Albemarle Magazine - Winter 2022

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Winter 2022 Magazine Holiday Celebration Lighted Boat Parade, Hot Cocoa Crawl to get EC in holiday spirit INSIDE PAGE 22 A PUBLICATION OF THE DAILY ADVANCE, CHOWAN HERALD AND THE PERQUIMANS WEEKLY
Albemarle

Albemarle

Magazine Holiday Celebration

Lighted Boat Parade, Hot Cocoa Crawl to get EC in holiday spirit

Local residents help ring in the holiday season during the Holiday Celebration and Grand Illumination ceremony in front of the Pasquotank County Courthouse, Friday, Nov. 26, 2021. Flipping the ceremonial switch to turn on the downtown lights were former Elizabeth City Mayor Bettie Parker and the family of Pasquotank Commissioner Sean Lavin.

Chris Day/The Daily Advance

Contents

Front Porch 4

Exact fit: Lane relies on math, patience to create stained-glass artworks 10-11

O Christmas Tree 12-13

’Tis the season to be jolly and generous 14-15

Hopeline’s Christmas Project brightens holidays for children whose families are in crisis 16-17

Special gifts and a friendly visit 20

Holiday Celebration, Lighted Boat Parade, Hot Cocoa Crawl to get EC in holiday spirit 22-23

Breakfast with Santa, Sip and Shop, Kick o to Christmas, Candlelight Tour highlight season 24-26 in Edenton

Turkey Drop, Grand Illumination, Christmas Parade, Christmas Craft Fair, Breakfast with Santa 27 highlight Perquimans holiday events

Candlelight Tours at Whalehead, Corolla Christmas Village ring in Christmas in Currituck 28

Extension o ers some tips for holiday meal prep, decorating on budget 30

Calendar 31-34

Winter 2022
INSIDE PAGE 22 A PUBLICATION OF THE DAILY ADVANCE, CHOWAN HERALD AND THE PERQUIMANS WEEKLY
THE 3 Albemarle Magazine
Winter 2022

The Open Door of Perquimans County will hold its annual Turkey Drop Thanksgiving Food Collection at Hertford United Methodist Church, at 200 Dobbs St., Hertford, in November. Donors can drop off frozen turkeys and Thanksgiving meal side items on Friday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Open Door will then distribute the food to families in the community who face food insecurity.

The Perquimans Weekly

Front Porch SHINING LIGHTS: COMMUNITIES PLAN HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES, AGENCIES RESPOND TO NEED

Here we are in early November and another holiday season is already upon us.

As we typically do with our Winter Edition of Albemarle Magazine, we’ve included in this edition stories about upcoming holiday events and activities across the region, a few stories about some interesting people, and stories about the great need for assistance during the holidays. The need seems especially acute this year given the

everything from gas to groceries.

Correspondent Anna Goodwin McCarthy gets things started with her story about Gail Lane, a retired math teacher who now gets to devote more time to her stained-glass art.

a couple of local businesses that sell Christmas trees. Both expect to start selling trees this month.

In our stories about need this holiday season, McCarthy spotlights Albemarle Hopeline’s Christmas Project, a 27-year-old program that helps brighten the Christmas hopes of women and children who are victims of domestic violence.

Williams also checks in with the Salvation Army and Food Bank of the Albemarle about their needs during the holiday season, while

correspondent Savannah Hess provides an update on Senior Santa, the holiday program that helps homebound seniors without family living in the area.

Staff Writer Paul Nielsen details the full slate of holiday events, including the Holiday Celebration and Lighted Boat Parade, in Elizabeth City. He also has details about the upcoming holiday celebrations in Currituck and Camden counties.

Tyler Newman, a staff writer with the Chowan Herald, details the upcoming holiday-related activities in Edenton, while John Foley, a staff writer for The Perquimans Weekly, writes about this year’s holidaythemed events in Hertford.

Finally, our Winter Edition calendar contains a complete list of holiday events across the region in November and December.

We hope you and your family have a bright holiday season. We also hope that if you’re else have a brighter holiday season as well.

ALBEMARLE MAGAZINE is a publication of The Daily Advance, Chowan Herald, and The Perquimans Weekly, all Adams Publishing Group Newspapers. 1016 W. Ehringhaus St., Elizabeth City, NC 27909 EDITORIAL 252-329-9680 Publisher David Prizer Editor Julian Eure 252-329-9680 Correspondents Kesha Williams Anna Goodwin McCarthy Savannah Hess Photography Staff & courtesy photos STAFF Paul Nielsen Tyler Newman John Foley PRODUCTION Graphic Design Jessica Harris ADVERTISING 252-329-9670 Multi-Media Account Executives Rich Houghton Lisa Bailey Bev Alexander SUBSCRIPTIONS 252-329-9505 CIRCULATION Chuck Edwards ONLINE See Albemarle Magazine at DailyAdvance.com
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Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 4

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Happy Holidays!

Exact fit: Lane relies on math, patience to create stained-glass artworks

Retired math teacher makes own stained-glass pieces, teaches others how

When Gail Lane was a little girl she would look at the beautiful stained-glass windows at her church in awe.

Now it’s others who are awestruck by Lane’s stainedglass pieces.

Lane said she started working with stained glass after taking a continuing education course on the art at College of The Albemarle 30 years ago.

Lane was a teacher at the time, so she only had minimal time to spend working as a stained-glass artist. Most of her pieces were gifts for her family and friends.

But after retiring from a 35-year career in education in 2004, Lane began to devote more time to stained glass, honing her skills as an artist.

Lane first started making stained glass in her garage, but she now uses a much larger space. She said her husband converted the attic room in their home into a studio for her.

“I can spend all day up here,” said Lane. “This is my happy place.”

Besides continuing to make her own art, Lane now offers courses in stained-glass art. She says she can

work with up to seven students in the studio space.

The classes meet on Saturdays at her home, and Lane often does not charge for them. The former teacher loves sharing her passion for stained glass with others.

“I love my Saturday afternoon classes,” said Lane. “We have such a good time.”

Lane earned a bachelor’s degree in primary education and a master’s degree in intermediate education from East Carolina University.

Some of her honors include: North Carolina state finalist for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Elementary Mathematics Teaching two years in a row; a former Teacher of the Year for Elizabeth CityPasquotank Public Schools; and Glaxo Fellow for East Carolina’s Leadership Development Program.

Lane also held offices in the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics. During her education career, Lane worked as teacher, math coach and math instructional specialist.

Lane’s expertise in mathematics complements her work with stained glass.

This winter scene is an example of the kind of stained-glass art Gail Lane creates at her home studio. Photo courtesy Gail Lane
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 10

“You have to be exact,” she says of her pieces. “It is like a big jigsaw puzzle.”

Stained glass requires preciseness and accurate measurements when designing a piece, especially if it is being made for a specific location or window.

“It’s challenging, it is hard work,” said Lane. “But it is so rewarding.”

Lane has created a variety of stained glass pieces — everything from angels to kaleidoscope patterns.

Lane said her process requires a variety of tools. One of her more frequently used tools is a pistol-grip glass cutter.

Lane said she normally uses gloves for her work. When she doesn’t, she can cut herself multiple times in a day, she said.

“Band-Aids and trash cans are your best friend,” she quipped.

Working with stained glass requires patience. Lane recalls standing and grinding glass for hours.

Gail Lane, a stained-glass artist, uses her pistol-grip cutting tool to cut glass for a stained-glass piece she’s working on. Lane has been creating stained-glass art ever since taking a class on it at College of The Albemarle 30 years ago. She also now teaches others how to work with stained glass.

“The tedious part is making everything fit exactly,” said Lane. “I measure, measure and measure more.”

Lane said she prefers to use copper foil instead of lead in her work.

One of the most integral parts in a stained glass project is purchasing the correct type and amount of glass at the beginning of a project.

Whether it is cathedral glass, opalescent glass or antique glass, it is important to find the style that best reflects the artist’s vision.

“When you are buying glass for a project make sure you have enough glass for the project,” said Lane.

Lane said it is difficult to find the same type of glass to finish a project once you’ve started it.

Lane has also started making fused glass and purchased a kiln a year ago to use for the process. She has divided her studio into two areas, one area for stained glass and the other for fused glass.

Lane also is experimenting with 3-D images.

“Doing different things is what keeps me going,” she said.

She said some of her favorite pieces of stained glass were made as gifts for her family. Her grandchildren have received pieces that feature cats, unicorns and a guitar.

Lane also has created different stained glass windows for her home. The light creates an awesome effect as it passes through the windows.

Lane recently participated in the weeklong RiverSplash artists gathering in downtown Elizabeth City. Lane said she looks forward to displaying her work at the Arts of the Albemarle in the near future.

Above

This angel is an example of the types of stained-glass pieces Gail Lane creates in her home studio.

Below

These flowers are an example of the kind of stained-glass pieces Gail Lane creates in her home studio.

Photos courtesy Gail Lane
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Chris Day/ The Daily Advance

Pendletons, Powells gear up for Christmas tree shoppers

Powells to begin sales Nov. 12, Pendletons on Nov. 19

There are plenty of things that can get you in the mood for Christmas: colder weather, carols, holiday lights, even crowds of shoppers.

But there’s only one thing that says it’s Christmas, and that’s a Christmas tree. Particularly if you’re able to purchase a live one.

The Christmas tree is, after all, where your holiday guests gather around to share beverages, songs and memories. It’s also the place where metallic and foil-wrapped gifts are tucked until the hour of

exchanging presents arrives.

None of those plans, however, will unfold until you’ve selected the right tree.

Two area families have been in the business of selling live Christmas trees for years, and both say finding the right tree begins with a visit to a tree market early in the holiday season.

Melissa Pendleton of Pendleton’s Christmas Trees in Weeksville said her family has been selling Fraser fir Christmas trees for the past 28

years. They sell Fraser firs because they smell go good, she said.

The Pendletons’ trees are grown in Deep Gap, in western North Carolina, so customers know they’re supporting North Carolina growers when they purchase one.

Many of the Pendletons’ customers are people who buy a Christmas tree from the family every year. For some families, buying a Christmas tree from the Pendletons has become a holiday tradition.

“I enjoy it when families come in

Alex (left) and John Thorne shop for a Christmas tree at Powell’s Roadside Market at Hughes and Halstead boulevards in Elizabeth City, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020. Powell’s will begin selling Christmas trees for the upcoming holiday season starting Nov. 12.
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 12
Chris Day/The Daily Advance

with small children and their eyes light up when they see our beautiful trees,” Pendleton said. “They are very excited about picking out this year’s Christmas tree and taking it home with them.”

Many repeat customers already have a preferred tree size because they know it will fit a designated location in their house. Other customers haven’t made up their minds yet.

“When a customer comes to buy a tree I usually find out how tall of a tree they are looking for and if they are looking for a fat, skinny or full tree,” Pendleton said.

The Pendletons’ Christmas trees will become available Nov. 19, the Saturday before Thanksgiving.

“Customers that want our tallest trees know they had better come soon because the past several years there has been a shortage of big trees,” Pendleton said.

She encourages customers to post pictures of their decorated trees on the Pendletons’ Christmas Tree Facebook page. The images help customers learn new decorating tips for next year, she said.

Eddie-Jo Powell of Powell’s Roadside Markets also sells Fraser fir Christmas trees grown in western North Carolina. The family-owned business in fact has sold the trees 33 out of the 42 years they’ve been in business.

Customers can shop Powell’s selection of trees at three locations: the Elizabeth City Farmer’s Market site, Powell’s roadside site in Sligo, and the Great Bridge Farm Market in Chesapeake, Virginia.

“The Christmas tree season is one of our favorite times of the year,” Powell said. “We will pick up our first load of fresh cut Fraser fir Christmas trees and they will be ready to sell on the 12th of November.”

Powell’s trees range in size from six to 12 feet tall; prices vary.

Powell’s also makes homemade wreaths that are sold at each market location.

Powell suggests customers consider their ceiling height before selecting a tree. He also recommends they make plans in advance to maintain their live tree over the holiday season.

Another important consideration, he says, is the tree’s proximity to wall sockets if electricity is needed to light the tree. Consult the manufacturer’s recommendations for proper use of electric powered decorations and power cords.

Next, select the tree stand that properly suits the height, width and trunk of the tree. The stand should also hold a sufficient amount of water and the stand should enable the tree to stand upright.

Powell recommends customers determine the amount of water needed for the life of the tree and apply as necessary. Also, keep your home temperature down and avoid placing the tree in direct sunlight for lengthy periods of time.

Lastly, determine in advance how to properly recycle or dispose of your tree at the end of the holiday season.

By that time, you’ll have made your guests happy in a hundred ways and proven there’s no place like your home for the holidays.

Pendleton’s Christmas Trees in Weeksville has been selling Fraser fir Christmas trees for the past 28 years. Pendleton’s will begin selling Christmas trees for this holiday season on Nov. 19.
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Photo courtesy Melissa Pendleton

’Tis the Season to be

JOLLY GENEROUS Salvation Army, Food Bank expect greater need

Because of inflation, SA anticipates more first-time applicants for aid

’Tis the season to be jolly and generous.

Area agencies that assist hungry residents and those without the means to provide a Christmas for their families are counting on it.

Toni Sawyer, community development and relations director with the Salvation Army of Elizabeth City, said the inflationary effects on almost everything families need — groceries, gas, housing — is likely to increase demand for the agency’s services this holiday season. The Salvation Army in fact expects to see people this holiday season it hasn’t before, she said.

“With the current rise of cost in almost every aspect of life, we anticipate an increase in (the number of)

individuals and families applying for (Christmas) assistance for the very first time. We want to make sure that persons in need have the opportunity to request help if and when it is needed.”

The Salvation Army wrapped its application process for Christmas assistance Oct. 31. This year, applications were only accepted online.

According to Sawyer, the Salvation Army traditionally counts on area civic groups, churches, individuals and organizations who help raise the funds it needs to assist families at Christmastime, and will be doing so again this year. Others like banks, schools, real estate companies and local businesses help by holding fundraisers and

The Elizabeth City Salvation Army is expected to soon begin its Red Kettle campaign for the holiday season. The Daily Advance
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 14

volunteering to ring bells outside area stores during the Salvation Army’s Red Kettle campaign.

“These organizations and groups sign on to cover a kettle location for one day,” Sawyer said. “They are also able to do this by splitting it up into one to twohour shifts. If an individual would like to ring and does not have the ability to cover a full day, that is OK, too, because we have shorter time frames available.

The Salvation Army’s Red Kettle campaign is scheduled to start in the Elizabeth City area on Nov. 11 at a few locations before expanding to multiple sites on Black Friday, Nov. 25.

The nonprofit’s Angel Tree program will begin late in the second week of November. Angel Tree sites will include Feyer Ford of Edenton, Muddy Waters Coffee House, Museum of the Albemarle, the Elizabeth City Area Chamber of Commerce, Rose’s, Walmart, Swimme and Son, the Perry Auto Group, Eastern Carolina Cardiovascular, the Wellness Spa, Evangelical Methodist Church, Elizabeth City Trophy Shop, The Circle II restaurant, Sentara Albemarle Medical Center and Big Lots.

To purchase items for the Angel Tree online, visit the Walmart registry at Walmart/registryforgood and search for The Salvation Army 27909.

Like Sawyer at the Salvation Army, Brian Gray of Food Bank of the Albemarle is also expecting an uptick in people turning to his agency for assistance this holiday season. Gray, communications and volunteer manager for the Food Bank, said the agency is already seen an increase in the number of people seeking help from area food pantries.

Fortunately, community members typically step up during the holidays to help the Food Bank address the extra need.

“This time of year we see an increase in organizations and businesses raising funds and food for the Food Bank through virtual food drives, online fundraising, as well as in-person food drives,” Gray said.

He suggested donors remember that every $1 donated to the Food Bank pays for about four meals, and collective donations can go very far in providing meals not just during the holidays but all year long.

Gray said with regular consistent help from civic groups and organizations those families needing assistance will receive the help they need. He also said the Food Bank’s mission remains the same regardless of the season: providing food to an estimated 41,000 people in the region who are food insecure.

Toni Sawyer, community development and relations director with the Salvation Army of Elizabeth City
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“We want to make sure that persons in need have the opportunity to request help if and when it is needed.”

Hopeline’s Christmas Project brightens holidays for children whose families are in crisis

Agency has been providing gifts to clients’ children for 27 years

Nothing compares to a child’s joy Christmas morning after Santa has left a special present under the tree. Especially when the child’s family is in crisis because of domestic violence.

Carol Patterson, director of residential services at Albemarle Hopeline, has been working to make that special moment a reality for clients of Albemarle Hopeline for nearly three decades.

Patterson has worked for Hopeline — the Elizabeth City-based nonprofit that provides “comprehensive direct and preventive services” to victims of family violence, sexual assault and teen dating violence — for 34 years. She and Hopeline’s former executive director, Pat Youngblood, started the Christmas Project 27 years ago.

Patterson said the Christmas Project benefits current clients of Albemarle Hopeline, and each year between 65 and 125 families are able to receive a brighter Christmas because of it.

“They have been through so much,” said Patterson. “It can bring light into their lives.”

Hopeline clients who wish to participate are asked to fill out a Christmas wish list. Patterson then works to

complete each wish list to a T.

If, for example, a child wants a specific doll, Patterson will not replace it with any doll; she’ll buy the specific doll on the wish list. Also, only new items are purchased.

Patterson said Hopeline wants to make sure “the children get the things they want, the things that are going to make them happy.”

Patterson said clients served by the shelter will often request gift cards for gas, food or practical items like pots and pans or hygiene products.

“We are always in need of gift cards,” she said.

Patterson said teenagers especially like to receive gift cards so they can purchase items like shoes.

“The most pressing need is for teenagers,” she said.

Patterson said businesses, churches, clubs, individuals and families have donated items for children’s wish lists in the past. In fact, people often will fill a child’s wish list.

“We also love monetary donations,” she said.

Hopeline staff will purchase items a client has specified with those funds, Patterson said.

Patterson said she plans the Christmas Project throughout the year, and she starts to receive the wish

Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 16

lists a couple of months before Christmas. Hopeline will continue to fill wish lists through Christmas Day, she said.

After the gifts are purchased, they’re brought to Hopeline where Patterson and other Hopeline staff wrap them.

“We have Santa’s Workshop in the conference room, and we get busy,” she said.

People donating can choose to wrap the presents themselves. If they do, Patterson requests that the “from” tag contain the words, “From: Santa.”

Clients who are not at the shelter can either pick up the presents or if they do not have transportation, Hopeline will deliver them to them.

Some clients have to come to Hopeline’s shelter during the holidays, and if they come to the shelter on Christmas, Patterson wants to be able to provide them with a present.

“We are going to provide for them,” she said.

Clients who are staying in the shelter also will get a special visit from Santa. Patterson said she’s always looking for someone to play Santa each year.

Patterson said she looks forward to bringing joy to her clients at Albemarle during the holidays.

“It is a lot of work, but the gratification is immense,” said Patterson.

But she’s quick to point out that “it’s not Hopeline alone making this happen.”

“If it were not for the community, we could not make this happen,” she said.

Patterson expressed thanks to all the people who have helped make Hopeline’s Christmas Project a reality for the last 27 years.

“We could not do that without them,” said Patterson. “Every one of our families (Albemarle Hopeline clients) gets an extra special Christmas.”

Patterson asks that anyone interested in helping fill a child’s wish list through Hopeline’s Christmas Project contact her first before purchasing anything. That way she can ensure specific items on the list are chosen. She can be reached at 252-338-5338.

Members of the Elizabeth City Chapter of The Links pose for a photo after the chapter donated gifts to Albemarle Hopeline’s annual Christmas Project. The Links sponsored a family helped by the project by providing gift cards. Photo courtesy Albemarle Hopeline
“They have been through so much. It can bring light into their lives.”
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‘Special gifts and a friendly visit’: Agency gears up for Senior Santa Program benefits

homebound seniors without loved ones in area

The Albemarle Commission’s Area Agency on Aging is once again preparing to brighten the holiday season for homebound seniors who do not have loved ones living in the area.

Santa for Seniors was started by the Albemarle Commission’s Area Agency on Aging in 2016 and is coordinated by Ashley Lamb, aging program specialist with the Area Agency on Aging.

“It was created to provide special gifts and a friendly visit to those clients that were typically alone during the Christmas holiday,” said Lamb.

For those that do not have loved ones in the area, Santa for Seniors serves as a reminder that people are still thinking about them.

Seniors who are served through the Albemarle Commission’s Area Agency on Aging’s Meals on Wheels program are eligible as well as “clients from other programs such as congregate nutrition clients, family caregiver support program clients and individuals of long-term care facilities,” Lamb said.

Each year, staff members comb through their client files after the completion of assessments and reassessments and identify clients who do not have loved ones living in the area. Information on each client is gathered in the fall and given to volunteers. The volunteers are then tasked with shopping for gifts that are personal to each client.

Last year, 48 seniors received gifts through Santa for Seniors. The gifts were hand-delivered by the AAA’s staff as well as by the Inner Banks Santa Claus. The AAA received enough donations to provide gift bags to the 500 clients receiving Meals on Wheels.

This year, personalized gifts will be the main focus of the program. Gift bags will also be provided to clients receiving Meals on Wheels. If you would like to donate items for the gift bags, you can do so at any local senior center.

To become a volunteer, members of the community can call 252-404-7088 and “adopt” a homebound senior. Gifts will be accepted at 512 S Church St., Hertford until Dec. 6.

Staff at the Area Agency on Aging wrap gifts at the Albemarle Commission for last year’s Senior Santa program. Photo courtesy Ashley Lamb Inner Banks Santa Claus, who also goes by the name Gary Lico, loads up gifts to deliver to clients of the Senior Santa program. The Albemarle Commission’s Area Agency on Aging hosts the program every year to brighten the holiday season for seniors who do not have loved ones living in the area. Photo courtesy Ashley Lamb
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 20
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Holiday Celebration, Lighted Boat Parade, Hot Cocoa Crawl to get EC in holiday spirit

ECP Parks and Rec Christmas Parade set for Dec. 4

From one-day events to month-long activities, “Christmas in Elizabeth City” offers a wide range of holiday activities for all ages.

The annual Downtown Holiday Celebration and Grand Illumination will kick off Elizabeth City’s holiday festivities on Nov. 25 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Holiday Celebration and Grand Illumination in past years has drawn hundreds of people to the Pasquotank County Courthouse where the switch for the downtown Christmas lights are turned on.

Among the activities scheduled for the event are the Hay-Ride/Sleigh Ride, free hot cocoa and sweets and visits with Santa Claus. Local businesses will also be hosting free activities for children.

“They are all kid-oriented activities,” said Elizabeth City Downtown, Inc. Executive Director Deborah Malenfant. “Some give out free ginger bread and some give out free hot cocoa or apple cider. Everybody does a little bit something different.”

ECDI has purchased $3,000 worth of new Christmas lights to replace old lights and decorate additional trees at Waterfront Park.

“Those trees at waterfront park will look much more festive,” Malenfant said.

Small Business Saturday will be on Nov. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. while First Friday ArtWalk and the annual Lighted Boat Parade will be held Dec. 2. ArtWalk will be from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. while the boat parade will start at 7 p.m.

Visitors for First Friday ArtWalk in December can enjoy artwork, artist demonstrations and live music around downtown Elizabeth City. Santa Claus will also make a visit.

Malenfant said the December ArtWalk is one of ECDI’s biggest in terms of businesses participating and people attending.

“All the businesses will be decorated for Christmas,” Malenfant said. “We will have a wandering Santa.”

In addition to the Dec. 2 ArtWalk, the annual downtown Christmas Window Decorating Contest will be from Nov. 26 to Dec. 31.

The Pasquotank River Yacht Club’s Lighted Boat Parade will be held on the Pasquotank River along the downtown waterfront. The boats will dock at Mariners’ Wharf after the boat parade where the public will judge and then give awards to the top decorated boats, Malenfant said.

The Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Parks and Recreation’s annual Christmas

Parade will be held the next day, Saturday, Dec. 4, at 5:30 p.m., with entries again lining up on Westover Street.

After turning right onto Ehringhaus Street, the parade will proceed to Road Street and turn left, and then right onto Main Street. After passing downtown, the parade will turn right on Water Street and end after passing Waterfront Park.

Also on tap is Visit Elizabeth City’s 2nd annual Hot Cocoa Crawl, which will be from Nov. 25 to Jan. 15. VEC has described the city as the “Hot Cocoa Capital of the World.”

VEC Executive Director Corrina Ruffieux called the event a “massive” effort and that over 30 businesses and organizations had signed up as of Oct. 20.

“That is more than triple in size from last year and that is super exciting,” Ruffieux said.

The community-wide Hot Cocoa Crawl will feature traditional with a twist hot cocoa and chocolate-infused beer and cocktails along with handcrafted cocoa-themed gifts.

“We will have incredibly created chocolate-themed beverages,” Ruffieux said. But it is not all hot-cocoa. We have custom-made candles to knitting projects, and all sorts of things.”

Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 22
The Pasquotank Yacht Club holds its Lighted Boat Parade on the Pasquotank River in Elizabeth City, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021. This year’s parade will be held on the river Friday, Dec. 2.
Left The Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Parks and Recreation’s annual Christmas Parade will be held Saturday, Dec. 4, at 5:30 p.m., with entries again lining up on Westover Street. The Daily Advance 105 BEAU PARKWAY ELIZABETH CITY,NC• 252-335-2596 SYSTEMS NOW AVAILABLE WITH 12 YEAR PARTS & LABOR KEVIN HARRELL “EXCELLENT SERVICE IS OUR GOAL” GEORGE &C OM PA NY HEATING,A IR CONDITIONIN G&E LECTRICAL HIRING FOR SERVICE TECH AND INSTALLERS Office: 252-331-1069 www.albemarlepestsolutions.com Offi 252 331 1069 104 Tarheel Court|Elizabeth City,NC27909 10% Off Any Initial Ser vice Expires 12/15/22 Reference Code -WINTER ALBEMARLE MAGAZINE 1501 W. Ehringhaus St. NEXT TO SEARS (252) 335-PAWN PORTABLE TOILETRENTALS SPECIAL EVENTS WEDDING UNI TS CONSTRUCTION HOLDING TA NKS AGRICULTURE FL US H-AB LE UNITS NOW AVA ILABLE Ben McPherson - Owner 252-339-2142 Erin Meads - Route Manager 252-562-6503 209CharlesStreet,Elizabeth City,NC27909 Of ce (252) 334-1616• Fax(252) 334-8575 Albemar le Rent-A-Jon
Chris Day/The Daily Advance

Breakfast with Santa, Sip and Shop, Kick off to Christmas, Candlelight Tour highlight season in Edenton

Second Kick-Off to Christmas will be at Colonial Park Dec. 3

With the arrival of the holidays, Edenton and Chowan County will feature a cornucopia of festive events to mark the occasion.

Kicking off the season on Saturday, Nov. 19 is Breakfast with Santa. A new Edenton tradition, the fifth annual breakfast will take place from 8 a.m to 11 a.m. at Edenton’s American Legion Post 40.

Besides breakfast, the event will feature professional photos with Santa, Christmas crafts, and Christmas cookies. The event is hosted by the Ladies Auxiliary Club, and tickets are available from Amber Hardy at (252) 312-6154. Tickets are $15 for children (the Santa experience and the food) and $12 for adults (food only).

Just up Virginia Road the same day at 9 a.m. will be the White Oak Elementary School Arts, Crafts and Vendor Fair, an annual event showing off the best and brightest from the community’s creative minds. Money raised from the show goes to benefit the Edenton-Chowan Schools. For those interested in setting up a booth, contact Heather Copeland at hcopeland@ ecps.k12.nc.us or Sarah Ryder at sryder@ ecps.k12.nc.us.

That very same evening, Edenton’s longawaited historic waterfront restaurant

will finally open with a bang as The Herringbone Restaurant invites rock band Red Clay Strays, a country blues band from Alabama, to perform on the main stage at Colonial Park. The festivities will last all day, with the band taking the stage around 7 p.m. that evening. Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

Kicking off December in the usual Christmas spirit will be Destination Downtown Edenton’s Sip and Shop event. Typically held on a chilly evening in late fall, the shopping extravaganza showcases Edenton’s unique and charming downtown district while allowing residents and visitors to tour and browse the wares of merchants on South Broad and neighboring streets. Many of the businesses will offer extended hours for the occasion.

Sip and Shop this year will be held on South Broad Street on Thursday, Dec. 1 and begin around 5 p.m. Businesses’ extended hours will run until 8 p.m.

Just a few days later, on Saturday, Dec. 3, Edenton will host its second annual Kick-Off to Christmas at Colonial Park from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Featuring fun for the kids, food trucks for all, a winter express-themed trolley ride and boat flotilla, last year’s inaugural event drew great crowds. Organizers say this year’s event is already shaping up to be even better.

Perhaps Edenton’s most famous and celebrated Christmas event, drawing visitors from other states, is the Edenton Historical Commission’s

Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 24
Shoppers pour hot apple cider and browse wares at Broad Street Bazaar in Edenton during the Sip & Shop event. This year’s Sip and Shop will be held on South Broad Street on Thursday, Dec. 1 and begin around 5 p.m. Businesses’ extended hours will run until 8 p.m. Tyler Newman/Chowan Herald KAYAK, CANOE &PADDLE BOARD RENTALS AVAILABLE COMPLIMENTARY TWO NIGHT BOAT SLIPS FOR RESERVATIONS: 252-482-2832 •WWW.VISITEDENTON.COM HIGH &CROWE LLP Attorneys at Law Civil and Criminal Litigation •Real Estate Wills and Estates •Personal Injury Corporations •Governmental Affairs William M. Crowe AttorneyatLaw wcrowe@highandcrowe.com W. Hackney High, Jr. AttorneyatLaw whigh@highandcrowe.com 252-482 -4422 303 South Broad Street Edenton NC 27932 christianbookseller@embarqmail.com 252-482-7378 “MoreThanJusta Book Store” 313 SBroad Street, Edenton, NC 27932 252-339-3941 Vin ta ge Furnit ure, Re purposed & Prev io usly Lo ve d It em s 25 Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022

The Edenton Historical Commission’s annual Candlelight Tour will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 9-10, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

annual Candlelight Tour. The year’s tour will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 9-10, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

This year’s Candlelight Tour will feature historic homes east of Broad Street; last year’s tour featured homes west of

downtown. Tour-goers are invited to marvel at the homes’ all-natural holiday decorations that capture Edenton Christmases reminiscent of the 18th and 19th centuries. Horse-drawn carriage rides through the town will be available for those

who want an even more authentic experience. Advance tickets for the Candlelight Tour are $30 and rise to $35 the weekend of the event. Children 12 and younger are admitted free, while groups of 10 or more can take the tour for only $25 per person plus tax. To book a spot in the tour and secure a ticket (good for both days), call the Penelope Barker House Welcome Center at (252) 4827800 or visit www. ehcnc.org.

Courtesy photo
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 26

Turkey Drop, Grand Illumination, parade, Breakfast with Santa highlight Perquimans holiday events

Christmas Craft Fair and 5K run set for Dec. 3 at PCHS

HERTFORD — With the arrival of cooler days and nearly frosty nights, the holiday season in Perquimans County can’t be too far off.

Soon the pumpkins will be pie and the street lights over Church Street in downtown Hertford will be dressed with holiday bows.

While festivities and events and parades highlight the holiday season, needs of community residents not as fortunate also will be at the forefront.

The Open Door of Perquimans County will hold its annual Turkey Drop Thanksgiving Food Collection at Hertford United Methodist Church in November. Donors can drop off frozen turkeys and Thanksgiving meal side items on Friday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Open Door will then distribute the food to families in the community who face food insecurity. Hertford United Methodist Church is located at 200 Dobbs St., Hertford.

Seeds of Success, the community organization that sponsors a number of youth initiatives addressing education, athletics, cultural awareness, self-esteem and life skills, will host a Thanksgiving Meal on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and a Christmas Party on Saturday, Dec. 17, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Downtown Hertford businesses will also be participating in a “Shop Local” event on Nov. 26 by offering special sales.

Then in December, the holiday festivities begin in full force.

On Friday, Dec. 2, Historic Hertford will sponsor Hertford’s Grand Illumination. The event, which includes the turning on of the

town’s downtown Christmas lights at 6 p.m., will also feature curbside festivities, music and entertainment.

The next day, Saturday, Dec. 3, is Hertford’s annual Christmas Parade. Sponsored by the Perquimans County Chamber of Commerce, the parade begins at Perquimans County High School at 2 p.m. and will proceed downtown.

Community organizations are encouraged to participate by entering floats, firetrucks, tractors and marching groups. Of course, Santa Claus is also expected to be on hand.

Another highlight of the holiday season in Perquimans is the Christmas Craft Fair and 5K run at Perquimans High School on Saturday, Dec. 3. Organized by Amy Tinsley of the Dance Company of Hertford, the fair begins at 9 a.m. and will run until 1 p.m. It will offer artisan holiday crafts and a variety of food and activities for the kids. There also will be opportunities to have a photo snapped with Santa before he rides into town in the parade.

The 5K Rhythm Run is also scheduled for Dec. 3 and kicks off at 9 a.m. For more information on the fair or the run, contact Tinsley at 252-312-2595.

The Perquimans County Chamber of Commerce will host its annual members dinner at the Crawfish Shack on Dec. 8, at 6 p.m., according to Perquimans County Chamber of Commerce Director Diane Cangemi.

For those looking to share a bit of Perquimans County history this holiday season, the Perquimans County Restoration Association will host its Colonial Christmas event on Thursday, Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. PCRA will also open its Holiday Gift Shop on Saturdays in November and again on Saturday, Dec. 3 and Dec. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For those looking to have breakfast with Jolly St. Nick, Historic Hertford is sponsoring “Breakfast with Santa“ at 110 West Academy Street on Saturday, Dec. 17. There will be two sessions: from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. and again from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Tickets are $5 for adults and free for children.

The Historic Hertford Building will also be the site of the Albemarle Community Orchestra’s concerts Saturday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3 p.m.

Historic Hertford Inc. will sponsor Hertford’s Grand Illumination on Friday, Dec. 2. The event, which includes the turning on of the town’s downtown Christmas lights at 6 p.m., will also feature curbside festivities, music and entertainment. Photo courtesy Historic Hertford Inc.
27 Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022

Candlelight Tours at Whalehead, Corolla Christmas Village ring in Christmas in Currituck

Camden to hold tree lighting Dec. 1, SM Christmas Parade Dec. 3

BARCO — Currituck County will feature a host of holiday events in November and December, starting with Candlelight Tours of the Whalehead Mansion in Corolla and continuing with the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony and Holiday Parade.

Meanwhile in Camden, the county’s two main holiday events — the annual tree lighting and South Mills Christmas Parade — will be held in early December.

Candlelight tours of the Whalehead mansion will be held every Friday and Saturday from Nov. 25 to Dec. 17. The tours are from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. each Friday and Saturday and the cost is $20 per person. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 252-453-9040.

The Whalehead mansion is decorated in the tradition of the times with greenery, Christmas trees, music, food, fruit, candy and nuts. The tour features a live performance on the original one-of-a-kind Steinway piano along a few traditional Christmas carols.

The 2nd Annual Historic Corolla Christmas Village will be held every Friday and Saturday evening from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. from Nov. 25 to Dec. 24.

The village features holiday lights, floral displays and other holiday sights. Each weekend features food trucks, beverages at The Kind Cup coffee shop

and shopping opportunities at various Corolla Village merchants. The tour is self-guided and free.

The holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony and 29th annual Holiday Parade will be held on Friday, Dec. 2 at the Currituck Center of N.C. Cooperative Extension in Community Park in Barco. Reindeer games — children’s activities and events — will begin at 5:30 p.m. with the tree lighting ceremony at 6:30 p.m. The parade, sponsored by the Currituck County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #89 will begin at 7 p.m.

In Camden, the county’s annual Tree Lighting on the county courthouse green will be Thursday, Dec. 1, at 5:30 p.m.

The South Mills Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual Christmas Parade on Main Street in South Mills, Saturday, Dec. 3 starting at 11 a.m.

For those unable to attend the Currituck tree lighting and parade in person, Cooperative Extension will be livestreaming both on its YouTube channel. Visit: https:// www.youtube.com/c/CurrituckCES, subscribe, and ring the bell so you’ll be notified when the event goes live.

For those interested in participating in the Currituck parade, complete the entry form at https://go.ncsu. edu/29thparadeentryform.

Residents take part in the South Mills Volunteer Fire Department’s annual Christmas Parade in 2019. This year’s parade in South Mills will be Saturday, Dec. 3.
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 28
The Daily Advance
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Extension offers some tips for holiday meal prep, decorating on budget

With the holidays quickly approaching, many families are preparing to celebrate together.

Inflation, however, is putting some families in a tough position. North Carolina Cooperative Extension has some tips on how to celebrate on a budget.

The first thing you need to consider when planning your holiday meal is what you are going to serve. For most holiday meals, meat is served as the main dish.

Unfortunately, your main dish is also going to be your most expensive. While dark meats are usually less expensive, Extension officials recommend lean, low-fat, white meats because they contain fewer fats and less sodium.

If you cannot afford to purchase meat, there are several alternative dishes you can serve such as stews, soups, chowders and bisque.

You are also going to want to choose what kinds of whole grains, vegetables and fruits you are going to serve. To save money on these items, consider buying them in bulk.

Additionally, low-income residents may qualify to participate in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. This program teaches participants how to make healthy meals on a budget and how to improve their health through exercise.

Next, you need to consider who is coming.

Because COVID-19 is still present and both it and the flu have worse outbreaks in the fall and winter, it is recommended that people gather in small groups of less than 20 people

Reducing the number of guests can reduce both your risk of catching COVID-19 and the amount of food you need to purchase. Extension experts recommends making about 1½ meal servings to ensure that no excess food goes to waste. They also recommend that hosts ask guests to bring inexpensive sectional plastic containers to make meals they can take home.

The first thing you need to consider when planning your holiday meal is what you are going to serve. For most holiday meals, meat is served as the main dish. Unfortunately, your main dish is also going to be your most expensive. While dark meats are usually less expensive, Cooperative Extension officials recommend lean, low-fat, white meats because they contain fewer fats and less sodium.

If you cannot afford to purchase meat for your holiday meal this year, there are several alternative dishes you can serve such as stews, soups, chowders and bisques.

If you do choose to participate in a large gathering, Albemarle Regional Health Services recommends you practice preventative and safety measures.

Prior to attending a large gathering, it is recommended that you get vaccinated for COVID-19 and the flu, have unvaccinated guests wear face masks and practice social distancing. You also should wear a mask if you live somewhere where there are high levels of COVID-19 transmission, and participate in activities that involve increased respiratory effort outdoors.

ARHS also recommends that people practice typical health precautions such as avoiding being close to ill people, washing your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, and disinfecting objects that are touched frequently. Additional information can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/ infographic/holiday-health.htm.

Finally, you must consider how you are going to decorate. There are several decorations you can make using relatively inexpensive items that can be found around the house. Pom-pom garlands can be made with yarn, string, scrap wood and a pair of scissors.

Need some tabletop decorations? You can make small paper trees using green cardstock, a small wood dowel, and scissors.

Photos courtesy NC Cooperative Extension
www.agr.state.ne.us www.facebook.com/della.hicks.313 www.hgtv.com/lifestyle/holidays/20-ways-todecorate-for-the-holidays-on-a-budget-pictures ON HOLIDAY MEAL PREPARATION ON HOLIDAY DECORATING AT HOME FOR MORE TIPS: Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 30
www.ncefnep.org

Holiday Calendar

NOVEMBER EVENTS

Holiday Gift Shop

The Perquimans County Restoration Association is opening its Holiday Gift Shop on Saturdays in November. It also will be open on Saturday, Dec. 3 and Dec. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

All Wrapped Up

The EDGE Class at Berea Baptist Church will host its annual craft and vendor show Saturday, Nov. 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Open Door Turkey Drop

The Open Door of Perquimans County will hold its annual Turkey Drop Thanksgiving Food Collection at Hertford United Methodist Church on Friday, Nov. 18 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 19 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donors can drop off frozen turkeys and Thanksgiving meal side items at the church located at 200 Dobbs St., Hertford.

Seeds of Success

Seeds of Success, the community organization that sponsors a number of youth initiatives in Perquimans County, will host a Thanksgiving Meal on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Arts, Crafts, Vendor Fair

White Oak Elementary School will host its Arts, Crafts and Vendor Fair on Saturday, Nov. 19, at 9 a.m. Money raised from the show goes to benefit the Edenton-Chowan Schools.

Designers Workshop

Museum of the Albemarle will host a Designer Workshop for participants to create no-sew quilted Christmas ornaments Saturday, Nov. 19, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. Cost is $25 for Friends of the Museum members, $30 for non-members. Registration forms are available in the lobby of the museum and on its Facebook page and website. Contact: 252-331-4054.

Breakfast with Santa

The Ladies Auxiliary Club will host its fifth annual Breakfast With Santa at the post at American Legion Post 40 at 1317 W. Queen St., Edenton, Saturday, Nov. 19, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Besides breakfast, the event will feature professional photos with Santa. Tickets are $15 for children and $12 for adults. Contact: Amber Hardy at (252) 312-6154.

Visit Elizabeth City will sponsor its 2nd annual Hot Cocoa Crawl from Friday, Nov. 25 to Sunday, Jan. 15. More than 30 businesses and organizations will participate in the event which will feature offerings of traditional hot cocoa with a twist.

Photo courtesy Visit Elizabeth City

Volanda Watts meal

The Volanda Watts Thanksgiving Dinner hosted by Victory Praise & Worship Center will be held at the former National Guard Armory at 600 Westover St., Elizabeth City, Thursday, Nov. 24, at 11 a.m. The meal is free to anyone who attends.

31 Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022

Small Business Saturday

Local businesses across the region will be taking part in Small Business Saturday, offering holiday sales and other activities, Saturday, Nov. 26. Hours in downtown Elizabeth City will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Turkey Trot

A 5K and one-mile Family Fun Run will start from Waterfront Park Saturday, Nov. 26, at 8 a.m.

Window decorating contest

Businesses in downtown Elizabeth City will be participating in the annual Christmas Window Decorating Contest from Friday, Nov. 26 to Saturday, Dec. 31.

Waterfront Market

A Downtown Waterfront Market will be held at Mariners’ Wharf Park Friday, Nov. 26, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Whalehead Candlelight Tours

Candlelight tours of the Whalehead mansion in Corolla will be held every Friday and Saturday from Nov. 25 to Dec. 17. Tours are from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. and cost $20. To make a required reservation, call 252-453-9040.

Corolla Christmas Village

The 2nd Annual Historic Corolla Christmas Village will be held every Friday and Saturday evening from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. from Nov. 25 to Dec. 24. The event features holiday lights, food trucks, shopping opportunities.

Holiday Celebration

Elizabeth City Downtown Inc. will host its Downtown Holiday Celebration and Grand Illumination Friday, Nov. 25 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Activities will include turning on the downtown Christmas lights, a hayride/sleigh ride, free hot cocoa and visits with Santa Claus.

Hot Cocoa Crawl

Visit Elizabeth City will sponsor its 2nd annual Hot Cocoa Crawl from Friday, Nov. 25 to Sunday, Jan. 15. More than 30 businesses and organizations will participate in the event which will feature offerings of traditional hot cocoa with a twist.

Photos with Santa

Port Discover will host a Pictures with Santa event at 611 East Main St., Elizabeth City, Friday, Nov. 25, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Local businesses across the region will be taking part in Small Business Saturday, offering holiday sales and other activities, Saturday, Nov. 26. Hours in downtown Elizabeth City will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Daily Advance

The EDGE Class at Berea Baptist Church will host its annual craft and vendor show Saturday, Nov. 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 32
Chris Day/The Daily Advance

DECEMBER EVENTS

Camden tree lighting

Camden County will host its annual Tree Lighting ceremony on the county courthouse green Thursday, Dec. 1, at 5:30 p.m.

Edenton Sip and Shop

Destination Downtown Edenton will host its Sip and Shop event on South Broad Street on Thursday, Dec. 1 at 5 p.m. Businesses will offer extended hours for holiday shoppers to 8 p.m.

Gingerbread Workshop

Museum of the Albemarle will host its annual Gingerbread Workshop, Friday, Dec. 2, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Participants will make a gingerbread house from candies, cookies, cereals and other goodies. Cost is $25 for members of Friends of the Museum, $30 for non-members. Register at 252-335-4054.

HH Grand Illumination

Historic Hertford will sponsor Hertford’s Grand Illumination Friday, Dec. 2 at 6 p.m. The event will include the turning on of the town’s downtown Christmas lights.

Currituck tree lighting, parade

Currituck County’s annual holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony and 29th annual Holiday Parade will be held Friday, Dec. 2 at the Currituck Center of N.C. Cooperative Extension in Community Park in Barco. Children’s games will begin at 5:30 p.m. and the tree lighting ceremony follows at 6:30 p.m. The parade, sponsored by the Currituck County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #89, begins at 7 p.m.

ArtWalk/Lighted Boat

Parade

The Pasquotank River Yacht Club will host its Lighted Boat Parade on the Pasquotank River along the downtown waterfront Friday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m. The boats will dock at Mariners’ Wharf after the boat parade for public judging. Awards will be presented to the top decorated boats. The parade will follow the monthly downtown First Friday ArtWalk from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Kick-Off to Christmas

Edenton’s second annual Kick-Off to Christmas event will be held at Colonial Park Saturday, Dec. 3, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Event will feature kids activities, food and winter express-themed trolley ride and boat flotilla.

Hertford Christmas Parade

The Perquimans Chamber of Commerce will sponsor Hertford’s annual Christmas Parade

Saturday, Dec. 3, at 2 p.m. The parade begins at Perquimans County High School at 2 p.m. and will proceed downtown.

South Mills parade

The South Mills Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual Christmas Parade on Main Street in South Mills, Saturday, Dec. 3 starting at 11 a.m.

EC Christmas Parade

The Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Parks and Recreation’s annual Christmas Parade will be held Saturday, Dec. 3, at 5:30 p.m. The parade will begin on Westover Street, turn right onto Ehringhaus Street, proceed to Road Street and turn left, and then right onto Main Street. After passing downtown, the parade will turn right on Water Street and end after passing Waterfront Park.

Craft Fair and 5K

A Christmas Craft Fair and 5K run organized by the Dance Company of Hertford will be held at Perquimans High School on Saturday, Dec. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Event will feature artisan holiday crafts, food and kids activities. The 5K Rhythm Run kicks off at 9 a.m. Contact: 252-312-2595.

Museum open house

Museum of the Albemarle will host its Holiday Open House Saturday, Dec. 3, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The theme for the event will be a “Back to 1970s Christmas.”

26 to Saturday, Dec. 31.

The Daily Advance

Businesses in downtown Elizabeth City will be participating in the annual Christmas Window Decorating Contest from Friday, Nov.
33 Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022

Candlelight Tour

The Edenton Historical Commission’s annual Candlelight Tour will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 9-10, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The tour will feature historic homes east of Broad Street in Edenton. Horse-drawn carriage rides will be available. Advance tickets are $30 but increase $35 the weekend of the event. Contact: (252) 482-7800 or visit www.ehcnc.org.

PCAR Colonial Christmas

The Perquimans County Restoration Association will host its Colonial Christmas event on Thursday, Dec. 15, from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sinnett Trio at AoA

Arts of the Albemarle will host the Jae Sinnett Trio for a “Christmas Jazz” concert, Friday, Dec. 16, in the Maguire Theater. The time and cost were not available at presstime.

Breakfast with Santa

Historic Hertford will sponsor its “Breakfast with Santa“ event at 110 West Academy St., Hertford, on Saturday, Dec. 17. There will be two sessions: from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. and again from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Tickets are $5 for adults and free for children.

Community Orchestra

The Albemarle Community Orchestra will perform holiday concerts at the Historic Hertford Building Saturday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3 p.m.

Camden County will host its annual Tree Lighting ceremony on the county courthouse green Thursday, Dec. 1, at 5:30 p.m.

Albemarle Magazine Winter 2022 34
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