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Editor's l l e v i c w Greetings. . . We usually don't like to make comments about the journal (preferring to let you judge for yourself), but we must acknowledge the many positive comments received on the contents of our last issue. We feel that it was a good issue, not because of any efforts on behalf of the staff, but rather due to the outstanding contributions submitted from Brothers around the country. These submissions allowed us to portray a true - and very positive - look at the continuing influence of our Fraternity on the important issues facing our people. I would like to again thank our contributors for their outstanding work in this regard. We can all be proud that Alpha is still "Number # 1 " . . . On the flip side, let me also address those questions raised about the size of our last issue. It was indeed smaller than most - solely due to budgetary restraints. In our effort to control costs several features originally slated were not published. However, I might not that, due to the increased allocation authorized in the budget at the last convention, we should be able to avoid this situation in 1980. . . Heading our list of features for this issue is our cover story spotlighting Brother LIONEL H. NEWSOM. This dynamic Alpha Brother was presented the Alpha Award of Merit (the Fraternity's highest honor for a member) in 1979 for his past contributions as General President and other works, and for his continued interest in and labors for the good of the Fraternity. My thanks to Mrs. Cora Hawkins of the Office of the President, Central State University, for assistance in preparing the story contained herein. A note of sadness surrounds our Legacy feature on Brother JOHN M. ELLISON. Brother THOMAS D. PAWLEY, III brought the story of this incredible educator to our attention during the summer of 1979 and, due to previous commitments for publication, the material was slated for this issue. Brother Ellison entered Omega Chapter in October of 1979, but we are pleased to present his story as a tribute to a man who dedicated nearly all of his ninety years of life to improving the educational status of his people.. . Viewpoint presents a frank and informative look at the problem facing predominately Black colleges in the field of computer technology. Brother JESSE J. MAYES, a recognized expert in the field, convincingly asserts that adequate computer facilities are absolutely necessary to support a first-class education in this increasingly technological age. .. Thanks are also extended to Brother CLARENCE FRAZIER of Delta Gamma Lambda Chapter in Cincinnati, Ohio for our Focus article on City Health Commissioner STANLEY BROADNAX and to Brother RICHARD WILLIAMS of Delta Chi Lambda Chapter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the story on Brother QUINN BUCKNER of the Milwaukee Bucks for Alpha Athletes. . . A special note to Brothere AL LEE, College Scene Editor, for always meeting his deadline and for not screaming when his last article was cut due to reasons mentioned above. Incidentally, if all of our contributors would meet the deadlines like Brother Lee we could really roll the presses. The author of our story on the MidWinter Leadership Conference must remain nameless. He claims that his name appears too often in these pages. But, we thank this Brother anyway and encourage him to keep up the good work. . . Our next issue (Summer 1980) will be dedicated to the College Brothers, as we present our Third Annual Distinguished Collegians feature. We're confident that this will be our best feature yet (applications have been submitted in record numbers) and we think you will be proud of the calibre of young men preparing themselves to take over the mantle of leadership in Alpha Phi Alpha and the nation. . . SPHINX DEADLINES: Hold Your Materials - By the time you receive this issue, the deadline for the final issue before the convention (Summer 1980) will have passed. The next deadline will be September 1,1980 - for materials to be covered in the Fall 1 980 edition. Subsequent deadlines will be as follows: November 1,1980 - Winter 1 980; January 1,1981 - Spring 1981 and March 1 - Summer 1981. . . Until next issue. . .MJP.

on Hie ilruwimi board • Distinguished Collegians -1980 • The Quest for Excellence • Onward and Upward


OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC. MICHAEL J. PRICE, Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors THOMAS G. ALLSTON, III

BRADFORD H. SPENCER

JULIUS HALL

6 — LIONEL H. NEWSOM — A personal perspective (and more) on Alpha's 22nd General President and the 1979 recipient of the Fraternity's highest award. . . 10 — ROLL-CALL— The Million Dollar Fund Drive presents a progress report and salutes those Brothers who have led the way in this historic effort. 14 — LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE '80 — A review of the Mid-Winter Leadership Conference in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. . . 16 — THE CANDIDATES — Two distinguished Alpha men vie for the General Presidency. . . 20 — COLLEGE SCENE — Brother Al Lee pens his final article as a College Brother. . . 21 — FOCUS — Cincinnati picks a native son, Brother Stanley Broadnax, as its City Health Commissioner. . . 22 — VIEWPOINT — Brother Jesse Mayes explains the crucial role of computer facilities in the educational process - and warns against entering the '80's using outmoded methods. . . 24 — LEGACY Brother John Ellison, a trailblazer in the education of the race in Virginia. . . DEPARTMENTS 2 3 4 9 25 30 47 49 50

— — — — — — — — —

The General President Speaks The Executive Secretary's Desk There Goes An Alpha Man Alpha Workshop Alphas On The Move Chapter News Omega Chapter Directory ot Officers Chapter Directory

Contributing Editors JAMES B. BLANTON

HENRY PONDER

Alpha Workshop

Educational News

AL LEE College Scene ELMER C. COLLINS Life Membership

LAURENCE T. YOUNG, SR. Omega Chapter JAMES R. WILLIAMS Ex Officio

The Sphinx (USPS 510-440) The Sphinx is the ptficial magazine of Ihe Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.. 4432 Dr Martin Luther King Dr . Chicago, IL 60653 Published four times a year: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter Send all editorial mail and change of address (send both addresses) to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 4432 Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, Chicago. IL 60653. Manuscripts or art submitted to The Sphinx should be accompanied by addressed envelopes and return postage. Editor assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts or art. Opinions expressed in columns and articles do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.. and use of any person's name in fiction, semi-fiction articles or humorous features is to be regarded as a coincidence and not as the responsibility of The Sphinx. It is never done knowingly. Copyright 1 976 by The Sphinx, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Reproduction or use. without written permission, of the editorial or pictorial content in any manner is prohibited. The Sphinx has been published continuously since 1914 Organizing Editor: Bro Raymond W Cannon. Organizing General President: Bro. Henry Lake Dickason. Second class postage paid at Chicago, IL. Postmaster: Send form 3579 and all correspondence: 4432 Dr. Martin Luther King Dr.. Chicago. IL 60653.


ran ©ME1M MEiHIffllF §JI>SM§,,0. Leadership Conference '80 The Mid-Winter Leadership Conference, held in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, was an inspiring and productive session. All who attended can agree that the program was a success in terms of achieving our goals. We chose to meet in Jamaica, A Blackgoverned land, to symbolize Alpha's interest in and identification with the Third World. In addition, we»were afforded a genuine welcome by the Jamaican government — including the greatly reduced airfares and hotel costs which made the trip practical from a fiscal standpoint. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Prime Minister Michael Manley for his gracious hospitality during our stay and a special note of thanks is due Brother Ralph Wynn, Manager of Groups and Conventions of the Jamaica Tourist Board, for his untiring efforts in making our stay memorable. I must also thank Brother Andrew Young for joining us for the entire conference. Brother Young shared with all present his expert insights on Third World concerns and led the entire delegation, officers and members alike, in thoughtful and rewarding discussions regarding our role as Black Americans in shaping this country's policies. As I watched our College Brothers engage Brother Young in conversation throughout our meeting, it became clear that this is the type of opportunity that only membership in Alpha Phi Alpha can provide. Because of experiences of this type, Alpha has been able to inspire and mold new leaders and Alpha men have always been prepared to answer the call for leadership — in our churches, our schools and our communities — over the past 74 years. The Leadership Conference also included the regularly scheduled mid-winter meeting of the Board of Directors. Actions taken at that meeting included the adoption of a staff Personnel Manual; sustaining the suspension of two chapters for illegal initiations; approving the employment of a parttime bookkeeper in the General Office; authorizing a housing consultant to make application for a federally-subsidized housing complex in Chicago; and concurring with a proposal to publish in The Sphinx the names and chapters of new initiates. Several of these actions will be discussed further in this article. Million Dollar Fund Drive As the General Convention rapidly approaches, preparations are being made for the completion of our Fraternity's commitment to raise One Million Dollars for the benefit of the United Negro College Fund, the NAACP and the National Urban League. Contributions to the drive are continuing to increase - and we expect more. The campaign committee is now preparing to give 2

Headlines like "Death on Fraternity Row" and "Student asks $20.4 million for injuries" have placed all fraternal organizations in jeopardy. Without a well-defined and uniform pledge system, we can be vunerable - as an organization - for the rash acts of any one of our thousands of members. Brothers, the time for nonsense has past and I am proud that Alpha Phi Alpha is moving forward to require of all chapters and members the type of responsibility which most of us already adhere to. I would like to applaud each of our Regional Vice Presidents for acting swiftly and forcefully against those who have violated the spirit and letter of Alpha's principles during the past year. Future violations will be met in like manner.

appropriate recognition and honor those Fraternity members who have contributed to this effort. A special Recognition Program is being planned for our General Convention in Chicago and designs are underway for preparation of a permanent scroll to contain the names of all who make this drive a success. In addition, this issue of The Sphinx lists all who have pledged over $250 and our next issue will highlight those who have pledgedand the amounts paid. Brothers, ROLL CALL is beginning! We have reached a remarkable level with the support of only a segment of our membership. With your contribution, we will succeed. Certainly, no Alpha man will step forward to share in the glory of this great drive - unless he has done his fair share in making the commitment a reality. Model Pledge Program The Standing Orders - outlining the membership process and the Model Pledge Program - are moving toward final adoption at the 1980 General Convention. The document has been revised after recommendations from the 1979 General Convention, with the additional input of Brother Norman Towels, Chairman of the Commission on College Brothers Affairs, and a representative of the Southern Assistant Vice President. Copies of the revised document have been forwarded to all chapters and forums have been held at each of the five Regional Conventions to familiarize Brothers with this program. In addition, each of the regions have recommended final adoption to the General Convention -and most enforced the plan during the past year.

National Headquarters In accordance with my commitment at the 1979 General Convention, notice has been sent that any chapter interested in developing a plan for the relocation of the General Office should forward said proposal to the Executive Secretary by July 1, 1980. Information to be included in proposals in outlined in the memorandum and additional copies of same are available, upon request, from the General Office. I want to make it clear that I personally do not consider the issue of relocation out of the City of Chicago an issue of major import. The primary consideration is the acquisition of a "first-class" headquarters facility. The Board of Directors, at its January meeting, took action to develop several alternatives toward a long-range headquarters plan. These included making application to build a senior citizens complex on the present site of the General Office. The Alpha Phi Alpha Building Foundation, Inc. is proceeding with this application which, if successful, will provide several opportunities, including - 1) using part of the complex as a headquarters facility, and 2) recouping the Fraternity's investment in the present real estate to provide a basis for relocation. Both alternatives appear viable and further plans are being developed. A full report will be given at the 1980 General Convention.

Fraternally,

/ /

JAMES R. WILLIAMS General President

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


M l i%HOT 1WIE il©!E3gf^Wi MEil It's never too late to start planning to attend the annual GENERAL CONVENTION — which this year will be held in Chicago, Illinois, August 1-7, 1 9 8 0 , at the Palmer House. Delegates For proper representation, it is imperative that every chapter make sure it has a delegate or delegates at the convention this year; there are several very important issues which will be discussed and decided upon. True, these issues will be discussed at the Regional Conventions but their final implementation will be taken up at the General Convention, namely: the Model Pledge Program and the Standing Orders; several important Constitutional Amendments; and, the National Headquarters Location proposals. The "delegate strength" will be determined for each chapter by the total number of active members it has on record in the national Office as of May 1 , 1 9 8 0 . Delegate Credential forms and Chapter Directory forms for 1 9 8 0 - 1 9 8 1 will be mailed to each chapter — to be returned promptly to the National Office. Failure to return either form can and will cause difficulty in certifying your delegates and the chapter receiving its mail. The credential form this year will again be in two colors: a yellow copy (to be returned to the General Office with thie chapter seal imprinted thereon) and a white copy (that should be retained by the chapter and presented to the Rules and Credentials Committee on arrival at the convention site). Both forms should be signed by both the chapter president and secretary and contain the passcard or Life Member number of each delegate that is listed. Please refer to the table on the back of the white copy as to the number of delegates apportioned to your chapter. (Article II - Section 4, Constitution and By-Laws, Revised 1979.) If your chapter does not have a seal, you may purchase one by contacting the National Office. Awards With regard to the criteria for individual and chapter awards for regional and national competitions, please refer to the Alpha Workshop of the Winter 1 9 7 9 issue of the Sphinx. If you follow the basic guidelines therein outlined and succeed in winning in your region, then you will have no The Sphinx / Spring 1980

problem meeting the national award requirements for the same area(s) of competition. However, please contact your regional awards chairman for possibly any further regional requirements to be met. Advance (Early-Bird) Registration Once again, for your convenience, an all-in-one Pre-Registration form has been provided in the 1 9 8 0 Convention brochure. This form will be mailed to the entire membership during f i e month of April — and copies will be available at the Regional Conventions. You would be well-advised to take advantage of the early-bird registration, which is lower than the on-site registration. Also, please be aware that the Deadline for early-bird registration is July 1,1980. In order to qualify for this rate, the forms must be in this office on July 1st. All Hotel reservations must be made through the General Office of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and reservations will be made ONLY FOR R E G I S T E R E D B R O T H E R S AND THEIR GUESTS. The entire form should be forwarded with all monies to the General Office at: 4 4 3 2 S. King Drive, Chicago, IL 6 0 6 5 3 . PREREGISTRATION . . . will allow you to spend less time at the registration and more time enjoying the "Windy City." Convention kits, activity tickets, and c o n v e n t i o n i n f o r m a t i o n will be prepared in advance for pre-registrants — and await their arrival at the Palmer

House. (Please indicate if you are a delegate or an alternate so that your badge can be made up properly.) ALL BANQUET SEATING WILL BE ON A "FIRST COME FIRST SERVED" BASIS — AND SEATS WILL BE PREASSIGNED AT THE TIME OF REGISTRATION. In order for group seating to be accomplished, all must register at the same time. Brothers must also purchase EXTRA BANQUET TICKETS at the same time he is registering himself, in order for them to be seated at the same table. Failure to follow these directions will cause Brothers and guests to be separated if tickets are purchased on site. Please note — THE WOMEN'S REGISTRATION DOES NOT INCLUDE THE BANQUET TICKET. College Brothers . . . are also urged to take advantage of the "Weekend Rate" that has been established especially for them. In order to take advantage of this rate, the same rules must be followed as above for regular registration. POST CONVENTION TOUR . . . Following the convention this year the Post Convention Tour is scheduled to go to Jamaica. Information on the tour will be mailed to the membership by the Jamaica Tourist Board and should be received well in advance of the convention. MAKE YOUR PLANS NOW AND REGISTER EARLY TO BE IN ATTENDANCE AT THE NATIONAL CONVENTION IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. BALLOTS FOR THE ELECTION OF THE GENERAL PRESIDENT will be mailed out by April 21st — and SHOULD BE RETURNED TO ARRIVE IN CHICAGO NO LATER THAN Saturday, AUGUST 2, 1 9 8 0 — inasmuch as the ballots will be picked up by the Election Committee for counting on August 3rd and the Post Office Box closed; any ballots not in the box at that time will be considered "void." DO NOT MAIL BALLOTS TO THE GENERAL OFFICE — simply insert it in the self-addressed envelope provided and the ballot will go to the Post Office Box indicated thereon. Fraternally,

James B. Blanton Executive Secretary 3


there goes alpha man

THERE GOES AN ALPHA MAN There goes a man of high impulse Of princely mien and grace There goes a man of humble faith A credit to his race There goes a man of conscience vast with will to reach his goal There goes a man of lordly rank Of heroes' stock and soul— There goes a man of noble caste Whom hardship cannot break There goes a man in merit clad Whom duty won't forsake There goes a man in cultured verse Who holds a sportsman's creed There goes a man too vigilant To bow to lust or greed There goes a man whose life is spent in service not in scorn There goes a man whose majesty Shines like a May time

There goes a man who is a friend To love and duty truth There goes a man to help uplift The lives of wholesome youth There goes a man with industry and faith at his command. There goes the best man in and out For he is an Alpha Man. 4

From College Brother of the Year to City Councilman . . . Brother Michael Hightower.

Brother MICHAEL HIGHTOWER On September 29, 1979, Brother MICHAEL HIGHTOWER was elected to the City Council of College Park, Georgia. He began his campaign for this office on August 20, 1979 — less than two weeks after he was named the recipient of the Stenson E. Broaddus Award for the Outstanding College Brother of the Year at the Alpha Phi Alpha General Convention in Washington, DC. The election of Brother Hightower, a 1979 graduate of Clark College in Atlanta, makes him the youngest person — and the first Black — ever to serve as a City Councilman in College Park. Brother Hightower, a College Park native, was a music major at Clark and he served on the university's Board of Trustees (elected by the student body) during his senior year. Active with the marching, concert and jazz bands, he served as President of the Band for 1978-79. Also, while in school, he was frequently named to the Honor Roll and Dean's List and he was selected for membership in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Michael was the recipient of the Alfred J. Turk Award, the Wayman Carter Award and the Clark College Band Award. He was also President of Alpha Phi Chapter. These honors reflect not only his dedication to academic life but his outstanding volunteer work with service institutions in the community, such as orphanages and convalescence homes. It is this

commitment to community service that he brings as a prime qualification for his new position. College Park is ten miles south of Atlanta, near the famed Hartsfield International Airport. The city's population is around 30,000, with a minority community comprising about 3 7 % of that total. Brother Hightower defeated his opponent (a white male in his 50's) by better than a 3-to-1 margin in the race to represent the city's predominately Black 2nd Ward. College Park is a vibrant part of the metropolitan Atlanta area. The city is rapidly expanding and bringing new and important benefits to its citizens, with the expansion of the Hartsfield Airport and the proposed MARTA (rapid rail system) station and other developments. As the city's sole minority legislator, Brother Hightower will represent the entire Black community in formulating these plans. Councilman Hightower was sworn in on November 1, 1979, and had his first council meeting on November 5th. He is presently serving a two-year term and definitely plans to run for reelection at the conclusion of his first term. Brother Hightower is employed full time by Georgia State University as Administrative Coordinator of the school's CETA program. He is an active member of Eta Lambda in Atlanta and (as the Brothers of Clark College put it) he will always remain a member of Alpha Phi Chapter at Clark. The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Brother LEVAN GORDON Brother LEVAN GORDON, who has served as a Municipal Court judge in Philadelphia since 1974, was elected to the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia in the November, 1979, municipal election. Judge Gordon bucked his party last without the Democratic City Committee's endorsement. This was something that had never been done in a judicial race in the history of Philadelphia politics. Judge Gordon, the only Black candidate to win a judicial post in the election, is a 1958 graduate of Lincoln University, and received his law degree from Howard University School of Law in 1 9 6 1 . He is former counsel to the Philadelphia Human Relations Commission and Executive Director of the Philadelphia Housing Information Service. Brother Gordon is active in civic and church affairs, and is an active member of Zeta Omicron Lambda Chapter in Philadelphia. He is married to the former Vivian J. Goode, and has one child, Shari-lyn Lisa. The Sphinx / Spring 1980

Brother FELIX L. GOODWIN A member of Eta Psi Lambda Chapter in Tucson, he serves as Director for Arizona, Nevada and Utah. He was Vice Chairman of the Arizona Bicentennial Commission and is active in Kiwanis International, the National Urban League, the Arizona Boys Ranch, Tucson YMCA Board of Directors and Una Noche Plateada, an inter-racial Brother Goodwin entered the field of and inter-cultural organization in Tuceducation in 1969. He is a retired son. A member of Phi Delta Kappa, regular Army Lieutenant Colonel, Beta Gamma Sigma (honorary having spent 30 years in the U. S. Arbusiness Administration), and Alpha my (1939-1969). He is the holder of a Delta Delta (public administration Bachelors degree in Military Science honorary), Brother G o o d w i n was from the University of Maryland, a honored in 1975 for his outstanding Masters d e g r e e in Public Adwork was Chairman of the Pima County ministration and an Education Personnel Commission. In this role he Specialist degree from the University was responsible for preparing the merit of Arizona. rules for all county employees and for preparing an affirmative action plan for Brother Goodwin received his docPima County. torate in the face of tremendous perOn the national level, Brother Goodsonal obstacles. While pursuing his win currently serves as a member of degree requirements, he suffered two the Committee on Standards and heart attacks and survived three canExtension. He and his wife, Esther, are cer operations. However, he perthe parents of three daughters and are severed through the years and has residents of Tucson. been active with Alpha and in the comBrother FELIX L. GOODWIN, Assistant to the President of the University of Arizona, was recently conferred the Doctor of Education d e g r e e in Educational Administration from that institution. This accomplishment marks of high-point of Brother Goodwin's second career.

munity. 5


LIONEL HODGE

NEWSOM A Personal Perspective By Michael J. Price

In 1979, Lionel H. Newsom joined the select group honored with Alpha 's highest award. No one deserved it more. 6

As a December 1968 initiate, 1 was among the last of those receiving a shingle bearing the signature of LIONEL H. NEWSOM as General President. 1 cannot really remember the occasion which afforded me the initial opportunity to hear him speak. Perhaps that's because his ' ' presence'' had such an impact upon my thinking about and involvement with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. When I saw Brother Newsom he struck me as a commanding personality - tall and stately like the legendary African kings whom in the late ' 6 0 ' s we were fond of reading about in great detail (some of which was obviously fictional). He began his address - and he hammered away at the need for excellence! I, in turn, was ecstatic. These were indeed the words I wanted to hear. Was I not an aspiring philosopher - determined to prove to the world that the Black could enter and function in that inner sanctum of academia which proclaimed the love of knowledge the ultimate in mortal existence? Was this man, a Black college president, a Ph.D. (no less), a leader of Alpha Phi Alpha, not in the tradition of Alpha thinkers like DuBois and Robeson; was this not the path that I longed to follow and was preparing for? Affirmative, I silently answered and returned my attention to the speaker. It was not a pleasant trip. Dr. Newsom was warning against a new wave of Fraternity members who were partying too much! Could he be speaking of me? He lashed out against those who would substitute mediocrity for the highest! My God, I had casually dismissed the magna and the summa - but wasn't the cum laude enough? Yet the unkindest cut was still to come. This leader of the Sons of Ethiopia sternly warned that our headlong rush to acquire the symbols of Africana could never supplant the proper usage of the language, a thorough and grueling education, the demeanor of civility. If our cultural immersion diverted attention and time from these things, he asserted, it was bad for us and for our people. Stunned was at least one of my reactions. Hurt, maybe; furious to be sure. Abandon my dashiki, my afro, my venacular of liberation NEVER! I was, at least in my eyes, a thinking man. My cause was just and right. Lionel H. Newsom made my " t e n most w a n t e d " listed, as I branded him a leader of the old guard. I assured myself that he was still operating under a slave mentality and my job was to overthrow him and those like him. To that extent, Dr. Newsom's address was a keystone in my continued activity within the Fraternity. For, you see, 1 had to prove that the ideology and methods of my generation would work; moreover, that they were superior. This mandated my active participation in the Fraternity to the widest extent possible. It was a task I undertook with relish. I tried to drown in Alpha history. I never missed an opportunity to hear Dr. Newsom, furiously (and sometimes futilely) composing counterarguments as I listened. I was really very good, Continued on Page 7

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


until he threw me a curve. Again the circumstances completely escape me. But somewhere I heard Brother Newsom speak of Paul Robeson. Incredibly, he said everything that I felt about this giant of a man. Indeed, he said it better than I could conceivably have done - and he said more. This time my reaction was clear - I felt betrayed and, again, turious. Robeson was my hero. Robeson was a radical. Robeson was. . . Something was wrong. Certainly Robeson was on my side. Reluctantly, I had to admit that my knowledge of the man didn't readily provide me with the proof that I needed. Yet, confident in my stand, I strategically retreated to bolster my defenses. And what did I find in the life and works of Paul Robeson to arm me in my battle against Lionel Newsom (mind you, this battle was only fought in my mind). I found a wealth of information - all of it supporting the stands of Brother Newsom. Robeson showed me that there were many points of agreement between my ideals and those of

Brother Newsom. Moreover, at points of divergence, he demonstrated the wisdom of Dr. Newsom's words. Robeson was Phi Beta Kappa. He earned it and fought for it, even though there were lesser honors which one could feel pride in attaining. Robeson's 15 varsity letters and AllAmertcan status were literally paid for in blood, though no one would have been ashamed had he not risked his life in that arena. Most importantly, the life of Paul Robeson demonstrates an ideal balance of values spiritual, scholastic and artistic. Yes, he was the first concert artist to sing programs consisting entirely of Negro Spirituals; but he was also the greatest interpreter of the Othello of William Shakespeare. Robeson did indeed champion African culture and learn African languages at a bleak period in our history; yet we dare not forget that he mastered the languages of more than 20 nations in speech and in song. The message of Paul Robeson, and Lionel Newsom, became clear. Scholarship

and freedom are inseparable. To diminish one is to inevitably retard the other. From my perspective, this is the message that Brother Lionel Newsom has continued to place before us, with a conviction based on the confidence gained only through knowledge. It even appears that it is the strength of those convictions, rather than his message, which is too often unsettling to those of us who would rather march to a less demanding beat. Even now, I constantly grapple with the proposition that it is possible to liberalize or be less stringent and still maintain high standards and reach lofty goals. I have even deluded myself into believing that I can experiment in this manner comfortably, because the Lionel Newsoms of Alpha will tow the line; and that I will be ready and willing to assume that strict posture when the time arises. But I can hear the words of Brother Newsom when he reads this: ' 'There can be no compromise from the pursuit of excellence. The time is n o w ! " What's more, he will be right.

A(DA(DA0A(DA(DA(DA(DA0A0A An Alpha Man .

Born in Wichita Falls, Texas, Brother LIONEL HODGE NEWSOM was reared in St. Louis, Missouri. He and his wife, Maxine Emerson Newsom, are parents of one daughter, Jacqueline Carol (the wife of Brother Curtis 0. Peters). Brother Newsom's chosen profession is education - and in that field he has compiled a record of service which clearly stands up to his own rigorous standard of excellence. In his own training, in teaching, administration, in community service - Brother Newsom's achievements are a credit to his Fraternity, which in 1979 bestowed upon him its highest honor (The Alpha Award of Merit). Brother Newsom is an honors graduate of Lincoln University (Missouri) and received his masters degree in Sociology from The University of Michigan. After further study in Social Administration at The Ohio State University, he went on to receive the Ph.D. from Washington University (St. Louis, Missouri) in the field of Sociology-Anthropology. Dr. Newsom entered the armed forces in 1943 as a Private. He was honorably discharged in 1946 with the rank of First Lieutenant, after serving in the American, China, Burma and India theaters. Following his discharge, he began an illustrious professional career as an instructor of History and Sociology at his alma mater, Lincoln

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

7


(Continued from Page 7)

University. After one year, he moved on to become Associate Professor, teaching in the same fields, at Southern University in Louisiana. While working toward the doctorate, Brother Newsom was Associate Professor of Sociology at Stowe Teachers College in St. Louis. He returned to Southern in 1951 as Professor of Sociology and, in 1956, was named head of that department. In 1960, Dr. Newsom became Professor of Sociology and Director of Woodrow Wilson General Honors at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. Here he served until 1964, when he was installed as President of Barber-Scotia College in Concord, North Carolina. In 1966, Brother Newsom returned to Atlanta to become Associate Director of the Higher Educational Opportunity in the South project of the Southern Regional Education Board. He was named President of Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, NC) in 1969 and served there until his selection to his present post as President of Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. In related activities, Brother Newsom's involvement has been equally impressive. He is a leader in professional organizations, and has always earned the respect of his peers. Since coming to Central State in 1972, he has already served as Chairman of the Inter-University Council of Ohio (1975-76) and as President of the Ohio College Association (1976-77). Even as this article was being prepared, The Sphinx received an independent release noting that Brother Newsom had been named to the Advisory Council to the Secretary of the Army, as Civilian Aide for Southeast Ohio. What no chronology of job titles and professional affiliations can possibly impart is the impact of a person on those who come into contact with him. In the case of Lionel H. Newsom, most who have known him have come to respect him. This is perhaps best evidenced by his citations for distinguished alumni achievement by both Lincoln University and Washington University; by his Award for Excellence from the University of Cincinnati; and by the five institutions (Davidson College, Bowling Green State University, Lincoln University, Wright State University, Western Michigan University, and Miami University of Ohio) which have conferred upon him honorary doctorates.

8

Speaks of his Fraternity I saw the light of Alpha Phi Alpha at Alpha Psi, Lincoln University, later serving as Treasurer of the chapter. I represented Alpha Chi (Fisk University) at the 1940 General Convention in Kansas City; served as President of Epsilon (University of Michigan) and later President of Kappa at The Ohio State University. Later I became a member of Alpha Rho Lambda. During the war I was among four who pulled together about 60 Alpha men at Fort Benning, Georgia, to establish a wartime chapter. The other three were Brothers, Clifton R. Jones of Virginia Union, James R. Tanner of Wilberforce and Lewis O. Swingler (former Editorin-Chief of The Sphinx) of University of Nebraska. We had forums, public meetings, parties, dances and learning sessions. My army duties took me overseas to serve in the China-Burma-India theater as a Lieutenant in the Corps of Military Police. Upon my return in 1946, I attended the convention in Columbus, Ohio where Brother Paul Robeson was the highlight of the program with Max Yergan, B.V. Lawson, General President; Channing Tobias, Dr. Tribbitt and Joseph H. B. Evans, General Secretary and Dr. Charles H. Wesley, former General President. During B. V.'s term I served as a member of the Reorganization Committee and Chairman of the Awards Committee. I also was Vice President of the Midwestern Region. During my teaching career I served as advisor to Alpha Psi, Beta Sigma (Southern University, Baton Rouge) and Alpha Rho (Morehouse College). Then I served as Chairman of the Recommendations Committee under General President A. Maceo Smith and Director of Educational Activities under General President Myles A. Paige. During that period I served as a member of the 50th Anniversary Committee of The Sphinx.

At Southern in Baton Rouge I served as President of Beta lota Lambda. In Atlanta I served as President of Eta Lambda and we bought a fraternity house where all Brother (graduate and undergrad) were welcomed. I served as chairman of two Regionals - one in Baton Rouge and one in Atlanta. I became President-Elect in 1964 and served as General President from 1965 through 1968. During my administration we refurbished and renovated the headquarters, bought the land next door and reorganized the fraternity. We initiated Vice President Hubert Horatio Humphrey and had a balanced budget each year I served, leaving the fraternity's treasury in very good condition. I was also instrumental in bringing Greek letter organizations (including Alpha Phi Alpha) to BarberScotia College in 1965. Presently, I am a member of Zeta Delta Lambda Chapter in Springfield, Ohio. I have not missed a General Convention since 1945. My record will show attendance at every convention since 1946, Columbus, Ohio to 1979 in Washington. I have not always been on the giving end but often a recipient of good things from Alpha. First and foremost was the love and respect of and for my brothers; an Alpha scholarship to the University of Michigan; our school, Central State University, received a gift of $15,000 in 1974 to aid us in the recovery from the devastating tornado of 1974; and the opportunity to serve my beloved brothers as their General President — which was, until the last convention when I received the Alpha Award of Merit, the highlight of my career in Alpha. I shall always remember how Alpha demanded high quality leadership through service and was a guide to my life. I am No. 16, Life Member, since 1947. During these years I have had wholesome contacts and meaningful relations with Jewels E. Kinckle Jones, Callis, Murray and Tandy. Stalwarts like Sidney Jones, Raymond W. Cannon, Frank Stanley, Bill Hale, Charles Wesley, B. V. Lawson, Raymond Paige, Alexander Jerrick, O. Wilson Winters, John Buckner, Lewis O. Swingler; the list is too long, there are so many, so I will leave it here. To me Alpha Phi Alpha is not a hard or cruel crucible for molding leadership, but (Alpha is) developing a way of life. -LHN

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Alpha Workshop GENERAL OFFICE James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary Darryl R. Matthews, Assistant Executive Secretary Michael J. Price, Assistant Executive Secretary Editor-in-Chief, The Sphinx

THE ELECTION OF THE GENERAL PRESIDENT . . .YOU MUST BE "ACTIVE" TO VOTE! As you all know by this time, 1980 is a year in which a new General President will be elected for the Fraternity. Two nominees were selected at the 1979 General Convention in Washington, and the names of these Brothers will appear on the election ballots. Results will be announced at the 1980 General Convention in Chicago — and the new president's term will commence on January 1, 1981. The election will be conducted according to the provisions of the Constitution of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and supervised by the Committee on Elections, Brother John I. Hendricks, Chairman. To insure that each member is aware of the established procedure, we would like to review same in this column. WHO RECEIVES A BALLOT? First, let us address the question of who will receive ballots. As you know, Alpha Phi Alpha some years ago adopted a procedure providing for "universal suffrage" — thus, each "active" member of the Fraternity will receive a ballot for the election of the General President. It is important to remember that "active" status with the General Organization means that a member has paid all applicable fees and taxes as set forth in the By-Laws. This means that Life Members must have paid the required Service Fee; and that non-Life Members have paid the annual Grand Tax and Service Fee.* Subscribing Life Members must pay Grand Tax and Service Fee in order to be "active." The determination in this regard will be made according to the records of the Executive Secretary as of April 1, 1980.

returned to the Chicago post office box which has been secured by the Election Committee. Access to this post office box is limited to both the Chairman of the Election Committee and the Executive Secretary. During the convention, the ballots will be retrieved from the post office box by the Election Committee and counted. When you receive your ballot, please READ ALL INSTRUCTION CAREFULLY to insure that your ballot is not voided by the Committee because of improper procedure.

DO THEY HAVE MY CORRECT ADDRESS? Finally, a word about addresses. Ballots will be mailed according to the addresses on file for the 1980 mailing list in the General Office. This will include all Life Members who have paid the Service Fee for the year and all Brothers holding a 1980 Passcard. Addresses are taken from the Remittance of Funds form submitted by the Chapter Secretary when paying fees. Life Members should note that their address was changed, if the Chapter Secretary submitted a different address (from the one in our file) when paying your Service Fee. If you received this magazine at the correct address, you are correctly listed on the mailing list and a ballot will be mailed to the same address. If you (or Brothers you know) did not receive this copy of the Sphinx, you (or they) should contact the General Office immediately. Please give your Life Membership Number or 1980 Passcard Number when submitting address corrections — and all corrections must be in the General Office by APRIL 1, 1980 in order to insure receipt of ballots. We are asking the special assistance of CHAPTER OFWHAT IS THE ELECTION PROCEDURE? FICERS in spreading the word about these procedures in Next, the procedure for the mailing of ballots is spelled out in Article V, Section 3.2 of the Constitution (Revised 1979) order to insure that every eligible Brother is given the opportunity to participate in the election. as follows: We are asking the special assistance of CHAPTER OFFICERS in spreading the word about these procedures in "3.2 Except as provided for in Section 3.22, election order to insure that every eligible Brother is given the opporto the office of General President shall be by tunity to participate in the election. You should feel free to ballots mailed to each member who is financial acduplicate this page and distribute it to chapter members at cording to the records of the Executive Secretary, your next meeting. The office is prepared to do address as of the first (1st) of April of the year in which an checks upon request. Make sure that you receive your election is held. Ballots shall be mailed not later ballot! than the twenty-first (21st) of April of an election year, and sent by the Election Committee." Therefore, ballots will be mailed between April 1st and •Life Members who are active should possess a (white) April 21 st of this year, under the direction of the chairman of "ACTIVE LIFE MEMBER" card. Grand Tax payers should i the Committee on Elections. Ballots are to be marked and possess a (white) "1980 PASSCARD." The Sphinx / Spring 1980

9


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Million Dollar Fund Drive Progress Report (March 10,1980) Goals

Pledges

Collection

-$1,000,000

$ 750,000 (75%)

THESE BROTHERS HAVE ANSWERED THE CALL!!!

$806,959.35

The next two pages list those Brothers who have pledged $250 or more to Alpha's Million Dollar Fund Drive. Are you listed? Our next issue will feature all Brothers who have pledged at least $250 and the amounts paid. Make sure that you are on the "Roll of Honor."

$ 500,000 (50%)

$ 300,000 (30%)

$312,818.63 $ 150,000 (15%)

Regional Progress GOALS

PLEDGES

REGION MONIES

EASTERN MIDWESTERN SOUTHERN SOUTHWESTERN WESTERN

MONIES

250,000

159,058.41

271,448

117,577.67

351,912 214,176

212,838.84

66,000

106,049.41

211,435.02

TO DATE % of R«t GOAL

64% 43% 61% 99% 161 %

COLLECTIONS MONIES

90,053.36 56,433.79 76,319.90 43,220.67 46,790.71

% ol Rat GOAL

36% 21% 22% 20% 71%

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION RECEPTION On Sunday, August 3, 1 9 8 0 , an Awards and Recognition Reception will be held at 7:00 P.M. At this time, all members, groups, organizations and other individuals, who have made significant contributions in time, money and/or effort to the successful completion of our Drive, will be rewarded. The Region and Chapter with the greatest productivity will also be properly awarded. Major contributors—$500.00 and above—will be recognized. A permanent scroll is being prepared, to include the names of all Brothers who have contributed between $ 5 0 0 . 0 0 and $ 9 9 9 . 9 9 , as well as a plaque, to include individual name plates and actual amount contributed, for all who have paid $ 1 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 or more. These will be permanently hung within the walls of our National Headquarters. The reception will be closed, and only those Brothers who have contributed $ 1 0 0 . 0 0 or more will be invited to attend. ft*****************************************************************************

10

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


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EXCITEMENT — EXCITEMENT ALPHA PHI ALPHA

MILLION DOLLAR FUND DRIVE 5 0 % OF PLEDGES SOLICITED 15% OF COLLECTIONS ALREADY IN ONLY 4 . 5 % CAMPAIGN COSTS

AN ALL OUT EFFORT IS NECESSARY TO COMPLETE OUR GOALS. ALL BROTHERS ARE CALLED UPON FOR HELP. -

Walter Sapp Southern Regional Chairman

— IF YOU HAVE ALREADY PLEDGED — PAY UP IF YOU HAVE ALREADY PAID - PLEDGE MORE IF YOU HAVE NOT PLEDGED - NOW IS THE TIME OVER 1,600 BROTHERS HAVE PLEDGED. WHERE ARE THE OTHER 12,000?

James Trent Eastern Regional Chairman

Roosevelt Johnson Southwestern Regional Chairman

Gus Ridgel Midwestern Regional Chairman

Clinton Minnis Western Regional Chairman

I. J. Lamothe, Jr. National Chairman

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

13


ALPHA PHI ALPHA HOLDS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE IN JAMAICA Alpha Phi Alpha's Mid-Winter Leadership Conference, only the second overseas meeting sponsored by the Fraternity in its history, was held January 11-13, 1980 in Ochos Rios, Jamaica. Similar to Phase II of the 1976 General Convention (held in Monrovia, Liberia), the recent leadership meeting was held in the Blackgoverned nation of Jamaica primarily to: (1) symbolize Alpha's (and Black America's) interest in and identification with the Third World; (2) to strengthen Black America's relationship with persons of African descent in the Caribbean; (3) to lay the groundwork for the organization of an Alpha chapter in Jamaica; and (4) to accept the genuine hospitality (including greatly reduced airfares and hotel costs) extended by the host government. The conference included meetings of the Fraternity's Board of Directors and seminars on leadership training and community action for Fraternity officials from across the United States who were in attendance. Approximately eighty Brothers participated in the Caribbean meeting, including about ten state/district directors and fifteen chapter presidents. The largest delegation came from the Eastern Region, followed by the West. Chapter-focused workshops included a seminar on Leadership Development, chaired by Western Vice President Clinton Minnis (with panelists James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary; James Jackson, Southern AVP; Terry Brown, Western AVP; and Jimmie Buford, Midwestern Vice President) -and a Model Chapter Program session, chaired by Brother Buford (with panelists Hanley J. Norment; Darryl R. Matthews; James T. Rushin; and Eastern AVP Darrell Freeman). Brother ANDREW YOUNG, former United Ambassador to the United Nations, urged those present at the Conference Luncheon to return to their communities and mobilize support for an even-handed American foreign policy affecting African and Caribbean nations. Citing Congressional opposition to a pending aid package to Jamaica and policies of the International Monetary Fund insensitive to that country's needs as actions damaging to the U.S. image in the Third World, Brother Young told the Black Americans present that America's interests lie in the reversal of such policies and that Black America should take the lead in achieving this goal. 14

TOP- Symposium on African/Caribbean Affairs featured, from left, Mr. Stoney Cooks and Brothers Michael J. Price, Richard Graves, Andrew Young, William Nelson and Thomas H. Hunt. BOTTOM: Even in Jamaica, the Alpha Hymn is traditional.

Jamaican Prime Minister MICHAEL MANLEY, speaking at the conference Banquet, reviewed the common experience of the Black American struggle for civil rights and the colonial history of nations such as Jamaica. Mr. MANLEY asserted that the present oil crisis is merely a symptom of the United State's refusal to fairly deal with the two-thirds of the world's population which is non-white. He suggested that it should be no surprise that, after years of colonial exploitation, these countries would be aggressive in using their newly-found weapon — oil. The Prime Minister also asked that Black Americans become a lobby for the cause of the Third World in order to make the United States more sensitive to the new world economic order and the aspirations of developing nations. He praised Ambassador Young for moving in this direction — stating that Young's policies won friends for the United States "it could not understand and in numbers it could not believe." Also during the Conference . . . a symposium on African/Caribbean Affairs was held with the panel chaired by Eastern Vice President, THOMAS R. HUNT, Assistant Commissioner of Information Services, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Other panelists discussing the interrelationship between Black America and Third World nations included Ambassador YOUNG; Brother (Dr.) WILLIAM NELSON, Chairman of the Afro-American Studies Department at Ohio State University; Brother

MICHAEL J. PRICE, Editor-in-Chief of The Sphinx (Alpha's official magazine); Midwestern Assistant Vice President, RICHARD GRAVES, a student at Kentucky State University; and Mr. STONEY COOKS, Administrative Aide to Ambassador Young. According to General President, JAMES R. WILLIAMS, the Fraternity's Leadership Conference was held in Jamaica as a part of the organization's continued interest in African and Caribbean affairs. He noted that Alpha Phi Alpha has long expressed a kinship with Third World citizens through the leadership of Brothers such as Paul Robeson, W. E. B. DuBois, and Jamaican independent Norman Manley (father of the present Prime Minister). In 1976, Alpha held its general convention in Monrovia, Liberia - and special activities on African and Caribbean affairs have been held at each convention since that time. The 1979 convention in Washington, DC featured an address by Ghanaian Ambassador to the United States Alex Quaison-Sackey, with the participation of officials from Liberia, Jamaica and other Third World nations. As a result of this conference, the Fraternity's Board of Directors has expressed support for additional ties with the Third World and a special committee (chaired by Professor Nelson) is reviewing the current Jamaica situation regarding the International Monetary Fund — with a view of submitting specific proposals to United States Government officials. The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Clockwise from top: The Board of Directors meetings were major agenda items: Western Region delegates join officers at lawn reception: Brother Gus Ridgel chats with Brother Aubrey Brown, one of the several Jamaican Alpha Men who attended the conference; Southern Vice President Clark greets a constituent; the Prime Minister enters the assembly. The Sphinx / Spring 1980

15


BROTHER THOMAS D. PAWLEY, III CANDIDATE FOR THE OFFICE OF GENERAL PRESIDENT

"Building A New Partnership"

My fellow Brothers in Alpha Phi Alpha, I am a candidate for the highest office of the most distinguished Black Fraternity, that of General President. By way of introduction, I would like to provide you with some insights into my qualifications for this important position. Secondly, I would like to discuss some of the important issues and problems facing our fraternity. Thirdly, I want to discuss the central theme of my candidacy, "Building A New Partnership." ALPHA HISTORY I was initiated into Alpha Phi Alpha in Beta Gamma Chapter, Virginia State College, in 1934; and served as Chapter President in 1936. Later, I became a member of Alpha Theta Chapter at the University of Iowa from 1937-39, and from 1947-49. I then became a member of Beta Zeta Lambda Chapter from 1940-47, and again in 1949. I have served as a delegate to the Midwestern Regional Conventions, held in Bluefield, W. Va., and Akron and Dayton, Ohio. I was a delegate to the General Conventions in Kansas City, New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Los Angeles, New Orleans, San Francisco, and Miami. In 1965, I was honored as Beta Zeta Lambda's "Man of the Year.' During the same year, I was named to the "Midwest Hall of Fame." I had the distinct honor, in 1965, of being named "Honorable Mention Midwest Man of the Year." In 1964, I served as Chairman of the Humanities and Arts Workshop and, during the 1966 General Convention, chaired the Resolutions Committee. From 1964-67, I served as Regional Director for Central Missouri. During the years 1967-73, I served as Director of Educational Activities and as

16

Chairman of the Education Foundation. It was an honor to serve as Midwestern VicePresident from 1 975-79. Currently, I am serving as Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri. This position gives me flexibility of movement which will permit me to meet the demands placed upon the office of General President of Alpha Phi Alpha. I was presented with awards from lota Sigma Lambda, Virginia State College, the Purple Masque, University of Iowa, Omicron Delta Kappa, University of Iowa, and was named to the College of Fellows, American Theatre Association.

be capable of initiating change. It must be able to use resources of knowledge and experience for achievement and contribution to mankind. The brotherhood must not forget yesterday's tasks. We should be about the business of developing new goals and objectives, and we must use our skills, talents, energies and resources for new and more productive tasks. If we want to create new and exciting horizons, we will have to take new and bold approaches. Primarily, we will have to look towards our fraternity for the kind of leadership which will guide us to a new future.

ISSUES AND CONCERNS There are many vital issues and concerns facing our fraternity: (1) the increased operating cost of the fraternity; (2) the condition of our national headquarters; (3) the apparent lack of concern for meeting the needs and interests of our college Brothers; (4) the political and social involvement of our fraternity; (5) the servicing of life memberships; (6) increasing polarization in and among the general membership; (7) alienation from the leadership of the fraternity; (8) the lack of effective communications with all members of the fraternity; and (9) the financial stability of the general organization. These are but a few of the many issues that will have to be addressed. The resolution of these issues will require not only a good problem solver, but a diligent leader and an administrator who has the ability experience and wisdom to lead our fraternity. The growth and future of Alpha Phi Alpha will depend, to a large degree, on the kind of leader who is at the helm. I believe that the General President must possess the characteristics of a strong leader; (1) confidence; (2) dependability; (3) know-how; (4) capability; (5) initiative; (6) versatility; (7) self-reliance; (8) adaptability; and (9) persistence. The above qualities will be essential in the operation of our fraternity as we move into the 80's. Strong leadership is important to the extent that it will provide the foundation for the general thrust of our fraternity. An organization such as Alpha Phi Alpha has always been dynamic. We must continue to make Alpha Phi Alpha the kind of organization that individuals will seek out and want to become a part of. We are on the threshold of a new beginnning, a beginning that calls for renewing our commitment to the ideals of our Fraternity, and to truly becoming "Servants to all." An organization such as Alpha Phi Alpha must be capable of change. Indeed, it must

BUILDING A NEW PARTNERSHIP Brothers, the purpose of "Building A New Partnership" is two-fold. First, I believe that each Brother has a particular skill, talent, experience or expertise to contribute to the fraternity. In the past, these have essentially been untapped resources. Secondly, in order for any organization to survive, it must maximize to the fullest extent possible, the resources of the organization. As an outcome, Alpha Phi Alpha will be in a pivotal position to make reality-based decisions. We intend to bring to the office of General President, organized, coordinated, costconscious programs that have been well planned, and will yield maximum return to the fraternity. We intend to be effective and efficient. Above all, we intend to be open to all Brothers. Brothers, I call for the building of a new partnership in our fraternity. This partnership will be about the business of developing and leading all Brothers towards a renewed future within the fraternity. This is what my candidacy is all about: BUILDING A NEW PARTNERSHIP FOR THE FUTURE OF ALPHA PHI ALPHA. In order to achieve this partnership, we will need to accomplish the following: (1) develop an effective means of communicating with the membership with the assurance that they can communicate directly with the General President; (2) develop a means by which the needs and interests of all brothers are met on an equitable basis; (3) develop within the fraternity a willingness and capacity to help not only at the local level, but also at the national level â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we want to utilize the skills and talents of all Brothers â&#x20AC;&#x201D;; and (4) develop a series of socially uplifting programs that will be directed by the fraternity and include all Brothers who desire to get involved. In order to move our great fraternity forward, we must look internally at ourselves The Sphinx / Spring 1980


and ask the following questions: Where are we? Where are we going? How are we going to get there? And once there, what are we going to do? My responses to these questions, Brothers are: (1) we are in a new decade, a decade characterized by uncertainty and change; (2) we intend to move forward to continue to achieve the greatness of our fraternity; and (3) we will get there by having a leader who has experience, who can make decisions, who will utilize the skills, knowledge, understanding and sanctions of all Brothers. We will develop a fraternal partnership worthy of greatness, more worthy of being called ALPHA PHI ALPHA. If I am elected to the office of General President, my first order of business will be to call for the convening of a "Special Convention." I will ask each chapter to send delegates to this convention with the spirit and understanding, that there will be much work that will have to be done. This convention will be about the business of determining the problem areas in our fraternity, developing viable alternatives and solutions, and establishing realistic time-tables for implementing these solutions. Brothers, it is important for each of us to have an understanding and input into the future direction of our fraternity. Before we chart new courses, we must make sure that our fraternity reflects the stability, effectiveness and efficiency that allows for positive management and the delivery of services to all Brothers. Above all, we must be accountable for our own actions. An additional outcome of this "Special Convention" will be the development of appropriate accountability guidelines. I believe, that as your General President, I must and will be accountable to the general membership. In keeping with the theme of my candidacy, "Building a New Partnership," I am proposing a series of socially uplifting programs. First, and foremost, we must not forget our older Brothers as well as our older citizens. We propose to develop programs at the national level that will respond to the needs and interests of our older citizens. I am sure that we as a fraternity can assist our older citizens in the areas of personal and social services. We must and will make a concrete contribution. We would not be where we are today, if it had not been for the sacrifices that those before us made. Alpha Phi Alpha has always taken the lead in social and personal causes. I am sure that collectively, we will use our creative and innovative talents to develop and implement realistic programs that lend themselves to helping to make the lives of our senior citizens more comfortable and meaningful. As we move into the 80's, we must be aware of the many problems facing our young people. Many of our young people are suffering the deleterious effects of unemployment. Youth unemployment among Black youth is a problem because it bars our youth from gaining socially valued qualities, occupational skills, good habits, The Sphinx / Spring 1980

and work records. I am proposing that Alpha Phi Alpha develop linkages with community-based organizations who are currently working on this problem. I believe that Alpha Phi Alpha can bring a new and different perspective to these organizations. I know that we will have a positive impact at the grass roots level. In addition, we will call for the development of supportive and transitional activities that are germane to the Black youth unemployment problem. In this way, each Brother can make a significant contribution of his time, skill, facilities and/or resources. Brothers, one of the hallmarks of our great fraternity has been in the area of education. We know from the past that our schools provide a certain kind of environment; individualistic, oriented toward cognitive achievement. So long as school was short and merely a supplement to the main activities of growing up, this mattered little. But our schools have expanded to fill the time that other activities once occupied, without substituting for them. These activities for young people included, all that is implied by "becoming adult" in matters other than gaining cognitive skills. It is our task, no more-no less, to create opportunities for youth to become adults in all ways, not merely intellective ones. We, as a fraternity, have an obligation to insure that young people receive a "good education." a set of wholesome experiences, and a goal to strive for. I believe that our fraternity must return to the forefront of education. We must help in all ways to better prepare our young people for a technological future, a future characterized by change, turbulence and uncertainty. We must give them the tools today, so that they can survive tomorrow. I am proposing that Alpha Phi Alpha take the leadership role at the local, state and national level, and develop an advisory commission whose responsibility would be to provide direction, input and wisdom, so as to improve the overall effectiveness of our public schools. Finally, I am proposing that Alpha Phi Alpha encourage minority business development, not only among the general public, but also among the general membership. I believe that we can formulate an in-house capability which will offer technical assistance and advice to Brothers who want to start their own businesses. We must encourage economic independence and establish political bases for ourselves and those in the community, and I know that we are capable of moving forward in this area. The life blood of Alpha has always been our college Brothers. We need to look closely at their particular needs and interests, and demonstrate a genuine concern by involving them in the mainstream of fraternal activities. We need the support of all Brothers as we strengthen our fraternity. In particular, we need to reach out and provide whatever help is needed to our college

Brothers; we need to be available to listen to their concerns, we must be prepared to act in a positive manner. In many instances, our college Brothers have expressed their concern about the future of Alpha Phi Alpha. The concerns that they have raised are real and important. We must reach out and join hands to make our fraternity even greater. At this junction, we must go about the task of systematically planning, organizing, developing, coordinating, and utilizing to the fullest the resources of our fraternity. In this way we will be able to establish concrete goals and achievable objectives. We can organize and marshal our internal resources (skills and talents) to tackle some of the more critical issues facing our fraternity. We must look at the financial condition of the fraternity. We are all aware of increasing costs and inflation. To stop here is not enough, we must look at how we can get the best "bang" for our dollars, in other words, we want to maximize on the low side and minimize our costs on the high side. This can be achieved if we take the time and carefully examine where we are, and where we want to go. At the outset, the basic premise of my candidacy was and still is "building a new partnership." I have attempted to lay out to you what I believe to be the kinds of things that will make this partnership function. The undergirdings for this partnership rest on the kind of leadership and administrative skills that are brought to the office of General President. As it has been in the past, so it will be in the future, the key will be LEADERSHIP. This quality of leaderhip has been reflected in our past presidents, and it is a tradition that I want to carry on. I want to exhibit a high degree of knowledge, experience, and understanding. The office of General President must be a responsive office, it must be sensitive to the needs of all Brothers, above all, it must be able to allow for all Brothers to communicate with it, rather than just receiving communications from it. Brothers, in summary, I have presented you with a brief history of my candidacy. I have addressed some of the more important pressing issues and concerns facing Alpha Phi Alpha. I have called for the "building of a new partnership." The essence of this partnership involves each brother, chapter and the entire fraternity working together to achieve jointly our goals and objectives. I have outlined several programs that I believe to be significant and important for the fraternity to become involved in. These programs are: (1) a senior citizens caring project; (2) youth unemployment and education; and (3) minority business development. We have more than the dreams and successes of yesterday to build on; we will have the needs of tomorrow to meet headon. Then we can truly say, "There goes an Alpha Man." 17


Alpha Belongs... • Alpha belongs in the forefront of leadership for human rights. • Alpha belongs in the forefront of leadership in Youth Motivation. • Alpha belongs in the forefront of leadership development among Black youths. • Alpha belongs in the forefront of Career Guidance for Black youths. • Alpha belongs in the forefront of leadership in Business Encouragement. • Alpha belongs in the forefront of support f o r t h r e e organizations basic to Black well-being and progress: The National Urban League, The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and The United Negro College Fund.

In Service to Alpha Past State Director of Two States: Georgia and Arkansas Life Member of the Fraternity Past Chairman, National Public Policy Committee Member, Executive Committee, Southern Region Vice-Chairman, 1977 National Convention-Atlanta Past Southwestern Vice-President and Past Southern Vice-President Served as Member of National Constitution Committee Served as Member of National Resolution Committee

Professional Service Regional Director, Southeast Region, Community Relations D Service, U.S. Department of Justice, 1971 to Present State Supervisor (Arkansas), Community • Relations Service, 1969-1971 Special Assistant for Human Resources to the Late Governor • Winthrop Rockefeller of Arkansas (First Black Assistant to a Governor in the South), 1968-1969 Field Representative, Community • Relations Service, 1966- 1968 Executive Director, Arkansas Council on • Human Relations, 1961-1966 Relocation Supervisor, Little Housing Authority, 1959-1961 • Personal Staff of the Late Winthrop Rockefeller, 1957-1959 D Staff Writer, Arkansas Democrat, Afternoon Daily • (First Black in South) 1951-1957 Consultant, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and the • Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1962-1966

• • •

Community Service President, Southeast Association of Black Federal Officials President, Greater Loch Lomond Community Organization Member, Board of Trustees and Executive Committee, Philander Smith College. Past President of the National Alumni Association and the Little Rock Chapter of Philander Smith College Served on Task Force that Conceptualized the Economic Opportunity Act Served on Task Force for Preliminary Planning of the 1966 White House Conference on Civil Rights Serves as Trustee Board Member and Youth Advisor, Friendship Baptist Church Board Member of Friendship Towers, a Housing Development for the Aged Board Member of Friendship Center, Another Housing Complex Executive Board, Atlanta Branch NAACP

Ozell Sutton Belongs ...to Alpha VOTE FOR OZELL SUTTON-GENERAL PRESIDENT-ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY


Ozell Sutton IS LEADERSHIP.

For General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

"Leadership Is A Prerequisite To Progress..."

ALPHA IS COMMITMENT, INVOLVEMENT AND SERVICE...SUTTON BELONGS


HOW THAT yOUVZ GOT 9T? My Brothers, if I may have just a few minutes of your time, I would like to pose a very important question to you. This question, although quite straightforward is a very important one and does require some very earnest thought. The question is as follows: "Now that you have it, what are you going to do with it?" Think about it as you read through this article. And then, when up reach the article's conclusion, hopefully you will understand why I feel this question is a very important one. I was attending a luncheon a couple of weeks ago when this challenge was presented to me. After sitting and thinking about it I was struck by a feeling that had been stirred up inside me by conversation with several Brothers and by observations that I had made. If I may, I'd like to share this feeling with you. My Brothers in ALPHA, there is a feeling that touches each of us as Alphamen. A feeling that, no matter what the time, place, or situation, the effect will be the same for each Brother. Many Brothers call it joy; many Brothers call it love; many Brothers don't have a name for it, to them it's just a fantastic feeling. But no matter what name this feeling is given it can be categorized into a love for an devotion to any organization that "sowed its seed in nature's soil" 73 years ago. And I am sure that for each of us this feeling will last as long as our stay here on earth.

As ALPHAMEN we love our fraternity and are true to its causes and precepts, but how devoted are you to seeing that its light continues to shine? Now that you have it what are you going to do with it? I know there are many Brothers who are content with wearing a shirt, sweater, or pin. To these Brothers it's only the recognition of being an ALPHAMAN that counts. Then there are those Brothers who are fraternally satisfied in coming to meetings and paying dues. Paying dues is important to fraternal life, but what type of personal fulfillment and satisfaction can one gain from only going to meetings and paying dues? As a Brother, each time you reach to put on a fraternity shirt, jacket, or emblem, you should ask yourself what you've done to further Alpha's existence other than paying your national fees. You should ask yourself: "What part have I played in seeing that my chapter is in line and functioning in accordance with the directives of the general organization? How am I making the name of Alpha Phi Alpha better and more respected on my college campus? What can my chapter do to benefit the surrounding communities?" These are just a few of the questions that you, as a Brother, might ask in order to evaluate whether or not you are truly living up to the precepts which you pledged to uphold. And, if after this self-evaluation you

are true to the precepts and directives of the fraternity, then continue to carry Alpha's torch. Moreover, encourage other Brothers to speak and get involved, that Alpha's beacon light may shine even brighter. But if you find that you've sat back and slipped into complacency, think about the oaths you took and the commitment you made. Then as you begin to put on that Alpha shirt or button, think about what those three Greek letters mean. And remember that those letters and the organization which they represent can only do for you what you do for it. Finally my Brothers, the act of pledging (and even the name itself for that matter) takes on different meanings to different people. Some say pledging means giving oneself for life; others say pledging means total devotion to that which is pledged. Funk and Wagnalls Standard Encyclopedia Dictionary states: pledging is a "promise or agreement to perform or fulfill some act, contract, or duty." So I ask each Brother who reads this article to take special notice to the promise you made during your pledge period. Please don't be content with just being an Alphaman on color days, Fraternity holidays, or when your chapter is involved in a special activity. Be an Alphaman everyday - an active, contributing Alphaman. You have Alpha now. . .but what are you going to do with it? GOD BLESS YOU

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Sphinx The Sphinx / Spring 1980


STANLEY E. BROADNAX

by CLARENCE

FRAZIER

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

The city that selected Alphaman Theodore M. Berry as its first Black mayor has again turned to the ranks of Alpha Phi Alpha for a top administrative appointment. Brother STANLEY E. BROADNAX, M.D., has been appointed City Health Commissioner of Cincinnati, Ohio. As Commissioner, Brother Broadnax will be responsible for the operation of the city's Department of Health, with some 3,000 employees and an annual budget of over 24 million dollars annually. Dr. Broadnax is the first Black to hold this important post. Dr. Broadnax was born in Cincinnati's West End section. A product of the city's public schools, he attended Taft Senior High, where he was president of his sophomore and junior classes and the Student Council. He was a member of the Honor Club and track team, and served as co-captain of the varsity football team. Brother Broadnax received a football scholarship to the University of Michigan in 1964. He was a member of the Michigan Wolverines football team and was elected to Michigauma, an organization composed of outstanding campus leaders. At Michigan, he was initiated into Epsilon Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. Admitted to the University of Michigan Medical School following graduation, Brother Broadnax distinguished himself as president of the freshman class, vice-president of the Student National Medical Association and through service on various medical school policy committees. He received his medical degree in 1974. Subsequently, Dr. Broadnax attended the University of Michigan School of Public Health, where he received a Master of Public Health degree in

Health Care Organization and Administration. He returned to Cincinnati in 1975 for specialty medical training at Christ Hospital in the Department of Internal Medicine. During this time he became involved in several community organizations on a voluntary basis. A great deal of his volunteer time was spent contributing his administrative and medical expertise to the West End Health Center Board of Trustees. He served as Vice-President and Chairman of the Health Services Commitee from 1975 to 1977. Dr. Broadnax became the Medical Director of the West End facility in November of 1977. After the organizational structure was revamped he was named Administrative Director of Health Services, as well as being Medical Director. Here, in his home community, Brother Broadnax substantially improved the quality of medical care available to residents. The center operated on a balanced budget and he developed innovative programs, including: a mobile health screening team; day care centers under health services contract; a laboratory referral system with the Cincinnati Health Department; Health in Housing, a program for senior citizens; and a patient referral system with Christ Hospital. These and other outstanding programs clearly marked Brother Broadnax as a professional in the fields of public health. Cincinnati is fortunate that one of its native sons decided to return home and share his medical and administrative skills with the city. Alpha Phi Alpha is proud of this achievement by Brother Broadnax, a member of Delta Gamma Lambda Chapter in Cincinnati. 21


VieWpOint

/ Jesse Mayes

Colleges, Computer Facilities and Educational Opportunity "modern advances in computing technology are not reaching disadvan taged minorities." No student in this generation would think of enrolling in a college which did not have an adequate library. Reflect for a moment on what an education at a college that did not have an accredited library would be worth. Following this line of thought, the author proposes that adequate computing facilities for educational purposes are just as important in colleges as adequate library facilities. The speed with which the electronic digital computer was adopted by nearly every segment of our society has been unmatched in the history of technology. Even so, there are many colleges in the United States with inadequate educational computing facilities, and many more are without any computing facilities at all. These colleges are producing graduates each year for the labor market, and these graduates must compete for available jobs with graduates from colleges with adequate computing facilities. Reflect for a moment on the odds against the success of a student who was graduated from a college without a computer getting a job when competing with a student who graduated from a college where computing facilities are an integral part of the pro22

gram. The outcome seems obvious. This is a case of violation of the United States' equal protection laws that apply to our educational system. There is no record of a college having recalled a graduate because the educational environment which produced that graduate was faulty or inadequate. Last year, a record total of more than 50 million products â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from foods, drugs and cosmetics to automobiles, appliances and toys â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were recalled by their manufacturers, either voluntarily or under pressue from one of the four government agencies empowered to police the marketplace for dangerously defective products. Should the education industry be submitted to the same kind of pressure? College graduates without an understanding of the role of the computer in society and without an appreciation for both the positive and negative impact of the computer on the world of work may just be candidates for recall. Since a college or university could not be accredited without adequate library facilities, it seems reasonable to begin to require adequate educational computing facilities. Computer facilities would appear to be equally important to library facilities, and failure to

provide would appear to be in violation of the equal protection of the laws. There are some 200 U.S. colleges that are without adequate educational computing facilities. Dr. John W. Hamblen of the University of Missouri and Dr. Lawrence H. Oliver, National Science Foundation (NSF), have shown some sensitivity toward this serious problem by securing grants from NSF to conduct conferences on educational computing in minority institutions. It was through the ECMI projects that the serious problems of "computing illiteracy" in many colleges through the U.S. have surfaced In the past, the blame for the lack of adequate educational computing facilities in many colleges and universities was placed on the college administrators. The absence of budget and plans for adequate educational computing facilities is not just the responsibility of the administrators. Often well meaning administrators were turned down in their attempts when boards of trustees and state legislators couldn't be convinced that computing costs were essential expenditures. Modern advances in computing The Sphinx / Spring 1980


technology are not reaching the disadvantaged minorities. These people could benefit substantially from the opportunity to use computers in their education process. Given such opportunity, more minority students would elect to pursue science oriented educational programs in their advanced education careers. This training would lead to professional careers in the sciences. There are approximately 2 0 0 U.S. institutions of higher learning which are predominately minority. About 1 25 of these institutions enroll Blacks, 2 0 enroll Spanish-surnamed Americans, and 3 0 enroll native Americans. Few of these instutions can boast of a high quality instructional program and few have faculty members who use computers in the academic programs for which they are responsible. Yet the computer is the one technology receiving significant use in practically all academic areas of the nation's toprated educational institutions. In the last 20 years, the computer has evolved into the third largest industry in the world. The computer's presence has become commonplace in many offices, and home use is rapidly becoming a reality. The diverse job opportunities in the computer industry are numerous. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that there were approximately 7 6 5 , 0 0 0 people employ-

ed in computer-related occupations in 1970, and predicts an increase to almost one million in 1 9 8 0 , a 3 0 percent growth rate. These statistics are now considered to be significantly underestimated. Findings of the President's Commission on Instructional Technology were submitted to the President and Congress in 1 9 7 0 in a report entitled "To Improve Learning." The commission found that computer technology can: (1) make education more productive, (2) make instruction more individual (3) give instruction a more scientific grounding, (4) make instruction more powerful, (5) make learning more equal. It found further that where computer technology has general value for education as a whole, it has special values for the instruction of the culturally disadvantaged and the mentally and physically handicapped. The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education also underscored the fact that computer technology offers students great flexibility and variety in the learning process; it enables educators to overcome the barriers to education that arise from race, sex, age, quality of previous education, learning ability, and socioeconomic conditions. The evidence points to a need for institutions of higher education to focus on the role of the computer in their teaching/learning process. The author is convinced that institutions of higher

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

MThis edition's VIEWPOINT article -Colleges, Computer Facilities and Educational Opportunity - was first published in the April/May/June issue of the AEDS Monitor, the publication of The Association for Educational Data Systems. The author, Brother Jesse Mayes, is a Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha and resides in Ettrick, Virginia. Brother Mayes was a computer center director for 15 years; taught computer science and automated data processing for 10 years; and established and operated three successful college computer centers - at the University of the District of Columbia (1976-79), Federal City College (1969-75) and Virginia State College (1964-69). He also served as Director of the Computer Center and Chairman of the Department of Computer Science Management at these colleges and Washington Technical Institute.

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computing illiteracy "College graduates without an understanding of the role of the computer in society and (without) an appreciation for both the positive and negative impact of the computer in the world of work may just be candidates for recall.'

learning not effectively employing computing in their instructional programs should not be accredited. To help these institutions solve their problem, the federal government and private foundations should provide financial aid to improve computing facilities and the use of the computer as an instructional tool. The goal should be to bring these programs up to an acceptable level - on a par with similar institutions that have accreditation.

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In 1909, JOHN MALCUS ELLISON was desperate. He had no money, no nothing — except the desire to attend Wayland Academy, at that time the high school division of Virginia Union University. In fact, he had spent two and a half years at Virginia Normal School in Petersburg (now Virginia State College) preparing for this dream. But the president of Virginia Union, George Hovey, thought that Ellison had no promise. From Hovey's point of view, Ellison was a poor investment. John Ellison describes that time as the first of the "clouds" in his life. It was, however, an obstacle he would overcome. He entered the school and graduated, earned his doctorate and went on to become the fourth and first Black president of Virginia Union University. He was the first alumnus to serve his alma mater in this capacity. The life of Brother John M. Ellison, who entered Omega Chapter in October of 1979 at the age of 90, is a reflection of his own philosophy. "Early in life," he said, "I saw the need to function as a churchman and an educator. Religion is basic in life. Without it, life is meaningless." He continued, "We owe it to ourselves to find meanings that endure, to know goodness, love, faith and patience — the patience to endure. We need to have vision beyond what we now see, because we all have blue days. They come to all of us as human beings. But we must see beyond the clouds." And see beyond the clouds he did — for Brother Ellison was a pioneer among private Black college presidents in this nation. He transcended to achieve personal goals and ambitions — and to make all our lives richer through his service. Born in Northumberland County, Virginia, in 1889, Brother Ellison received his early education in that county and, in 1906, he matriculated at the Virginia Normal School. Following his graduation from Wayland Academy, he received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Virginia Union in 1917. He returned to his home community and started the Northumberland County Training School. He also served as minister of Shiloh Baptist Church.

It appeared that prosperity was assured, but during the next nine years Brother Ellison was twice married and twice widowed. "In my life there have been intermittent shadows of sunshine and darkness," he would later remark. A large ray of sunshine appeared when he went to Ohio to attend the Oberlin Graduate School of Theology. In this setting he was first exposed to a world which did not judge him solely on the basis of color. "In the South," he remembered, "I had a complex. I didn't know if I was somebody or nobody. But there, I was somebody, and I knew my future had no limits." Brother Ellison received his Master of Arts degree in 1927, returning to Virginia to become the first campus minister at Virginia State University, also teaching sociology and ethics. In 1930, he received a leave of absence from the college to continue graduate work at Drew University in New Jersey. In 1933, he became the 49th Black in the United States to earn a Ph.D. He assumed pastoral duties at a church in Washington, taught at Howard University and married Elizabeth Balfour, his spouse at the time of his death. Brother Ellison again met Dr. Hovey during this period. "He couldn't believe it was me, and that I now held a Ph.D." Dr. Ellison recalled. Brother Ellison was invited to join the faculty of Virginia Union in 1936, with a view of giving special emphasis to field work — aside from teaching. After four years of classroom and field activities, Dr. Ellison was elected President of the University in the the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees in 1 9 4 1 . This represented a most critical period inasmuch as the nation was at the brink of World War II. After his installation, he again visited Dr. Hovey. Ellison noted that Hovey congratulated him and added "I always knew you were a fine young man, but I didn't think you were a scholar. I'm glad to know that you are a scholar as well." After fourteen years of administrative service, Dr. Ellison announced his decision to retire in June, 1955. His contributions to Virginia Union were immense and he is credited with leading the transformation of the school into a major Black institution of higher learning. He remained active in the life of Virginia Union until his death as a professor, advisor, writer and Chancellor, a position bestowed upon him by the trustees. Throughout his career, Brother Ellison was active in a number of societies and organizations. He was a prolific writer and author, as well as a noted historian. He authored a number of publications including "The Art of Friendship" in 1940, "Tensions and Destiny" in 1953, "They Who Preach" in 1956, "They Sang Through The Crisis" in 1 9 6 1 , "Trilogy On Adventurous Living" in 1962, and, most recently, "Let This Mind Be In You." He once declared that religion was his vocation and sociology his avocation. In the latter field he co-authored with C. H. Hamilton, "The Negro Church in Rural Virginia" in 1930 and with Dr. W. E. Garnett, "Rural Negro Life in Virginia, 1864-1934." He also wrote Negro Organizations and Leadership in Rural Virginia" in 1933, and numerous other pieces. For ninety years, John M. Ellison strived to benefit all mankind. He lived to deliver the eulogy for the college president who saw no promise in him, at George Hovey's request. He lived to receive three honorary doctorates and to see buildings named after him at Union and at Bishop College in Dallas. But, most importantly, he lived to see the accomplishments of his students — many of whom have received national prominence. He once said of the students, "They are jewels in the flock. And my job is to find them and polish them, and make them ready for life." This he did. Brother John Malcus Ellison "saw beyond the clouds." The Sphinx / Spring 1980


â&#x20AC;˘Alphas

on the ^/Move

Brother LORENZO P. BUTLER, Jr., wasn't an active member of the NAACP at the beginning of last year, but now he is the youngest state wide youth leader for the civil rights group (19,000 membership). The 19-year-old Wiley College student, a member of Alpha Sigma chapter, is now on an exchange program at Clark College in Broadcasting Management with the Brothers of Alpha Phi. Butler was recently reelected president of the Texas Youth & College Division of the NAACP. Many Black youth think the NAACP is "dead," Butler said, and he wants to do something to change that impression. "I plan to bring the state together by having more activities, so members can get together other than just at regional & state meetings," he said. By doing so, he hopes to demonstrate that the NAACP still is at the forefront of the civil rights involvement and remains active and responsive, regardless of race. Brother JAMES A. COLSTON, one of the nation's foremost educators and an Alpha Man, retired from N.C.A. and T. State University at the end of June 1979. During his 46 years in academics, his accomplishment included serving as principals of high schools, director of public relations, professor of education and as president of four colleges throughout the nation. He served as President of Bethune Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Florida from 1942 to 1946. During this presidency, he helped turn the two-year Junior College into a fouryear accredited liberal arts college. From 1946-1947 he served as director of public relations at Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia. Brother Colston was named President of Savannah State College in Georgia in 1947 where he initiated and completed a large scale renovation program. He left that position in 1949 to become Lecturer in Higher Education at New York University while he pursued work for the Ph.D. degree from the same institution. Upon completion of his work for the doctorate in 1950, he served as Professor of Education and Chairman of the Department at A. and T. College in Greensboro, North Carolina. In 1951, he became President of Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee. There, he upgraded the academic program, tripling the enroll-

ment and adding 11 new buildings, two of which were named in his honor: a new residential building, 'Colston Hall' and a new building for cultural affairs, The Colston Center for the Performing Arts.' He served as President of Knoxville College for 15 years, from 1951 through 1966 at which time he was elected to the Presidency of Bronx Community College of the City University of N.Y., thus becoming the first Black person to serve as president of a predominantly white college in New York State. In 1973, he presided over Bronx Community College's move to its new 50 acre campus at University Heights, and was instrumental in developing the college's Master Plan which will chart the course of the college for the next generation. During his presidency, Bronx Community College developed one of the largest Continuing Education Programs in New York City. He received his B.S. degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia; his M.A. from Atlanta University, and his Ph.D. from New York University. Dr. Colston holds honorary degrees from seven colleges: Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois; Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia; Westminister College, Fulton, Missouri; Knoxville College, Knoxville Tennessee, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania; and Bethune Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida. His professional affiliations include membership in Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Delta Kappa, Sigma Delta Psi and Alpha Kappa Mu. He received more than 20 awards for Distinguished Service including the Carter G. Woodson Award for Dedication to the Furtherance of Black History; the Distinguished and Exceptional Service Award from the Mayor of New York in 1973; and the Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from New York University in 1974. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C.; Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, N.J.; Bennett College, Greensboro, N.C.; Johnson C. Smith Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia. He serves as a member of the N.C.A. and T. State University Foundation, and the Rotary Club of Greensboro. Other past affiliations include Board of Directors, United Negro College 25


Fund Committees; Chairman, American Red Cross Board of Directors; New York State Health Planning Advisory Commission, and the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges Commission on Curriculum. Brother Colston said he still plans to be useful even in retirement. "I hope to continue something that is professionally rewarding," he said. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina with his wife, Wilhelmina White Colson. They are members of St. James United Presbyterian Church, Greensboro; have one daughter and three grandson. Brother E. LEWIS GREGORY, President of Gregory Enterprises Ltd. (Systems Research Assoc), and Assistant Professor in the Humanities Division at Wilberforce University, in Wilberforce, Ohio, recently donated copies of his books to the Black Collection and the General Collection of the Wilberforce University Library.

Brother Lewis E. Gregory The Black Collection at historic Wilberforce is under the directorship of Assistant Librarian, Clarence Chisolm, the University Archivist. It is a magnificent collection of historic documents from the university, and by Black authors, leaders, educators, artists, etc., and is located in the Dr. Rembert E. Stokes Learning Resources Center. Professor Gregory is presently working on his fourth book, and plans to donate copies of his other publications to the library, as well as his photography collection taken after the tornado that touched down in the Wilberforce area in 1974. Brother Gregory received his B.S. from Central State University, C.D.R. from Howard University, and completed post-graduate studies at Antioch College. 26

He is a Life Member of Alpha, a member of the Alpha Phi Gamma National Honorary Journalism Fraternity, American Association of University Professors, American Public Welfare Association, American Society of Writers, Consumers Union, Council for Exceptional Children, National Conference on Social Welfare, National Reading Association, and the Ohio Education Association. Brother Gregory's collections have been dedicated to his wife, Carol (Alpha Kappa Alpha) and sons, Christopher, Courtenay and Clifton. Brother HOMER A. NEAL recently returned from a one-week visit to China, where he was a guest of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. During his stay in Beijing (Peking), Neal lectured at the academy's Institute for High Energy Physics. He also discussed with institute officials plans for implementing a scientific cooperation agreement between the Chinese and U.S. governments. On his way to Beijing, Neal visited the Japanese Laboratory for High Energy Physics near Tokyo, where he delivered a lecture on various experimental efforts under way by the High Energy Physics Research Group at Indiana University, of which he is a member. Through his service on the physics advisory panels of the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation, Neal has played a role in the development of the cooperation agreement which is about to be signed by the Chinese and U.S. governments, as well as a similar agreement recently established with the government of Japan. The pending agreement with the Chinese calls for small groups of Chinese physicists to visit U.S. national laboratories and universities, where they will learn various techniques of high energy physics research. "From our experiences in Geneva, Switzerland, where 14 countries cooperate in operating the European Council for Nuclear Research (ECNR) laboratory," Neal said, "it has been shown that joint efforts in pursuing fundamental inquiry into nature have very positive benefits in the area of international relations, and that scientific progress can be significantly enhanced." Brother Neal is Dean for Research and Graduate Development, and Professor of Physics at Indiana University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees

from Indiana University and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1966. The Greater Cleveland (OH) Regional Transit Authority Board of Trustees selected Brother BILLY R. OWENS as Director of Accounting in December of 1979. Owens had been filling this position as Acting Director for five months. A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Brother Owens had been with RTA for only three years, serving first as a Financial Analyst and later as Director of Internal Audit. Prior to joining the transit system, Owens was an auditor with the firm of Ernst and Whinney (formerly Ernst and Ernst). "We are most fortunate in having a person with such outstanding capabilities as Mr. Owens fill such a key position," commented Leonard Bonis, RTA General Manager. "His vast experience, coupled with the many innovations and improvements he has already introduced at RTA, indicate that he is well able to handle the many diversified and critical responsiblities of the Director of Accounting." A graduate of Southern University in New Orleans, Brother Owens is a member of the National Association of Black Accountants and the Municipal Finance Officers Association. While at Southern University Brother Owens served as president of Beta Sigma Chapter. Brother Owens currently resides in Bedford Heights with his wife, Aslean, and their two children. Brother ROGERS E. RANDALL, Calumet College professor, is one of five educators in a two-state area to receive $1,000 for being an "outstanding educator."

Rogers E. Randall The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Brother Randall, chairman of the College's Division of Science and Mathematics, was honored by the InlandRyserson Foundation of Chicago. O. J. Crepeau, assistant to the president at Inland Steel, presented the check as part of a program "to honor and give recognition to outstanding teachers and to encourage teaching in private colleges at the undergraduate level." Some of the criteria for judging was based on the educators ability to "stimulate the students' intellect, and at the same time challenge the faculty," Crepeau said. The foundation, established in 1957, was formed to acknowledge "that talented men and women teachers are needed for the education values and the continued survival of our democratic form of government." Nominations for the award were screened by a committee of Calumet College faculty, administrators, students, and alumni. According to Father James F. McCabe, C.PP.S., college president, Brother Randall was selected "from many worthy candidates for his demanding but fair academic standards, his accessibility to students, and his ability to inspire students in their continuing search for knowledge. Brother JOHN C. RAWLS, Vice President of Nu Eta Lambda Chapter, Gainesville, Florida, was recently appointed by Florida State Commissioner of Education Ralph D. Turlington to the Statewide Assessment Advisory Committee. Brother Rawls is Life Member # 2 1 , and is completing his twentieth year in public school administration. He has taught at all levels of education from elementary to graduate school. Presently, he is principal at Idylwild Elementary School in Gainesville, and is an Adjunct Professor of Administration and Supervision at Nova University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Brother Rawls is a charter member of Epsilon Tau Lambda Chapter and also of Nu Eta Lambda Chapter. He exercised leadership in establishing the latter one. For the Florida Federation of Alpha Chapters, Brothers Rawls serves as Assistant Director for the northern region. A native of Gainesville, Brother Rawls received the B.S. Degree (Honors) from A & T State University, the M.A. Degree from the University of Iowa, and the Ed. D. Degree from Nova University. Prior to returning to The Sphinx / Spring 1980

ingham, Alabama where he received his early education in the public school system. He graduated with honors from Booker T. Washington Business College, attended Miles College in Birmingham and graduated with honors from Athens State College in Athens, Alabama with a major in accounting. As a contractor and developer Brother Sanders provided the expertise and the driving force behind the planning, development, and construction of the Alpha Complex of Delta Theta Lambda. Added to his credit as a contractor and developer is the sixtyfour unit Regency Apartments located in northeast Huntsville, and the Downtown Office Plaza located on Church Street in downtown Huntsville. Brother John C. Rawls Gainesville, he was chairman of the Department of Social Science at Lincoln School, Marion, Alabama, and also a Professor of Economics at Prairie View A & M State University. He is a member of Sigma Rho Sigma and Phi Delta Kappa. Brother Rawls is president of the 9 million dollar Alachua County Teachers Credit Union where he has served on the Board of Directors since 1957. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Friendship Day Care Center. Also, he is organist and choir director at Mount Carmel Baptist Church and at Mount Pleasant United Methodist Church. He is Lay Leader at the latter church and has served as vice chairman of its administrative board. He is a former member of the Advisory Council to the District Office of the Social Security Administration. He has had articles published in the Southwestern Social Science Quarterly and in the Florida State Teachers Bulletin. He resides with his wife, the former Yvonne C. Williams of Ocala, Florida, who is a graduate of FAMU and Temple University and a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, and their four children, John, Gerard, Valencia, and Cedric. Brother COLUMBUS SANDERS of Delta Theta Lambda Chapter, Huntsville, Alabama recently became Executive Vice-President and Chairman of the Board of Directors of Beowulf Corporation. Beowulf is a minority owned enterprise specializing in cable asemblies, wiring harnesses, circuit cards, electrical consoles, platform scales, load cells, and precision machine parts. Brother Sanders is a native of Birm-

Active in community affairs, Brother Sanders is a member of the following civic, cultural, religious, social, business, and professional organizations: Ascension Lutheran Church, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Contractors and Developers Corporation, and the Black Business Association of Huntsville. With his devoted wife, Olivia, and three children, Carlton, 15 years of age; Monica, age 10; and Patrick, age 8; Sanders resides in Huntsville, Alabama.

Brother THOMAS B. SHROPSHIRE, Miller Brewing Company executive, won the Business Award at the Second Annual American Black Achievement Awards For Outstanding Contributions at a TV taping at the TransAmerica Celebrity Theatre in Hollywood, California. The A.B.A.A., produced under the auspices of EBONY magazine, honored Shropshire "for his exemplary performance as senior vice president and treasurer of the Miller Brewing Company and corporate vice president of Philip Morris, Inc., and for confirming to our nation's private corporate sector that the Black American can, when given the opportunity, rise to the very top of American business enterprise and work effectively as a major decision-maker." EBONY'S One Hundred Most Influential Black Americans, who served as the final judges, selected winners for achievement in athletics, business, communications, dramatic arts, fine arts, music, professions, public service and religion in the nine major catagories. 27


In addition to managing the Spencer Center, working summers and carrying a full schedule at Rockhurst, Stith is president of the Black Student Union at Rockhurst. He is also Midwestern Regional Treasurer of Alpha Phi Alpha. He is a member of American Humanics. Stith, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Stith, is a sophomore at Rockhurst. Currently he is majoring in marketing and management, with a minor in Youth Agency Administration. Following his 1982 graduation from Rockhurst, he hopes to work in a management position, working in JA on a volunteer basis. Brother EARL H. STOKES was honored by the Educational Community of Meriwether County, Georgia in recognition of his promotion to Assistant to the Superintendent of Schools as Administrator of Student Personnel Services and for serving 29 years as Principal of Greenville Consolidated and Greenville Elementary Schools. Mayor Richmond D. Hill proclaimed prestigious Business Award from presenters,Sunday, October 28, 1979 as "Earl H. Brother Thomas Shropshire (right) receives star of the current television series, "One LifeStokes" Day. Local educational actor Raymond St. Jacques and Ellen Holly, To Live." dignitaries, teachers, students, as well necessary information from each comBrother ERIC J. STITH manages the as Brother Oliver N. Greene (Presipany for his evaluation statements and Spencer Junior Achievement Center, dent) and other members of Theta Nu answer any questions that the combetween his classes at Rockhurst ColLambda praised the educational conpanies might have. He then coorlege, that is. tributions of Brother Stokes to the dinates the materials before turning Brother Stith became interested in youth of Greenville and Meriwether them into his supervisors. Stith works the Junior Achievement Program when County, Georgia. Many tributes of apwith students, adult volunteers who act he was a sophomore at Metro High preciation were presented Brother as advisers and the supervisors on the School in St. Louis. He spent his Stokes including one by the President JA Program in the Kansas City Area. sophomore and junior years of high of Morris Brown College, Dr. Robert school working for Consolidated Because he is working toward a Threatt. American Products, a company sponminor in Youth Agency Adminstration, The Brothers of Theta Nu Lambda, sored by the Internal Revenue Service. Stith is able to earn college credit for through Brother Oliver N. Greene, During his senior year he worked in a his work at the Spencer Center. presented Stokes the Chapter's Black company sponsored by Blue Cross Rockhurst credits him with practicum and Gold Award. The honors bestowand Blue Shield. Stith enjoyed the proexperience. ed on Brother Stokes made the occagram and felt that he gained a lot of Brother Stith does not idle away his sion an unforgettable event for Brother practical experience from working in it. summers, either. Because JA is Stokes and his family. designed for the school year, activities After graduation, Stith decided that Brother Stokes is a native of Tampa, lag during the summer. So, every year, he didn't want to cast the experience Florida and a graduate of Morris Brown Stith works for the Packaging Corporaoff as a pleasant memory of high College and Atlanta University. Brother tion of America as a Production school activities. In looking at colleges, Stokes, a Life Member of Alpha Phi Management Trainee. Stith has held Alpha, was made into Alpha at Morris he discovered that Rockhurst offers a the position since the summer followYouth Agency Administration Program. Brown College (lota Chapter) and has ing his high school graduation, and is given more than 32 years to the fraterBecause the program would allow him guaranteed the position for each sumto continue working in Junior Achievenity. mer that he is in college. ment, Stith came to Rockhurst. He Brother Stokes is married to the was able to apply the Program toward INROADS-ST. LOUIS sponsors former Dorothy M. Huckaby, an AKA of his tuition at Rockhurst. Through the Stith's summer employment. INROADS Atlanta; they have one son and two program at Rockhurst, he acquired the is a program designed to help minority daughters; leroy E., an Eastern Airline position of Center Manager at the youth find employment while they are executive, Miami, Florida; Mrs. MarSpencer Junior Achievement Center attending school. The program also jorie E. Roberts (AKA), a 3rd grade on Linwood. provides counseling and motivation for teacher for the Meriwether County students that participate in it. Last sumAs Center Manager, Brother Stith is Schools (Greenville Elementary); and mer Brother Stith placed second in the responsible for coordinating 20 comAnnita E., (AKA) a K-Mart executive in INROADS National Essay Contest. panies. He must also collect the Houston, Texas. 28

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


tified Social Workers, a life member of both the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and the NAACP, and is listed in Who's Who in Government and Community Leaders and Noteworthy Americans. Heritage Press was formed on August 1 , 1 9 7 9 . Its purpose is to publish books on the Black experience in America. Present plans call for adding one or two titles each year.

Brother Earl H. Stokes receiving the Black and Gold Award of Theta Nu Lambda from Brother Oliver Greene. Brother WILBERT L. WALKER, publisher for the newly formed Heritage Press, has completed a novel entitled Stalemate at Panmunjon. This novel is the first publication for Heritage Press. It is the story of Lieutenant Charlie Brooks on the front line in Korea. This fast moving drama unfolds against the background of the deadlocked truce talks at Panmunjon. Brooks fight the Chinese communists and racial bigotry in the newly integrated Army. Brother Walker holds a bachelor's degree in Economics from Morgan State University in Baltimore and a

master's degree in Social Work from Howard University in Washington, D.C. He served in World War II as an aviation metalsmith, and as a first lieutenant in the Korean War, he won the Combat Infantryman badge. He is the author of We Are Men, a memoir of the two wars: and The Pride of Our Hearts, a novel. Since 1 9 5 0 Mr, Walker has held progressively more responsible positions in public welfare. At the present time he is Deputy Director of the Social Services Administration, Department of Human Resources, in Maryland. He is a member of the Academy of Cer-

Brother ELLIS B. WRIGHT, Jr. has been promoted from corrections treatment program supervisor to assistant superintendent at Southampton Correctional Center in Southampton, VA. A native of Southampton, Brother Wright is a 1 9 7 0 graduate of Virginia State College. He received his M.S. from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1 9 7 7 . After two years in the Army, he began working at Southampton Correctional. Center in August, 1 9 7 3 . His first job was as corrections institution rehabilitation supervisor in July, 1 9 7 7 . Promoted to corrections treatment program supervisor in March, 1 9 7 8 , Wright assumed his new duties on January 1 , 1 9 8 0 . As supervisor of the reception and classification of 100 offenders from across the state. Wright will supervise 6 9 employees and answer directly to superintendent of Southampton Correctional Center G. M. Johnson.

Were counting on you. Answer the census.

*u§^ A Public Service of This Magazine

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

29


EAST hampton institute The Brothers of Gamma lota extend greetings to all Brothers. We look forward to this new year and new decade, knowing that Alpha will continue to grow and to strengthen its dedication in striving for and achieving "Manly Deeds, Scholarship, and Love for All Mankind." On October 13, 1979, the Brothers of Gamma lota sponsored a successful "Alphathon"â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a seven-mile walkathon through the city of Hampton to raise money for the Million Dollar Fund Drive. The weekend of October 19th, Gamma lota's first reunion was held, largely because of the dedication and hard work of graduate Brother Alfred Bailey. Brothers who were made at Hampton Institute, beginning in 1947, our Chapter's birth, through the present, attended the reunion. The festive weekend included a luncheon at which the President of Hampton Institute, William Harvey, spoke; a business meeting where Brothers discussed programs'to strengthen the Chapter and voiced their desires to hold another Gamma lota Reunion in 1980 and in later years; and finally, a private dinner and later a dance where the Brothers, their guests, and other Hamptonians partied through the night. Because it was Hampton's Homecoming, the Brothers and their families were treated to the Homecoming Parade and game. That Saturday evening, the college Brothers of "Crazy Gamma I" thrilled the Homecoming crowd in the Greek Show.

Black and Gold Weekend took place November 3rd and 4th. During Coronation that Saturday, the Brothers presented our "Miss Alpha Phi Alpha," Jacqui Pinkney. On Sunday, we conducted our annual Smoker with the theme, "The School For the Better Making of Men." Brother Samuel F. Yette, journalist and author of The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America, and Brother Thomas G. Allston, III, Director of the Hampton Institute News Bureau, delivered inspiring messages concerning Alpha and its role in today's society and at Hampton. The Brothers at Hampton have participated in community activities such as singing for and entertaining elderly persons from the city of Hampton, and supplying a family-food-basket during Thanksgiving, and much needed toys and clothing in Hampton's Christmas Child Program. To close out 1979, the Brothers of Alpha held a successful and innovative Mini-Cabaret with the rising Brothers of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. It was Hampton's "Last Chance to Dance" in the decade of 1970, and a colorful illustration that Brotherhood includes all colors. To begin the new year, we will be launching a new tutorial program for young children in Hampton. We also look forward to initiating more strong, able men into the House of Alpha, where we all dwell and work in Brotherhood. The officers for this school year are: Leonard Chester, President; Ronald Johnson, Vice-President; Michael Byrd, Treasurer; James Patterson, Parliamentarian; Darrell Harvey, Recording Secretary; Daryle Jordan, Cor-

Gamma lota, 1979-80: Kneeling (L-R): Carl Parker, Leonard Chester, Von Goodloe; Standing (L-R): Ronald Hayden, Ricky Harris, James Patterson, Ronald Johnson, Frederick Yette, Lance Douglas, Michael Byrd, Daryle Jordan, Anthony Perry, Ronald Poulson, Eric Davenport, Kevin Barrett, Darrell Harvey, Shawn Baker. The Sphinx / Spring 1980


responding Secretary; Frederick Yette, Editor-to-the-Sphinx; Ronald Hayden, Chaplain; Gregory Reyes, Historian; Lance Douglas, Coordinator; Anthony Perry, Dean of Pledges; and Ronald Poulson, Asst. Dean of Pledges.

new york An overflow crowd of Alpha Phi Alpha men, their families, friends and members of other Greek letter organizations filled Wollman Auditorium at Columbia University Sunday, December 9, 1979. The occasion was the celebration of the prestigious fraternity's 73rd birthday. Congressman Charles B. Rangel, an active member of Alpha Phi Alpha, like his illustrious predecessor, Adam Clayton Powell, drove home several very significant points to his attentive audience as the keynote speaker. He urged his listeners to get involved politically; consolidate their political strength and bring it to bear both in New York City and on the national level since most politicians react only to those who can help them or hurt them. If they have no influence either way, then they are ignored. Congressman Rangel also set the event in historical perspective as he related how Alpha men such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Adam Clayton Powell had spearheaded the successful civil rights struggles of the 50's and the 60's. He reminded his audience that such popular figures as the Irish Catholic John F. Kennedy had to overcome racial and religious barriers in his successful quest for the Presidency. Following this thought the next speaker, John P. Rice, Jr., President of Gamma lota Lambda Chapter, was applauded by the crowd as he suggested that Alpha Brother Congressman Charles B. Rangel, a veteran political figure in Washington and chairman of some of the most powerful committees should be nominated for the Presidency. Mr. Rice went on to develop his theme of "Once an AlphaAlways an Alpha" by noting that in his chapter membership ranged from young Brothers in their early twenties, such as Jorman Granger to energetic Brothers in their eighties such as Albert A. Edwards who was sitting in the audience. Mr. Edwards was warmly applauded by the crowded gathering. Mr. Lewis R. Hurst, Chairman of the Founders Day Committee and Director of the nine Metropolitan New York The Sphinx / Spring 1980

Alpha Chapters has displayed a great deal of executive and management skill by establishing a tradition of bringing all Alphas together annually to celebrate their fraternity's birthday. Judge Andrew Tyler was the Master of Ceremonies for this stellar event. Congressman Rangel was introduced by William Decker Clarke, Esq. Dr. Hobart Jarrett served as his back up. Young college men such as Michael Francis and Roderick Carter also spoke at the ceremonies. Alpha men never overlook the religious aspect of life. The invocation and benediction were given by Reverend William Smartt. The St. Pascal Baylon Choir gave several stirring musical selections. Brother Clifford R. Clemmons, the New York State Director of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity wrapped up the proceedings and then invited the enthusiastic crowd to a gala reception at the Zeta Eta Alpha House. The Alpha Wives, the Alpha Angels and Brother Leon E. DeKalb played host to the crowd and thus capped a highly successful Founders Day celebration.

c.w. post Kappa Rho Chapter on the campus of Long Island University's C.W. Post Center in Green vale, Long Island is a newly established chapter that is forever holding Alpha high. On September 5, 1975 Kappa Rho was officially established on C. W. Post's campus. We were honored to be the first Black fraternity established at the college. Since our founding at the university we have guided over 60 men to the light of Alphadom. Subsequently, we have recently extended our services overseas. In the year of 1978, under the presidency of Arthur T. Matthews, the Brothers of Kappa Rho invited orphans, from St. Mary's of Angels/Home for Boys, to our Homecoming Football Game. The experience with these children was so enlightening that a month later we cosponsored a trip to a New York Knick basketball game with more children from St. Mary's. On October 14, 1978, we stepped away with a first place award in a "Step Show Competition" at Hofstra University. The following month the Brothers held a "Food Can Drive Disco" for the needy. December brought our 72nd anniversary celebration and the initiation of "The Undisputed Truth" pledge line. In February 1979, the Brothers sponsored a Pre-Valentine's Day Dance at the University and a benefit basketball game with boys from St. Mary's. The

next month we sponsored a beautiful and educational slide presentation on the Treasures of Tutankhamon and cosponsored a "Blood Drive" with ZBT Fraternity. April brought the initiation of "Phrater Seven" pledge line, a "Greek Step Out," and dance which hosted many fraternities and sororities. The Chapter's year ended on May 5, 1979 when the Brothers of K P held "An evening of Reunion and Recognition." We were honored to have Brothers; James B. Blanton, Luis Hurst, Clifford R. Clemmons, John Rice, and members of Gamma lota Lambda, and our guest speaker, Brother Albert Vann, State Assemblyman, 56th District. The awards for Outstanding Brothers on their pledge lines were presented to Brothers Matthew Woods, Eugene Aikens, Mark C. O'Riley, Willie Morton, Arthur T. Matthews, Russel Mapp, Philip Tavada, Eric Gregory, Robert Edwards, Derrick Thomas. A special award was given to Brother Warren Hayes, the first president of Kappa Rho Chapter. The Outstanding Service Award for 1978-79 was awarded to Brother Philip Tavada. The Brothers who upheld the high standards of Alpha, through academic excellence were Brothers Michael Francis, Gregory Shawn Hyman, and Arthur T. Matthews. The Outstandiang Kappa Rho Brother of the Year Award went to Brother Arthur T. Matthews, president of Kappa Rho 1978-79. The awards for services to Kappa Rho went to Brothers, Dr. Milton B. Flemmings, Professor, Biology Department; and chapter advisor, Clifford R. demons, N. Y. State Director; Luis Hurst, District Director for Alpha Phi Alpha; James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary; Oliver Davis, Assistant Director of Financial Aid; and chapter advisor, Theodore Collins, former District Director; and Brothers of Gamma lota Lambda. Service awards were also given to various administrators: Dennis Payette, Vice President of Student Affairs; Michael Mainon, Assistant Director of Hillwood Commons; Kay Mealing, Assistant Director of HEOP/MLK; Joseph Benedict, Director of Student Activities and Hillwood Commons; Gloria Henn, Director of Student Development; Melvin Sylvester, Director of Library, Periodical Department; and Ezra Huber, President of Student Government of C. W. Post College. This year our services to the community continued as we the Brothers of K P heard of the plight of the victims of 31


Hurricane David. We ran a successful "Food Can Drive" which netted over 2 0 0 cans of food and a one hundred dollar check that was sent to lessen the grief of those unfortunate victims. At the same time the Brothers of K P took on a massive "Voter Registration Drive" in order to have more minority representation in government. We succeeded in registering over 4 0 0 people to vote. We also worked hand in hand with the Association of Black Social Workers with their Voter Registration Drive. Our upcoming events include a "Blood Drive," and the establishment of a choir to sing to the elderly at various Senior Citizens Homes. We, the Brothers of Kappa Rho, are constantly striving to uphold the high standards of Alpha Phi Alpha. First of all, Servants of all, we shall transcend all.

Pennsylvania Remembering last year, Zeta Omicron Lambda was among the leading graduate chapters in the East. Our newly-elected Brothers will lead Zeta Omicron Lambda to greater heights in the year 1 9 8 0 . The men of Zeta have the Philadelphia community on the move. We had a very successful Black and Gold Dinner Dance. Congratulations to Brother Moose and members of the Million Dollar Fund Drive Committee for a job well done in the true Alpha spirit. As a result of their efforts, we were able to make a sizeable contribution to the drive. Brother Ronald Penny has been appointed General Counsel to

the Elizabeth City State Teachers' College; also Brother Kenneth Henderson received an appointment from the Governor. Our Sweetheart Dance was held February 9, 1 9 8 0 . We can't forget the Brothers of Rho; their Annual Harvest Moon Ball was a "touch of Class," and the Brothers of Psi hosted a very successful leadership conference that was well attended. Zeta wishes all a happy decade.

towson state u Mu Rho Chapter was founded on December 10, 1 9 7 6 by thirteen Brothers: Erik King, Keith Woody, Pierre Douyon, John Cambell, Robert C l o u d , Michael Carter, Michael Jackson, Oscar Jenkins Jr., Gary Lancaster, Brian Ridgeley, J e f f r e y Woodard, Raymond Tubman, and Leon T h o m p s o n Jr. Since the chapter's beginning in the Fall of ' 7 6 , four other young men have crossed the sands into the chapter: Donald Roberts and David Gaines in the Fall of 1 9 7 7 and Howard Roberts and Theron Scott Jr.in the Spring of 1 9 7 9 . Mu Rho Chapter, located at Towson State U n i v e r s i t y , in Baltimore, Maryland, at a predominantly white institution, has become one of the most highly regarded fraternities on campus (including white fraternities). The Brothers of Mu Rho Chapter have and will always uphold the traditions of our dear fraternity: High academic standards, Brotherly love, Personal progress, and Love for all mankind.

At this point we would like to list what we feel are stepping stones in the direction oif Alpha's tradition: 7 Brothers have been named Who's Who Among American Colleges and Universities; 2 have graduated with honors; 5 Senators of the Student Government Association; 3 present Black Student Union Executive Officers; 3 past Black Student Union Executive Officers; Brother Theron Scott - Maryland Black Student Union Association Treasurer; Brother Pierre Douydon - V.P. InterFraternity-Sorority Council; Brother Robert Cloud - former Advertising Manager for the Towerlight (the university's weekly newspaper); Brother Erik "Ubiquity" King, the most noted Black actor to ever graduate from Towson State University; Brother Howard Roberts, Captain of the wrestling team and Brothers Keith Woody and Brian Ridgeley, outstanding members of the track team. Likewise, during our stay here at Towson, we have served our community. We have worked with many programs, such as The Pheresis Blood Donor Program (Red Cross), numerous clothing drives (Salvation Army), and food drives during the holidays (for the needy); we have volunteered our time and services to the Maryland Correctional Institute, the Maryland League for the Handicapped, and the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Central Maryland. The tradition here at Towson is short but outstanding; we would like all Brothers to be on the look-out for Mu Rho.

maryland

The newly-elected officers of Zeta Omicron Lambda for the current 19 79-80 year are (front row, from left) Waverly Easley, Corresponding Secretary; Vincent Hawkins, immediate past President; Craig Brown, President, Kenneth Henderson, Vice President; Charles Whiting, Recording Secretary; and (back row, from left) Hugh Morris, Treasurer; Emery Utterback, Dean of Pledges; Hiran Stith, Financial Secretary; Wilfred Bond, Sergeant-at-arms; James Wilson, Editor-to-the Sphinx; and Allen Smallwood, Historian. 32

Kappa Phi Lambda Chapter in Columbia, Md. (Howard County) is one of the fastest growing and most active chapters in the Eastern Region. In the past three years Kappa Phi Lambda has initiatetd 11 men into Alphadom and as of December, 1 9 7 9 had 3 4 active members (including 10 life members) for the 1 9 7 9 - 8 0 fraternal year. The chapter activities include a fall R a c q u e t Ball Disco f u n d r a i s e r , Founders Day Program, Christmas Party, Martin Luther King Memorial Breakfast, Scholarship Spring Dance, Summer Picnic, and a Retreat. Also included are Sphinx Club activities and active participation in Staff and District Conferences, Eastern Regional and General Conventions. This year's Founders Day Program on December 1, 1 9 7 9 featured Brother Tom Hunt, The Sphinx / Spring 1980


The Brothers of Kappa Phi Lambda. Columbia Maryland.

Eastern Regional Vice President, as the guest speaker. And the annual Martin Luther King Breakfast on January 30, 1980 had Brother Mai Goode as guest speaker. The Breakfast, whose proceeds go to the scholarship fund, had an attendance of over 300 people in 1979. Some of the community services of the chapter include providing transportation for senior citizens for 48 weeks/year as a part of a program of the Howard County Commission on Aging. The Brothers also provide maintenance of the Audrey Robbins emergency shelter for displaced families and received the Audrey Robbins Humanitarian Award for Community Service for 1978-79. Over $1,200 in scholarships and awards were presented in 1979 by the chapter to local high school seniors and faculty. The chapter annually contributes to numerous other causes and organizations including the NAACP and Black Family Life of Columbia. The chapter has also been active at local, state and federal government levels. Several Brothers serve on Howard County Boards and Commissions and the chapter was very instrumental in forming the Alliance Toward an Active Community (ATAC), the first predominately Black political organization in Howard County. Service on Committees and Councils also exists at the federal level and Brothers have been influential in getting legislation passed at federal, state and local levels to benefit minorities. The chapter is also active in the media, having one Brother as a columnist for a local newspaper and another with his own radio program. In addition, the Alpha Wives of Howard County are also very active The Sphinx / Spring 1980

and recently donated over $400 to the chapter's scholarship fund. The Brothers of Kappa Phi Lambda are looking forward to another great year with six prospective candidates for Alpha and a very active reclamation effort underway. The electetd officers are - E. Dalton Young, President; Harold Payne, Vice President; James Fitzpatrick, Treasurer; Rodney Savory, Financial Secretary; Lewis Saunders, Recording Secretary; David Rakes, Corresponding Secretary; Wayne Kong, Parliamentarian; Theodore Page, Chaplain; Moss Kendrix, Sergeant-at-Arms; and Ernest C. Davis, Historian/'Editor-to-the Sphinx & Newsletter.

new jersey Kappa Theta Lambda Chapter of Bergen County, New Jersey has been thrusting forward in the true spirit of Alpha. Bergen County, located in northern New Jersey approximately 20 miles from the Big Apple (New York City), has a unique collection of Brothers involved in professions, education, business, industry and government. Their dedication to Alpha and contributions to community service can be found in all aspects of life in the county. Activities completed this fraternal year include 1) Report on the General Convention. Brothers Thomas Ashley, William Beavers, and Carlos Peay presented highlights of the Washington, D.C. Convention at the September chapter meeting giving the initial thrust for strong involvement. 2) September Initiation in which three candidates were initiated into Alpha, John Horner a manager with IBM, Office Products Division; Larry Harris an officer with the U.S. Customs

Department; and Robert Copeland an Engineer with Bell Labs. 3) October Social held at the home of Brother Colden Raines. The affair attended by Brothers, wives and sweethearts was a kickoff activity for the start of the fraternity year. 4) Apple picking family picnic coordinated by Brother William Beavers. The Brothers and their families enjoyed an afternoon of picking apples at a local orchard. This was a great family social outing. 5) Scholarship of $500.00 awarded to Walter W. Watson III who is attending Fairleigh Dickerson as a Pre-Med Student. 6) NAACP Banquet Support and Attendance. The chapter purchases a full page ad for the NAACP Journal ($100). 7) Sponsored a November Fund Raiser - An Over 30's Disco. The affair was coordinated by Brother Carlos Peay and Brother Percy Pollard (Ticket Chairman). Receipts netted more than $1500.00 for the chapter. The affair was held at the Colonial Post (a minority owned restaurant) in Ridgewood, New Jersey.

brown u The Brothers of Alpha Gamma, Providence, Rhode Island, extend warm greetings to all of our fellow Brothers. We have been a busy group this semester, keeping up the Alpha spirit in whatever we do. Early in November we held our first annual Alpha Social. Presentations were given regarding fraternity history, goals and objectives, as well as our own chapter's past and present accomplishments. There was music, food, and drink provided and the affair was a very sophisticated one. On November 17, several Brothers participated in a 10 kilometer "RunFor-Hunger." We went out and asked people to sponsor us in the run. The money went towards the purchase of food and supplies for the refugees in Cambodia. During the week before Thanksgiving we made candy apples and sold them in the student Post Office. Proceeds went towards our annual holiday basket to a needy family in the Providence community. On the social side, Alpha Gamma has formed a 3-man basketball team which participates in the 3-on-3 intramural league here at Brown University. Our second annual Backgammon Tournament was held in early January. And last, but not least, we threw two of the 33


best parties given this semester. The first one featured the Brothers steppin' to that Alpha beat! Our chapter consists of eight Brothers. They are: Eska Bly, Michael Frazier, Bernard Godley, Steve Jordan, Michael McPherson, Richard Moore, Arthur Wright, and Curtis White. Looking at the attendance to our smoker last month, it is possible that our chapter size may double by the spring. But whatever happens, Alpha Gamma will continue to strive to be "Servants of All" and uphold the name of Alpha Phi Alpha!

Cornell u The Brothers of Alpha Chapter hold the honorable distinction of maintaining the Mother chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. It gives us great pride to walk the paths of Cornell University, where our precious "JEWELS" tread 74 years ago. Even greater satisfaction is drawn from upholding the fraternity's commitment to academic excellence and community service.

undergraduates reactivated Alpha chapter under the direction of Brother Dr. G. Alex Galvin, who held the charter during the five year period of inactivity. Six lines have crossed the "burning sands" of Alpha since the summer of 1974. Those are: MANDRILL '74, VULCAN '75, PLAYERS '76, SOLID '76, PAMOJA '77, and the most recent BUSHIDO '78. Alpha Chapter has united under a single banner for a purpose, the betterment of our community. Alpha Chapter has sponsored two blood drives in conjunction with the American Red Cross, which remains in recordbreaking capacity. The Brothers also have performed cleanup, volunteer work and financial assistance to the Greater Ithaca Activities Center. This is in addition to our annual Halloween celebration for the children of the Southside Community Center. The Spring of 1979 found the Brothers of the First Chapter in the midst of a campus fund raising drive, the proceeds of which were donated to the Sickle-Qell Anemia Foundation in

dedication ceremony in honor of Brother G. Alex Galvin. The theme of the evening was, "Renaissance of a Black House." In addition to being advisor to Alpha Chapter, Brother Galvin is a physician and prominent community man. Among other positions, Brother Galvin is a past president of the Tompkins County Hospital Medical Staff, member of the Tompkins County Board of Health, and member of the Governor's Commission of Health and Resources of the State of New York. The ceremony was held at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art in Ithaca. Present were some members of the Cornell University Administration and faculty, community and church leaders, students, and the friends and family of Brother Galvin. Guests were permitted to browse through the museum's galleries, which included an exhibition of African art. A postdedication dance was held immediately following the ceremony and was enjoyed by the capacity crowd. The community is our source, our home, our future. Our task is its maintenance and improvement. To this, the Brothers of Alpha Chapter direct our energies; A BLACK HOUSE CAN DO NO MORE.

morylond

The light shines at Alpha Chapter Dedication. (L to R): Brothers Brian Hughes, Quentin Brathwaite, Eric Vaughn.

The original chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha was disbodied in 1969 amidst the nationally publicized hostile racial problems at Cornell University. However, on July 29, 1974, four

Washington, D.C. On April 2 1 , 1979, an event which the local media called, "the community event of the year" took place. The Brothers of Alpha Chapter presented a

Support the MILLION DOLLAR FUND DRIVE

A substantial number of Brothers from lota Upsilon Lambda, Montgomery County, MD and lota Zeta Chapter at the University of Maryland and their guests were in attendance at the Founders' Day Observance and Reclamation Smoker on December 2, 1979. The theme for the program was "Alpha Phi Alpha-Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow and Forever." Brother Delano Lewis was the primary speaker for the event. He gave a thunderous speech related to the program theme. In relating the theme to "Yesterday," Brother Lewis cited the cohesion of the men of Cornell University in founding the fraternity. He further noted that today, Alphas are displaying political leadership with the likes of Brother Ronald Dellums, Marion Barry, Ernest Morial and Maynard Jackson. He also saluted Brother Andrew Young for his contributions to international politics and foreign policy. There are not enough superlatives to describe the efforts of those lovely Alpha Wives. November 10, 1979 was no exception, when the Annual Family Dinner was held at the Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Rockville, The Sphinx / Spring 1980


MD. Also, the Alpha Wives announced that they will be contributing $2,000 to the Million Dollar Drive Campaign. In recognition of Black History Month the Brothers of lota Upsilon Lambda sponsored a Black Heritage Program on February 27, 1980. And finally, the Brothers of lota Upsilon Lambda wish you a health and happy decade.

MIDWEST bradley u The Brothers of Epsilon Kappa Chapter extend a warm greeting to all of our Brothers in Alpha. Since our founding in 1961 at Bradley University, Epsilon Kappa has excelled in being first of all, servants of all, and transcending all. This recent semester has seen the Brothers of EK serving all through community service. During the summer break, the EK Brothers joined to raise funds for the United Negro College Fund during their Tag Day. Over two hundred dollars was contributed to the U.N.C.F. on behalf of Epsilon Kappa. During the fall semester, Brothers convened to canvass the Peoria area during our 18th annual Food and Clothing Drive for the benefit of Peoria's Friendship House. A vanload of food and clothes was collected for Peoria's needy. The Brotherhood joined with parents of the Harrison and Taft Homes to sponsor our Annual Halloween and Christmas parties for underprivileged children. We also sponsor an Annual Easter Egg Hunt and Easter Party for the Peoria youths during the spring semester. The spring semester also finds the Brothers of EK holding our Miss Black and Gold Ball. Since its inception, the Miss Black and Gold Ball has been a major social event in Peoria. Our 3rd Annual Miss Black and Gold Ball, held last April, was attended by more than 650 persons. Ms. Pamela Atkins was crowned Miss Black and Gold 1979. Miss Black was Zellita Dennis and Miss Gold was Pamela Johnson. The crowd was entertained by a movie which was produced, directed and starred the Brothers of Epsilon Kappa. Peoria's finest sound system, WSOL SSI, provided the music for an outstanding evening. The Brothers are looking forward to the 1980 Illinois State Convention at Beta Eta Chapter. We hope to repeat as state champions in the step comThe Sphinx / Spring 1980

petition after last years victorious performance at the convention at Zeta Nu Chapter. This semester we shall continue to strive towards "Manly deeds, Scholarship, and Love for all Mankind." Semester plans call for greater community service, Black History month activities, our 4th Annual Miss Black and Gold Ball, and continuous leadership on the Bradley campus. The Brothers of Epsilon Kappa shall continue to raise the banner of Alpha Phi Alpha very high.

northern illinois u Epsilon Phi Chapter, Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, wishes to extend greetings to all of our Brothers throughout Alphadom. The light of Alpha has been beaming brightly all over our campus and community. During the Spring '79 semester our 5th annual Miss Eboness Pageant was showcased. Thirteen of the campus' most lovely women had the opportunity to display their femininity, charm, talent, and poise before a large and enthusiastic audience. Our reigning Miss Eboness is Ms. Gwen McGee of Chicago, Illinois. Miss McGee, a theatre arts major, rendered an emotional rendition of "Between The World and Me" by Richard Wright. This performance is still a topic of conversation. Ten courageous young men crossed those sands into Alphaland: "Scorpus" with eight members and "Magnitude II" with two members. The semester also saw the formation of our first sweetheart court. Forty (40) young women participated in our court activities. We affectionally called our court the "Cleopatra Court" after the most celebrated queen of Egypt. Towards the close of the semester

we presented cash awards to students who had achieved in scholarship, athletics, scientific ability, and humanities at Chicago Vocation High School reimplementing Alpha's "Go to High School, Go to College" program. The close of the semester was marked by the election of '79-80 chapter officers: Brother Earl I. Manning, President; Darrell Picket, Vice- President; Robert C. Gunn, Secretary; Eric Griggs, Treasurer; and Darrell Hill, Historian. Mu Alpha Lambda (DeKalb) hosted a well received and attended retreat for all Brothers to rededicate themselves to the aims of our fraternity. Workshops on chapter administration and pledging were well facilitated by our alumni during the summer session. The Fall '79 semester began with our first annual Alpha Games in September. For a first endeavor this weekend of events was well attended. Greeks and non-Greeks alike competed in basketball, bowling, Softball, track, backgammon and bid whist. A t-shirt set and semi-formal dance where the winners of the competitions were announced were also held. Two weeks later Epsilon Phi commemorated 15 years "in service not in scorn" to the NIU community. Approximately one hundred E Phi and Mu Alpha Lambda and alumni undergrad Brothers celebrated this momentus occasion. One alumni Brother traveled from Washington D.C.! The weekend included many Brotherly activities such as grad vs. undergrad ball games. A formal smoker was held for interested men, highlighted by alumni Brothers who conveyed how much A Phi A has aided them in their professional lives. Later that evening, our Black and Gold Anniversary Ball was held. Over 800 people witnessed 15 years of E

The Brothers of Epsilon Phi and Mu Alpha Lambda. 35


Phi history in an explosive slide presentation covering 1964 to 1979! The program also included remarks by NIU assistant to Vice President of Student Affairs recognizing E Phi's contributions to the NIU community. We also awarded our faculty advisor, Stacy Dolby, for his 15 years of support and advice. Our ever-dedicated alumni Brothers, Willard Draper, James Brunson, and Rick Hall were also awarded for their support and advice. The celebration was topped off with a most spirit-filled brunch. Since then, the Brothers of E Phi have continued to "Alphatize" the campus with their dazzling step performances when they captured the first place trophy in the annual Sigma Gamma Rho Greek Scene. We have collected can goods for our yearly holiday food drive to assist the needy of the DeKalb area. We have also participated in Black Greek Week, sponsored by the NIU Black Greek Council, to enlighten freshmen about all Black Greek fraternal organizations. At the close of the semester we joined Brothers across the country in observing the founding of our great fraternity by sharing intimate and thought provoking conversation about our personal encounters since becoming members of Alpha Phi Alpha. Currently Brothers are serving as staff members of campus residence halls and as members and officers of other campus organizations. Epsilon Phi will continue to hold the light of Alpha ever aloft.

ball state u The Brothers of Theta Xi Chapter at Ball State University honored Mrs. Coretta Scotta King when she came to the university as a convocation speaker.

Chapter president (and artist) E. Maurice Bransford, a junior from Cincinnati, OH, presented a portrait to Mrs. King. Also, the chapter presented a plaque to the widow of the late Brother Martin Luther King, Jr.

Wisconsin The Brothers of Delta Chi Lambda Chapter (Milwaukee area) are proud to announce the initiation of four fine Brothers into the fraternity. They are Brothers Edward Bolton, Paul Broussard, Quinn Buckner and Victor Gray. The chapter plans several activities throughout the upcoming year. One of the most challenging will be our attempt to reactivate our Brothers who have not been involved during the past few years. In accordance with the National organization's encouragement of young Blacks to enter the business world Delta Chi Lambda Brothers have appointed a committee to carry out this objective. Likewise, the chapter has established a Political Action Committee to monitor community political activities and consider projects or positions to be taken by the Brothers. The first activity the committee was charged with was the assistance of our Brother Fred St. Clair in his bid for election to Circuit Court. The officers for the year are: Taft Benson, President; Fred L. St. Clair, Vice President; Coleman Wells, Treasurer; Clarence Bolton, Corresponding Secretary; Derrick Kenner, Assistant Corresponding Secretary; Earnest Hendricks, Recording Secretary; and Walter Jenkins, Parliamentarian.

Mrs. Coretta S. King viewing the portrait by Brother Bransford. 36

SOUTH livingstone college As we, the Brothers of Gamma Mu Chapter, Livingstone College, enter into the second half of the school year we'd like to inform everyone that we're very much alive and on the move. To kickoff the new school year we sponsored a public relations campaign to welcome the new and returning students into the college environment. This had great results and reached 100% of our expected goals. Soon after that the college inauguration ceremony was held and the new chapter leadership was sworn into office. It consists of: Brother Clay Hart, President, feature writer for the Pamjo (school newspaper), representative to the Student Government Association, and the Pan-Hellenic Council; Brother Brian Lockhart, VicePresident, accounting tutor, and student-faculty member; Brother Rudolph Harrison, Chapter Secretary, Greek Editor for the Pamjo, and member of the mathematics club; Brother Seth Meningall, Chaplain, member, Prayer Meeting and Concert Choirs; Brother Randy Matthews, Treasurer, Dean of Pledges, member, Harris House Council, and the mathematics club; Miss Alpha Phi Alpha, Cathy Miles; Miss Black, Princess Walden; Miss Gold, Beverly Dumas, Miss Sphinxmen, Valerie Dunlap; Gamma Mu Sweethearts, Misses Lisa Adams, Patress Blakeney, Connie Brown, Anita Gambrell and Annie Lesane. November 15th was declared National Smoke Out Day by the American Cancer Society. A day in which all citizens were asked to give up smoking for at least one day. To do our small part in this most noble cause, we put on a local Smoke Out Day Program. This program consisted of various films depicting the health hazards of smoking and the benefits of stopping at any point in one's life. The civil rights and needs of our fellow students have been one of the major concerns of this chapter. With this in mind we have set out upon the task of chartering a college chapter of the NAACP here at our school. To give support to this endeavor we were fortunate enough to have Mr. Kelly M. Alexander, Jr., Vice President for Development and Training of the NAACP bring a message on the importance of the NAACP in college life. The The Sphinx / Spring 1980


theme for the occasion was "The Role of the NAACP in the 1980's" addressing some of the key issues facing college students as education, career outlooks, and positive thinking. Everyone present seemed to enjoy what Mr. Alexander had to say and he exclaimed "although I've made previous trips to this campus for this same purpose, this is the largest turnout I have ever seen here." In order to get the proper foundation and organization for this chapter Brother Menigall, coordinating chairman for this project, went as a delegate to the NAACP College Chapters Southeastern Conference held November 30 to December 2nd in Atlanta, Georgia. The workshops, information, and literature he acquired provided us with a great amount of data on how to make this an outstanding successful service project. It gave all of us great fJride and pleasure to have three new Brothers cross those burning sands into Alphadom this semester. They are: Arthaniel Harris, sophomore, engineering major, from Kinston, N.C.; Bobby Moody, sophomore, music major, from Durham, N.C.; and Reginald Stewart, sophomore, accounting major, from Washington, D.C. While Sphinxmen, the new Brothers participated in numerous service projects and activities. One which received good reaction from the students was an Educational Awareness program held in November. Its purpose was to reemphasize the various benefits of graduate studies for Black students. To close out the last year of the '70's the chapter pledged a contribution to the campus annual UNCF drive. In December the chapter, with Dylan's Publishers, Inc., launched a special fund raising campaign for a considerable pledge to be made to the National Office's Million Dollar Drive Fund. In making arrangements for this fund raiser activity we spoke with Mr. E. D. Banks, President & Publishers of THE BELIEVERS magazine, he had these comments: "it has been too long that businesses have cut themselves off from their own community and the people it serves. When we (business and industry) fail to serve the needs of our society then we fail in our whole purpose for existence â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to provide people with products and sevices that are needed and beneficial." To honor the 73rd anniversary of this great fraternity we held our annual celebration program. Among our distinguished guests were: Brother The Sphinx / Spring 1980

Frank R. Brown, chapter founder and advisor to the Gamma Mu chapter for over 40 years; Brother Marion Jones, Professor, Hood Theological Seminary and present advisor to the chapter; Brother James Rainbow, chapter founder and guest speaker for the occasion; and the Sweethearts of Gamma Mu, Miss Patress Blakeney, Miss Anita Gambrell, and Miss Annie Lesane. To conclude the Founders Day program a screening of movies was shown reflecting upon concepts relating to the Black Experience. Among such was a film depicting the life and struggles of our beloved Brother, Dr. Martin Luther King. We hope that all Brothers have the happiest of New Years, and we suggest that you keep an ear to the ground and one eye on us because we're on the move and there's no stopping us now.

memphis state u Manly deeds, scholarship, and love all mankind. The Brothers from Kappa Eta Chapter, Memphis State University, would like to extend a warm hello. The fall semester has truly shown productive and active involvement here at Kappa Eta. To kick off a good school year the Brothers teamed up with the Brothers of Nu Eta Chapter, Christian Brothers College, and presented an elaborate cheese and wine sip. This occasion was given especially for the promotion of Black unity on all Mem-

phis College campuses. During the past semester, we had the pleasure of taking three suave, and sophisticated men across those burning sands of Alpha. Neophyte Brothers John D. Calhoun, Reginald Hendricks, and Tony Taylor proved to be masters of their fate, and captains of their souls. Our Alpha week proved to be one of our best ever. Brothers Willis Hardaway and Robert Sommerville really got it together. To start the week off we hosted a Gospel Concert with the past reigning Queen of the 1977 Miss Black America Pageant, Claire Denise Ford, as one of our guest artists. On Tuesday we held our first annual Sphinx Awards, giving awards to deserving students on campus. Wednesday we presented a 'Step down' in the University Center. To you stepping Brothers around the boundaries, you better look out. Thursday we tuned in to our 'Talent night' with entertainers from around the community showing what they do best. Saturday was the night of 'Class in action'. The Brothers along with Nu Eta Chapter got together again and presented our first Black and Gold Ball. It highlighted a new degree of distinction in all areas of sophistication. Taking time out from our social status, the Brothers settled down to help promote the real meaning of Alpha Brotherhood. Which is, without a doubt, helping those who need it most. Kappa Eta pledged full support to State Representative Lois Deberry and the

Brothers of Kappa Eta Chapter (L to R) Standing: Myron Gray, Michael Cox, Joe Ha Willis Hardaway, Clifton Berry, Brian Maddox, Terrance Carnes; (Sitting L to R) Tony Reginald Hendrix, John Calhoun and Robert Somerville. 37


"Black-on-Black Crime" issue. Iman Khalil Addel Muhammad was the keynote speaker at one of the workshops. He insisted that one of the primary roots of the problem is the identification of the problem itself, termed "Black-on-Black Crime." He made the phrase, "Black does not unite us, instead it divides us." We also have been very involved with operation P.U.S.H. Some of our Brothers helped by participating on the honor program for Judge Otis Higgs. Kappa Eta presented him an award for his solicitude in the entire community. Good tidings was the Frat's main concern this holiday season. We worked at the fraternities' Goodfellows booth contributing time and money to help children less fortunate have a merrier Christmas. We also entertained the Girls Club with Christmas carols and good cheer. The Brothers held a "Greek Disco" at 2 0 0 1 , December 26, 1979. The funds raised at this affair are to go to the Million Dollar Fund Drive. With the problems of America in its traditional friendship with Iran, and with the rising effects of what the white sector terms as "Black-on-Black Crime," Alpha Delta Lambda proved that we can continue to stand together on one accord and recognize those people that strive to represent our country as one. This Founders' day they decided to give an award to the one who was most worthy. The recipient was Dr. W. W. Herrington, newly selected Black Superintendent of the Memphis City School System. Dr. W. W. Herrington proved to be a man of scholarship and displays love for all mankind. The speaker for the occasion was Brother Reverend James Ford newly elected councilman. He chose the topic "Who Is An Alphaman?" Before Brother Ford's speech we were deeply motivated by the selection Brother Terance Carnes performed and wrote especially for Alpha. It was well received from both the Brothers and the visiting audience. Brother Willis Hardaway was another recipient at our Founders Day program. He was awarded "College Brother of the Year" from our advisor, Brother Leon Freeman. Brother Hardaway graduated this semester with a BBA degree in Business Management. To you we say keep striving towards the light. We hope to communicate with you Brothers at the National Convention, until then may we continue to be about the business of our dear A-Phi-A. 38

georgia Theta Nu Lambda Chapter of La Grange, Georgia involves Brothers in and around the surrounding counties of Carroll, Coweta, Harris, Merriwether, Talbot and Troup. During the Summer of 1979 the Brothers of Meriwether county; Manchester, Georgia served as volunteer instructors for a Summer Tutorial Program in the areas of Leadership Potentials, Mathematics and Physical Education experiences. During the mid-point of this summer of learning experiences, the group enjoyed an outing at Six Flags Over Georgia (Atlanta).

Muscogee County School District, Columbus, Georgia. Theta Nu Lambda hosted the State Convention for 1980. The Alphabettes and the Brothers of Nu Gamma, West Georgia College, Carrollton, Georgia, assisted with the activities. The Convention was held at Callaway Gardens, Pine Mountain, Georgia on January 25th and 26th, 1980. The chapter's officers are: Oliver N. Greene, President; Solomon Ferguson, Vice-President; Frank R. Lewis, Secretary; Cleveland Bedgood, Financial Secretary; Billy Brown, Treasurer; Donald Weatherington, Dean of Pledges; Willie J. Anderson.

Theta Nu Lambda Chapter, (Left to Right): Brother Ronnie Jones, Brother Oliver N. Greene, Brother Eddie T. Lindsey, Speaker, Brother Donald Weatherington and Brother Earl H. Strokes.

The Brothers of fheta Nu Lambda hold high the ideals of Scholarship, Manly Deeds and Love For All Mankind. . . The Chapter gives an annual scholarship to the deserving high school senior with the highest college entrance score, upon selecting the college of his choice. The scholarship recipients for the past two years were: Nathan B. Greene, the son of Brother and Mrs. Oliver Greene of La Grange, Georgia. Nathan is a Sophomore at the University of Cincinnati and is pursuing a degree in Voice; and, Zerman Billingslea, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Billingslea of West Point, Georgia. Zerman is a Freshman at the University of Tennessee and is pursuing a degree in Chemical Engineering. Theta Nu Lambda Chapter observed Founders Day with a program at Warren Temple United Methodist Church, La Grange, Georgia on Sunday, December 16, 1979. Speaker for the occasion was Brother Eddie T. Lindsey, Assistant Superintendent to the

Historian; Earl H. Stokes, Editor-to-The Sphinx; Leroy Norwood, Chaplain; Tom McBride, Director of Educational Activities; Charles Milligan, Sergeantat-Arms; Alfred M. Randolph, Parliamentarian; and John D. Hoggs, Chairman of Committees.

u of tennessee Mu lota, at the University of Tennessee - Knoxville, extends warm fraternal greetings to men of Alpha Phi Alpha everywhere. We are working diligently here at UTK and hope that Brothers everywhere are preparing to meet the challenges that this new decade will bring. Since our last report we have been working hard to be first of all, servants of all and transcending all at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Last winter Ml participated in our campus Black History Month commemoration by honoring one of Alpha's own, Brother Tony Brown. Brother Brown is The Sphinx / Spring 1980


the producer of television's nationallysyndicated Tony Brown's Journal. He was a guest speaker on Blacks in the Media and our chapter presented him with a plaque citing his outstanding achievements in the broadcasting industry. The Brothers also hosted a reception held in his honor. May of 1979 saw Ml participating in the annual campus Greek show. Thanks to the hard work done by Brother Ray Clark of Birmingham, Alabama, the campus witnessed the best performance put on by Alphas yet. In recognition of our work and oncampus involvement UTK's Black Student Union awarded us their "Outstanding Service Fraternity Award" for excellence in campus service. Not to be satisfied with our past work the Brothers spent the summer planning for the upcoming year and a busy one it is turning out to be. On October 23, in the University Center Auditorium, over 500 persons witnessed our second Miss Black and Gold Pageant. After competing against seven other beautiful, and talented women, Robin Peek, a freshman communications student from Atlanta, became our new Miss Black and Gold. The pageant was also the occasion where the coveted Marvin E. Peek scholarship was presented. The freshman scholarship was awarded to Theodore Martin, a mechanical engineering student. The scholarship is named after Brother Peek, who is our chapter advisor and director of UTK's African-Afro-American Studies Department. The pageant also saw Alven Whiting selected as our 1979-80 Brother of the Year. After working to help benefit others, the Brothers participated in a benefit basketball tournament. The tournament was given by our Black Cultural Center theatre group to raise money for an upcoming production of the Broadway musical, "Purlie." In an effort to concretely show our concern for entering freshmen, the chapter sponsored its first Freshman Tea. This tea served as an orientation and get-acquainted session for Black freshman. Finalizing the quarter was recognition of our chapter by a national scholastic organization. During their southeastern regional convention held at the Hyatt Regency in November, the National Council on Black Studies cited our chapter for outstanding service and leadership by a campus organization. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority was the only other organization to receive The Sphinx / Spring 1980

this honor. We have many other activities planned for this year and are looking forward to the new year. We wish each and every Brother success and happiness and remember "none is greater than the innovator. For the 1980's and beyond Alpha is and will always be Number 1 . "

ly active the night of the crowning, for they were the ushers at this event and then later at the dinner that followed. In our attempt to promote Scholarship on the campus, the Brothers sold bells to raise money for a scholarship which will be given out at the end of the school year. The scholarship will be given to a student of ASU.

alabama state

duke u

The Brothers of Beta Upsilon would like to extend warm greetings to the other Brothers of Alpha. Beta Upsilon, located at Alabama State University, is composed of 5 pledge lines. They are: Spirit of 76 (Fall '76), Untouchable 10 ('77), Electrifying 6 ('78), Eighth Wonder (Spring '79) and the newest line, Ubiquity (Fall '79). The Brothers of this chapter work very hard and diligently to 'hold high' the name of Alpha. The Brothers are presently working on a program where they will entertain at an Early Childhood Center that is located on the campus. The Brothers at ASU also try very hard to support functions given by other Brothers in the area. We have traveled to most of the chapters located in Alabama and recently traveled to Tallahassee, FL. This is where the Brothers of lota Delta were having their second annual Alpha Extravaganza. 18 Brothers of Beta Upsilon (which is 86% of the chapter) journeyed to Florida. Participation of this type let it be known that the Brotherhood at ASU, which started in 1936, still lives on. The Brothers helped to pass out leaflets for a candidate who was running for city councilman. Even though the Brothers asked for no recognition for the deed, they were rewarded when the candidate was elected. The Brothers also participated in the drive to get Birmingham students of ASU to vote and elect Brother Richard Arrington to the office of mayor in Birmingham, Alabama. Once again the Brothers were rewarded when their candidate was indeed elected to serve as mayor. The Brothers continued expressing their 'Manly Deeds' during the month of December when they caroled at one of Montgomery's convalescent homes. The Brothers always attempt to put their best foot forward when it comes to participating with the Student Government Association (SGA). During Coronation (crowning of Miss ASU) Week, the Brothers gave their support in all the activities. They were especial-

The Brothers of Kappa Omicron at Duke University extend fraternal greetings to all our Brothers of Alpha. Kappa Omicron has the following dedicated officers this year: Byron L. Godwin, President; G. Strong, VicePresident; M. Smith, Recording Secretary; R. Reid, Corresponding Secretary; G. Ramsey, Treasurer; W. Alston, Dean of Pledges; T. C. Adams, Historian; K. Horton, Education Director; A. Knox, Social Coordinator; and L. Chisolm, Editor to the Sphinx. In living up to our motto "First of All, Servants of All, We Shall Transcend All," Kappa Omicron has successfully completed four of our projects thus far this semester and have made solid steps toward achieving other goals. Firstly, K.O. awarded our annual scholarship to a Black youth in the Durham Community. This year's winner has enrolled at the University of North Carolina; last year's is at Morehouse. Secondly, we sponsored a NAACP membership drive, garnering almost a hundred new members. Thirdly, we raised money for our "Kid of the Month" program in which we financially assist or provide gifts to a needy kid in Durham County General Hospital. Lastly, K.O. raised $500 through a raffle to benefit several elderly citizens at Christmas. Additionally, Kappa Omicron is participating in a tutoring and "big brother/big sister" type program at Mt. Zion Baptist of Durham along with our sisters of AKA. We recently have become the big Brothers of a Junior High basketball team which primarily consists of underpriviledged Black youth. We, also, hosted and prepared a banquet for the Alvin Ailey Dance Ensemble in conjunction with the AKA's. Kappa Omicron was awarded sponsorship of Duke's annual Red Cross Blood Drive in Cameron Indoor Stadium and the University's Flowers Lounge. We have also begun preparations for our annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Service in Duke Chapel on April 4th and have tentatively secured the services of a nationally 39


prominent figure as main speaker. We are continuing in our efforts to establish an endowment for the acquisition of Black historical manuscripts and aesthetic works. The Brothers of K.O. hope that 80's hold continued productivity, prosperity, and happiness for the Brothers. First of All, Servants of All, We Shall indeed Transcend All!

florido state u Greetings, Alpha Brothers all around from lota Delta Chapter. Most of the school year has dawned upon us, and it has been as successful as ever. In case some Brothers haven't known, visions of CHAPTER OF THE YEAR are still dancing in our heads at lota Delta. Thus far, we are way ahead of

Dystrophy and of course, the Million Dollar Drive. The chapter made a fivehundred dollar pledge which is sure to be paid by the time of Regional Convention. At that time we're going to make another pledge of the same amount. There's no such thing as noncommunication at lota Delta chapter. So far, our newsletter is very successful, as most Brothers in the Southern Region can attest to. We also were very successful in our first chapter reunion, which brought many Brothers back to lota Delta. But, our biggest communication project was our 2nd Annual Alpha Weekend, which brought Brothers from all over Florida and Alabama to compete in our Stomp Contest. In all, eight chapters were present. As you all can see, lota Delta is very positive minded about winning CHAPTER OF THE YEAR IN 1980.

The Brothers of lota Delta Chapter, Florida State University. schedule of the amount of things we were to accomplish this quarter, and we are still going one-hundred percent. Some of the things we accomplished since we were last heard from are as follows: We started the year off with a bicycle registration drive that was very successful; we took community children out trick or treating on Halloween; we served as ushers at a local church service; we collected can goods to donate to needy families, and our biggest service project was the wheelbarrow push. The chapter borrowed a wheelbarrow, and the Brothers pushed it around the city for seven hours collecting donations, which were donated to Muscular 40

We hope our incentive builds the incentive of the other chapters: therefore, keeping ALPHA to be a greater servant to mankind.

south Carolina On Sunday, December 9, 1979, the Brothers of Alpha Psi Lambda met at the fraternity house for breakfast to observe the fraternity's 73rd anniversary. Brother Raymond Bailey, who was initiated in the Fraternity in 1931 and who became a member of Alpha Psi Lambda in 1936, was the anniversary speaker. Brother Bailey's address was informative, inspirational and laced with

humor. He recounted serious and humorous incidents that he experienced as an undergraduate and as a member of the chapter. Brother Bailey challenged the brethren to continue to seek answers to some of the fraternity's most vexing concerns: what direction should the fraternity go; where should its emphasis be placed, and how should its priorities be ordered? The program was closed with the singing of the Alpha Hymn.

dark college Alpha Phi Chapter is located on the beautiful campus of Clark College, in Atlanta, Georgia. Since the time of its birth in 1927, the chapter has made many meaningful contributions in developing strong, scholarly, enthusiastic Alpha leadership through the world. Whenever we think of our A Phi A slogan, "There goes an Alpha Man", we at Clark College, think of all of our Brothers and especially those Alphas who are carrying the banner of leadership at Clark College this year. We Alphas are especially proud of Brother Clarence Johnson who recently has been elected president of Alpha Kappa Mu, Honor Society, and voted business Manager of Student Government Association for 1979-80; Brother Orrin Byrd, a junior, also has been elected president of Junior class and Vice President of the Pre-alumni Council of the United Negro College Fund; Brother Murray Davis, a Senior, is President of the Senior Class of 1979-80, and was elected "Mr. Clark College," for this year; Brother Stanley Brown, is President of our Pan Hellenic Council; Brother Lorenza P. Butler, Jr., an exchange student this year, was initiated into Alpha Sigma Chapter, Wiley College, Marshall, Texas, is Special Assistant to the President for the Clark College Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, State President of the Texas NAACP, National Business Manager of the Pre-Alumni Council of the United Negro College Fund; and Brother Gregg Daniels who is the President of Alpha Phi Chapter. We, at Clark College, are especially proud of our Black college and its role in developing quality leadership for tomorrow, and because we feel strongly about this concern, we share with you some of our leadership developing programs held during this college year. For the Carrie Steele Pitts Home, Alpha Phi held its annual The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Halloween Party for the children of the orphanage. For other community and political leadership and development, we involved ourselves in the following: the political campaign of Brother Michael Hightower in his successful attempt to be elected to the City Council of College Park, Georgia; sponsored bus trips for the students of Clark to attend away football games; served as ushers for important affairs, such as Atlanta's Airport Hearings, Mr. & Mrs. Little Clark Pageant, and the Brother Martin Luther King, Jr. March. We held our annual Christmas program on Founders' Day, erected a Christmas tree on the campus and sang Christmas carols. Also, we participated in the Southeastern Regional College Conference of the NAACP and CC's Jubilee Day-Freedom Song Rally. For those who aspire to become leaders, we share this poem "A Black Child's Destiny with you: A Black child's destiny in the world to be. A Thurgood Marshall or Booker T, A Marion Anderson with a beautiful voice, A Martin Luther King or W. E. B. DuBois, A James Weldon Johnson, a wiz with his pen, A famous architect like Washington's Ben, A Wilma Rudolph or Muhammed Ali, A Cecily Tyson or Billy Dee, Frederick Douglas, Harriet Tubman, or maybe Diana Ross. Without the existence of schools, all hope is lost. He may even want to build a character of his own And contribute his best and be well known. But where ever the dreams of the Black child lie Without people who care his dreams will die. Please support A PHI A to set a Black child's pace.

founded on December 12, 1969 by Brothers Lawrence Sutton and Arvid Mukes, has just completed its first decade of existence. During this period of time seventy-two Brothers have gone through Zeta Phi into Alphadom, and we expect many more during our next ten years of existence. In celebrating this joyous occasion Zeta Phi has been honored with the privilege of hosting this year's annual state convention on February 29, through March 2, 1980. At present our chapter is engaged in activities centered primarily around the state convention. Having chosen to forgo certain activities in favor of dedicating all our efforts at preparing for the convention we don't have much to report about our community activities for this year. But one of the projects we undertook was the painting of a house in a neighboring community which belonged to an elderly woman. We also visited senior citizens living in a rest home just before Thanksgiving. Also, we visited an elementary school and performed for the students, with the performance centered around their need to stay in school and get an education. Zeta Phi held its Founders Day program which was a great success due in part to Brother Walter Washington , President of Alcorn State University and past General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, who was our guest speaker for this occasion. Brother Washington's speech was very inspiring; he spoke on the basic elements upon which Alpha was founded: scholarship, manly deeds, and love for all mankind. To you Brother Washington, we, the Brothers of Zeta Phi thank you again for such an inspiring speech; for, we realize that as long as Alpha has men of your statue, setting such fine examples of what

Alpha is all about, we will continue to strive onward and upward toward the light. In closing, Brothers of Zeta Phi take this opportunity to welcome any Brothers passing through Mississippi to stop and visit us here at "The Valley." This year's chapter officers are: Earnie M. Sercye, President; Morris McCaskill, Vice-President; Daryl 0. Marshall, Treasurer; Billy Benson, Dean of Pledgees; Marshall Davis, Recording Secretary; Clavin E. Lipsey, Historian; and Kenneth A. Vesley, Editor-to-the-Sphinx.

winston-salem state u During the fall semester of 1979, the Brothers of Beta lota have worked diligently, holding the name of Alpha high in our minds as well as in our hearts. We strongly encourage each of our 16 chapter Brothers to take part in campus activities, as well as becoming leaders of the various organizations. The following Brothers currently hold office in campus organizations: Bobby Bennett, President of the Student Government Association; Wavey Williams, Director of Student Affairs (SGA); Ronald Davis, Director of Social Affairs (SGA); Craig Umstead, VicePresident, Senior Class; Ronald Hamilton, Vice-President, Junior Class; Raphael Hauser, President of the University Ushers; Clifton Sparrow, SGA Respresentative; Robert L. Hunt, President of the University Marching Band; Jay Farabee, Project Strengthen; Lewis Rogers, Yearbook Consultant; William Peterson, Yearbook Staff; Robert Brower, Yearbook Photographer; and Chavis, Big Brother-Big Sister program. Of the 16

This year's other members are: Ronald Alexander, Eric Brooks, Charles Cornelison, Gerald Pay ton, Michael Pittman, Ernest L. White, Ronald Woodard.

mississippi volley state u Zeta Phi chapter is located at Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, Mississippi. Zeta Phi, which was The Sphinx / Spring 1980

The men of Zeta Phi Chapter, Mississippi Valley State University. 41


chapter Brothers, five made "Who's Who Among American Colleges and Universities" - Wavey Williams, Raphael Hauser, Jay Farabee, Ronald Davis, and Robert Hunt II. The Brothers of Beta lota feel that "in order to remember those things done yesterday, one must strive to complete today's work goals." In light of this, various projects have been directed by the Brothers, so that we can proudly say that the work of Alpha is being done. We've sponsored a campus clean-up and an Educational Week; during National Education Week we sponsored the "Joseph N. Patterson" Oratorical contest, as well as various fund-raising projects. It is our hope that each Brother of Alpha, is striving to hold the name of Alpha high. If each Brother would do this, there is no doubt that we will remain "First of All, Servants of All, and Shall Transcend All."

The Annual Black and Gold Ball, Black History Week, and other tentatively scheduled fund raising projects. One of Mu Beta's most prominent Brothers, Anthony Plummer, received the honor of Who's Who Among American College Students, a honor that is rarely presented to Blacks on campus. Officers for Mu Beta are: James Harris, President; Larry Beasley, VicePresident; Russell Heaston, Corresponding Secretary; Sylvester Bernard, Treasurer; Terry Mitchell, Chaplain; and Anthony Plummer, Dean of Pledgees. The Brothers of Mu Beta Chapter are dedicated to academic and social excellence to prepare its members with the necessary tools to cope with today's society. We are placing great emphasis on the future with the hope that we can greatly expand our role so that the interest of the campus body and the entire community can be better served by Alpha Phi Alpha.

tennessee - martin The Brothers of Mu Beta Chapter at the University of Tennessee at Martin, would like to extend warm greetings to all Brothers in Alpha. Mu Beta Chapter is very young, yet one of the most progressive chapters in the state. "MB" has wasted no time in becoming an essential part of the academic and social life among Black students of UTM. Founded November 15, 1975, "MB" presently consists of 18 Brothers. The Charter Line under the name of "Nine Sons of Pharoah" was instrumental in starting the great Brotherhood of Alpha at UTM. Other lines include "Four Forces of Fury," "Five Keys to Success," "Fearless One," "Four Disciples of Thor," and the "Six Souls of Supremacy." The roster also includes two transfer Brothers. The Brothers held their annual Thanksgiving Canned Goods Dance which was very successful. Several boxes with canned goods, meat and bread were given to needy families in the Martin area. "MB" has also slated the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Program, commemorating the death of the late Black leader and Brother. At this time a scholarship will be presented to an outstanding Black student on campus. The annual Campus "Stepping" Hop is also planned for Winter Quarter. Some of the other activities scheduled for the year include Alpha Week, 42

Charleston metro The Brothers of the Mu Pi Chapter are examples of Alphas' perseverance. In 1977, the Senate of Baptist College at Charleston, South Carolina, granted Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity a charter to establish a chapter of the fraternity on the campus. This was done after a two-year investigation and probationary period. In August of 1978, the president of the Mu Pi Chapter received a letter

from the Associate Dean of Student Affairs informing the chapter that its charter had been revoked. This action was taken because the Dean was informed that Alpha Phi Alpha was a member of the National Panhellenic Council, which automatically designates the fraternity as a national Greek lettered social fraternity. The laws of Baptist College prohobits the chartering of such organizations. During the first semester of the school year the Brothers pursued this matter with full attention. They had no s u c c e s s . During the second sememster the Brothers decided to direct their attention to the business of the fraternity. They started with fund raising projects and continued their work by helping an orphanage in the area. At the present time, the Mu Pi Chapter is still in existence through an arrangement with the general headquarters. The Baptist College permits the chapter to solicit eligible and interested men for the Sphinx Club. The Brothers of the Mu Pi Chapter, like the seven jewels, believe that education, especially higher education, is the key to equality in America and the world. So the Brothers are working with Black students in an area high school to entice them to go to college. They also counsel them on worthwhile majors. The Brothers of the Mu Pi Chapter with the guidance of Beta Kappa Lambda Chapter (Charleston) would like to let other Brothers know that we will not let the light of Alpha dim in Charleston, South Carolina.

The Brothers of Mu Pi Chapter, Charleston, South Carolina. The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Qlobomo Delta Theta Lambda Chapter, Huntsville, Alabama, sends greetings to all its Brothers in Alphadom. The past fraternal year (1978-79) has been one of sacrifice in terms of work by many of the Brothers, but it has also been one of tremendous success for the chapter. Communications with our Brothers of Delta Gamma Chapter, Alabama A&M University, have improved greatly during the past year. The mutual respect which has developed between the chapters is an accomplishment which members of both chapters can be proud. Our Brothers of Delta Gamma have shown the true spirit of Alpha during the past year by their physical labor, financial support, and general support of the Alpha complex. Delta Theta Lambda competed for and walked away with the chapter of year awards at both the Alabama State and the Southern Regional Conventions. However, we lost at the National Convention in Washington, D.C., but we were very much in competition. Successes also include the chapter's own Willie Mingo Clark being elected as the new Southern Regional Vice-President. Finally the chapter's most profitable accomplishment was the opening of the Alpha Complex located at 4301 Oakwood Avenue NW, Huntsville, Alabama. Delegates to the 1979 National Convention in Washington, D.C. were Brothers Willie Mingo Clark, Harold G. Dickerson, Wiley T. Henderson, and Hugh G. Lacy. With the installation of the following officers by Brother Michael Crutch of Delta Gamma, plans were made for Founders Day, the Annual Toy Dance, and the New Year Eve's Party. 1979-80 Officers are Dr. Harold G. Dickerson, President; Jimmy Liner, Vice President; Calvin B. Browne, Financial Secretary; A. J. Garth, Recording Secretary; Elige Jones, Treasurer; Wiley T. Henderson, Dean of Pledges; Josh Oliver, Chaplain; Army Daniels, Jr., Director of Educational Activities; Lindsey G. Fields, Historian; Herman Mixon, Sergeant-at-Arms; and Hugh G. Lacy, Associate Editor of "The Sphinx."

tennessee An impressive public Founders Day program was sponsored by the Memphis Alumni Chapter, (Alpha Delta The Sphinx / Spring 1980

Lambda) and college chapters located at LeMoyne College, (Beta Xi), Memphis State University, (Kappa Eta), and Christian Brothers College (Nu Eta). The program was to memoralize the great founders of this fraternity, as well as to honor some outstanding leaders in the community, by presenting them with the fraternity's Distinguished Leadership and Community Service Award. Dr. Willie W. Herenton, the first Black Superintendent of the Memphis City Schools was recognized as the outstanding and distinguished local citizen who has exemplified leadership and outstanding community services to the Memphis and Shelby County community. A plaque was presented to Dr. Henrenton, by Brother George H. Brown, past president of Alpha Delta Lambda Chapter and member of the Memphis City School Board. Brother Dr. James Ford, one of the newly elected City Councilmen of Memphis, received a standing ovation, after an outstanding address. "A Tribute to the Jewels" by Brother Melvin Tuggle," "The House of Alpha," by Brother Mark Bell, and "There Goes An Alpha Man" by Brother Clarence Payne were all eloquently done, as was "Invictus" by Brother Willis Hardaway, who also received the Outstanding College Brother Award, presented by Brother Leon Freeman. The program would not have been complete without the golden voices of Brother Harold Winfrey and Brother Harold Brooks. Organ mediation music by Brother Walter Martin, Jr., while Brother Odell Brown, played the Greek Medley. Ms. Velma Lois Jones, Basileus, of the Alumni Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., accepted the Alpha welcome from Brother Troy Simpson. The program was centered around community service, aimed at leadership development and promotion within the Memphis community. The major thrust of the program was to encourage youth development and leadership as the founders of this great fraternity did seventy-three years ago. Brother Charles Jackson was chairman of the "Distinguished Leadership and Community Service Award," while Brother Troy Simpson, Jr. chaired the program. Brother Melvin Tuggle is president of the chapter. Alpha Phi Alpha chapters of Memphis, have conducted a "Leadership Development Program" for the past four years, under the supervision of Alpha Delta Lambda Alumni Chapter, for the high school students in Mem-

phis and county schools. The conferences are conducted at Shelby State Community College. The students are selected to attend on the recommendation of their high school guidance counselors.

SOUTHWEST arkonsos Pi Lambda Chapter of Little Rock, Arkansas observed its Annual Founders Day Program, December 9, 1979 at 3:00 p.m. at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church. The program chairman was Brother Dr. Roosevelt Brown. It was the most innovative and inspiring program that Pi Lambda has conducted in the past five years. This is the type of leadership that Brother Brown is noted for. And, we must say that, under his leadership eight years ago, Brother Brown initiated the idea of having our first annual debutante benefit ball and from this benefit ball, proceeds have been given to various civic organizations and Philander Smith College. The keynote speaker was Brother Ozell Sutton, Regional Director, Southeast Regional Community Relations, U.S. Department of Justice. Brother Sutton is also one of the candidates for the General President of Alpha Phi Alpha. Brother Sutton has distinguished himself by being Regional Vice President for two regions: Southwest and the Southeast. Brother Sutton's theme centered around the word LIGHT as part of the ritual of Alpha's "The Light of the World." Brother Sutton, with dignity, scholarship and integrity analyzed the word LIGHT, what it meant to him as well as what it should mean to all Alpha men as they struggle in their fight for truth, freedom, justice and equality for all mankind.

texas The La Villita Assembly Hall in San Antonio, Texas was the site for the Thirteenth Annual "Toys for Tots" Dance staged by the Brothers of Delta Rho Lambda Chapter, on November 23, 1979. The purpose of the gala, formal affair was to provide toys for young, less fortunate children in order to brighten their Christmas holidays. The Chairman of the Toy Dance Committee was Brother Allen 43


Melonsen. Brother Robert Wilson served as Master of Ceremonies for the occasion and he presented special guests after the Chapter President, Colonel Brodes H. Hartley, Jr., welcomed the more than 850 guests. Mrs. Dorothy Hopkins provided piano accompaniment for the medley of National Greek songs participated in by eight fraternities and sororities. Dance music was furnished by the Tom Ellis Ensemble. There were six community social service agencies receiving toys donated by the Alpha Brothers for the very young clientele of those agencies. On Sunday, December 6, 1979, the chapter sponsored its annual Founders Day Breakfast at the Fort Sam Houston, Texas Officers Club. The breakfast was well attended with over 50 Brothers and their wives or sweethearts, along with 5 undergraduate Brothers who shared in the event. The theme of the program was: "The Heritage of Alpha Phi Alpha." Brother William D. Smedler, Chairman of the Founders' Day Committee, served as Master of Ceremonies and also introduced the guest speaker, Brother Matthew H. Dawson. The traditional Lighting of the Candles and Tribute to Founders of Delta Rho Lambda were both solemn occasions. Remarks were made by the Chapter President, Brother Hartley.

grombling state The fall semester of 1979 found the Brothers of Delta Sigma Chapter, Grambling State University profoundly first of all, servants of all, transcending all. In response to this commitment, initially the Brothers assisted some of the incoming freshmen with registration and assignment to classes. Also, in accordance with this, the Brothers performed many other useful functions which included the annual Halloween promulgation of candies to the surrounding elementary schools, and, a service project at Thanksgiving by giving $75.00 worth of groceries to a needy family. December 4th, found the chapter in a particularly attentive frenzy in observing Founders' Day. Brother Charlie Johnson of Monroe entailed that we should reiterate our endeavors and strive more forcefully to be First Of All. Delta Sigma Chapter bows in strong 44

recognition of Brother Dennis James Redden, a native of Tallulah, Louisiana. Brother Redden graduated summa cum laude with a 3.93 average in elementary education. During his reign at Grambling he had achieved the highest average in his field of specialization. Brother Redden was a versatile ALPHA MAN indeed, for not only was he an intellectual ALPHA, but also he was a member of the Baptist Student Union, a Merit Scholar, and past president of SNEA-SLAE, an educational society for Louisiana. Brother Redden crossed the "burning sands" in the Spring of 1977. The new Brothers upholding the aims of our dear fraternity include Brothers James Thompson, Brian Ingram, Ellis Hawkins, DarreJI Manning and Nias Overstreet. The officers for this fraternal year are: Thomas Glover, President; Danny Woods, Vice President; Albert Johnson, Secretary; Nias Overstreet, Assistant Secretary; and Frank Hicks, Treasurer. Look for bigger and better things from Delta Sigma.

southern university The Brothers of Beta Sigma Chapter located at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana would like to let all Alphadom know that Alpha "ain't half steppin'" in the Deep South. In a university community rich in Alpha tradition , the Brothers of Beta Sigma

choose not to bask in Apha achievements of the past but strive to set higher goals and achievements. After making a respectable showing in last summer's National Convention, the Brothers of Beta Sigma started the school year with a great deal of enthusiasm. The result of that enthusiasm is quite evident. It comes in the form of 20 new Brothers and a continued commitment of service to the University, the community and to Alpha Phi Alpha. The fraternal year kicked off with our Fall Smoker. Brother Huel Perkins, author of many profound articles in the last few editions of our Sphinx Magazine, gave a heart warming and inspirational message which excited both Brothers and prospectives. This successful Smoker resulted in 20 new Brothers which pushes our active membership to 43. In the community, Beta Sigma is quite active. The Brothers have sponsored Halloween and Thanksgiving parties for mentally retarded children at the Mohican Learning Center, visited several rest homes, donated Thanksgiving baskets to needy families and donated money collected by Christmas caroling. In service to the University, Beta Sigma has excelled. Brothers serve in many capacities in the Student Government Association and various campus committees and organizations. These include, Vice President of the S.G.A.; President of the Senior Class; Chairman, Student Elections Committee; Vice President, Pan-Hellenic Council; Vice President, Student Union

Brothers of Beta Sigma pose beside "Lift Every Voice," a memorial project spearhead the chapter. (Shown left to right) Brothers Glenn Etienne, Grady Prestage, David H and Carl Weary. The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Governing Board; President, American Society of Civil Engineers; President, Electronics Technology Club; President, Microbiology Club; President, Biology Club; President, Chemistry Club; President, Pi Omega Pi Business Fraternity, and four members serve on the Student Senate. The most notable contribution that Beta Sigma has made is the presentation of the Smith-Brown Memorial Sculpture. The sculpture which is located in the courtyard of the Student Union is in memory of two students who were killed by local law enforcement officers during a demonstration in November of 1972. The 8 foot sculpture which received newspaper, radio, and television exposure was a result of a fund raising drive initiated in 1974 and culminated in November of 1979. It is entitled, "Lift Every Voice," and was completed at a cost of approximately $6,000. The televised dedication featured presentations by Brothers David Hayes, Grady Prestage, Glenn Etienne, Carl Weary and a special acceptance by Acting University President, Brother James J. Prestage. Beta Sigma has continued to lead the way campus-wide. The Brothers have sponsored a Greek Stomp contest, won first place in the Annual Homecoming Stomp contest, second place float award in the Homecoming parade, and first place in the Alpha Kappa Alpha Stomp competition. Plans for next semester include a continued commitment to public service, participation in state, regional, and National awards competition, and an increasing pledge of $1,000 to the Million Dollar Fund Drive. On behalf of the Brothers of Beta Sigma we hope that the true spirit of the Fraternity will rule your hearts, guide your thoughts and control your lives so that we all may become "Servants of All."

longston u As we enter into the decade of the 1980's the Brothers of Beta Kappa Chapter in Langston University at Langston, Oklahoma are very optimistic. One reason for our optimism was the addition of nine Brothers in the fall semester from the ship, "Juggernaut." They were: Philip Anderson; Michael Brackeen, Captain; Anthony Buatler; Arthur Houston; Clarence Isadore, Co-captain; Gerd Kelso; Carlos King; Lovell Leverette; and Michael Maloy. We are proud of these The Sphinx / Spring 1980

individuals and are looking forward to working with them. During the past fall semester the Brothers and Sphinxmen participated in numerous civic and social activities. Some of them were the local Jerry Lewis Labor Day Muscular Dystrophy Drive, the St. Jude's Christian Hospital National Bike-a-thon, the local American Red Cross Bloodmobile, and the Langston Elementary Schools annual King and Queen Coronation. Also, several Brothers are holding or occupying key positions at the University. Such as Brother James W. Simpson, President of the Pan-hellenic Council; Brother Arthur Houston, President of the Junior Class; Brother Carlos King, Vice-President of the Sophomore Class; Brother Michael Maloy, President of the Spanish Club; Brother Clarence Isadore, All-Star defensive end for the football team; Barother Doyle Moore, assistant station manager of the institution's local radio station, KALU; and Brother Ernest Holloway, Jr., Chief Announcer at KALU. Several Brothers are members of Langston University's concert choir and marching band. The Brothers of the Beta Kappa chapter recently celebrated Founders' Week with a number of activities. Some of them included sponsoring Sunday morning worship services on December 2, Pre-Founders' Day Banquet, and a salute to the ladies of the Alpha Zeta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Also on December 5, Beta Kappa sponsored the weekly Wednesday all-school assembly, and featured as the guest speaker Oklahoma state representative, the Honorable Brother A. Visiano Johnson. Also, congratulations are in order for Brother Dr. Ernest Holloway, Sr., who in mid-October was named the 14th President of Langston University. The Brothers of Beta Kappa hope everyone has a prosperous new year, and hope to see you at the 34th Southwest Regional in Galveston, Texas and the National Convention in Chicago.

WEST U Of

orizono Eta Psi Lambda Chapter, Tucson, Arizon and Zeta Theta Chapter, University of Arizona hosted a gala

Founders Day Week-end, December 7, 8, and 9, 1979. Brother Henry Ryan was Chairman and Coordinator of the activities. The weekend started with a Black Tie Alpha Anniversary Dance at the downtown Santa Rita Hotel, Friday night, December 7th. Saturday, December 8th a Symposium for high school students was held from 9:00 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. at the "A" Mountain Neighborhood Center. The theme was "GO-TO-HIGH SCHOOL; GO-TO-COLLEGE." The Chapter had obtained from the Tucson School Districts names and addresses of all Black Sophomore, Junior and Senior students (798). School principals and counselors were contacted and a letter inviting each student was delivered to them through their high school counselor. Arrangements were made through the school districts to have school buses pick up students at their respective high schools at 8:00 A.M. Saturday, and bring them to the "A" Mountain Center. The buses remained until the program was completed to return the students to their respective areas. Ninety-six (96) students and eight (8) parents attended the Symposium. Three major topics were discussed with the students: (1) "Academic Opportunities in Tucson" by Dr. Vivian Cox, Associate Professor, Elementary Education, University of Arizona and Mr. Larry Rosette, Vocational Assessment Specialist, Pima Community College, Tucson; (2) "Vocational Opportunities in Tucson" by Ms. Carol Smith, Internship Adviser, Special Projects in High Schools, Tucson Unified School District and Mr. Robert Hedgecock, Chairman, Department of Industrial and Vocational Education, Tucson High School; (3) "Recreational Opportunities in Tucson" by Mr. Eoleaun Underwood, Coordinator, Cultural Arts, Tucson City Parks and Recreational Department and Ms. Donna Pitt, Recreational Coordinator, Tuscon City Parks and Recreation Department. Brother Felix L. Goodwin, Assistant to the President, University of Arizona closed the Symposium with a discussion on "Planning for Today and Tomorrow." Lunch was served by the Alpha Wives following the Symposium. A highlight of the program for the students was the drawing for the ten door prizes which were given to those in attendance. The Founders' Day Week-End was climaxed with a Public Meeting at 45


Prince Chapel AME Church at 3:00 P.M. Sunday, December 9, 1979. Brother Lumus Byrd, Jr., Delta Tau Lambda Chapter, Phoenix was the featured speaker. Brother Byrd, Manager of Market Development Special Projects, The Greyhound Corporation spoke on "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People." Brother Byrd, a native of South Carolina and a graduate of South Carolina State, Orangeburg, S.C. has had an impressive career since graduation. He taught high school in Charleston, S.C. for six years; worked with Schlitz Brewing Company for five years and has been with Greyhound Corporation for five years in Oakland, California and Phoenix, Arizona. Brother Clyde Phillips is President of Eta Psi Lambda and Brother Dwayne Smith, a Junior at the University of Arizona, is President of Zeta Theta. Brother Johnnie Zander and wife, Jessie celebrated their 25th Wedding Anniversary December 2 1 , 1979. Mrs. Zander's anniversary present to Brother Zander was a Life Membership in Alpha. Eta Psi Lambda welcomed Brother Ronald Clark and Brother Leroy Colbert, Jr. who moved to Tucson from

Boulder, Colorado with the IBM Corporation. Both Brothers were affiliated with Mu Upsilon Lambda Chapter in Boulder, Colorado before coming to Tucson. Brother Jon Hall, Zeta Theta and Brother Felix Goodwin are the two Black members of the University of Arizona Student Senate and Faculty Senate. Brother Hall, a Junior in

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For a free booklet with more easy energy-saving tips, write "Energy," Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37830. ENERGY. We can't afford to waste it. U S. Department of Energy

Management Information Systems and Air Force ROTC Cadet attends the University on a four-year ROTC Scholarship and is active in student activities at the University. He is the first Black member of the Student Senate. Brother Goodwin served two previous terms on the Faculty Senate and is the first and only Black member. Alpha is movina ahead in Tuscon!

Were counting onyou. You, the people.That's what the Census has been about since the first one was taken in 1790. Now, the Census is helping people more than ever by providing information needed to allocate funds for jobs, schools, hospitals, parks and much more. Your answers also assure your area ot equal representation in Congress. All answers are kept confidential by law. /2> fztZ 1980

of the

83SÂťâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Answer the Census. A Publu- Sci

CENSUS 'HO uf This Mugu/jnc & The Advertising Council

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


Omega CbapteR Laurence T. Young Sr. Editor

Brother BENJAMIN HARRISON BROWN entered Oemega Chapter October 15, 1979. Brother Brown was an active member of Eta Beta Lambda Chapter, Wichita, Kansas. Brother Brown was born in Sedalia, Missouri where he received his elementary and secondary education in the local schools - later receiving his college training at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. He rendered military service, serving during World War I. Following his military service, Brother Brown enrolled in the School of Law, - Kansas University where the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence was conferred upon him. Brother Brown was the first "Black" to practice law in the city of Wichita. He was a member of the local Bar Association, - the National Negro Bar Association. He was one of the founders of St. Mark United Methodist Church. Brother Brown is survived by a daughter, Mary L. Williams, and many collateral relatives.

B. H. Brown

Harold F. Drake

Brother HAROLD FANNING DRAKE - an active member of Delta Theta Lambda Chapter in Huntsville, Alabama entered Omega Chapter November 3, 1979. Brother Drake received his elementary and secondary education at the Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, Normal, Alabama; later receiving a Bachelor's degree at Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) and subsequently his medical degree at Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee. Brother Drake entered private practice in Huntsville, Alabama, staff member of the Donaldson Hospital in Fayetteville, Tennessee, later admitted as staff physician at Huntsville General Hospital, and served as school physician at Oakwood College and Alabama A & M University for a number of years. Brother Drake was a member of many civic, community and national organizations. He was a member of the Rocket City Radio Controllers Model Airplane Club; he was a deacon of the Church Street Cumberland Presbyterian Church; a member of Evening Star Lodge #6; he was the recipient of many service awards and plaques. Brother Drake was devoted to Alpha Phi Alpha in all it's various aspects and exerted a great influence over members of his local chapter. Brother Drake is survived by his mother - Ann, his wife, Geneva, his sister Marian, and a host of collateral relatives and friends. The Sphinx / Spring 1980

Brother JAMES PETERSON DIXON entered Omega Chapter January 25, 1980 at a local hospital in Mobile, Alabama following a brief illness. Brother Peterson was born in Mobile, Alabama - where he received his early education - later earned his baccalaureate degree at Talladega College - and following this received his medical degree at Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee in 1949. Brother Dixon was a former vice president of the Mobile Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America; member of the Chamber of Commerce, Chairman of the Board of Gulf Federal Savings and Loan Association; a charter member of Beta Omicron Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, a member of the Mental Health Board, in Mobile. Brother Dixon is survived by his wife - Lillian, - two daughters, Janet and Patricia and four grandsons. Funeral arrangements were conducted by the Johnson & Allen Mortuary in Mobile.

D.PARKE GIBSON

Brother D. PARKE GIBSON, age 48, entered Omega Chapter May 12, 1979 at New York City Hospital, following a brief illness. Brother Gibson was born in Seattle, Washington October 8, 1930 - where he received his elementary and secondary education. He attended New York City College, from which institution the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred upon him. Brother Gibson was a prolific writer, - he was a former employee at the Chicago Defender, leaving his newspaper to open his own public relations firm in New York City, the Harlem district. The growth of Brother Gibson's operation necessitated his moving the "D. PARKE GIBSON ASSOCIATES, Inc." executive offices to 475-5th Avenue, New York, - using his Harlem office as a research center. This firm is recognized as one of the largest minority owned firms in the industry listing several national and international businesses as clients. Alpha Gamma Lambda chapter conducted Omega services at Abyssinian Baptist Church which were followed by funeral rites there. Brother Gibson is survived by his wife - Patricia, two children, Dyle Hall of Washington, D.C.; Frank Turner of Los Angeles, California, a brother Everett of San Antonio, Texas and three grandchildren. 47


Brother LAMAR S. LEWIS entered Omega chapter December 7, 1979 at Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Brother Lewis, age 22 years, was born in Chicago, the youngest son of Ernestine and Carl Lewis. At a very early age - Brother Lewis was initiated into Eta Eta chapter at Western Illinois University, McComb, Illinois, - he served his chapter well in many official capacities. Brother Lewis' educational background well reflected his attitude toward others. He attended the Deneen Elementary School in Chicago, and the Quigley South institution from which he graduated in 1975. In the fall of that year he matriculated at Western Illinois University majoring in elementary Education - and law enforcement. Alpha Phi Alpha Omega chapter rites were conducted by Chicago chapters Wednesday, December 12, 1979 which preceded funeral rites at the Leak Funeral Home, 7838 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. Brother Lewis is survived by a devoted wife, Kay; his mother and father; a sister, Donzella; two brothers, Carl Jr., and Rodney; a grandmother and grandfather, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, and a host of friends. Brother PAUL R. REESE, a Life Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, entered Omega Chapter December 14, 1979 at the age of 67 in his home in Baltimore, Maryland. Brother Reese was an active member of Delta Lambda Chapter -Baltimore, Maryland; he was born in Columbia, South Carolina

where he received his elementary and secondary education; was a graduate of Benedict College and later did graduate work at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, majoring in Hospital Administration. In Baltimore, Brother Reese helped plan the West Baltimore health care center - serving as its administrator for several years before his retirement therefrom. Brother Reese was a member of Bethel A.M.E. Church serving as a member of the Steward Board for many years; also held membership in many civic organizations of the city. Brother Reese is survived by his wife, Doris; two sisters, Thelma of Columbia, South Carolina and Stella of Boston, Massachusetts; and many collateral relatives.

O M E G A CHAPTER N O T I C E S In profound sorrow Alpha Phi Alpha announces the passing into OMEGA CHAPTER: Brother J. MAYO WILLIAMS - an ardent member of Xi Lambda Chapter, Chicago, Illinois, following a lengthy illness. Brother Williams was a former member of Alpha Gamma Chapter, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island; where he distinguished himself on the football team; later returned to Chicago where he established a thriving record business, the Decca Record Company. More information on Brother Williams will appear in a subsequent edition of The Sphinx.

3 n JUtemnrtam

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1913 — 1980

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48

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


c Henry A. Calhs. MO.

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JEWELS, OMEGA CHAPTER

Charles H. Chapman

Eugene Kinckle Jones

George B. Kelley

Nathaniel A. Murray

Robert H. Ogle

Vertner W Tandy

GENERAL OFFICERS GENERAL PRESIDENT — James R. Williams 5 8 4 Avalon, Akron OH EXECUTIVE SECRETARY — James B. Blanton 4 4 3 2 King Drive, Chicago IL GENERAL TREASURER — James M. Trent 3 6 0 6 Edward Street, Landover, MD GENERAL COUNSEL — Albert Holland, Jr 31 Hickory Hill Rd„ Tappan, NY HISTORIAN — Charles H. Wesley 7 6 3 2 17th Street, N.W., Washington, DC COMPTROLLER — Charles C. Teamer 2 6 0 1 Gentilly Blvd., New Orleans, LA DIRECTOR-GENERAL CONVENTIONS - Kermit J. Hall 1 0 0 Fairview Ave., Yeadon, PA

44320 60653 20785 10983 20012 70122 19050

VICE PRESIDENTS EASTERN — Thomas R.Hunt MIDWESTERN — Jimmie L. Buford SOUTHERN — W . M i n g o Clark SOUTHWESTERN — Charles H. Lewis WESTERN — Clinton L. Minnis

9 Rickover Court, Annapolis, MD 2 1 4 0 1 9 8 0 7 Smalley Drive, Kansas City, MO 6 4 1 3 4 2 0 2 6 Winchester Road, Huntsville, AL 3 5 8 1 0 1 7 1 0 West Xyler, Tulsa, OK 7 4 1 2 7 2 1 1 8 S. Bagley Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 9 0 0 3 4

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENTS EASTERN — Darrell V. Freeman MIDWESTERN — Richard Graves SOUTHERN — James C. Jackson SOUTHWESTERN — Tyrone M. Dudley WESTERN — Terry C. Brown

2 2 2 7 South 27th Street, Philadelphia, PA 1 9 1 4 5 4 4 3 9 Campbell Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 4 6 2 2 6 2 1 5 1 University Station, Athens, GA 3 0 6 0 2 Box 9 0 6 , Northeast Louisiana U, Monroe LA 7 0 1 8 1 2 4 0 5 S. Corning St. • Apt. 2 8 , Los Angeles, CA 9 0 0 3 4

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. GENERAL O F F I C E : 4432 Martin Luther King Drive, C h i c a g o , IL 60653 James B. Blanton, Executive Secretary Michael J. Price, Assistant Executive Secretary, Editor-in Chief, The SPHINX Darryl R. Matthews, Assistant Executive Secretary Alpha Phi Alpha Building Foundation, Inc.

Wayne C. Harvey, Chairman

8775 W. Kingsbury University City, MO 63124 Dr. Edward Ballard, Vice Chairman James B. Blanton, Secretary James M. Trent, Treasurer Albert Holland, Counsel William Decker Clarke James Hunt James Rushin Larry Earvin Theodis Johnson James R. Williams, Ex-Officio

Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation, Inc. Henry Ponder, Chairman Office of the President Benedict College Columbia, SC 2 9 2 0 4 Ivan L Cotman, Vice Chairman James B. Blanton, Secretary James M. Trent, Treasurer Albert Holland, Counsel Jesse Sterling Walter Sullivan Paul Williams Ernest L. Holloway Anthony D. Mosely James R. Williams, Ex-Officio

NATIONAL

COMMITTEE/COMMISSION

CHAIRMEN

AWARDS T ^ ™ 3 ^ A- p h l l l , P s 9 9 0 8 Taylor Drive Overland Park, KS 6 6 2 1 2

ONE MILLION DOLLAR DRIVE Isidore J. Lamothe, Jr. , 4 0 7 University Ave. Marshall, TX 7 5 6 7 0

BUDGET AND FINANCE Charles C. Teamer 2 6 0 1 Gentilly Blvd. New Orleans, LA 7 0 1 2 2

PUBLIC POLICY Hobart S. Jarrett 3 1 5 West 70thSt - N o . 15-J New York, NY 1 0 0 2 3

BUSINESS ENCOURAGEMENT COMMISSION Robert E Sanders 100 Wilshire Blvd. — Suite 4 5 0 Santa Monica, CA 9 0 4 0 1

PUBLICATIONS Hanley J. Norment 1 2 5 0 0 Arbor View Terrace Silver Spring, MD 2 0 9 0 2

COLLEGE BROTHERS AFFAIRS COMMISSION Norman E. W. Towels 2 7 5 Mohawk Perris, CA 9 2 3 7 0

PUBLICITY-PUBLIC RELATIONS Ronald S. Flowers 7217S.Oglesby Chicago, IL 6 0 6 4 9

CONSTITUTION A. Wendell Wheadon 2 6 0 0 St. Louis Ave. E. St. Louis. IL 6 2 2 0 5

RECOMMENDATIONS Earnest Wallace 2 0 1 8 Van Cleave Dallas, TX 2 5 2 1 6

ELECTIONS John I. Hendricks Box 4 2 Alcorn State University Lorman, MS 3 9 0 9 6

RULES AND CREDENTIALS Wilson J. Davis 4 5 0 9 Williamsburg Dr. Columbia, SC 2 9 2 0 3

EQUITABLE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Charles E. Lewis 3 5 0 0 Fieldstone Dr. Winston-Salem. NC 2 7 1 0 5 GRIEVANCES AND DISCIPLINE Ottawa W. Harris 2 6 0 4 Elizabeth St. Denver, CO 8 0 2 0 5 LIFE MEMBERSHIP Elmer C Collins 2 6 1 5 1 Lake Shore Blvd. — No. 1 2 2 4 Euclid, OH 4 4 1 3 2

SENIOR ALPHAS COMMISSION Laurence T. Young, Sr. 5 5 5 East 33rd PI. — No. 1 2 0 8 Chicago, IL 6 0 6 1 6 STANDARDS AND EXTENSION A. Thomas Reliford 1 5 3 0 16th St., N.W. — No. 6 0 4 Washington, DC 2 0 0 3 6 TIME AND PLACE Frank E. Devine 6 2 0 2 Washington Ave. Philadelphia, PA 1 9 1 4 3

PAST GENERAL

PRESIDENTS

Moses Melvin Morrison* Roscoe C. Giles* Frederick Miller Drawer " M " Mound Bayou, MS 38762 Charles H. Garvin* Henry L Dickason* Henry Arthur Callis* Howard H. Long* W. A. Pollard* Daniel D. Fowler* L L. McGee* S. S. Booker* Raymond W. Cannon 2008 Virginia Road Los Angeles. CA 90016 B. Andrew Rose* Charles H. Wesley 1824 Taylor Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20011 Rayford W. Logan 3001 Veazey Terrace, N.W., No. 326 Washington, DC 20008 Belford V. Lawson, Jr. 1140 Connecticut Avenue. N.W. Washington, DC 20036 A. Maceo Smith* Frank L Stanley, Sr.* Myles A. Paige 4124 Kenway Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90008 William H. Hale* T. Winston Cole 124 S W 23rd Gainesville. FL 32601 Lionel H. Newsom Central State University Wilberforce, OH 45384 Ernest N. Morial 1101 Harrison-Avenue New Orleans, LA 70122 Walter Washington Alcorn State University, Lorman. MS 39096 •OMEGA CHAPTER

The Sphinx / Spring 1980

PERSONNEL Randolph Baxter 9 1 9 Independence Avenue Akron, OH 4 4 3 1 0

' O M E G A CHAPTER

49


CHAPTER

mm,

DIRECTORY

* ( A s t e r i s k ) i n d i c a t e s that a d d r e s s l i s t e d in not c u r r e n t . In this c a s e a d i r e c t o r y w a s s u b -

1*1

Advisor

IT)

Treasurer

m i t t e d for 1 9 7 7 - 7 8 . b u t n o t for 1 9 7 8 - 7 9 .

IP)

President

IESI

Editor to T h e - S p h m x

(CS) N O R E P O R T i n d i c a t e s that t h e c h a p t e r h a s f a i l e d to r e p o r t a n a d d r e s s (file a c h a p t e r

Corresponding Secretary

IVP)

V i c e President

Secretary

(OOP)

D e a n of P l e d g e s

(S)

d i r e c t o r y ) for t w o c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s prior to p u b l i c a t i o n In s u c h c a s e s n o d i r e c t o r y w a s

(FS)

Financial Secretary

(DP)

D e a n of P l e d g e s

filed for 1 9 7 7 - 7 8 or 1 9 7 8 - 7 9

(RS|

Recording Secretary

(AS)

Assistant S e c r e t a r y

F A C T £•!*& I

INTERNATIONAL ( D I S T R I C T I) Director To Be Appointed Africa (Area I)

•EU Alpha Lambda (New Haven - #256) Ronald E Manning (P) 140 Stimson Road New Haven, CI 06511 Rhode Island (Area III) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Gamma (Brown U - #25) Michael C. Frazier P 0 Box 1167 - Brown University Providence. Rl 02912 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Mil Theta Lambda

K^Phiro£"^PT'E"SsPDiemB,ot^, (Uo. Liberia-Cottington C o l l . - P r 0 | d ^ 6062 O 2 M O #439) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS EU Epsilon Lambda (Monrovia, Liberia - #260) No Report Europe (Area II) Theta Theta Lambda (Frankfort. Germany - #285) Charles Betterson (CS) 327 SIG CO APO NV 09052 Caribbean (Area III) Theta Epsilon Lambda (St. Thomas. VI - #282) No Report lota Sigma Lambda (St, Croix. V I - # 5 1 8 ) No Report Epsilon Theta Lambda (Hamilton, Bermuda - #219 No Report Iota Epsilon Lambda (Nassau, Bahamas - #506) No Report Asia (Area IV) 'Mu Phi Lambda (Seoul South Korea - #565) Col Wm J.Srmpkins(P) 121 Evacuation Hospital APO San Francisco, CA 96301

New Hampshire (Area IV) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Theta Zeta (Dartmouth College - #381) Ray Blackwell (P) HB 671 Dartmouth College Hanover. NH 03755

NEW YORK STATE ( D I S T R I C T III)

Eta Zeta Lambda (New Rochelle - #261) No Report •Eta Chi Lambda (Nyack - #276) Walter C Blount, Jr. P.O. Box 130 Orangeburg, NY 10962 Kappa Upsilon Lambda (Mid Hudson Valley - #542) James McLaughlin (P) 7 Cindy Lane Wappingers Falls. NY 12590 New York City (Metropolitan) (Area V) COLLEGE CHAPTERS EU (Metropolitan - #7) Ruben Wilkerson (P) 1470 Amsterdam Ave - #3 New York. NY 10023 Zeta Eta (Columbia U - #338) Charles Stephens 534 W 114th Street New York. NY 10025 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Gamma Lambda (New Y o r k - # 1 2 5 ) Henry W Rice. II (P) 160 Broadway New York. NY 10038 Kappa Xi Lambda (New York - #536) No Report Brooklyn and Long Island (Area VI) COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Delta Chi (City of Brooklyn-#308) Steven E Palmer (CS) 102 02 Van Wyck Exp. Queens. NY 11419 Theta Epsilon (Adelphi U - #380) Bert Hunter (P) Room 202 • linen Hall Adelphi University Garden City. NY 11530 •Kappa Rho (C W. Post College - #435) Arthur Matthews (P) Brookvrlle Hall, Rm. 235 C W Post College Greenvale, NY 11548 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma lota Lambda (Brooklyn Long Island - #175) John M Williams (S) 51 Alabama Avenue Hempstead, NY 11550 ZeU Zeta Lambda (St, Albans - #239) Eugene L. Aiken, Jr (CS) P. 0 Box - B Cambria Heights. NY 11411

Director Clifford R Clemmons 221 25 Manor Road Queens Village, NV 11427 Western New fork State (Area I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Epsilon (U ol Buffalo - #93) Robert E Daniel (P) 3217 Bailey Avenue Buffalo NY 14215 Mu Sigma (U of Rochester - #458) Tor Elliot Aschan (S) P.O. Box 5051 Rochester. NY 14627 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Rho Lambda (Buffalo-#116) Benjamin F. Bullock, Jr (P) 373 Humboldt Parkway Buffalo. NY 14208 Eta Theta Lambda ( D I S T R I C T II) (Vfyandoance - #263) Director Thell Butler. Jr (S) Thomas D. Harris, IV 35 Seneca Avenue 135 Canterbury Street Dix Hills. NY 11746 Hartford, CT 06112 EU Rho Lambda Massachusetts (Area I) (Rochester - #271) COLLEGE CHAPTERS ^ H d . o n ( P ) Sigma 135 Fairhill Drive (Metropolitan - #17) Rochester. NY 14618 No Report Central New York SUte (Area II) Alpha Kappa COLLEGE CHAPTERS (Metropolitan - #32) Alpha inactive (Cornell U - #1) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Robert P Griggs (CS) Epsilon Gamma Lambda 104 Willaid Straight Hall (Boston - #214) Cornell University No Report Ithaca, NY 14853 Theta Iota Lambda M b Ml (Springfield - #286) (Syracuse U - #94) lesse Parks (P) Ervin Allgood (CS) 184 Middlesex Street P.O. Box 6041 Springfield, MA 01109 Teal Avenue Station Connecticut (Area II) Syracuse, NY 13217 COLLEGE CHAPTERS ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta lota Theta Lambda (Yale U - #6) (Endicott - #509) No Report Frank Wilson (P) Kappa Delta P. 0 Box 232 (U of Connecticut - #423) Endicott, NY 13760 No Report •Iota Kappa Lambda MuPhi (Syracuse- #511) (U of Bridgeport - #461) Edgar Blackman loel Roach (S) Box 1128 Teall Station 244 University Ave - Box 14 Syracuse, NY 13210 Bridgeport. CT 06602 Northeast New York SUte (Area III) MuPsi COLLEGE CHAPTERS (SCSC - #463) Kappa Zeta Henry Rhodes (S) (Utica College - #425) 146 Sprmgside Avenue, A 1 Gustee Brown. Jr (P) New Haven. CT 06515 B016OSH Utica College ALUMNI CHAPTERS Utica, NY 13502 BeU Sigma Lambda (Hartlord - #161) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Sylvester Johnson (P) BeU Pi Lambda 31 Chestnut Hill Road (Albany - #159) West Srmsbury, CT 06092 Irving Smith. Jr. (S) Zeta Phi Lambda 35 Briarwood Road (SUmlord - #253) Loudonvrlle. NY 12211 William D. McLean (P) TheU Chi Lambda 19 Oakwood Drive (Schenectady - #298) Seymour. CT 06483 No Report lota loU Lambda (Rome - #510) No Report Hudson Valley (Area IV, ALUMNI CHAPTERS

NEW ENGLAND

50

NEW JERSEY (District IV) Director Elbert C, Wisner 300 Lincoln Dr., Colonial Terr Ocean, NJ 07112 (Area I - Northern) COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota Rho (Newark College of Engineering Samuel C. Carter (P) 30 Lenox Avenue - #3006 East Orange. NJ 07018 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Alpha Lambda (Newark-#123) Arthur C. Williams (RS) 158 Uncoln Street Montclarr, Nl 07042 Beta Alpha Lambda (Jersey City - #145) No Report Delta Mu Lambda (Paterson - #199) James Gaines (P) 22 Gardner Avenue Jersey City, NJ 07304 Kappa TheU Lambda (Teaneck-#531) Carlos Peay, Jr, (P) 295 Ferris Place Ridgewood. NJ 07450 (Area II - Central) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Iota (Rutgers U - #97) Kevin C. Johnson (S) LPO 12325 Livingston College New Brunswick, NJ 08903

ALUMNI CHAPTERS ZeU Epsilon Lambda (Red Bank - #238) Reginald Creed (S) 751 Shrewsbury Avenue Long Branch. NJ 07740 ZeU Nu Lambda (Plamfreld - #245) Alfred Crawford (P) 169 Hellem Street Fanwood, NJ 07023 Theta Psi Lambda (Somerset - #299) Henry P Brooks (CS) 1223 West 4th Street Plamfield, NJ 07063 (Area III - Southern) COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota Iota (Trenton State College - #406) Ronald Taylor (P) Centennial Hall - #291 Trenton State College Trenton NJ 08625 Nulota (Glassboro State - #472) Keith D Butler (P) Park Crest Village - Apt #255 Glassboro. NJ 08028 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha TheU Lambda (Atlantic City - #130) Austin Martin (P) 1905 Arctic Avenue Atlantic City. NJ 08401 Zeta lota Lambda (Trenton - #242) Herman I Kimbrough (FS) 200 King Street Trenton, NJ 08046 Kappa lota Lambda (Burlington County - #532) Horton Cooper (CS) 24 Marigold Lane Willmgboro. NJ 08046 Nu Gamma Lambda (Glassboro - #570) John J Williams (P) 26 Pmewood Lane Sicklerville. Nl 08081

PENNSYLVANIA (District V )

Psi (U of Pennsylvania - #22) Raymond K. Wallace (P) 4029 Spruce Street - #12 Philadelphia. PA 19104 IMUPi (Cheney - 302) No Report Zeta Psi (West Chester State Coll #353) Warren M. Trent (P) West Chester State College Box 3093 - Lawrence Center West Chester. PA 19380 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Rho (Philadelphia - #16) Thomas H, Watkins (P) 847 N. Ml. Pleasant Road Philadelphia. PA 19119 ZeU Omicron Lambda (Philadelphia - #247) Craig C. Brown (P) 7822 Thouron Avenue Philadelphia. PA 19119

DELAWARE, MARYLAND & D.C. (District VI) Directof Hanley) Norment 12500 Arbor View Terrace Silver Spring. MD 20902 Delaware (Area I) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Sigma (Delaware State College- #83) William S Banks. Jr. (T) 115 Reese Street Dover. DE 19901 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma TheU Lambda (Wilmington - #174) Joshua W. Martin. Ill (P) 36 Coachlight Court Wilton Newcastle, DE 19720 ZeU Rho Lambda (Dover - #249) Reuben Sailers (P) 109 Bertrand Drive Dover, DE 19901

Maryland North (Area II) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Director BeU Alpha Frank Devme (Morgan State U - #45) 6202 Washington Avenue Dan H. Spikes (P) Philadelphia, PA 19143 1652 E. Coldspring Lane Western Pennsylvania (Area 1) Baltimore. MD 21218 COLLEGE CHAPTERS MuRho Omicron (Towson State - #457) (U of Pittsburgh - # 1 4 ) Robert Cloud (P) Chester A. Ray, Jr, (P) 540 Winston Ave Box 7573 - Oakland Station Baltimore, MD 21212 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Nu Kappa lota Sigma (UM Baltimore County - #473) (Millersville Stale Coll - #414) Ruchell S Reed (CS) Anthony Morris (P) P. 0. Box 6993 Box 147 - Gaige Hall - M S. C. Baltimore. MD 21216 Millersville. PA 17551 ALUMNI CHAPTERS •XlMu Delta Lambda (Slippery Rock State College - #496) (Baltimore- #104) Harry I Budd Alonjo P Hairston (P) R D 4 - Bradman Estates 4014 loch Raven Blvd. Slippery Rock, PA 16057 Baltimore. MD 21218 ALUMNI CHAPTERS lota Alpha Lambda Alpha Omicron Lambda (Aberdeen - #502) #4 13)!Pittsburgh- #136) Monroe L Manning (CS) Albert R Pannell (S) P. 0. Box 705 4158 Ivanhoe Dr - Apt #A 23 Aberdeen. MD 21001 Monroeville, PA 15146 Kappa Kappa Lambda Kappa BeU Lambda (Baltimore - #533) (Erie - #525) Seaton White (CS) J M. Murfree(P) P.O. Box 11347 1404 Greenfield Drive Baltimore. MD 21239 Erie. PA 16509 Maryland Southwest (Area III) Central Pennsylvania (Area II) COLLEGE CHAPTERS COLLEGE CHAPTERS Iota Zeta Gamma Nu (U of Maryland - #403) (Pennsylvania State U - #78) George W. Ratliff (P) David I Thacker (P) 4711 Berwyn Road 736 E Foster Avenue-#309 College Park. MD 20740 Stale College. PA 16801 Mu Upsilon ALUMNI CHAPTERS (Frostburg State Coll - #460) 'Zeta TheU lambda Edward L. King (CS) (Harnsburg- #241) 601 Frederick Hall - F.S.C. Zane G Phoenix (P) Frostburg, MD 21532 600 North 17th Street ALUMNI CHAPTERS Harrrsburj. PA 17103 lota Upsilon Lambda Eastern Pennsylvania (Area III) (Silver Spring - #520) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Myron Robertson (CS! Nu 902 Hoyt Street (Lincoln U - #12) Silver Spring. MD 20902 Earl Gray (P) Kappa Epsilon Lambda P. 0. Box 967 - L. U. Handover - #528 Lincoln University, PA 19352 Charles Ross (CS) 213 West Mill Avenue Seat Pleasant. MD 20027

Kappa Phi Lambda (Columbia - #543) £ Oalton Young (P) 10514 Green Mountain Circle Columbia. MD 21044 Maryland Eastern (Area IV) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Nu (U of Maryland, ES - #100) William P Hytche. Jr (P) UMESBox 1375 Princess Anne. MD 21853 Eta ZeU (Bowie State College - #359) Ronald E Nichols(P) P 0 Box 414 Bowie, MD 20715 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Omicron Lambda (Princess Anne - #203) Claud C. Marion (P) P. 0. Box 399 Princess Anne. MD 21853 EU EU Lambda (Annapolis - #262) William A. Hayes (P) 2004 Madison Avenue Baltimore. MD 21217 Washington, D.C. (Area V) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta (Howard U - #2) Reginald Grant (CS) P 0 Box 506, Howard University Washington. DC 20059 NuBeta (American U - #465) Douglas D Grayson (VP) 801 Bellevue Street. SE - #403 Washington. DC 20032 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Mu Lambda (Washington-#111) Robert M Brown (CS) 6339 Beryl Road Alexandria. VA 22312 Omicron Lambda Alpha (Washington - #500) Willie Ruff (P) 311 Broadleaf Dr, N I Vienna, VA 22180

Xi Zeta (Hampden Sydney - #491) Edward Owens (P) P.O Box 381 - H S C Hampden Sydney, VA 23943 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Nu Lambda (Danville - #200) Curtis Flood (P) Route 3 - Box 74 Danville. VA 24541 Epsilon Omicron lambda (lawrenceville - #225) Ernest L Morse (CS) P 0 Box 595 South Hill. VA 23970 lota Tau Lambda (Charlotte Court House - #519) Leon A Moton (P) Route 1 - Box 275 H Prospect. VA 23960 Northern Virginia (Area IV) ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Upsilon Lambda (Reston - #252) Frank Fisher (CS) 1070 Dougal Court Great falls. VA 22066 TheU Rho Lambda (Arlington - #293) Walter A Payne. Jr (P) 2012 Houston Street Surtland, MO 20023 Central Virginia (Area V) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma (Virginia Union U - #3) O'vell Harrison (P) Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity-VUU 1500 Lombrady Street Richmond. VA 23220 Beta Gamma (Virginia State College - #47) Vincent Gatlmg (P) Box 444 - Virginia State U Petersburg. VA 23803 TheU Rho (Virginia Commonwealth U - #391) Dennis G. Kemp (FS) 711 W. Main Street #413 A Richmond, VA 23284

VIRGINIA

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Nu Lambda (Virginia State College - # 1 1 2 ) R.J Hayes (CS) Director 21329 Sparta Drive C. A, Pennington Ettrick. VA 23803 3212 Griffin Avenue Beta Gamma Lambda Richmond. VA 23222 Blue Ridge North (Area I) (Richmond - #147) Gilbert Carter (P) COLLEGE CHAPTERS 811 Maggie Walker Ave. lota Alpha Richmond. VA 23222 (Washington S Lee U - #398) Tidewater North (Area VI) No Report COLLEGE CHAPTERS lota BeU Gamma lota (U of Virginia- #399) (Hampton Institute - #75) Larry D Evans (S) Leonard Chester (P) Box 430. Newcomb Hall Station 207 Moton Hall -• Hampton Institute Charlottesville. VA 22901 Hampton, VA 23668 Xi Delta Kappa Pi (Harrisonburg - #489) (William t, Mary - #434) James A. Taylor Connie Swiner. Ill (P) Box 64 Old Dominion 109 Ruckersville, VA 22968 College Station - Box 8982 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Williamsburg, VA 23186 Gamma Alpha Lambda ALUMNI CHAPTERS (Charlottesville-#167) Zeta Lambda Stephen D Waters (S) (Newport News - #106) Box 3036 Claude N. Carter (CS) Charlottesville. VA 22903 Blue Ridge South (Area II) 12 Suburban Parkway Hampton, VA 23661 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta BeU Lambda Theta lota (Hampton - #190) (Virginia Polytechnic U - #384) Moses Easter, Ir, Ronald A. Keele (CS) P 0 Box 266 P. 0. Box 346 Hampton, VA 23669 Bl3Cksburg. VA 24061 Nu Delta Lambda ALUMNI CHAPTERS (Surry County - #571) Alpha Kappa Lambda Wiley Powell (S) (Roanoke - #132) Route 1 - Box 160 B William Calloway (CS) Surry, VA 23883 P. 0. Box 7850 Tidewater South (Area VII) Roanoke, VA 24019 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Nu Lambda Epsilon Pi (Lynchburg-#178) (Norfolk State U. - # 3 2 4 ) David L Moseley (S) Charles E. Johnson (P) Route 4 - Box 144 Box 2033 - N S U Madison Heights. VA 24572 Norfolk, VA 23504 Southern Virginia (Area III) Nu Theta COLLEGE CHAPTERS (Old Dominion U - #471) Delta Tau Gregory Pettaway (S) (St. Pauls Polytechnic - #305) 1069West41stSt. - #5 Howard L Coleman (CS) Norfolk. VA 23508 St. Paul's College lawrenceville. VA 23868 (District VII)

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Phi Lambda (Norfolk #142) Willie Harris. Jr. (P) P 0 Box 816 Norfolk. Va 23501 Epsilon lota Lambda (Suffolk - #220) Leon N. Harris (CS) 5548 Greenwood Rd. Suffolk. VA 23437 'Epsilon Nu Lambda (Portsmouth - #223) Franklin D. Taliaferro (P) P 0 Box 1092 Portsmouth, VA 23705

MIDWEST ILLINOIS (Central) Director Dr. Robert Copeland 270 Lincoln Hall University of Illinois Urbana. IL 61801 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Tan (U of Illinois-#18) Jonathan M Currin (P) P 0. Box 2062 Champaign. IL 61820 ZetaNu (Eastern Illinois - #343) Fredrick Stalford (P) University Apt #57 Eastern Illinois University Charleston. IL 61920 EUTiu (Illinois State U - #371) Lance Jones (P) 901 W Market -Apt. #1 Normal. IL 61761 •Theta Omicron (Mrllrkin U - #389) Charles H. Jones. Jr (Adv) 256 Dover Drive Decatur, IL 62521 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Omicron Lambda Beta (Champaign - #501) Jim Casey (S) 1 Canterbury Lane Champaign. IL 61820

ILLINOIS (Northern) Ernest Gibson 23 West 235 Edgewood Ct GlenEllyn.IL 60137 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Phi (Northern Illinois U - # 3 2 9 ) Robert C. Gunn (S) P. 0 Box 66 DeKalb. II 60115 Mu Mu (Elmhurst College - #452) David Dines (P) Box 2368 190 Prospect Ave Elmhurst. IL 60126 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Chi Lambda (Waukegan - #544) Vernon Shelton (CS) P. O. Box 512 North Chicago. IL 60064 Mu Alpha Lambda (De Kalb - #546) Rick A. Hall (P) Stevenson South Apt 2028 Dekalb. IL 60115 Mu Mu Lambda (Glen Ellyn - #556) James Ivory (P) 1241 Oak Hill Road Downers Grove, IL 60515

ILLINOIS (North Central) Director Allen Knox 5020 S. Lake Shore Drive #2704 Chicago. IL 60615 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Theta (Metro Chicago - #8) Anthony Mosely (P) 2901 S Michigan - #608 Chicago. IL 60616 Alpha Mu (Northwestern U - #33) Julius Washington (P) 2313 Sheridan Road Evanston. IL 60201 Nu Delta (Chicago State U - #467) William G Fielder. Ill (P) 1228 S. Avers Chicago. IL 60623 Nu Epsilon (Lewis U - #468) Christopher Washington (S) Lewis University - Box 1275 Romeoville. IL 60441 •Nu Rho (IIT - #479) Ronald Andre (P) 1227W Winnemac Chicago, IL 60640

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Xi Lambda (Chicago-#113) Leon Hendricks (P) 840 N Laramie Chicago, IL 60615 Zeta Xi Lambda (Evanston - #246) No Report Theta Mu Lambda (Johet - #288) No Report •Iota Delta Lambda (Chicago - #505) Randy Twilley (VP) 10136 S King Drive Chicago. IL 60628

ILLINOIS (Southern) Director John Reeves 3519 Converse Avenue East St lours. IL 62207 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Eta (Southern Illinois U - #51) Fran; Smith (P) P 0. Box 1002 Carbondale, IL 62901 lota Pi (SIU Edwardsville - #412) Darryl Haire (VP) 518 IA lower Lake Apts Edwardsville. IL 62025 ALUMNI CHAPTERS •Delta Epsilon Lambda (East St Louis - #193) Jesse P Gorley. Ill (P) 1758 North 43rd Street East St. Louis. IL 62204 •Mu Kappa Lambda (Carbondale - #555) Carl R. Flowers (P) P.0 Box 2393 Carbondale. IL 62901

ILLINOIS (Western) Director Curley R Bradford 3109 9'i Street Rock Island, IL 61201 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Kappa (Bradley U - # 3 1 9 ) Michael E Roper (DP) 1206 W College Apt H Peoria. IL 61606 Eta Eta (Western Illinois - #360) Reginald R Lewis (S) 321 Olson Hall - WIU Macomb. IL 61455 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Pi Lambda (Peoria - #538) No Report Mu Delta Lambda (Springfield - #549) Milton P Johnson (T) 2009 Austin Drive Springfield. IL 62704 Mu Chi Lambda (Rock Island - #566) Victor L Davis (CS) 1744 West 54th Davenpoit. IA 52806

INDIANA Director Theo Hamiter 7158 Avalon Trail Ct Indianapolis. IN 46250 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Gamma Eta (Indiana U - #73) James Taylor (P) 1600 E Hillside Drive - #3E Bloomington. IN 47401 Gamma Rho (Purdue - #82) Donald G Brown (P) 613 Waldron Street West Lafayette. IN 47906 •Zeta Rho (Indiana State U - #347) Terry Collins P O Box 418 Terre Haute. IN 47808 Theta Xi (Ball State U - #388) E Maurice Bransford (P) Box 355 - Ball State U Muncre, IN 47306 lota Theta (Calumet College - #405) David E Rogers (P) 2337 Johnson Street Gary. IN 46407 NuPi (UolEvansville-#478) No rteport ALUMNI CHAPTERS lota Lambda (Indianapolis - #109) Keith Smith (CS) 8023 Stonehinge Circle Indianapolis. IN 46260

The Sphinx / Spring 1 9 8 0

Gamma Rho Lambda (Gary - #182) No Report Theta Xi Lambda (South Bend - #290) Inactive Theta Upsilon Lambda (FortWayne- #296) Timothy Williams (S) P 0 Box 5076 Ft. Wayne, IN 46895 Kappa Rho Lambda (Evansville - #539) No Report

IOWA Director Everett A. Mays P, 0 Box 533 Des Moines, IA 50302 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Alpha Theta (Uof Iowa- #30) Preston James (S) P 0. Box 789 Iowa City. IA 52242 'Alpha Nu (Drake U - #34) David M Milliner 921 Docker Street #143 Des Moines, IA 50309 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Zeta Kappa Lambda (Des Moines - #243) Douglas Pierre (S) 4117 Brrarcliff Des Moines, IA 50317 Mu Tau Lambda (Cedar Raprds - #563) No Report

KANSAS (Eastern) Director Richard Marshall 626 Oakland Kansas City. KS 66101 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Upsilon (U of Kansas-#19) D Alonzo Wharton (P) 1014 Mississippi Lawrence. KS 66045 •Gamma Chi (Kansas State - #87) Alphonso Watson 1805 B S Homer - #30 Pittsburg. KS 66762 Kappa Tau (Kansas State U - #437) Charles Bey (S) 915 Colorado Manhattan, KS 66502

KANSAS (Western) Director P I Williams 3601 Randolph Topeka. KS 66611 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Mu (Wichita State U - #99) No Report Epsilon Omicron (Washburn U - #323) No Report Xi Nu (Emporia State College #497) Charles C. Colbert (Adv) ESU 1200 Commercial Emporia KS 66801 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Eta Lambda (Topeka - #195) Earl Fowler (P) 2022 Turnpike Avenue Topeka. KS 66605 •Eta Beta Lambda (Wichita - #257) Henry B Brown (S) 4830 N Oliver Wichita. KS 67220

KENTUCKY (Eastern) Director Lee Jackson 3640 Bold Bidder Dr #71 Lexington. KV 40502 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Pi (U of Louisville - #37) Arthur Simpson (P) Miller Hall. Rm 202 - #1028 University of Louisville Louisville. KY 40208 M a Hi (Kentucky State U - #55) David B Moore (P) 239 East Campus - K.SU Franklort, KY 40601 Epsilon Chi (U ol Kentucky - #330) Anthony G Grvens (S) 413 Hollow Creek Rd Lexington, KY 40511 Xi Alpha (Morehead State U - #486) Christopher Turley (P) U.P.O #1397 - MSU Morehead. KY 40351

ALUMNI CHAPTERS •Alpha Lambda (Louisville - #101) Charles R Brown (CS) P. 0 Box 11426 Louisville, KY 40211 •Alpha Beta lambda (Lexington - #124) Jay R Anderson (CS) P. 0, Box 1248 Lexington. KY 40590 Gamma Beta Lambda (Franklort - #168) Donald W Lyons (S) Box 121 - KSU Franklort. KY 40601

KENTUCKY (Western) Director Claude Snorton Box 654 Hopkinsville. KY 42240 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Zeta Omicron (Murray State U - #345) Lewey Knox (P) P. 0 Box 2309 - MSU Murray. KY 42071 Eta Rho (Western Kentucky U - #369) Michael R. Fain (S) 2507 Pearce Ford Tower. W.K.U Bowling Green, KY 42101 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Gamma Epsilon Lambda (Hopkinsville - #171) James E Victoi (P) 1304 East 7th Street Hopkinsville, KY 42240

MICHIGAN (Central) Director William Tipper 912 E Wellington Flint. Ml 48503 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon (U of Michigan - #5) Craig B Williams (S) 1912 W. liberty -Apt #1 Ann Arbor, Ml 48103 Alpha Upsilon Daryl R Young (P) 2129 Cadillac Detroit, Ml 48214 Epsilon Eta (Eastern Michigan U - #316) Anthony J. Tillman (P) 203 N. Washington Ypsilanti, Ml 48197 Eta Xi (U of Detroit - #366) No Report •Theta Tau (General Motors Institute - #393) Leon Simpson (P) 1700 West 3rd Street Flint, Ml 48502 lota Epsilon (Grand Valley - #402) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS 'Gamma Lambda (Detroit - #103) Ivan L Cotman (P) 20141 Mclntyre Detroit, Ml 48219 Epsilon Upsilon Lambda (Flint - #230) O'Neil Wiley (CS) P.0 Box 1247 Flint. Ml 48502 Theta Zeta Lambda (Ann Arbor - 283) Eddie L Boyd (S) 3211 Hayes Court Ann Arbor, Ml 48104 lota Rho Lambda (Pontrac-#517) No Report

MICHIGAN (Northern) Director lames H Gaddis 4028 Wisner Saginaw. Mi 48601 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Gamma Tau (Michigan State U - #84) Leroy Jackson 811 C Cherry Lane East Lansing. Ml 48823 Zeta Beta (Ferris State - #333) Eric Nigel Greene (P) 117 Locust Big Rapids. Ml 49307 Zeta Delta (Northern Michigan - #335) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Eta Nu Lambda (Grand Rapids - #267) No Report Iota Chi Lambda (Saginaw - #522) James H Gaddis (DP) 4028 Wisner Saginaw, Ml 48601

Kappa Delta Lambda (Lansing - #527) Richard D. Letts (P) 510 S. Jenison Lansing, Ml 48915

MICHIGAN (Southern) Director Theophihs Duckett 917 Clover Kalamazoo. Ml 49008 COLLEGE CHAPTER Epsilon Xi (Western Michigan U - #322) Anthony Samara (P) 2145 Albatross- #2 A Kalamazoo, Ml 49002 ALUMNI CHAPTERS lota Phi Lambda (Muskegon Heights-#521) Joseph N Ward (P) 2341 Fifth Street Muskegon Heights. Ml 49444 Kappa Psi Lambda (Kalamazoo - #545) Robert B lones(P) Box 368 Courthouse Station Kalamazoo. Ml 49006

MINNESOTA Director James Beard 4109 Portland Ave., South Minneapolis. MN 55407 COLLEGE CHAPTER •Mu (U ol Minnesota - #11) Kent Warder (P) 235 Coif man Union 300 Washington. SE Minneapolis. MN 55455 ALUMNI CHAPTER Gamma Xi Lambda (Minneapolis-#179) Willis K. Bright. Jr. (P) 4840 Park Avenue. S Minneapolis. MN 55417

MISSOURI (Eastern) Director Ronald E Smiley 1562 Mendall St. Louis. MO 63130 COLLEGE CHAPTERS -Alpha Eta (St Louis - #29) Lenell Baker. II (P) 8003 Milan Court University City. MO 63130 Epsilon Psi (Uol Missouri - #331) Ernest K. Banks (CS) Hwy. 63 i Elm Rolla M0 65401 Xi Gamma Chapter Cape Girardeau - #488) James Brightman (P) 320 N. Sprrgg Street Cape Girardeau. Mo 63701 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Epsilon Lambda (St Louis - #105) John R Pope (CS) 6176 Lucille Avenue St Louis. M0 63136 Epsilon Eta Lambda (Charleston - #218) Edward W Barrett (P) P 0 Box 171 Charleston. MO 63834

MISSOURI (Central) Director Carl Smith Lakeview Subdivision Jefferson City. MO 65101 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Psi (Lincoln U - #44) Lawrence Deadmon (S) 2320 E. McCartySt. - # 1 1 Jefferson City. M0 65101 Zeta Alpha (U ol Missouri - #332) James K. Williams (S) 504 Hudson Hall University of Missouri Columbia. MO 65201 •lotaXi (Northeast Missouri - #410) Michael W. Srmms 401 S Washington Travelers Hotel Kuksville MO 63501 ALUMNI CHAPTER •Beta Zeta Lambda (Jefferson City-#150) Owen G Abrahams (P) 1006 Moreau Drive Jefferson City. MO 65101

MISSOURI (Western) Director James Fleming 1304 Kingston Road Blue Springs. MO 64015

COLLEGE CHAPTERS Delta Rho (U ol Missouri - #303) Vincent M Roberson (S) 4641 Agnes Avenue Kansas City. M0 64130 Zeta Gamma (Central Missouri - #334) Nathaniel Friends (P) Box 20 CMSU Union Warrensburg. M0 64093 ALUMNI CHAPTER Beta Lambda (KanS3sCity- #102) Mrlous S. Lusk (CS) 7400 East 127th Place Grandview. MO 64030

NEBRASKA Director Ned Williams 3425 South 120th Omaha. NE 68144 COLLEGE CHAPTER Beta Beta (U of Nebraska - #46) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTER Beta Xi Lambda (Omaha - #157) Duane Moody (S) 10028 Himebaugh Plaza Omaha, NE 68134

OHIO (Northern) Director Charles Harrell 110 Melody Lane Toledo, OH 43615 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Epsilon Alpha (U of Toledo-#310) Greg Collier (VP) 905 Woodward Avenue Toledo, OH 43608 •Epsilon Theta (Bowling Green U - #317) Ronald Winston 130 S, Prospect Bowling Green, OH 43403

Phi (Ohio U - #20) Darryl E Griffin (P) c/o Baker Center Athens. OH 45701 ALUMNI CHAPTER •Alpha Rho Lambda (Columbus- #138) Eddie Francis (FS) Box 6821 Columbus. OH 43205

OHIO (West Central) Director Edward White 5211 Big Bend Drive Dayton, OH 45427 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Xi (Wilber!orceU-#13) No Report •Gamma Theta (U of Dayton - #74) Casby Harrison. Ill 642 Westwood Avenue Dayton, OH 45407 Delta Ii (Central State U - #300) Frank Boldoe (T) Box 441 Wilberlorce, OH 45384 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Theta Lambda (Dayton - #108) Roy Taylor (P) Box 468. Dunbar Station Dayton, OH 45417 •Chi Lambda (Wilberlorce - #121) John H Cooper Box 351 Wilberlorce, OH 45384 Zeta Delta Lambda (Springlield - #237) William B Simpson (S) 667 Omar Circle Yellow Springs, OH 45387

OHIO (Southwest)

Director Clarence Fraziei 1145 Wionna Avenue Cincinnati. OH 45224 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Alpha (U ol Cincinnati - #23) Jumfer Robb (P) 214Fosdick (Northeast) Cincinnati, OH 45219 Director Delta Upsilon James T Rushin (Miami U - #306) 1186 Wyley Avenue Jellery Sharpe (P) Akron, OH 44306 715 South Main - #1 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Oxford OH 45056 Pi ALUMNI CHAPTER (Cleveland State/Western Reserve - - l_b , * > M b Gamma Lambda Eric Flowers (P) (Cincinnati #191) Box 99551 Chester C Pryor, II (P) Cleveland. OH 44199 3980 Winding Way Alpha Tau Cincinnati. OH 45229 (U of Akron - #40) Albert Bragg (CS) P. 0. Box 492 Akron, OH 44309 Director Epsilon Delta Adolphus A. Young. Jr (Kent State U - #313) P.O Box 13 Christopher Hughes (S) Keystone, WVA 24852 829 Leebnck Hall - KSU COLLEGE CHAPTERS Kent, OH 44243 Alpha Zeta Iota Phi (West Virginia State - #28) (Mount Union College - #417) Ronnie K Waid (VP) No Report P 0 Box 511 Institute, WV 25112 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Beta Theta •Beta Rho Lambda (Blueheld State - #52) (Youngstown - #160) Adrian Dowell (CS) Frank Woolen 305 N Mercer Street 1734 Glenwood Avenue Blueliekt. WVA 24701 P 0 Box 1500 NuNu Youngstown. OH 44501 Delta Alpha lambda (Marshall U - #475) (Cleveland - #189) Clyde C Perry (Adv) Leonard Hamilton (P) Route 4 - Box 172 Box 99551 Soulh Point, OH 45680 Xi Theta Cleveland, OH 44199 (Concord College - #493) Eta Tau Lambda Clarence Hudson (S) (Akron - #273) C 42 Concord College James T Rushin (P) Athens, WV 24712 1186 Wyley Avenue Akron. OH 44306 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Mu Lambda Alpha Zeta Lambda (Lorrain - #534) (Bluefreld - #128) Thomas A Jenkins. II (P) Adolphus A Young. Jr (S) 1420 West 20th Street P 0 Box 671 Lorain, OH 44052 Bluefreld. WV 24701 •Alpha lota Lambda (Charleston - #131) John E Scott (S) (Central) P 0 Box 303 Director Institute. WV 25112 William Nelson. Ph D Gamma Delta Lambda 2572 Burnaby Drive (Beckley- #170) Inactive Columbus, OH 43209 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Kappa (Ohio State U - #10) Director William Crawford (S) Coleman 0 Wells Box 51, Ohio Union 922 W ZedlerLane 1739 N. High Milwaukee. Wl 53092 Columbus, OH 43201 ALUMNI CHAPTER •Alpha Xi Lambda (Toledo-#135) Joseph Sansbury (P) 1437 Addington Toledo. OH 43607

OHIO

WEST VIRGINIA

OHIO

WISCONSIN

51


COLLEGE CHAPTERS Gamma Epsilon (UW Madison - # 7 1 ) Bobby L. Moore (S) 1806 Broadway Madison, Wl 53713 •Epsilon Tau (UW Milwaukee - #327) Larry Johnson (P)

Box 153 Milwaukee. Wl 53211 • H i Ml (UW Whitewater - #340) David Graham (S) 801 West Mam Street Whitewater, Wl 53190 Da M i (WSU Platteville - #355) No Report Eta PI (WSU Oshkosh - #368) Robert E. Bedford 207 Nelson Hall • U of W Oshkosh. Wl 54901 Mu Epsilon (Carthage College - #446) No Report Null (Marquette U - #476) Jeffrey Lane (P) 920 North 15th St. - #10 Milwaukee. Wl 53233 Nu Omicron (Carroll College - #477) No Report ALUMNI CHAPTERS Delta Oil Lambda (Milwaukee - #210) Taft E. Benson (P) 2815 W. Ranch Road Mequon.WI 53092 Mu Eta Lambda (Madison - #552) Allen A Hancock (P) 1102 Fnsch Road Madison Wl 53711

SOUTH ALABAMA Director Leotis Peterman 4340 Yorkshire Drive Montgomery, AL 36108 COUEGE CHAPTERS •Alpha Beta (Talladega College - #24) Coleman Henderson (P) Talladega College Talladega. AL 35061 Beta Upsilon (Alabama State U - #63) Lawrence Bell (P) Box 28 - ASU Montgomery. AL 36104 Gamma Kappa (MilesCollege~#76) Harlan K. tones (S) Box 177-Miles College Birmingham. AL 35208 Gamma Phi (Tuskegee Institute - #86) John Hudson (CS) P. 0 Box 36 Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 Delta Gamma (AlabamaASM-#91) Arnold Veazie (CS) P. 0. Box 220 Normal, AL 35762 •Epsilon Nu (Stillman College - #321) Bruce Crawford (S) Box 4008. Stillman College Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 Theta Delta (U of South Alabama - #379) Wayne M Simon (P) 307 University Blvd Mobile, AL 36688 krtlNu (UA8 - #409) Cleveland Parker (S) Box 329, NBSB Birmingham, AL 35294 •Kappa Alpha (U of Alabama - #420) Norman Taylor (P) Box 7368 University, AL 35486 Kappa Gamma (U of North Alabama - #422) Kenneth Anderson (P) 313 A Beale Street Florence. AL 35630 NuTau (U of Montevallo - #481) Jimmy Adams, Jr (P) P 0. Box 2571 - U ofM. Montevallo. AL 35115 XiBeta (Troy State U - #487) Edwin Little (P) Box 154, TSU Troy, AL 36081 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Omicron Lambda (Birmingham - #114) Leroy A. Simmons, Jr. (S)

P. 0. Box 3910 Birmingham. AL 35208

52

Alpha Nu Lambda (Tuskegee Institute - #134) Walter Oldham (P) P.O. Drawer BBB Tuskegee Institute. AL 36088 Alpha Upsilon Lambda (Montgomery - #141) Leotis Peterman (CS) P O. Box 6058 Montgomery, AL 36106 Beta Omicron Lambda (Mobile - #158) Alvin Allen (RS) 1205 St. Madar Street Mobile. AL 36603 Delta Theta Lambda (Huntsville - #196) A. J Garth (CS) P. 0. Box 33 Alabama A&M University Normal, AL 35762 Delta Pi Lambda (Selma - #204) Willie Gilford (CS) Route 1 - Box 98 Browns, AL 36724 Delta Phi Lambda (Tuscaloosa - #209) Mr/ton M Williams (S) 1910 40th Ave.. College Hills Tuscaloosa. AL 35401 Epsilon Delta Lambda (Talladega- #215) T. Y. Lawrence, Jr, (S) 114 Baker Street Talladega, AL 35160 'Theta Alpha Lambda (Gadsden - #278) Daniel Littlefield (ST) 1215 Mountambrook Drive Gadsden, AL 35901 Theta Gamma Lambda (Dothan - #280) Jerome Coleman (P) P 0 Box 6893 Dothan, AL 36302 Kappa Nu Lambda (Leighton - #535) Fred Johnson (P) P. 0, Box 622 Sheffield. AL 35660 Mu lota Lambda (Mobile - #554) Isaac Bowie. Jr (S) 2252 Clinton Street Mobile, AL 36617 Mu Psi Lambda (Homewood - #567) Alphonsa Mahone (S) 105 16th Place. SW Birmingham, AL 35211

FLORIDA Director Vandon E White 14830 SW 87th Avenue Miami, FL 33157 COLLEGE CHAPTERS •Beta Nu (Florida A S M - #56) Michello Williams (P) Box 598. FAMU Tallahassee. FL 32307 •Delta Beta (Bethune Cookman - #90) Gregory Carl Smith (P) Bethune Cookman College Daytona Beach. FL 32015 Delta Psi (Florida Memorial Coll - #309) Oarrell S. White (S) 15800 NW 42nd Avenue Miami, FL 33054 Eta Delta (U of Miami - #357) Ted Nichols University of Miami 248 Ashe Bldg Coral Gables, FL 33124 Theta Gamma (U of South Florida - #378) Terry Booker (P) Box 2421 University Center U ol South Florida Tampa, FL 33620 Theta Sigma (U of Florida - #392) Theta Sigma Chapter - A Phi A 129 Trgert Hall University ol Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 lota Delta (Florida State U - #401) Ronnie Bembry (S) U Box 4297 FSU Tallahassee. FL 32313 Kappa Upsilon (Metiopolitan - #438) No Report Mu Theta (U of West Florida - #449) No Report •Xilota (U of Cential Florida - #494) Ernest C. Goodman 3400 W. Church Street Orlando, FL 32805 •Xi Kappa (Florida Inst, of Tech - #495) J Albert Diggs 1725 Country Club Drive Titusville, FL 32780

ALUMNI CHAPTERS •Upsilon Lambda (Jacksonville-#119) Clarence Von Bostick (CS) 2816 Ribault Scenic Drive Jacksonville, Fl 32208 Beta Beta Lambda (Miami - #146) Albert Hall (S) 7521 NW 14th Avenue Miami. FL 33147 Beta Delta Lambda (Daytona Beach - #148) Robert K Wright (P) 365 Bartley Road Daytona Beach, FL 32014 Gamma Zeta Lambda (Tampa- #172) No Report Gamma Mu Lambda (Tallahassee-#177) Charles Russell (S) 433 Mercury Drive Tallahassee, FL 32301 Delta Delta Lambda (West Palm Beach - #192) Charles E White (P) 519 Nineteenth Street W. Palm Beach, FL 33407 Delta Xi Lambda (Orlando - #202) Cecil Boston (P) P. 0. Box 5548 Orlando. FL 32855 Epsilon Mu Lambda (Pensacola - #222) Robert Albury (P) 1308 E. Hatton Pensacola. FL 32503 Epsilon Pi Lambda (Ocala - #226) William E. Jackson (S) 1822 S. W. 4th St. Ocala. FL 32670 Zeta Alpha Lambda (Ft Lauderdale - #234) Raleigh R. Rawls (P) 1018*4 NW Sixth Street Ft Lauderdale. FL 33311 Eta Kappa Lambda (Ft. Pierce - #265) verryl Floyd (S)

P. 0 Box 1271 Ft Pierce. FL 33450 Theta Eta Lambda (St. Petersburg - #284) Emanuel Stewart (P)

Box 15024 St Petersburg, FL 33733 lota Beta Lambda (Cocoa - #503) I Albert Diggs 1725 Country Club Drive Titusville, Fl 32780 lota Pi Lambda (Miami-#516) Paul Joseph (P) 16140 SW 87th Avenue Miami. FL 33157 Mu Zeta Lambda (Lakeland - #551) Lynwood Bell (T) 1902 Pollock Loop Road Lakeland. FL 33801 Nu Eta Lambda (Gainesville - #574) Alfred C. Peoples (S) 611 S.E. 13th Terrace Gainesville. FL 32601

GEORGIA Director Lorenzo Manns 4554 Moline Avenue Columbus, GA 31907 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Iota (Morris Brown College - #9) Maurice Davis (P) P 0 Box 92055 Atlanta. GA 30314 Alpha Rho (Morehouse College - #38) Reginald Scott (CS) Box 445, Morehouse College Atlanta, GA 30314 Alpha Phi (ClarkCollege- #42) Gregory Daniels (P) Box 137 240 Chestnut St., SW Atlanta. GA 30314 •Gamma Zeta (Ft. Valley State - #72) Thomas Miller (CS) Box 4326 FVSC Ft. Valley, GA 31030 Delta Delta '(Albany State - #92) Titus Biown (P) Box 36 ASC Albany, GA 31705 Delta Eta (Savannah State CoU. - #95) Ellis Albright (P) Box 20742 SSC Savannah. GA 31404 ZelaMu (Georgia State U - #342) Keaven L. Dortery (P) Box 542 - Georgia State U Atlanta, GA 30303 Zeta Pi (U of Georgia - #346) Ernest S. Stillwell (P) 2151 University Station Athens, GA 30602

Eta Alpha (Paine College - #354) Donald Murray (P) Box 77 - Paine College Augusta, GA 30901 Theta Beta (Columbus College - #377) B.Michael Coleman (P) 226 30th Avenue - Apt. D Columbus, GA 31903 •Iota Eta (Mercei U - #404) Duan Sandeis(P) Box 61 - Mercer U Macon, GA 31207 Mu Alpha (Emory U - #442) Emory Wilkerson (P) Box 21185-EmoiyU Atlanta. GA 30322 Mu Gamma (Georgia College - #444) No Report Mu Delta (Georgia Southwestern - #445) Anthony Hubbard (P) Box 689 Georgia Southwestern College Amencus. GA 31709 •Mu Omicron (Valdosta State - #455) Randy Rush (VP) Box 1060 VSC Valdosta. GA 31601 Nu Gamma (West Georgia Coll - #466) Samuel Mosteller (P) Box 10016-WG.C. Carrollton, GA 30117 NuMu (Southern Tech. Inst - #474) Adrian L. Raines (CS) Box 36700 - Georgia Tech Atlanta. GA 30332 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Eta Lambda (Atlanta - #107) Larry Epps (CS) 32 Third Avenue. NE Atlanta. GA 30317 •Alpha Chi Lambda (Augusta - #143) Willie G. Marshall (FS) 829 Strother Drive Augusta, GA 30901 •Beta Phi Lambda (Savannah - # 1 6 4 ) Chester A. Ellis (CS) ' P 0 Box 1361 Savannah. GA 31402 Gamma Omicron Lambda (Albany - #180) Edgar Martin (P) P. 0 Box 4054 Albany. GA 31706 Gamma Sigma Lambda (Ft Valley - #183) Clinton Dixon (S) Box 5742 FVSC Ft Valley. GA 31030 •Delta lota Lambda (Columbus-#197) Lorenzo Manns (S) 4554 Mohne Avenue Columbus, GA 31907 •Epsilon Beta Lambda (Macon - #213) Joseph Lindsey (S) P.O. Box 5329 Macon, GA 31208 Eta lota Lambda (Athens - #264) Hugh Goodium (CS)

lota Gamma (Rust College - #400) John W Crittle, II (P) 237 A East Valley Ave Holly Springs, MS 38635 •Kappa Beta (MS State U - # 4 2 1 ) Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Kappa Beta Chapter P 0, Box 1472 Mississippi State. MS 39762 MuXi (Metropolitan - #454) Carlis Andrews (P) Southern Station, Box 4613 Hattiesburg, MS 39401 •Nu Upsilon (U of Mississippi - #482) Mr lames S. Blake P.O. Box 3251 University, MS 38677 ALUMNI CHAPTERS •Alpha Epsilon Lambda (Jackson - #127) Robert W Harrison (S) Box 356 Yazoo City, MS 39194 Epsilon Xi Lambda (Mound Bayou - #224) George Bacon (RS) P.O. Box 5531 Greenville. MS 38701 •Zeta Mu Lambda (Bilon - #244) Don Johnson (CS) Route 3,202 Leslye Avenue Gulfpoit. MS 39501 Eta Phi Lambda (Columbus - #275) Charles Houston (P) Spivey Road Columbus, MS 39701 Theta Sigma Lambda (Natchez - #294) Al W Johnson (P) Box 552. ASU Lorman, MS 39096 Mu Gamma Lambda (Hattiesburg Laurel - #548) Mance Langham 310 Vernon Dahmer Drive Hattiesburg, MS 39401 Mu Pi Lambda (Brookhaven - #560) Dr Worth E.Haynes(P) Box 133 - Utica Jr College Utica, MS 39175

NORTH CAROLINA Director Dr A M Witherspoon 2701 Rothgeb Drive Raleigh, NC 27610 COUEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Omicron (Johnson C. Smith U - #36) Kim L Gray (P) UPO 1035 JCSU Charlotte. NC 28216 Beta Epsilon (A&T State U - #49) Ronald Mangum (P) Box A 14, A&T State U Greensboro. NC 27411 Beta Zeta

(Elizabeth City State U - #50) Lavern Jones Box 163 - ECSU Elizabeth City, NC 27909 Beta lota (Winston-Salem State U - #53) . WaveyB. Williams (P) Box 14318. WSSU P 0 Box 902 Winston Salem, NC 27102 Athens. GA 30603 Beta Rho Theta Nu Lambda (Shaw U - #60) (LaGrange - #289) Alvin Chapman (S) Frank Lewis (S) P 0 Box 1875 130 Brenda Blvd Raleigh, NC 27602 LaGrange. GA 30240 Gamma Beta lota Gamma Lambda (North Carolina Central U - #68) (Brunswick - #504) No Report Richard Wilson (S) Gamma Mu P 0. Box 98 (Livingston College - #77) White Oak. GA 31568 Clay Hart (P) •Kappa Tau Lambda Box 62 Livingston College (Valdosta - #541) Salisbury. NC 28144 Arthur L Hart Gamma Psi P 0. Box 1684 (St. Augustine's College - #88) Valdosta. GA 31601 James Ford (P) P.O. Box 26611 Raleigh. NC 27611 Epsilon Zeta Director (Fayetteville State U - # 3 1 5 ) William K Dease No Report 5980 Huntview Drive •Zeta Epsilon Jackson, MS 39206 (Barber Scotia College - #336) COLLEGE CHAPTERS Morris Avery (S) Gamma Upsilon Barber Scotia College (Tougaloo College - #85) Concord, NC 28025 No Report EtaNu Delta Kappa (East Carolina U - #365) (Alcorn State U - #98) Pratt Simons (S) Billy Ray Smrth (P) P O Box 3167 Box 267 ASU Greenville. NC 27834 Lorman. MS 39096 Eta Omicron Delta Phi (North Carolina State U - #367) (Jackson State U - #307) Orlando E.Han kins (CS) Davey Mitchell (S) P 0 Box 5631 PO Box 17177-JSU Raleigh. NC 27650 Jackson, MS 39217 Kappa Omicron Zeta Phi (Duke U - #433) (MS Valley State U - #351) Michael A. Smith (S) Marshall Oavis (CS) Box 4783 - Duke Station Box 899. MVSU Durham. NC 27706 IttaBena, MS 38941

MISSISSIPPI

Mu Zeta (U of North Carolina - #447) James Moore (CS)

P. 0. Box 551 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 MuTau (UNC - Charlotte - #459) Robert Rowell (CS) 509 Scott Hall - UNCC Stn. Charlotte, NC 28223 •NuZeta (Western Carolina U - #469) Vernon McRae (P) Box 543 Cullowhee, NC 28723

XI Eta Wake Forest U - #492) Dr A. M Witherspoon 2701 Rothgeb Drive Raleigh. NC 27106 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Kappa Lambda (Greensboro-#110) Arthur Stevens (CS) P. 0 Box 21052 Greensboro, NC 27420 •Phi Lambda (Raleigh - #120) Les Brinson (P) 4617 Limerick Drive Raleigh, NC 27604 Alpha Pi Lambda (Winston-Salem - #137) Thomas H Hooper, Jr 1415 E. 14th Street Winston Salem. NC 27105 Beta Theta Lambda (Durham - #152) No Report •Beta Mu Lambda (Salisbury-#155) Marion Jones (S) 809 W Ihomas Street Salisbury. NC 28144 Beta Nu Lambda (Charlotte - #156) George T. Dunlap(P) 5247 Elderbank Drive Charlotte. NC 28216 •Gamma Kappa Lambda (Wilmington - #176) Johnsie A. Lowe (S) 112 South 14th Street Wilmington, NC 28403 Gamma Psi Lambda (Astieville - #188) No Report Epsilon Rho Lambda (Fayetteville - #227) John V. Parham (P) 1536 Palmer Drive Fayetteville, NC 28303 Epsilon Sigma Lambda (Rocky Mount - #228) Lonnie T Foster (P) P. 0 Box 853 Rocky Mount. NC 27801 •Epsilon Chi Lambda (Elizabeth City - #232) Roger McLean (FS) Box 21. ECSU Elizabeth City, NC 27909 •Zeta Eta Lambda (Kinston - #240) B. F Hall, Jr. (S) 10071 Caswell Street Kinston, NC 28501 •Eta Mu lambda (Gastonia - #266) J. C. Marable (S) 407 Belvedere Circle Kings Mountain. NC 28086 Theta Omicron Lambda (Goldsboro- #291) No Report Nu lota Lambda (Kinston #576) Clifton T Epps. Jr (P) 401 Greenmead Drive Kinston, NC 28501

SOUTH CAROLINA Peter Felder P. 0 Box 41 Claflin College Orangeburg.SC 29115 COLLEGE CHAPTERS Beta Delta (South Carolina State - #48) Ernest Yarborough (S) Box 1954. SCSC Orangeburg.SC 29117 Gamma Gamma (Allen U - #69) No Report Gamma Pi (Benedict College-#81) Arthur L. Edmunds (S) Evans Apts. - #F2 Benedict College Columbia, SC 29204 Delta Alpha (Claflin U - #89) No Report Eta lota (Voorhees College - #362) Leon Hanberry (P) P 0 Box 564 Denmark, SC 29042

Theta Nu (U of South Carolina - #387) Reginald Perry (P) Box 80026. USC Columbia, SC 29225 Xappa Chi (Francis Marion College - #440) Walter D Gaffney, Ir. (P) 601 W Darlington Florence, SC 29501 MuPi (Baptist College - #456) Bernett Mazyck (S) 903 West 5th North St Summerville, SC 29483 NuPhi (U of South Carolina- #483) No Report Xi Epsilon (MornsCollege-#490) Lester Coiley Morris College Sumter. SC 29150 ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alpha Psi Lambda (Columbia - #144) Cecil Adderley. Ir. (P) 1730 Standish Street Columbia. SC 29203 Beta Kappa Lambda (Charleston - #154) Raymond Smalls (CS) P.O. Box 2714 Charleston. SC 29403 •Gamma Gamma Lambda (Greenville - #169) Luke Chatman (FS) P.O. Box 1311 Greenville, SC 29602 Delta Zeta Lambda (Orangeburg - #194) William J. Nelson (P) P, 0. Box M Orangeburg.SC 29115 Delta Kappa Lambda (Florence - #198) Joseph Heyward (S) P 0. Box 384 Florence. SC 29503 Eta Omicron Lambda (Rock Hill - #269) Arthur F Lathan (P) Route 1 - Box 7A Lancaster. SC 29720 •Theta Phi Lambda (Bennettsville - #297) Ralph DuPree. Sr. (CS) 203 Beauty Spot Road Bennettsville, SC 29512 Iota Eta Lambda (Denmark - #508) No Report Mu Epsilon Lambda (Conway - #550) No Report

TENNESSEE Director 2enoch G Adams 1024 Kellow Street Nashville. TN 37208 COUEGE CHAPTERS Chi (Meharry Medical College - # 2 1 ) Bayne Spotwood (CS) Box 758, Meharry Medical College Nashville, TN 37208 Alpha Chi (Fisk U - #43) Nathaniel A Coopei (CS) P.O. Box 791 Fisk University Nashville. TN 37203 Beta Xi (LeMoyne-Owen College - #57) No Report Beta Omicron (Tennessee State U - #58) Andrea Williams (S) Box 419, TSU Nashville, TN 37203 Beta Pi (Lane College - #59) Randall Campbell (P) 200 Hayes Avenue Jackson. TN 38301 •Gamma Omicron (KnoxvilleCollege- #80) Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Gamma Omicron Chapter P 0 Box 382, Knoxville College Knoxville, TN 37921 •Eta Phi (UT Chattanooga - #373) Eta Phi Chapter 651 Vine Street Chattanooga. TN 37402 •Theta Pi (Austin Peay State U - #390) Theta Pi Chaptei - Box 8337 Austin Peay State University Clarksville, TN 37040 Kappa Eta (Memphis State U - #426) Jerry Malone (P) 2856 Choctaw Memphis, TN 38114 Kappa Theta (VanderbiltU - # 4 2 7 ) Michael Terry (P) P 0 Box 3269-B Nashville. TN 37235

The Sphinx / Spring 1980


This issue is missing the back cover


The SPHINX | Spring 1980 | Volume 66 | Number 1 198006601  

Alpha's 22nd General President Lionel H. Newsom receives the fraternity's highest award in 1979. Progress of the Million Dollar Fund is upda...

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