

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

Chinese department’s Moon Festival play

Foreign language department’s first publication together!

Students make Gyuudon in Japanese class.


From the

Music Department Sophie Holbrook Music Department Chair

The APIS Music Department continues to enrich the lives of our students by providing opportunities for musical and personal growth in classes and on the performance stage. This fall the music department experienced changes and improvement from past years. At the elementary level, the Orff-Schulwerk approach is used in all grades. The second-grade students now have private lessons to better learn the violin. These once-per-week lessons are in addition to the music classes during which the students sing and explore music in more ways than just the violin. The children use the violin as a tool to better understand musical concepts, much like how the other elementary students use Orff instruments and recorders. Fifth-grade classes now participate in band or orchestra and chorus once per week. Students are continuing their Orff and chorus instruction from fourth grade in addition to being a member in an instrumental ensemble. Middle school music has grown to span two periods in the school day: Period 6 is Music Fundamentals and Period 9 is Band and Orchestra. With the addition of Music Fundamentals the students now participate in chorus, study basic elements of music, and use their voice and body as instruments. In Period 9, students continue their instrumental study in either band or orchestra. The middle school students have opportunities to participate in the upcoming KIMEA Honor Festivals held in the winter.

WINTER 2014

MUSIC

High school classes are the largest they have ever been and the quality continues to rise with practice and effort. Each high school student musician has an online portfolio in which they upload recordings and receive feedback from their music teacher. This way teachers can listen to the students’ playing multiple times and students can quickly and easily receive comments for improvement. Throughout their musical career at APIS, the student will keep their portfolio and hear their progress throughout the years. Students and teachers have remarked how this online portfolio has raised the standard of performance within the ensembles. Several students have taken the extra challenge to audition for the AMIS and KIMEA national and international honor ensembles. Participation in these events will take the accepted students overseas as they represent the APIS Music Department. The music department looks forward to making more music with the fine young musicians who fill the basement classrooms. It is a joy to hear them sing and play every day!

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

27


WINTER 2014

COLLEGE COUNSELING

From the

College Counseling Director Shana Russell Director of College Counseling The fall and winter are always eventful times of the year in the College Counseling Center. The Class of 2015 is busy putting the finishing touches on their applications, most of which are due in late December and early January. It is a time of college essay revisions and rerevisions, finalizing application materials, and getting excited about finally hitting that “submit” button. I am always anxious to begin hearing about application decisions, which should begin coming in around December 1 for those students who applied early. Such a fun, busy, and exciting time of the year!

This past semester was filled with firsts — the first dedicated college counseling space at APIS opened in August, we hosted our first major college fair in October, and I was part of the first group of college counselors to visit the new campus of New York University Abu Dhabi in November. The new College Counseling Center is a dedicated space for Senior Seminar classes with a resource library and Smart Board, along with a conference room and an office space. The students have made great use of these three rooms not only during classes, but also during study halls and after school. In October, we welcomed the Linden College Tour to campus in the gymnasium. More than 30 American colleges visited campus to get to know our students and our facilities. This event was wildly successful and we hope to welcome them back to APIS again next year! In addition, I was invited by the Abu Dhabi campus of New York University to be one of the first college counselors to visit their new Saadiyat Island facility. This multi-million dollar campus is home to a progressive and forward-thinking liberal arts university, which also houses state-of-the-art arts facilities, high tech research labs, athletic fields, and restaurants. For the right student, this university could be a path to a truly global education and a lifelong love of learning. In January, I will begin working with the Class of 2016. We will spend the semester discussing college admissions topics such as finding the “best fit” college, creating a balanced college list, understanding the importance of holistic admissions, and writing a killer college essay. I look forward to taking this voyage with the Class of 2016 as they begin their journey to adulthood. I hope that they will move through this process with maturity, happiness, and a sense of self-satisfaction!

28

Linden College Fair at APIS. W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

Students talk with admission officers from various universities.


From the

School Counselors Kirstan Beatty & Jodi Nielsen School Counselors Many wonderful changes have happened in the Counseling Department this year. We began the year by welcoming Jodi Nielsen to the staff. Currently completing her doctorate in counseling, she brings a wealth of talent and experience in our effort to continually improve the counseling role throughout the school.

Our team is also undertaking a complete audit of the counseling department. We are aligning APIS’ Expected School-Wide Learning Results (ESLR’s) with the International Model for School Counseling Programs to verify what services we provide support the academic, social/emotional, career, and international domains. In this process, we are verifying strength areas, as well as aspects that need improvement. Once we determine what aspects are covered directly through the counseling department, we will then consider other ways these standards are being addressed through classroom subject areas and chapel topics. Look for additional counselor visibility throughout the school as the year progresses. We are continuing to use the Second Step Curriculum http://www.cfchildren.org/second-step.aspx in kindergarten to grade 8 to address the social emotional domain. This program covers skills to communicate and interact with others in a positive way. While this curriculum addresses issues related to bullying, the term “bully” is not directly used in K to grade 5. Instead, the lessons focus on providing the skills students need to resolve bullying issues. Topics of positive communication, stress and bullying are being addressed with Grade 9 to 12 through classes or small groups.

WINTER 2014

COUNSELING

As always, we continue to provide support through individual and small group meetings. We have an open door policy for all students to be able to meet with us for any issue. Our team is also part of the Student Support Team that provides specific services for individual students needing additional academic and/or social/emotional support. Our team is also reviewing the student support process to continue to meet changing student needs. Please contact if you have any suggestions or need support with your student: Kirstan Beatty kbeatty@apis.seoul.kr or Jodi Nielsen jnielsen@apis.seoul.kr.

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

29


WINTER 2014

T H A N K Y O U A P I S PA R E N T S

THANK YOU !

APIS PARENTS Fifth-grade teachers, Jeff Underhill and Alicia Morgenroth, extend their thanks to: Room moms Ms. Ji Eun Baik (G5 Sarah Koo’s mom) and Ms. Jae Hee Lee (G5 Sunny Pak’s mom) for supporting the fifth-graders with preparations for the “Geology Rocks!” musical and Poetry Reading Publishing Party. Ms. Seong-Ju Jeong (G5 Jason Misner’s mom) for surprising us with a celebration of Mr. Underhill’s birthday. To all the generous moms of grade five, we thank you! Your time and effort working on events — including our Geology Rocks! musical — is so very much appreciated! It is only through collaboration with parents that our community can meet its potential, and your efforts are a wonderful example for us all. The children are watching, and they see your kindness! Thank you! Ms. Ji Eun Baik (G5 Sarah Koo’s mom) Ms. Jae Hee Lee (G5 Sunny Pak’s mom) Ms. Heena Baek (G5 Sophia Park’s mom) Ms. Kyoung Mi Kim (G5 Je-in Kim’s mom) Ms. Jisoo Koo (G5 Namee Kim’s mom) Ms. Yuni Kim (G5 Eunice Kwak’s mom) Ms. Yang Geum Lee (G5 Subin Park’s mom) Ms. Eun Ha Lee (G5 Andrew Linton’s mom) Ms. Seong-Ju Jeong (G5 Jason Misner’s mom) Ms. Wol Hyang Eum (G5 Min Seok Koo’s mom) Ms. Sun Kyung Lee (G5 Matthew Lee’s mom) Ms. Ally Lee (G5 Neo Lee’s mom)

The elementary grade teachers thank all the parents who attended any of the publishing parties held in each grade this fall. And for those publishing parties that included refreshments, we thank those parents who brought in treats and drinks!

30

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R


Thank You APIS Parents

The Korean language department would like to thank the following parents who joined in singing “노을” (Sunset) with the students during the elementary music concert: Ms. Hyebin Yeom (Kindergarten Yurina’s mom) Ms. Carlota & Mr. Ki Cheol Ahn (Kindergarten Soomin’s mom & dad) Ms. Mi Kyung Ha (Kindergarten Abigail & Nicole’s mom) Ms. Obi & Mr. No Jun Park (Kindergarten Suki’s mom & dad) Ms. Jocelyn Cruz (Kindergarten Kurt’s mom) Ms. In Sun Chong (Kindergarten Sunon’s mom) Ms. Se Jung Lim (Kindergarten Janice & G1 Joshua’s mom) Ms. Ji Eun Kim (Kindergarten Knicole’s mom) Ms. Kyung Hee Song (Kindergarten Yin & G4 Rin’s mom) Ms. Adella Woo (Kindergarten Jensen’s mom) Ms. Mi Jung Shin (G1 Juney’s mom) Ms. So Yeon Kim (G1 Jimin & G2 Jiwoo’s mom) Ms. Mi Ra Kim (G1 Elliot & G5 Justin’s mom) Ms. Kazumi Akita (G1 Heumjae’s mom) Ms. Hyekyun Sim & Mr. Jaesung Sim (G2 Ianna’s mom & dad) Ms. Sonomi Torii (G2 Louie’s mom) Ms. Tomoko Arata (G2 Yeonsue’s mom) Ms. Jin Sook Kim (G2 Jenny’s mom) Ms. Hey Jung Eum (G2 Jason’s mom) Ms. Jae Eun Yang (G2 Matthew’s mom) Ms. Kyoung Hee Lim (G2 William’s mom) Ms. Kelly Chan (G2 Justin’s mom) Ms. Julien K Solizen-Veri (G2 Jacklyn’s mom) Ms. Ju Eun Cho (G3 Margaret’s mom) Ms. Eun Mi Kim (G3 Jamie’s mom) Ms. Yuni Kim (G3 Adelia & G5 Eunice’s mom) Ms. Myoung Hi Lee (G3 Jean’s mom) Ms. Ally Lee (G3 Noa’s mom)

WINTER 2014

T H A N K Y O U A P I S PA R E N T S

A special thanks goes to Ms. Jamie Shin (Kindergarten Hannah & G3 Johan’s mom), Mr. Bruce Knox (G1 Katrien’s dad), Ms. Landy Hwang (G3 Amber & G5 Allison’s mom) for their musical contributions.

Thank you to Ms. So Yeon Kim (G2 Jiwoo Jung’s mom) and all the grade 2 families who helped arrange our field trip to the National Museum of Korean Contemporary History and make it a success. An extra thank you to Ms. Kyoung Hee Lim (G2 William Yoo’s mom), Ms. Tomoko Arata (G2 Yeonsue Arata’s mom), and Ms. Jae Eun Yang (G2 Matthew Jeon’s mom) who joined us at the museum and helped to make it a special day for all the students! -Becky Cyrus, Second-grade Teacher W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R

31


WINTER 2014

2014 Capital Campaign

I

n order to increase our elective offerings and further expand student opportunities for experiential/project-based learning, APIS embarked on a capital fundraising campaign to furnish a new woodshop and a cooking/multipurpose lab. As of the end of the first semester, we have raised 60,795,247 KRW from our current parents as well as from our alumni parents! We are grateful to the following parents who have contributed to the 2014 Capital Campaign.

Platinum Level Donations

Gold Level Donations

Silver Level Donations

Bronze Level Donations

32

W W W. A P I S . S E O U L . K R EDITORIAL TEAM: ■ Euysung Kim Director ■ Nicole Suh Art & Design Editor ■ Josephine Shim Communications & PR Team Leader ■ Susan Craton Writing / Editing Staff ■ Soora Koh Communication Officer

APIS Update Winter 2014/2015 (Print Edition)  

APIS Update Winter 2014/2015 (Print Edition)

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you