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2013-2014 9800 West Dartmouth Place Lakewood, CO 80227 (303) 982-8855 JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ MISSION STATEMENT To provide a quality education that prepares all children for a successful future.


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Table of Contents High Education Academic Requirements ................................................................ 1-2 

Advanced placement courses and weighted grades

For the class of 2013 and beyond…

Transfer Grades

Academic Letter

Honors Classes

Schedule Changes

Policy for Dropping a Class

NCAA Eligibility Requirements

Valedictorian Requirements

Art.......................................................................................................................... 3-6 Business ................................................................................................................. 7-9 Computer Science ......................................................................................................9 English ................................................................................................................10-12 Family and Consumer Science .............................................................................13-14 Math ...................................................................................................................15-18 Music ..................................................................................................................19-21 Performing Arts........................................................................................................21 Physical Education ...................................................................................................22 Project Lead the Way ..........................................................................................23-24 Science ................................................................................................................25-27 Social Studies ......................................................................................................28-30 World Language ..................................................................................................31-34 Special Programs .................................................................................................35-37 Your page .................................................................................................................38 

Take notes on the classes you would like to take


BEAR CREEK GRADUATION AND HIGHER EDUCATION ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS (HEAR)

The following courses will be weighted using the quality point scale above:  

Bear Creek High School follows the requirements established by the Jefferson County School District’s Board of Education. A semester class = 0.5 credits and most teacher assistant credits = 0.25. The Colorado Commission on Higher Education has instituted a pre-collegiate curriculum for admission standards to all Colorado four-year public colleges or universities. Students in the classes of 2010 and above must meet the Higher Education Academic Requirements (HEAR) for the state of Colorado below. Academic credit is a term used by colleges and universities to designate specific subject areas identified as important for college preparation. The number of academic credits varies from college to college. “Academic” credits may be earned in the following subject areas in grades 9-12: language arts, social studies, mathematics, science, computer science and world language. To determine the number of academic credits required for college admission, students should check individual college catalogs or websites; the Colorado Collegiate Handbook, or see their counselor. All students are encouraged to work with their individual counselor on post-graduate plans. Subject

English Math Science Social Studies American Government Geography American History World History Economics World Language Fine Arts PE Other Electives Total

BCHS Graduation Requirements 4 3 3 3.5 see below

HEAR 4 Year Colleges In Colorado 4 4 3 3

 

.5 .5 1 1 .5

Transfer Grades Transcripts for students who transfer in from other districts will be evaluated based on Jefferson County criteria. Only Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, honors, and concurrent enrollment courses that meet or exceed AP and IB standards will be granted weighted status at the principal's discretion.

1 .5 .5 8.5

Advanced Placement (AP) program courses offered in Jefferson County Public Schools. Honors courses offered in Jefferson County Public Schools. Courses can be designated “honors” in content areas that offer AP or IB. Concurrent enrollment courses offered in Jefferson County Public Schools under partnership agreements with a sponsoring Colorado community college or four-year college or university when those courses are recognized as part of the state guaranteed general education courses known as the GT Pathways Curriculum as indicated in section I-L of the Department of Higher Education approved policies. Concurrent enrollment courses offered in Jeffco schools that are part of institutional extended studies programs as indicated in Section IV of the Department of Higher Education approved policy (e.g. CU Succeeds). Concurrent enrollment in courses that meet or exceed the level of AP or IB courses with prior approval of the principal. Concurrent enrollment is defined as courses taken by high school students which allow them to earn both high school and college credit for certain college-level courses they successfully complete while in high school. BCHS requires students to take the AP exam or college equivalent exam in order to secure weighted credit for the course. It is the decision of the individual school site to use the Weighted Grade Point Average and Weighted Class Rank to determine eligibility for school academic awards and honors such as Valedictorian, Salutatorian, Honors at Graduation, etc.

2 Academic Electives

HONORS CLASSES Advanced study is provided for students who wish to be academically challenged. Qualification for 9 th grade Honors English and Social Studies will be determined by successful completion of an application during the registration process. To be in Honors Earth Science/Biology, students must be in Geometry or higher and have the recommendation of the 8th grade science teacher. Honors classes for grades 10 and 11 are based on a 3.5 GPA and a teacher’s recommendation. The sequence of Honors classes is designed to prepare students for Advanced Placement classes.

23 Credits

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES & WEIGHTED GRADES Students must follow the appropriate process to enroll in an Advanced Placement (AP) course. The student must complete both semesters of the course and take the AP test in order to receive the AP weight on their transcript. Earning a 3 or higher score on the AP exam results in college credit at most colleges. Also, students who take Advanced Placement courses and complete the AP exam will be given weighted credit for these courses The following scale will be used by all Jefferson County High Schools for weighting grades: A=5 Quality Points B=4 Quality Points C=3 Quality Points D=1 Quality Points F=0 Quality Points

1


ACADEMIC LETTER       

VALEDICTORIAN REQUIREMENTS To ensure that the top student scholars will have the opportunity to become the Valedictorian(s) of Bear Creek High School each year, the following requirements must be met by all students desiring these honors:  Compliance with the BCHS Honor Code*;  16 academic credits including THREE years of the same world language during grades 9-12, or TWO years each of TWO different languages during grades 9-12, or completion of level four in any one language;  A minimum of five academic courses must be taken each semester of the senior year. (Academic courses are those taken in mathematics, science, world language, English and social studies. Additionally, Teacher Cadet, Computer Science, and Project Lead the Way or any AP course are identified as academic coursed);  Complete at least five full years of AP courses during grades 10-12, including completion of the AP exam (or college equivalent exam for the Class of 2013+) in the spring; Complete TWO of the following courses: AP Calculus BC AP Chemistry AP Biology Complete TWO of the following courses, including at least one AP English course: AP English Literature AP English Language AP American History AP European History AP World History Complete your choice of ONE listed in the above two categories. The student or students completing the above requirements who have the highest weighted cumulative GPA will be awarded the Valedictorian of BCHS. Grades earned during all four years at Bear Creek High School will be included in the grade point average of all Valedictorian candidates. Students transferring from another school will be allowed this designation if the junior and senior year is completed at BCHS. Valedictorians may have the opportunity to audition to speak at graduation. Final valedictorian selection is based on principal discretion.

Letters will be awarded at the beginning of the school year for the previous year’s accomplishments. A student must have completed one full year at Bear Creek High School. A semester grade of C or better in each class taken. (Freshmen and sophomores must complete 7 classes including study hall, and juniors/seniors must complete a minimum of 5 classes). A student’s semester class load must include a minimum of 4 academic classes. (Any combination of English, math, science, social studies or world language.) A teacher’s assistant or office assistant may not be included in the minimum number of core classes. Students must achieve at least a 3.5 GPA (weighted) for the semester grade for both semesters to qualify. Students who qualify will be mailed an application over the summer and must return it by the deadline at the beginning of the fall semester. Students are expected to participate in the awards ceremony to receive a letter.

****SCHEDULE CHANGES**** At Bear Creek High School, students register for an entire year in the spring. It is extremely important that the student, as well as the parent, looks through this curriculum guide very carefully when deciding classes for the next year. We are only able to make a change to a student’s schedule if the class is the wrong level, or you did not take or failed the prerequisite class. If there is ever a question about a course, please talk to your counselor, or the Assistant Principal/Scheduler.

POLICY FOR DROPPING A CLASS During the first 10 days of the semester, students will be able to drop a class without penalty. Any class dropped after the 10 day period will result in an ‘F’ on the transcript.

NCAA ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS If athletes are planning to enroll in college as freshmen and wish to participate in Division I or Division II athletics, they must be certified by the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Center. Approved core courses are labeled in the course descriptions. English Core Math Core Science Core Social Studies English, math or science Additional Core (English, Math, Science, Social Studies, World Language) TOTAL CORE UNITS REQUIRED

Division I 4 years 3 years 2 years 2 years 1 year 4 years

Division II 3 years 2 years 2 years 2 years 3 years 4 years

16 Core Classes

16 Core Classes

*Bear Creek High School Honor Code: The Bear Creek High School community believes in maintaining an atmosphere of trust and confidence among students and faculty to insure that each student is judged solely according to his or her own merits. No student will unfairly advance his or her own academic performance or in any way intentionally limit or impede the academic pursuits of other students. The following are examples of actions that are considered to be academically dishonest: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Giving or receiving aid during examinations or otherwise cheating on an examination. Failing to distinguish carefully between one’s own work and material from any other source. Misrepresenting the type or amount of one’s own work. Misusing school resources, including library materials, Jefferson County’s resources, and

computers.

Students should register with NCAA eligibility center at the end of their junior year. It is the student and parents’ responsibility to verify their eligibility for NCAA participation. Students may see their counselor for details.

2


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION

05154G05011

Creative Art - Comprehensive provides students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore a variety of art media and to create individual works of art. This course may also provide a discussion and exploration of career opportunities in the art world. This course covers design elements and principles supporting a work of art.

Creative Art - Sculpture/3D Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $35 for sculpture materials

05158G05012

Creative Art - Sculpture focuses on creating three-dimensional works. Students typically work with several media (such as clay, ceramics, wood, metals, recycled materials, paper Mache, etc.) Artists practice work to represent subjects both realistically and abstractly. This class offers students may ways to express themselves while focusing on three-dimensional forms.

Creative Art - Sculpture/3D Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Sculpture Fee: $35 for sculpture materials Creative Art - Sculpture/3D Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Sculpture Inter Fee: $35 for sculpture materials Ceramics/Pottery Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $35 for ceramic materials Ceramics/Pottery Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Ceramics Fee: $35 for ceramic materials Ceramics/Pottery Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Ceramics Intermediate Fee: $35 for ceramic materials Ceramics/Pottery-Studio Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Ceramics 1, 2, and 3 Fee: $35 for ceramic materials

05158G05022

Creative Art - Sculpture Intermediate will allow students who completed Beginning Sculpture to expand their three-dimensional skills. Students will explore new mediums and techniques while focusing on observation and compositional elements. Contemporary trends in art will be integrated within this course to enrich student knowledge and awareness.

05158E05012

Creative Art - Sculpture Advanced is designed to provide the student with a more in-depth approach to three-dimensional work. Students will explore a wide range of media while strengthening their skills, focusing on a high level of expressiveness. Students will analyze their own work as well as study the merits and meanings of contemporary and historical works of art.

05159G05012

Ceramics/Pottery focuses on creating three-dimensional works out of clay and ceramic material. Students will use the various methods to create and finish objects.

05159G05022

Ceramics/Pottery Intermediate will allow students who completed Beginning Ceramics/Pottery to expand their three-dimensional skills. Students will explore new mediums and techniques while focusing on observation and compositional elements. Contemporary trends in art will be integrated within this course to enrich student knowledge and awareness.

05159E05012

Ceramics/Pottery Advanced is designed to provide the student with a more in-depth approach to threedimensional work. Students will explore a wide range of media while strengthening their skills, focusing on a high level of expressiveness. Students will analyze their own work as well as study the merits and meanings of contemporary and historical works of art.

05197E05032

Ceramics/Pottery - Studio offers students the opportunity to create a professional body of work that reflects their personal style and talent. Students are often encouraged to display their work publicly.

Creative Art - Drawing Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $30 for drawing materials

05156G05012

Creative Art - Drawing focuses on learning the skills to draw. Students typically work with several media such as pen-and-ink, pencil, chalk. Students will study value form, composition, portraiture and perspective.

3

ART

Creative Art - Comprehensive Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $35 for art materials


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Creative Art - Drawing Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Drawing Fee: $30 for drawing materials Creative Art - Drawing Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Drawing Intermediate Fee: $30 for drawing materials Creative Art - Painting Credit: .5 per semester 9, 10,11,12 Fee: $45 for art materials

COURSE CODE 05156G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION Creative Art - Drawing Intermediate will allow students who completed Beginning Drawing to expand their skills. Students will explore new mediums and techniques while focusing on observation and compositional elements. Contemporary trends in art will be integrated within this course to enrich student knowledge and awareness. Creative Art - Drawing Advanced is designed to provide the student with a more in-depth approach to drawing. Students will explore a wide range of media while strengthening drawing skills, focusing on a high level of expressiveness. Students will analyze their own work as well as study the merits and meanings of contemporary and historical works of art.

05157G05012

Creative Art - Painting focuses on painting, media and technique. Students typically work with several media such as watercolor, and acrylics.

Creative Art - Painting Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Painting Fee: $45 for painting materials

05157G05022

Creative Art - Painting Intermediate will allow students who completed Beginning Painting to expand their skills. Students will continue to explore mediums and techniques while focusing on observation and compositional elements. Contemporary trends in art will be integrated within this course to enrich student knowledge and awareness.

Creative Art - Painting Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Intermediate Painting Fee: $45 for painting materials Art Portfolio Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Any 3 art classes and/or teacher signature Fee: $45 for art materials AP Studio Art – 2D Design Credit: .5 per semester year long course. May be taken for 2 years to develop portfolio 10,11,12 Fee: $85 for art materials, $85 Exam Fee

05157E05012

Creative Art - Painting Advanced is designed to provide the student with a more in-depth approach to painting. Students will explore a wide range of media while strengthening painting skills, focusing on a high level of expressiveness. Students will analyze their own work as well as study the merits and meanings of contemporary and historical works of art.

05170E05011

Art Portfolio offers students the opportunity to create a professional body of work that reflects their personal style and talent. Students are encouraged to display their work publicly and create a digital portfolio.

05171H05014 05171H05024

Designed for students with a serious interest in art, the AP Studio Art—2D Design course enables students to refine their skills and create artistic works to be submitted to the College Board for evaluation. Students are asked to demonstrate proficiency in 2D design using a variety of art forms. These could include, but are not limited to, graphic design, typography, digital imaging, photography, collage, illustration, painting or printmaking. This type of design involves purposeful decision making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way with the entire spectrum of ideas. Students who pass the AP exam may be eligible to receive college credit, which is decided by the individual colleges.

4

ART

05156E05012


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE AP Studio Art – 3D Design Credit: .5 per semester year long course. 10,11,12 Fee: $85 for art materials $85 exam fee

COURSE CODE 05171H05034 05171H05044

05153H05012 05153H05022

Jewelry Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $50 for jewelry materials

05166G05012

Jewelry Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Beginning Jewelry and teacher signature Fee: $50 for jewelry materials Jewelry Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Jewelry Intermediate and teacher signature Fee: $50 for jewelry materials Photography Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $50 for photography materials

05166G05022

Jewelry courses apply art and design principles to the creation of jewelry. Typically, students explore using various media, such as glass, plastic, copper-enameled, brass, and silver. Course topics include exposure to jewelry of diverse world cultures and the history of jewelry design. Jewelry courses also concentrate on metalwork processes such as soldering, casting, riveting, and finishing as they relate to the creation of jewelry. Jewelry-Intermediate will allow students who completed Beginning Jewelry to expand their skills. Students will explore new techniques while focusing on observation and compositional elements. Contemporary trends in jewelry will be integrated within this course to enrich student knowledge and awareness.

05166E05012

Jewelry-Advanced is designed to provide the student with a more in depth approach to jewelry design work. Students will explore a wide range of media while strengthening their skills, focusing on a high level of expressiveness. Students will analyze their own work as well as study the merits and meanings of contemporary and historical works of art.

05167G05014

In Photography, students will receive a fundamental course covering selection, care, maintenance, handling of cameras, light metering, and compositional techniques in both film and digital formats. Emphasis will be on 35mm SLR and Photoshop CS5 camera techniques. Basic darkroom procedures such as film processing, contact printing, and enlarging will be covered as well as Adobe Photoshop CS5 tools and techniques. ALL STUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO HAVE A MANUALLY OPERATED 35MM FILM CAMERA FOR THIS CLASS.

5

ART

AP Art - History of Art Credit: .5 per semester year long course. 10,11,12 Fee: $35 for art materials $85 exam fee

COURSE DESCRIPTION Designed for students with a serious interest in art, the AP Studio Art—3D Design course enables students to refine their skills and create artistic works to be submitted to the College Board for evaluation. Given the nature of the AP evaluation, the course typically emphasizes quality of work, with attention to issues of depth and space. These may include mass, volume, form, plane, light, and texture. Such elements and concepts may be articulated through additive, subtractive, and/or fabrication processes. These might include traditional sculpture, architectural models, apparel, ceramics, three-dimensional fiber arts, or metal work, among others. Students who pass the exam may be eligible to receive college credit, which is decided by individual colleges. Designed to parallel college-level Art History courses, AP Art—History of Art provides the opportunity for students to critically examine architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within their historical and cultural contexts. In covering the art of several centuries (not necessarily in chronological order), students learn to identify different styles, techniques, and influences and to formulate and articulate their reactions to various kinds of artwork.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION

05167G05034

Photography Intermediate emphasizes photography as an art form. Students will be encouraged to use photography as a creative and expressive tool through experimental darkroom techniques, multiple image exposure, hand coloring and other expressive processes which are used to produce strong visual images. Additionally, students will be further exposed to Adobe Photoshop CS5 and be given more extensive work with this program. ALL STUDENTS MUST HAVE A MANUALLY OPERATED 35MM FILM CAMERA FOR THIS CLASS.

Photography Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Intermediate Photography Fee: $55 for photography materials

05167E05011

Photography-Advanced is designed to provide students with a more in-depth approach to photography. Instruction regarding the creative process becomes focused upon students developing their own artistic style. Historic styles and techniques and contemporary photographic trends will be analyzed as students critique their own work and begin to develop professional portfolios. Students will work in a combination of film and digital formats. ALL STUDENTS MUST HAVE A MANUALLY OPERATED 35MM FILM CAMERA FOR THIS CLASS.

Photography-Studio Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Advanced Photography and/or teacher signature Fee: $60 for photography materials

05197E05032

Photography - Studio is designed to challenge the serious photography student. Emphasis is placed on perfecting photography, creative thinking, individual expression and problem solving, as well as developing an entry-level photography portfolio. Digital photography and manipulation of photographs using image-editing software will continue to be explored along with advanced darkroom photography techniques. Students are encouraged to display their work publicly. ALL STUDENTS MUST HAVE A MANUALLY OPERATED 35MM FILM CAMERA FOR THIS CLASS.

Intro to Computer Graphics Credit: 5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $30 for paper ink and art materials

10202G05014

Interactive Media-Adobe Photo Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $30 for paper, ink and art materials

10203G05038

Intro to Computer Graphics introduces the student to the hardware and software for digital graphics and multimedia production, including basic computer operations, ergonomics, file management, scanning/ printing techniques, archiving capabilities, and utilization of the server and Internet connection. Students will gain hands-on experience with layout and design, using primarily Adobe programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator. Juniors and Seniors may be eligible to earn college credit through Red Rocks Community College. This course concentrates on the high-end capabilities of a raster photo-editing and image manipulation software as an illustration, design and photo retouching tool. Students explore a wide range of selection and manipulation techniques that can be applied to photos and graphics. Students use creative thinking to solve communication and design problems. Emphasis will be placed on quality design work, art appreciation, and the application of computer graphics within the field of art. A previous class of Photography and Drawing is strongly encouraged. Fee includes all students’ supplies such as paper, ink for printing, computer discs, and other supplies for producing final artwork.

6

ART

Photography Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisites: Beginning Photography Fee: $55 for photography materials


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Business/Office Careers Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $25

COURSE CODE 12001G05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION Business/Office Careers is designed to equip students with the technological and critical thinking tools to help explore different types of careers. Students will learn how to use self-assessments, plan for educational career needs, set goals, and use decision-making skills. The course will help students build a base of knowledge to adapt to the ever-changing future job market.

12054G05011

Business law is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the legal system in the united States and how the law affects individuals and businesses in everyday life. Areas of law covered include criminal, tort, credit, real estate, insurance, and contract. Individual rights, consumer rights, and the rights of businesses and their transactions are explored.

Banking and Finance Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Fee: $25

12101G05011

Banking and Finance equips students with the fundamentals of basic financial planning and money management essential in today’s fast moving economy. This course is designed to give students the advantage of understanding financial planning concepts and investment principles as they enter the financial world as young adults. Students will create their own financial plan and budget, explore saving and investing strategies, be introduced to the intricacies of credit and managing debt, and identify ways to manage risk, including the wise use of insurance.

Accounting Credit: .5 per semester, fall semester 10,11,12 Fee: $25

12104G05012

Accounting provides students with an in-depth look at business accounting systems. Students will complete the accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship. The accounting software will provide the students with realistic opportunities to apply their knowledge of accounting concepts and procedures. Students will also analyze cash control and banking activities.

Accounting Advanced Credit: .5 per semester, spring semester 10,11,12 Prerequisites: Instructor Signature Fee: $25 Marketing Principles Credit: .5 per semester, semester long course. 9, 10,11,12 Fee: $30

12104E05012

In Accounting Adv, students spend the second year of accounting studying special topics such as: payroll accounting, cash controls, depreciation, un-collectible receivables, inventories, financial statement analysis, notes payable and receivable, and partnership accounting. This course gives students the opportunity to learn how to make business decisions, flex problem-solving skills, and boost computer skills.

12152G05014

Marketing Principles is a fast paced class, which prepares students for the future through many real-life experiences and introduces students to marketing practices, principles, and related careers. The class content may include units of study in salesmanship, advertising, and promotion, financing, human relationships, merchandising, free enterprise, and career exploration. The college bound or career bound student will enhance their chance to succeed by understanding the role marketing plays in their life. Students may apply what they have learned in real business situations through DECA by attending local, state, and national conferences. This class addresses all seven marketing standards. Marketing Adv is designed for students who wish to expand their knowledge and experience in the field of marketing. New course offerings will be introduced and/or disciplines previously taught expanded. Students may enhance their knowledge by doing projects using technology with marketing manuals, ecommerce, international marketing, etc. Students will be able to attend all DECA conferences and competitions. This class addresses all seven marketing standards.

Marketing - Advanced Credit: .5 per semester, year long course. 11,12 Prerequisite: Instructor Signature Fee: $30

12152E05012 12152E05022

7

BUSINESS

Business Law Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Fee: $25


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Sports & Entertain Marketing Credit: .5 per semester, year long course. 11,12 Prerequisite: Instructor Signature Fee: $30 International Marketing/Business Credit: .5 per semester, semester long course. 11,12 Prerequisite: Instructor signature Fee: $30 Business Leadership 1 .5 Credit per semester, semester long course 11,12

COURSE CODE 12163G05012 12163G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION In Sports/Entertainment Marketing, students will learn about marketing through the dynamic world of sports and entertainment. Areas of instruction will include advertising, game day promotions, ticket pricing, TV, radio, and cable contracts, player salaries, endorsement contracts, licensing, promotional tieins and more. Guest speakers, projects, and field trips are an important part of this class.

In International Business/Market, students will explore the concepts of globalization, investigate the international business environment, analyze the impact of environmental factors on worldwide business operations and identify and examine managerial issues facing international business firms with an emphasis on case study and experiential lessons using real world applications.

12058G05012

This course is designed to strengthen the awareness of an individual’s leadership potential. Students will be challenged to understand what leadership is and how to apply that to their personal lives. Students will look at how leadership skills influence and bring about change in an organization, along with learning how leadership theories have progressed over time. Students will be eligible to receive 3 credits from Arapahoe Community College if they successfully complete Leadership 1 & 2. This course is designed to put the leadership skills that were learned in Leadership to practice. Students will get experience leading projects and teams, along with participating in supportive roles within small groups. Some of the main topics that will be discussed are moral leadership, motivation and empowerment, and leading change. Students will be eligible to receive 3 credits from Arapahoe Community College if they successfully complete Leadership 1 & 2. Business Computer Apps introduces computer concepts and components as well as application suite software and the Internet. Included are hands-on experiences with word processors, spreadsheets, databases, presentation software, operating environments, and other common applications packages. Course could qualify for community college credit.

Business Leadership 2 .5 Credit per semester, semester long class 11,12

12058G05022

Business Computer Apps Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $25 Business Computer Apps Adv Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $25

10005G05022

10005E05012

Business Computer Apps Adv continues with advanced computer concepts and components as well as application suite software and the Internet. Included are advanced word processing, databases, and spreadsheets. Students will learn to apply their Internet skills to develop an understanding of communications and information seeking. Multimedia applications will be explored to help facilitate student's success in advanced presentations and communications skills. Course could qualify for community college credit.

School Store Credit: .5 per semester 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Instructor signature

12999G05012 12999G05022

Students who have the opportunity to work in and assist in the daily operations of the Bear Creek High School store will develop skills in salesmanship, marketing, personnel management, cashiering, and inventory procedures. Students will gain hands-on experience in the daily business operations of a small business.

Workplace Experience Credit: .5 per semester th 12 Prerequisite: Application process

22998G05012 22998G05022

Workplace Experience courses provide students with work experience in a field related to their interests. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and employer (although students are not necessarily paid). These courses may include classroom activities as well, involving further study of the field or discussion regarding experiences that students encounter in the workplace. Credit is awarded based on completion of required paperwork and supervisor(s) evaluation(s). Note: if the particular subject area is known, use the code associated with the Workplace Experience course within that subject area.

8

BUSINESS

12056G05011


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Web Page Design Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $25 (Beginning)

COURSE CODE 10201G05012

10203G05078

Interactive Media-Web Design Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Web Page Design Inter Fee: $25

10203G05088

COURSE TITLE

AP Computer Science A Credit: .5 per semester, year long course. 11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher signature Fee: $20

COURSE CODE 10152G05012 10152G05022

10157H05012 10157H05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION In Computer Programming, students learn how to write computer programs using a variety of programming languages. Possible computer programming languages include: C++, C#, Java, Flash Action Script 3, and java script. Students also learn how to use industry standard Interactive Development Environment (IDE) software such as Microsoft Visual Studio, Eclipse and Flash or Flex. Learning objectives include: types, variables and standard I/O, truth and branching, for loops, strings and arrays, standard template library, functions (methods in Java), references, pointers, classes, advanced classes and dynamic memory, inheritance and polymorphism.

In AP Computer Science A, students learn the advanced Java programming skills needed in preparation for the AP Computer Science exam. Because the designated outcomes for the AP Computer Science exam change yearly, consult the AP web site for more information. (http;\\www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html)

9

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer Programming Credit: .5 per semester, year long course. 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Minimum of C in Algebra I Fee: $20

This course introduces the fundamentals of Web Design. Students use HTML syntax to create a web page. Web-safe colors and the use of graphic editors will be explored. Students study web aesthetics and incorporation of animation and interactive elements. The course emphasizes file organization and layout including tables and frames. Course could qualify for community college credit.

BUSINESS

Web Page Design Inter Credit: .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Web Page Design 1 Fee: $25

COURSE DESCRIPTION Students will learn the history of the Internet, email principles, HTML coding, and FTP. Hand coding of HTML programming will be required to build a strong knowledge of how this language works before moving to WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) program use. Students will learn to create solid navigation architecture, address a target audience as well as information planning and usability analysis. Beginning graphic design for the Web will address site look, feel and voice and creation of GIF and JPEG images. Multimedia MIDI sound files will also be introduced. Course could qualify for community college credit. Students will continue building knowledge of HTML programming language and move to use of WYSIWYG programs. Java Script will be introduced to create mouse over and pop-up windows. Programming and usage forms and cascading style sheets will be introduced. Evaluation of web sites, ethical usage and copyright information will be discussed. Commercial graphic design software will be introduced to create graphics and animations. Flash, digital video and PDF will be included.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE English/Lang Arts 9 .5 per semester th 9

COURSE CODE 01001G05012 01001G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION English/Language Arts 9 incorporates the five aspects of language arts: reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Study of genres leads to written compositions that build upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and mechanics. Students apply comprehension and critical reading skills to both literature and nonfiction.

01001H05012 01001H05022

English/Language Arts 9 incorporates the five aspects of language arts: reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Study of genres leads to written compositions that build upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and mechanics. Students apply comprehension and critical reading skills to both literature and nonfiction. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course.

English/Lang Arts 10 .5 per semester th 10

01002G05012 01002G05022

English/Language Arts 10 offers a balanced focus on composition and literature. Students read widely to improve their reading rate, vocabulary, and comprehension and develop skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message. Students apply knowledge of purposes and audiences by studying and producing various genres. Oral communication is practiced in group settings as well through presentations.

English/Lang Arts 10 Honors .5 per semester th 10 Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and application. FEE: $25.00 for materials

01002H05012 01002H05022

English/Language Arts 10 offers a balanced focus on composition and literature. Students read widely to improve their reading rate, vocabulary, and comprehension and develop skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message. Students apply knowledge of purposes and audiences by studying and producing various genres. Oral communication is practiced in group settings as well through presentations. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course.

English/Lang Arts 11 .5 per semester th 11

01003G05012 01003G05022

English/Language Arts 11 develops students’ writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, which students apply to compositions that utilize research and rhetoric. Students read nonfiction and literary works as a means to understand the world and to inform their writing. Literary conventions and stylistic devices may receive greater emphasis than in previous courses. Participation in class dialogue and delivering presentations are expectations of this course.

AP English Lang & Comp th th .5 per semester 11 & 12 Prerequisites: See “Advancement Placement Courses” on page 1. FEE: $25 copy fee for course packet.

01005H05012 01005H05022

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Language and Composition courses expose students to prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. These courses emphasize the interaction of authorial purpose, intended audience, and the subject at hand, and through them, students learn to develop stylistic flexibility as they write compositions covering a variety of subjects that are intended for various purposes. This writing course prepares students for college-level writing in a variety of disciplines. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU succeed program.

10

ENGLISH

English/Lang Arts 9 Honors .5 per semester th 9 Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and application. FEE: $25.00 for materials


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE AP English Lit and Comp th .5 per semester 12 Prerequisites: See “Advancement Placement Courses” on page 1. FEE: $25 copy fee and paperback book purchase

COURSE CODE 01006H05012 01006H05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Literature and Composition courses enable students to develop critical standards for evaluating literature. Students study the language, character, action, and theme in works of recognized literary merit; enrich their understanding of connotation, metaphor, irony, syntax, and tone; and write compositions of their own (including literary analysis, exposition, argument, narrative, and creative writing). . Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU succeed program.

01004G05016 01004G05026

English/Language Arts 12 blends composition, analytical reading, and literature into a cohesive whole. Students combine purposes, patterns, and genres in writing while incorporating research and rhetorical techniques. Collaboration and critical thinking lead to more complex presentations and products, with students honing their comprehension skills while reading more complicated literary and nonfiction texts. In this English/Language Arts 12 option, students will focus their attention primarily on texts from one historical period or cultural group; however, different resources will also be studied. The fall semester focuses on realistic portrayals of the human experience, while the spring semester delves into the realm of the unreal, where students analyze how literary genres such as horror, fantasy, and science fiction make profound statements about our reality.

English/Lang Arts 12-Literature Study/Senior Project .5 per semester th 12 nd FEE: $25 materials for 2 semester Senior Project needs additional folders & paper.

01004G05036 01004G05046

English/Language Arts 12 blends composition, analytical reading, and literature into a cohesive whole. Students combine purposes, patterns, and genres in writing while incorporating research and rhetorical techniques. Collaboration and critical thinking lead to more complex presentations and products, with students honing their comprehension skills while reading more complicated literary and nonfiction texts. Literature Study/Senior Project is a portfolio-based class. The fall semester focuses on creative writing, which offers students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. In the spring semester, students will research a topic of their choice, write a research paper, complete a comprehensive project, and present their experience through a formal presentation to a panel of teachers, administrators, and community members.

English/Lang Arts 12-Literary Genre .5 per semester th 12

01004G05056 01004G05066

English/Language Arts 12 blends composition, analytical reading, and literature into a cohesive whole. Students combine purposes, patterns, and genres in writing while incorporating research and rhetorical techniques. Collaboration and critical thinking lead to more complex presentations and products, with students honing their comprehension skills while reading more complicated literary and nonfiction texts. In this English/Language Arts 12 option, students will examine current social issues and trends (from pop culture to current events) as they are explored in modern American literary works and contemporary nonfiction. Students will focus primarily on a person’s sense of identity looking through the lenses of race, gender, social class, and sexual orientation.

Creative Writing .5 per semester/ Elective Credit Only th 10, 11, 12 $20 copy fee

01104G05011

Creative Writing offers students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Although most creative writing courses cover several expressive forms, others concentrate exclusively on one particular form (such as poetry or playwriting).

11

ENGLISH

English/Lang Arts 12-Period Study .5 per semester th 12


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION

11104G05034 11104G05044

Publication Production courses provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to produce the school newspaper, yearbook, literary magazine, or other printed publication. Students may gain experience in several components (writing, editing, layout, production, and so on) or may focus on a single aspect while producing the publication. Yearbook is journalistic in nature and allows students to participate in the production of the school yearbook. Individual responsibility is essential toward completion of assignments for deadlines. Students will also have the opportunity to accept leadership positions and develop new skills as they build the yearbook. To register for this course, students must sign up for both first and second semesters.

Audio/Visual Production .5 per semester/Elective Credit Only th 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Teacher signature Fee:$15 technology fee

11051G05014 11051G05024

Audio/Visual Production covers digitizing, compression boards, imputing, outputting, and software integration as well as the principles of nonlinear editing. Final projects are output to digital tape. Students will analyze films from a variety of perspectives: drama, history, culture, and film technology.

Audio/Visual Production Int. .5 per semester/Elective Credit Only th 10, (space available) 11th, 12 Prerequisite: A/V Production and teacher signature Fee:$15 technology fee

11051G05034 11051G05044

Audio/Visual Production courses provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for television, video, film, and/or radio production. Writing scripts, camera operation, use of graphics and other visuals, lighting, audio techniques, editing, production principles, and career opportunities are typical topics covered within production courses. Students are usually required to produce their own program or segment. Additional topics such as broadcast industry regulations, radio/TV operation, power of the medium, photography, transmission technology, and so on may be included.

Broadcasting Technology .5 per semester th 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: BCTN teacher signature Fee:$15 technology fee

11103G05012 11103G05022

In Broadcasting Technology, students will develop specific technical, computer and communication skills necessary for effective studio production including, but not limited to, studio camera, audio, lighting, VTR operation, computer graphics generation and nonlinear editing, script writing and editing, directing, teleprompting, and anchoring. Broadcast Studio students will focus solely on the final editing and online production of the broadcast.

Forensic Speech Inclusive .5 per semester year long course, Elective Credit Only 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: teacher signature Fee: $60 for tournament registrations and NFL expenses.

01152G05012 01152G05022

Forensic Speech—Inclusive courses offer students the opportunity to learn how to use oral skills effectively in formal and informal situations. Students learn such skills as logic and reasoning, the organization of thought and supporting materials, and effective presentation of one’s voice and body. Often linked to an extracurricular program, these courses introduce students to numerous public speaking situations, and they learn the methods, aims, and styles of a variety of events. This class has required attendance at Speech Tournaments on some Saturdays.

Forensic Speech Debate .5 per semester year long course, Elective Credit Only 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: teacher signature Fee: $60 for tournament registrations and NFL expenses.

01153E05012 01153E05022

Forensic Speech—Debate courses offer students the opportunity to learn how to use oral skills in formal and informal situations. In these courses, students are able to develop such skills as logic and reasoning, research and analysis, organization of thought and supporting materials, argumentative style and skill, and effective presentation of one’s voice and body. Often linked to an extracurricular program, these courses introduce students to the methods, aims, and styles used in various kinds of debates (formal debate or Lincoln-Douglas). This class has required attendance at Speech Tournaments on some Saturdays.

12

ENGLISH

Publication Prod: Yearbook .5 per semester/Elective Credit Only th 9, 10, 11, 12


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 22209G05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION Teen Choices includes large and small group activities designed to help the students understand themselves and their relationships with others. Students will develop techniques for handling friends, high school, dating and other teen related issues. Topics to be covered include responsible decision making and problem solving, human development, sexuality issues, abstinence, effective communication, teens and the law, destructive behaviors and addictions. Methods of handling social pressures and a teen’s personal power will be emphasized.

Life Management .5 per semester 11,12 Fee: $15

22206G05012

Students in Life Management will demonstrate problem solving, communication skills, computation/estimation, career choice, paycheck management and decision making skills for living on their own. Students will apply knowledge to real world situations like managing resources and finances, paying bills, using credit, applying for loans, selecting apartments and cars, and balancing checkbooks to meet their short and long term goals. Becoming an effective consumer will be emphasized. In addition, topics covered may include investment planning, taxes, personal wellness, and time management.

Interpersonal Relationships .5 per semester 11,12 Fee: $15

22208G05011

Interpersonal Relationships helps young men and women establish personal goals for living, as well as develop positive and rewarding relationships. Students will demonstrate communication skills based on male/female roles in relationships and family situations. Students will examine relationship issues, marriage planning, communication, family decisions and crises, and stages of the life cycle through group discussions, simulations, and case studies. Use of critical thinking and positive interpersonal skills in family issues and other adult situations will be emphasized.

Child Development/Parenting .5 per semester 10,11,12 Fee: $15

22204G05011

The Child Development/Parenting course provides students with knowledge about the physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development of children from conception to adolescence. Course content typically includes topics such as prenatal and birth processes; responsibilities and difficulties of parenthood; fundamentals of children’s emotional and physical development; and the appropriate care of infants, toddlers, young children and school-aged children. Students interested in careers with children and/or psychology will find this class an excellent experience.

Advanced Interior Design .5 per semester, yearlong class 10,11,12 Fee: $30 per semester plus the cost of supplies

19205G05012 19205G05022

Advanced Interior Design provides students with advanced knowledge regarding interior design. While exploring design elements and principles, needs and style, and decision-making, students may also explore the following topics: color, texture, furniture styles and arrangement, lighting, window treatments, floor and wall coverings, and improvement/modification. Advanced Interior Design courses may also cover architectural style and design, both residential and commercial. Housing problems or current housing issues may also be explored.

Teacher Cadet I .5 per semester yearlong course 11,12 Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, Applicationand Teacher Approval Fee: $20 per year

19152E05014 19152E05024

This full year course is designed for students who have a strong interest in, or who are considering a career related to, the occupation of "teacher" at any age or grade level. Students will complete self assessments, participate in individual and group projects, complete observations at various ages and stages of learning, and increase their understanding of themselves and others as "learners". The culminating event in this class is a 10-week mini-teaching experience during second semester at an area school where students will plan and deliver lessons under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. This academic elective course is fast paced and students may apply for college credit with a "B" or higher in the class.

13

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

Teen Choices .5 per semester 9, 10 Fee: $15


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Introductory Foods & Nutrition .5 per semester 9,10,11 Fee: $50

COURSE CODE 16054G05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Culinary Art Specialty/Creative Foods .5 per semester 10,11,12 Fee: $50

16056G05012

This is an upper level foods preparation class that takes an advanced look at culinary skills. Students work in kitchen teams to develop skills through lab experiences which may include breads, appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, cake decorating, candy making, event planning and much more. This course gives students the opportunity to use creativity in preparing and serving food.

Pro Start Culinary .5 per semester yearlong course 11,12 Prerequisite: Any foods class, application, and teacher approval Fee: $150 per year

16052G05012 16052G05022

Pro Start is a food service/hospitality management program. This program was developed by the National Restaurant Education Association. This course combines culinary skills with business management skills, along with guest speakers and field trips in the hospitality industry. Students will develop skills in nutrition, breakfast foods, sandwiches, salads, menu development, cost planning, inventory control, and customer service. This course is designed as part of a two year program to help students prepare for a career in the hospitality industry. Students who wish to obtain national Pro Start certification must complete a 400 hour guided internship and pass the National Restaurant Association Exam for Pro Start I. Students may also receive ServSafe certification and will work with a chef mentor.

Pro Start Hospitality Credit: .5 per semester year-long course th 12 Prerequisite: ProStart Culinary and teacher approval Fee: $150 per year

16052E05012 16052E05022

In ProStart II, students will continue to develop skills for the restaurant and hospitality industries. Students will refine their culinary skills in the area of cuisines of the world; potatoes, pasta, grains, baked goods, cakes, pastries, pies, meat, poultry, seafood, stocks and sauces. Students will develop menus, marketing skills, sales skills, interview skills, procedures for running their own restaurant, and learn to write a resume. Students who wish to obtain national Pro Start certification must complete a 400 hour guided internship and pass the National Restaurant Association Exam for Pro Start II. At the conclusion of this class, students will be eligible to apply for scholarships, and receive college credit with participating institutions.

14

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

This is an introductory course in food preparation and nutrition. Throughout foods lab experiences, students will be learning the principles of cooking and preparing foods, egg cookery, quick and yeast breads, poultry and beef dishes, and fruits and vegetables. Students will learn the importance of healthy eating habits. In addition, students will acquire the knowledge about safety and sanitation, equivalents and equipment needed to be successful in the kitchen.


COURSE TITLE

Algebra I Analytical Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Fee: $10 (Algebra Principles)

COURSE CODE 02051B05012 02051B05022

02052G05034 02052G05044

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is an Algebra readiness class which increases students’ foundational algebraic and computational skills and does not count as a high school math graduation credit. Topics include ratio, proportion, rational number concepts and operations, estimation, exponents, the rectangular coordinate system, formulas and using equivalence and algebraic properties to solve for x. An emphasis is placed on analyzing situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically and application of mathematical skills to make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. Instruction is designed to fill gaps in previous concepts so that upon completion of this course students will be prepared to take algebra. If students select this course, they may not be able to complete courses above Algebra 2 by graduation. This course meets Colorado 9th grade standards, covers the same content as the district approved Algebra grade curriculum, and counts as first year of graduation requirements. Analytical Algebra infuses business concepts and skills into Algebra I. It includes the study of properties and operations of the real number system, applications of proportional reasoning, solving and graphing first degree equations, inequalities and systems of linear equations. Students generate equivalent expressions, use formulas to solve problems, simplify and factor polynomials and solve simple quadratic equations. Class room ready lesson plans are built around 9th grade Colorado standards with business applications like department store floor plans, payroll calculations, and customer satisfaction surveys create an authentic learning experience for students and a direct connection to real world problem solving. The curriculum demonstrates pre-collegiate preparation, and meets community college admissions standards. (This is a Career and Technical Education course)

02052G05014 02052G05024

This course meets 9th grade Colorado standards by following district approved Algebra curriculum and counts as first year of graduation requirements. Algebra I includes the study of properties and operations of the real number system including irrational numbers, applications of proportional reasoning, and solving and graphing first degree equations, inequalities and systems of linear equations. Students generate equivalent expressions, use formulas to solve problems, simplify and factor polynomials and solve simple quadratic equations. An emphasis is placed on analyzing situations verbally, numerically, graphically, and symbolically. To meet 21st century learning, students use technology and models to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships and develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations.

Geometry Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Analytical Fee:$10

02072G05014 02072G05024

This course meets 10th grade Colorado standards by following the district approved Geometry curriculum and counts as second year of graduation requirements. This course develops the structure of Euclidean geometry and applies the resulting theorems and formulas to address meaningful problems. It includes properties of plane and solid figures; deductive methods of reasoning and use of logic; geometry as an axiomatic system including the study of postulates, theorems and proofs; concepts of congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, and proportion; rules of angle measurement in triangles and concepts of coordinate geometry and trigonometry. Dynamic geometry software, compass and straightedge, and other tools are used to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships and to develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations.

Geometry Principles Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 Analytical Fee: $15

02072G05034 02072G05044

This course meets 10th grade Colorado standards and covers the same content as the district approved Geometry curriculum. This course counts as second year of graduation requirement. Students continue their pursuit of formal mathematics using geometry concepts, properties, and relationships in problem solving within the context of the construction industry. The emphasis is on using experimentation and inductive reasoning to construct geometric concepts, discover geometric relationships, and formulate conjectures. Deductive logic is employed to construct informal logical arguments and proofs. Topics include: logic, properties of triangles, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruence, similarity, coordinate geometry, area, volume, properties for circles and introductory trigonometry. Technology is emphasized through the use of graphing calculators and software applications. Students apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. (This is a Career and Technical Education Course)

15

MATHEMATICS

Algebra I Credit: .5 per semester, fall semester 9,10,11,12 Fee: $10

A graphing calculator is highly recommended for Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 1 Analytical, and Geometry Principles. A graphing calculator is required for all math courses at Algebra II or Higher. (The TI-84+ is recommended)

Pre Algebra Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course elective math credit only 9, 10 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Fee: $10

BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 02072H05012 02072H05022

02069G05014 02069G05024

Algebra II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10, 11 Prerequisite: C or better in Geometry or Geometry Principles, and teacher recommendation. Fee: $10

02056G05012 02056G05022

Algebra II Honors Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9, 10, 11 Prerequisite: Honors Geometry or Geometry with minimum grade of A and teacher recommendation Fee: $10

02056H05012 02056H05022

This course follows the Algebra 2 district approved curriculum and counts as a third year of graduation requirements. Algebra 2 topics include operations with rational and irrational expressions, in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities, analyzing and solving quadratic functions including complex numbers, solving systems of linear and quadratic equations, properties of higher degree equations, and operations with rational and irrational exponents. Students investigate and solve linear piece wise, absolute value, cubic, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without a graphing calculator. Students analyze data and develop mathematical models to address real world problem situations. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thoughtprovoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course.

16

MATHEMATICS

Algebra Inter Credit: .5 per semester, fall semester 11,12 Prerequisite: Geometry or Geometry Principles. Teacher Recommendation. Fee: $10

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course meets 10th grade Colorado standards by following the district approved Geometry curriculum and counts as second year of graduation requirements. This course develops the structure of Euclidean geometry and applies the resulting theorems and formulas to address meaningful problems. It includes properties of plane and solid figures; deductive methods of reasoning and use of logic; geometry as an axiomatic system including the study of postulates, theorems and proofs; concepts of congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, and proportion; rules of angle measurement in triangles and concepts of coordinate geometry and trigonometry. Dynamic geometry software, compass and straightedge, and other tools are used to investigate and explore mathematical ideas and relationships and to develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thoughtprovoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. This course follows the 11th grade district approved curriculum and counts as the third year of graduation requirements. Intermediate Algebra connects and extends algebra and geometry concepts. This course focuses on modeling various situations using rigorous mathematics with an emphasis on real numbers and algebraic properties, graphing skills, and applications drawn from a variety of areas including algebra, statistics, geometry, and continuous and discrete mathematics. Topics include polynomials, factoring, exponents and their notation, matrices, linear functions, linear systems and inequalities, quadratics, exponential functions, geometric connections, trigonometry and topics in probability and statistics. Students apply mathematical skills and make meaningful connections to life’s experiences. These courses are the fall semester courses for the two year Algebra II program. The two-year program does not meet HEAR requirements for college entrance. This course follows the Algebra 2 district approved curriculum and counts as a third year of graduation requirements. Algebra 2 topics include operations with rational and irrational expressions, in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities, analyzing and solving quadratic functions including complex numbers, solving systems of linear and quadratic equations, properties of higher degree equations, and operations with rational and irrational exponents. Students investigate and solve linear piece wise, absolute value, cubic, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically, with and without a graphing calculator. Students analyze data and develop mathematical models to address real world problem situations.

A graphing calculator is highly recommended for Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 1 Analytical, and Geometry Principles. A graphing calculator is required for all math courses at Algebra II or Higher. (The TI-84+ is recommended)

Geometry Honors Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Fee: $10


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 02110G05012 02110G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course combines the study of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytical geometry and math analysis topics as preparation for calculus. Topics include the study of complex numbers, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential , rational , right trigonometric and circular functions and their relations, inverses, and graphs, trigonometric identities and equations, solutions of right and oblique triangles, vectors, parametric equations and their graphs, the polar coordinate system, conic sections, and limits. NOTE: This class includes Calculus A topics. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program. This course combines the study of trigonometry, elementary functions, analytical geometry and math analysis topics as preparation for calculus. Topics include the study of complex numbers, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential , rational , right trigonometric and circular functions and their relations, inverses, and graphs, trigonometric identities and equations, solutions of right and oblique triangles, vectors, parametric equations and their graphs, the polar coordinate system, conic sections, and limits. NOTE: This class includes Calculus A topics. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program.

Algebra III Credit: .5 per semester , Fall course th 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2. Fee: $10

02057G05011

This one semester course reviews and extends algebraic concepts for students that have already taken Algebra 2. Topics include complex numbers, numerical tables, field properties and theorems, operations with rational and irrational expressions, factoring of rational expressions, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, solving systems of linear and quadratic equations, properties of higher degree equations, and operations with rational exponents.

Inferential Probability and Stat Credit: .5 per semester , Spring course th 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 3.

02202G05011

This one semester course gives a general overview of statistical methods that are used in originating and analyzing data. Statistics topics include event probability, normal probability distribution collection and description of data, frequency tables and graphs, measures of central tendency and variability, random variables, and random sampling, covariance and correlation, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program.

AP Statistics Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with a minimum grade of C. Fee: $10

02203H05012 02203H05022

This course follows the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level statistics courses. AP Statistics courses introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program.

17

MATHEMATICS

02110H05012 02110H05022

A graphing calculator is highly recommended for Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 1 Analytical, and Geometry Principles. A graphing calculator is required for all math courses at Algebra II or Higher. (The TI-84+ is recommended)

Pre-Calculus/Trig Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 with a minimum grade of C. Fee: $15 Pre-Calculus/Trig Honors Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 with a minimum grade of A and teacher recommendation. Fee: $15


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 02124H05012 02124H05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION

AP Calculus BC Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11, 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or PreCalculus Hon with a minimum grade of C. Fee: $10 Multivariate Calculus Honors Credit: .5 per semester, fall semester 11,12 Prerequisite: AP BC Calculus and teacher recommendation.

02125H05012 02125H05022

02122H05011

One semester Multivariate Calculus includes the study of hyperbolic functions, improper integrals, directional directives, multiple integration and its applications. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program.

Differential Calculus Honors Credit: .5 per semester, spring semester 11,12 Prerequisite: Multivariate Calculus and teacher recommendation.

02123H05011

One semester Differential Calculus course includes the study of elementary differential equations including first and higher order differential equations, partial differential equation, linear equations systems of linear equations, transformations, series solutions, numerical methods, boundary value problems and the existence theorem. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thoughtprovoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program.

18

MATHEMATICS

This course follows the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses. AP Calculus AB provides students with an intuitive understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. This course introduces calculus and includes the following topics: elementary functions; properties of functions and their graphs; limits and continuity; differential calculus(including definition of the derivative, derivative formulas, theorems about derivatives, geometric applications, optimization problems, and rate-of change problems); and integral calculus (including antiderivatives, the definite integral and application of integrals). Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program. This course follows the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses. AP Calculus BC provides students with an intuitive understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications, and also requires additional knowledge of the theoretical tools of calculus. This course assumes a thorough knowledge of elementary functions, and covers all of the calculus topics in AP Calculus AB as well as the following topics: vector functions, parametric equations and graphs, polar coordinates and functions, advanced techniques of integration, advanced applications of the definite integral, polynomial approximation and series. Students in this class may also have the option to apply for college credit through the CU Succeeds program

A graphing calculator is highly recommended for Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 1 Analytical, and Geometry Principles. A graphing calculator is required for all math courses at Algebra II or Higher. (The TI-84+ is recommended)

AP Calculus AB 11, 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with a minimum grade of C. Fee: $10


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 05110G05016 05110G05026

COURSE DESCRIPTION Chorus-Men provides the opportunity to sing a variety of choral literature for men’s voices and is designed to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts. Concert Attire: Students will provide concert dress consisting of black pants, white dress shirt, and black dress shoes.

05110G05036 05110G05046

Chorus-Women provides the opportunity to sing a variety of choral literature for women’s voices and is designed to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts. Concert Attire: Students will provide concert dress consisting of black pants, white dress shirt, black dress shoes.

05111G05056 05111G05066

Vocal Ensembles-Concert is intended to develop vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts in a concert choir. Course goals may include the development of solo singing ability and will emphasize various ensemble literature styles. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a black dress ($60) or tuxedo ($110) .

05110E05034 05110E05044

Chorus-Women Advanced provides the opportunity to sing an advanced variety of choral literature for women’s voices and is designed to develop more advanced vocal techniques. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a black dress ($60).

05111E05012 05111E05022

Vocal Ensembles-Select is intended to develop advanced vocal techniques and the ability to sing parts in ensemble or madrigal groups. Course goals may include the development of solo singing ability and may emphasize various ensemble literature styles. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a black dress ($60) or tuxedo ($110).

(Onyx)

Vocal Ensembles-Select Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Successful Audition with Choral Director Fee: $80; Concert Attire Fee Black Dress -$60 Tuxedo - $110 (Sounds)

19

MUSIC

Chorus - Men’s Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None (no audition required) Fee: $30 Chorus - Women’s Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None (no audition required) Fee: $30 Vocal Ensembles - Concert Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Successful Audition with Choral Director Fee: $80; Concert Attire Fee Black Dress -$60 Tuxedo - $110 Chorus - Women Adv Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Successful Audition with Choral Director Fee: $80; Concert Attire Fee Black Dress -$60 Tuxedo - $110


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 05103G05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION Marching Band is intended to develop students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover appropriate marching band literature styles, primarily for marching performances.

05102G05016

Concert Band is designed to promote students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and cover a variety of band literature styles, primarily for concert performances.

05106G05012 05106G05022

Instrumental Ensemble is intended to develop students’ technique for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and/or string instruments in small ensemble groups. Instrumental Ensemble courses cover one or more instrumental ensemble or band literature styles. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a long black dress ($60) or Tuxedo shirt and tie ($20).

05104G05034 05104G05044

Orchestra Strings is designed to develop students’ abilities to play string instruments, covering a variety of string and orchestral literature styles. This is a strings only class. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a long black dress ($60) or Tuxedo shirt and tie ($20).

05105G05014 05105G05024

Contemporary Band helps students develop their techniques for playing brass, woodwind, percussion, and string instruments, as well as guitars and keyboards, focusing primarily on contemporary stage band literature styles, such as traditional jazz, Latin, and rock. Jazz improvisation is introduced and developed. Concert Attire: Students will purchase a long black dress ($60) or Tuxedo shirt and tie ($20).

05114H05012 05114H05022

AP Music Theory is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year music theory college course as specified by the College Board. AP Music Theory develops students’ understanding of musical structure and compositional procedures. Usually intended for students who already possess performance-level skills, AP Music Theory courses extend and build upon students’ knowledge of intervals, scales, chords, metric/rhythmic patterns, and the ways they interact in a composition. Musical notation, analysis, composition, and aural skills are important components of the course.

20

MUSIC

Marching Band Credit: .5 per semester, fall course 9, 10, 11, 12 Fee: $50, $125 use fee for district owned instruments, $30 Smart Music subscription Concert Band Credit: .5 per semester, fall course 9, 10, 11, 12 Fee: $50, $125 use fee for district owned instruments, $32.50 Smart Music subscription Instrumental Ensemble Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Approval of Music Director Fee: $50, $125 use fee for district owned instruments, $32.50 Smart Music subscription (Percussion) Orchestra - Strings Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None (no audition) Fee: $50, $125 use fee for district owned instruments, $32.50 Smart Music subscription Contemporary/Jazz Band Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Audition and approval by the Director. All wind players must be enrolled in the Marching Band/Concert Band course, and all percussion players must be enrolled in the Instrumental Ensemble. Fee: $50, $125 use fee for district owned instruments, $32.50 Smart Music subscription AP Music Theory Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10, 11,12 Prerequisite: Music teacher signature Fee: $90 for Textbook


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE TITLE Drama - Acting/Performing .5 per semester 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: None Fee: $30 for scripts.

COURSE CODE 05108G05014

COURSE CODE 05055G05014

COURSE DESCRIPTION Guitar introduces students to the fundamentals of music and guitar – playing techniques, such as strumming and chords

MUSIC

Guitar 9,10,11,12 Credit: .5 Per Semester Fall or Spring Fee:$50, Students must provide their own their own acoustic Guitar or Electric guitar

COURSE DESCRIPTION Drama - Acting/Performance is intended to promote students’ experience and skill development in one or more aspects of theatrical production, but they concentrate on acting and performance skills. This course is introductory in nature and reviews a wide range of scripted materials, such as plays, screen plays, teleplays, readers’ theatre scripts, dramatic criticism, creation of original dramatic works, and the role of dramatic arts in society. In addition, students will work collaboratively on performances.

05055G05034

Drama - Acting/Performance Intermediate is intended to promote students’ experience and skill development in one or more aspects of theatrical production, but they concentrate on acting and performance skills. This course is for those who have had the initial acting course. The focus is on improving technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and increasing their chances of participating in public productions.

Drama - Acting/Perf Adv .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Drama Acting/Performing Inter Fee: $30 for scripts

05055E05012

Drama - Acting/Performance Advanced is intended to promote students’ experience and using advanced skills in one or more aspects of theatrical production, but they concentrate on advanced acting and performance skills. This advanced course focuses on improving technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical techniques and traditions, and increasing their chances of participating in public productions.

Drama - Stagecraft .5 per semester 9, 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher signature Fee: $40 for tools/supplies

05056G05012 05056G05022

Drama - Stagecraft requires an active, creative student willing to work at a variety of tasks in a hands-on environment. Students will explore technical aspects of theater including lighting, sound, costumes, set design, and stage managing. Safety and responsibility are learned and are essential elements in this class. This course will have limited enrollment and is a skilled class.

21

PERFORMING ARTS

Drama - Acting/Performing Inter .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: One semester of Drama – Acting/Performing or successful audition/interview with theater teacher. Fee: $30 for scripts.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Physical Education 9 Credit: .5 per semester th 9 Only

COURSE CODE 08001G05014

COURSE DESCRIPTION Physical Education 9 provides students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one of the following sports or activities: team sports, individual/dual sports, recreational sports, and fitness/conditioning activities. For students who have already taken the basic Physical Education class.

08016G05014

Lifetime Fitness emphasizes acquiring knowledge and skills regarding lifetime physical fitness; content may include related topics such as nutrition, stress management, and consumer issues. Students may develop and implement a personal fitness plan. This course is not appropriate for student athletes or students participating in club sports.

Gymnastics Credit: .5 per semester 9,10, 11,12

08008G05012

Gymnastics is designed to help students develop knowledge and skills in gymnastics, stunts, and tumbling while emphasizing safety. Floor gymnastics may be supplemented by the use of gymnastic equipment such as balance beam, uneven bars, parallel bars, rings, and so on. Gymnastic courses may include other components such as the history of gymnastics and conditioning.

Team Sports Credit: .5 per semester 10, 11,12

08002G05018

Team Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one team sport (such as volleyball, basketball, soccer, and so on). Fitness/conditioning is also implemented throughout this course.

Weight Training 9 Credit: .5 per semester th 9

08009G05056

Weight Training 9th provides introductory weight training for 9th grade students. Students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while safety and proper body positioning will be emphasized; may include other components such as anatomy, conditioning, and various team sports activities.

Weight Training Credit: .5 per semester 10, 11,12 Weight Training Adv Credit: .5 per semester 10, 11,12

08009G05016

Weight Training helps students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while emphasizing safety and proper body positioning; they may include other components such as anatomy and conditioning.

08009E05012 08009E05022

Advanced Weight Training uses advanced skills and weight training techniques. This class is designed for the male and female varsity athlete.

08013G05014

Specific Sports Activities helps students develop knowledge, experience, and skills in a single sport or activity (such as basketball, volleyball, track and field, and equestrian events) other than those coded within this section. (Dance and Weight Lifting are included under other course titles). Fitness/conditioning is also implemented throughout this course.

08005G05018

Fitness/Conditioning Activities courses emphasize conditioning activities that help develop muscular strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness.

08003G05014

Individual/Dual Sports courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to expand their skills in various racquet sports. Fitness/conditioning is also implemented throughout this course.

th

Specific Sports Activities Credit: .5 per semester 9,10, 11,12 (Volleyball) Fitness/Conditioning Aerobics Credit: .5 per semester 9,10, 11,12 Individual/Dual Sports Credit: .5 per semester 9, 10,11,12 (Racquet Sports)

*BY SIGNATURE ONLY*

22

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Lifetime Fitness Education Credit: .5 per semester 9,10, 11,12


COURSE TITLE Engineer Design/Development Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra I, or higher. Fee: $30

BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014

COURSE CODE 21007G05012 21007G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the Engineer Design/Development course, students will learn problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of project solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. This course, combined with traditional mathematics, and science courses in high school, introduces students to the scope, rigor and discipline of engineering and engineering technology prior to entering college.

21004G05012 21004G05022

Principles of Engineering is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering problem solving skills that are involved in post-secondary education programs and engineering careers. They will explore various engineering systems and manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. The main purpose of this course is to experience through theory and hands-on problem-solving activities what engineering is all about and to answer the question, "Is a career in engineering or engineering technology for me?"

Digital Electronics Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher mathematics, teacher approval and successful completion of either Principles of Engineering or Into to Engineering Design. Fee: $30 Civil Engineering & Architecture Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Geometry or higher mathematics, teacher approval and successful completion Principles of Engineering or Into to Engineering Design. Fee:$30

21008G05012 21008G05022

Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic. Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in video games, switches, digital cameras, calculators, and thousands of other devices. Students will study the application of digital logic and digital devices that are used to control automatic equipment. The course utilizes state of the art, virtual electronic circuitry design software. This course is similar to a first semester college course and is an important course of study for a student exploring a career in engineering or engineering technology.

21012G05012 21012G05022

The major focus of the Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn to the design and development of this property. The course requires students to develop the property as a simulation that models the real-world experiences that civil engineers and architects experience when developing a property. Students learn to use state of the art 3-D design software to help them design and develop the property. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on projects and activities to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture. The course is structured to enable all students to have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of both fields.

23

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

Principles of Engineering Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Geometry, or higher mathematics. Fee: $30


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

Medical Interventions 11,12 Credit: .5 per semester, year-long Perquisite: C or better in Human Body Systems Fee: $40

COURSE CODE 21013G05012 21013G05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION The Aerospace Engineering class will follow a systemic curriculum package that introduces students to the world of aeronautics, flight, and engineering. The entire curriculum sequence will include experiences from the diverse fields of Aeronautics, Aerospace Engineering, and related areas of study. Lessons will engage students in engineering design problems that can be accomplished in a high school setting related to aerospace information systems, star sailing, or astronautics rocketry and propulsion. Also included are the physics of space science, space life sciences (BioSpace), principles of aeronautics, structures and materials, and systems engineering. This course has been developed in conjunction with NASA. Projects include Mars Lander robots, gliders, planes, hydro rockets, chemical rockets, flight simulators, remote controlled flight and others

14251G05032 14251G05042

Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses.

14252G05012 14252G05022

Students examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

14254G05012 14254G05022

Students investigate the variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the lives of a fictitious family. The course is a “How-To” manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore: how to prevent and fight infection; how to screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; how to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and how to prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Lifestyle choices and preventive measures are emphasized throughout the course as well as the important roles scientific thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future.

24

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

Aerospace Engineering Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher mathematics, teacher approval and successful completion of either Principles of Engineering or Into to Engineering Design. Fee: $30 Principles of Biomedical Sciences Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Earth Science, Biology or Honors Biology, or upper level science course. Fee: $40.00 Human Body Systems Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology or Chemistry. C or better in Principles of Biomedical Sciences. Fee:$40.00


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE Earth Science Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course th 9

COURSE CODE 03001G05012 03001G05022

03051H05012 03051H05022

Biology Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course th 10 Chemistry Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Completion of/or current enrollment in Algebra II. (Not the 2 year Algebra II class) Fee: $30 lab fees. Laboratory supplies must be purchased in advance, therefore no refunds if the course is dropped. Chemistry/Physics Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I or higher. Fee: $30 lab and project materials

03051G05012 03051G05022

Biology is designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. These courses include (but are not restricted to) such topics as cell structure and function, general plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. This course incorporates relevant topics from both Earth Science and Biology in order to give students a solid science foundation as they move into Chemistry and beyond. Biology is designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. These courses include (but are not restricted to) such topics as cell structure and function, general plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy.

03101G05012 03101G05022

Chemistry involves studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances. These courses typically explore such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied. This course is a Red Rocks Community College course and college credit can be earned with an average course grade of C or higher.

03999G05014 03999G05024

Integrated Chemistry Physics courses integrate chemistry and physics into a unified domain of study. It will introduce the fundamental concepts of scientific inquiry, the structure of matter, chemical reactions, forces, motion and the interactions between energy and matter. The ultimate goal of the course is to produce scientifically literate citizens capable of using their knowledge of physical science to solve real-world problems and to make personal, social and ethical decisions that have consequences beyond the classroom walls.

25

SCIENCE

Biology Honors Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course th 9 only Prerequisite: Requires current enrollment in Geometry or Honors Geometry or higher & teacher recommendation. Fee: $25

COURSE DESCRIPTION Earth Science offers insight in to the environment on earth and the earth’s environment in space. While presenting the concepts and principles essential to students’ understanding of the dynamics and history of the earth, these courses usually explore oceanography, geology, astronomy, meteorology, and geography. This course will be taught using sheltered instructional methods and strategies which make the subject matter concepts comprehensible to linguistically diverse students while simultaneously promoting the students’ English language development.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 21052G05014 21052G05024

COURSE DESCRIPTION The Technological Processes course provides students with practical knowledge of science and technology to help prepare them for postsecondary education in process technologies. This class is standards based, multimedia, modular program that includes hands-on applications in chemistry, biology, and the earth science designed to procure students with the knowledge to be successful in their postsecondary and career choices in the process. This course is the same course as the Red Rocks Community College Introduction to Process Technology course. This is a Career and Technical Education course.

03151G05012 03151G05022

Physics involves the study of the forces and laws of nature affecting matter, such as equilibrium, motion, momentum, and the relationships between matter and energy. The study of physics includes examination of sound, light, and magnetic and electric phenomena.

03053G05012 03053G05022

Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology, Anatomy and Physiology presents the human body and biological systems in more detail. In order to understand the structure of the human body and its functions, students learn anatomical terminology, study cells and tissues, explore functional systems (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, nervous, and so on), and will dissect mammals.

21052G05034 21052G05044

Technological Processes Adv provides an introduction to the field of safety, health, & environmental concerns within the process industry. Within this course, you will be introduced to various types of plant hazards, safety and environmental systems and equipment, and the regulations under which processing plants are governed. This is a Career and Technical Education course. This course is a Red Rocks Community College course and college credit can be earned with an average course grade of C or higher.

03207H05012 03207H05022

AP Environmental Science is designed by the College Board to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, identify and analyze environmental problems (both natural and human made), evaluate the relative risks associated with the problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Topics covered include science as a process, ecological processes and energy conversions, earth as an interconnected system, the impact of humans on natural systems, cultural and societal contexts of environmental problems, and the development of practices that will ensure sustainable systems.

26

SCIENCE

Technological Process I Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Earth Science and Biology. Fee: $40 for consumable lab supplies Physics Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II or higher, with a B or better. Fee: $30 lab and project materials Anatomy and Physiology Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course th 12 only Prerequisite: Completion of Earth Science, Biology, Technical Process 1 with a grade of C or higher. Fee: $50 lab fees & lab packet Technological Process II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Completion of Earth Science, Biology, and Technical Process I with a grade of C or higher. Fee: $40 for consumable lab supplies AP Environmental Science Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Completion if Biology and Chemistry with a minimum grade of B, and Algebra II and teacher recommendation. Fee: Students will purchase their own textbooks. $40 lab supply


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE AP Physics C Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Physics or BC Calculus

COURSE CODE 03156H05014 03156H05024

COURSE DESCRIPTION Designed by the College Board to parallel college-level physics courses that serve as a partial foundation for science or engineering majors, AP Physics C courses primarily focus on 1) mechanics and 2) electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas. AP Physics C courses are more intensive and analytical than AP Physics B courses and require the use of calculus to solve the problems posed. Topics include: motion, forces, energy, momentum, and rotation.

with a minimum grade of B, and PreCalculus and concurrent enrollment in or completion of Calculus preferred, teacher recommendation.

03106H05012 03106H05022

Following the curricula recommended by the College Board, AP Chemistry usually follows high school chemistry and second-year algebra. Topics covered may include atomic theory and structure; chemical bonding; nuclear chemistry; states of matter; and reactions (stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics). AP Chemistry laboratories are equivalent to those of typical college courses.

03056H05012 03056H05022

Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college level introductory biology courses, AP Biology stresses basic facts and their synthesis into major biological concepts and themes. These courses cover three general areas: molecules and cells (including biological chemistry and energy transformation); genetics and evolution; and organisms and populations (i.e., taxonomy, plants, animals, and ecology). AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory experiments.

SCIENCE

Fee: Students will purchase their own textbooks. $40 lab supplies AP Chemistry Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Chemistry with a minimum grade of B and teacher recommend. Fee: $50 Lab supplies, laboratory supplies purchased in advance, therefore no refunds for dropping the course after the first week of school. Students will purchase their own text books. AP Biology Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Completion of Biology I & Chemistry with a minimum grade of B, concurrent enrollment in Algebra II and teacher recommend. Fee: Students will purchase their own textbooks. $40 lab supplies.

27


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE World Geography Credit: .5 per semester, spring semester th (required) 9 World Geography Honors Credit: .5 per semester, Fall course Prerequisite: Refer to “Honors Courses” Fee: $15 Materials/copies th 9

COURSE CODE 04001G05011

04001H05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION

U.S. Gov Comprehensive Credit: .5 per semester, Fall semester th (required) 9

04151G05011

U.S. Gov Comprehensive Honors Credit: .5 per semester, Fall course th 9 Prerequisite: Refer to “Honors Courses” Fee: $15 Materials/copies

04151H05011

Modern U.S. History Credit: .5 per semester, year-long th course (required) 10

04103G05012 04103G05022

Modern U.S. History examines the history of the United States from the Progressive Era through the present time. This course typically includes a historical review of political, military, scientific, economic, and social developments.

AP U.S. History Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and completion of AP contract Fee: Textbook: $120 NEW/Avail. USED $20 Material/copies, $90 Exam World History Overview Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course (required) th 11

04104H05012 04104H05022

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.

04051G05012 04051G05022

World History provides students with an overview of the history of human society from early civilization to the contemporary period, examining political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments. World History may include geographical studies, but often these components are not as explicitly taught as geography.

28

SOCIAL STUDIES

World Geography provides students with an overview of world geography, but may vary widely in the topics they cover. Topics typically include the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationship between people and the environment; economic development, the interdependence of regions; and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. World Geography provides students with an overview of world geography, but may vary widely in the topics they cover. Topics typically include the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationship between people and the environment; economic development, the interdependence of regions; and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. U.S. Government—Comprehensive provides an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. government and political institutions and examine constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. This course may examine the structure and function of state and local governments and may cover certain economic and legal topics. U.S. Government—Comprehensive provides an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. government and political institutions and examine constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. This course may examine the structure and function of state and local governments and may cover certain economic and legal topics. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problem-solving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 04057H05012 04057H05022

COURSE DESCRIPTION Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level World History courses, AP World History examines world history from 8000 BCE to the present with the aim of helping students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contracts and how different human societies have interacted. This course highlights the nature of continuity and change over time in an international context and explores cause and effect relationships.

04056H05012 04056H05022

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level European History courses, AP European History examines European civilization from the High Renaissance period to the recent past and also expose students to the factual narrative. In addition, this course helps students develop an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and the abilities to analyze historical evidence and to express that understanding and analysis in writing.

04251G05011

Anthropology introduces students to the study of human evolution with regard to the origin, distribution, physical attributes, environment, and culture of human beings. The course provides an overview of anthropology, including but not limited to both physical and cultural anthropology.

Sociology Credit: .5 per semester 11,12 Fee: $10 Economics th Credit: .5 per semester 12 (required)

04258G05011

Sociology introduces students to the study of human behavior in society. The course provides an overview of sociology, generally including, but not limited to topics such as social institutions and norms, socialization and social change, and the relationships among individuals and groups in society. Economics provides students with an overview of economics with primary emphasis on the principles of microeconomics, macroeconomics and the U.S. economic system. The course may also cover topics such as international economics, and comparative economics. Economic principles may be presented in formal theoretical contexts, applied contexts, or both.

AP U.S. Gov’t and Politics Credit: .5 per semester, Spring semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and completion of AP contract Fee: $100 Textbook, $20 Material/copies, $90 Exam Psychology Credit: .5 per semester 11,12 Fee: $10

04157H05011

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. Government and Politics courses, this course provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States, involving both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. The course generally covers the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, the institutions and policy process of national government, and civil rights and liberties.

04254G05011

Psychology introduces students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes, but is not limited to an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, and abnormal psychology.

04201G05011

29

SOCIAL STUDIES

AP World History Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and completion of AP contract Fee: Textbook - $125 NEW/Avail. USED $25 Material/copies, $90 Exam AP European History Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and completion of AP contract Fee: Textbook $120 NEW/Avail. USED $20 Material/copies, $90 Exam Anthropology Credit: .5 per semester 11,12 Fee: $15


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE 04256H05012 04256H05022

04204H05011

COURSE DESCRIPTION Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel a college-level psychology course, AP Psychology courses introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals, expose students to each major subfield within psychology, and enable students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice.

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level macroeconomics, AP Macroeconomics courses provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. They place particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination and developing students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

30

SOCIAL STUDIES

AP Psychology Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and AP contract Fee: Textbook: $120 NEW/Avail. USED $20 Material/copies, $90 Exam AP Macroeconomics Credit: .5 per semester, Spring-Fall th 12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by instructor and completion of AP contract, successful completion of Algebra II. Fee: Textbooks - $125 NEW/Avail. USED $15 Material/Copies,$90 Exam


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION SPANISH

06101G05012 06101G05022

Designed to introduce students to Spanish language and culture, Spanish I courses emphasize basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. Spanish culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of Spanishspeaking people.

06102G05012 06102G05022

Spanish II courses build upon skills developed in Spanish I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in Spanish and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of Spanish speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

06103G05012 06103G05022

Spanish III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

Spanish IV Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: 301-302, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Materials Fee

06104G05012 06104G05022

Spanish IV courses focus on advancing students’ skills and abilities to read, write, speak, and understand the Spanish language so that they can maintain simple conversations with sufficient vocabulary and an acceptable accent, have sufficient comprehension to understand speech spoken at a normal pace, read uncomplicated but authentic prose, and write narratives that indicate a good understanding of grammar and a strong vocabulary.

Spanish III Hon Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher invitation only Fee: $20 Materials Fee

06103H05012 06103H05012

AP Spanish Language Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite:.401-402 or teacher signature Fee: $90 Textbook

06112H05012 06112H05022

Spanish III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations. The honors course prepares students for advanced course work and engages students in enrichment opportunities. Rigor is demonstrated through sophistication and acceleration in terms of thought-provoking learning activities, challenging assessments, and more complex text/materials. Diverse interests, cultures, perspectives, learning styles, and intelligences are cultivated and higher level critical and creative thinking skills such as interpretation, problemsolving, investigation, and logic are emphasized throughout the honors course. Designed by the College Board to parallel third-year college-level courses in Spanish Composition and Conversation, AP Spanish Language courses build upon prior knowledge and develop students’ ability to understand others and express themselves (in Spanish) accurately, coherently, and fluently in both formal and informal situations. Students will develop a vocabulary large enough to understand literary texts, magazine/newspaper articles, films and television productions, and so on.

31

WORLD LANGUAGE

Spanish I Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 st Prerequisite: None for 1 nd semester, teacher approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook Spanish II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 101-102, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook Spanish III Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 201-202, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Materials Fee


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION FRENCH

06121G05014 06121G05024

Designed to introduce students to French language and culture, French I emphasizes basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. French culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of the French-speaking people.

06122G05012 06122G05022

French II courses build upon skills developed in French I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in French and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of French speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

French III Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 201-202, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook French IV Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: 301-302, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $25 Workbook

06123G05012 06123G05022

French III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

06124G05012 06124G05022

French IV courses focus on advancing students’ skills and abilities to read, write, speak, and understand the French language so that they can maintain simple conversations with sufficient vocabulary and an acceptable accent, have sufficient comprehension to understand speech spoken at a normal pace, read uncomplicated but authentic prose, and write narratives that indicate a good understanding of grammar and a strong vocabulary.

AP French Language Credit:.5 per semester, year-long course 11,12 Prerequisite: French IV and teacher signature Fee: Approx. $90 for textbook

06132H05012 06123H05022

Designed to parallel third-year college-level courses in French Composition and Conversation, AP French Language courses build upon prior knowledge and develop students’ ability to understand others and express themselves (in French) accurately, coherently, and fluently. Students will develop a vocabulary large enough to understand literary texts, magazine/newspaper articles, films and television productions, and so on.

32

WORLD LANGUAGE

French I Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 st Prerequisite: None for 1 semester, nd teacher approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook French II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 101-102, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION GERMAN

06201G05012 06201G05022

Designed to introduce students to German language and culture, German I courses emphasize basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. German culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of the Germanspeaking people.

German II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 101-102, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Materials fee

06202G05012 06202G05022

German II courses build upon skills developed in German I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in German and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of German speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

German III Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 201-202, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Materials fee

06203G05012 06203G05022

German III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

German IV Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: 301-302, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $25 Materials fee

06204G05012 06204G05022

German IV courses focus on advancing students’ skills and abilities to read, write, speak, and understand the German language so that they can maintain simple conversations with sufficient vocabulary and an acceptable accent, have sufficient comprehension to understand speech spoken at a normal pace, read uncomplicated but authentic prose, and write narratives that indicate a good understanding of grammar and a strong vocabulary.

33

WORLD LANGUAGE

German I Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 st Prerequisite: None for 1 nd semester, teacher approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Materials fee


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

COURSE DESCRIPTION JAPANESE

06421G05012 06421G05022

Designed to introduce students to Japanese language and culture, Japanese I courses emphasize basic Grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions. Japanese culture is introduced through the art, literature, customs, and history of the Japanesespeaking people.

Japanese II Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 101-102, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook

06422G05012 06422G05022

Japanese II courses build upon skills developed in Japanese I, extending students’ ability to understand and express themselves in Japanese and increasing their vocabulary. Typically, students learn how to engage in discourse for informative or social purposes, write expressions or passages that show understanding of sentence construction and the rules of grammar, and comprehend the language when spoken slowly. Students usually explore the customs, history, and art forms of Japanese-speaking people to deepen their understanding of the culture(s).

Japanese III Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: 201-202, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook

06423G05012 06423G05022

Japanese III courses focus on having students express increasingly complex concepts both verbally and in writing while showing some spontaneity. Comprehension goals for students may include attaining more facility and faster understanding when listening to the language spoken at normal rates, being able to paraphrase or summarize written passages, and conversing easily within limited situations.

Japanese IV Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 10,11,12 Prerequisite: 301-302, teacher nd approval for 2 semester Fee: $25 Workbook

06424G05012 06424G05022

Japanese IV courses focus on advancing students’ skills and abilities to read, write, speak, and understand the Japanese language so that they can maintain simple conversations with sufficient vocabulary and an acceptable accent, have sufficient comprehension to understand speech spoken at a normal pace, read uncomplicated but authentic prose, and write narratives that indicate a good understanding of grammar and a strong vocabulary.

34

WORLD LANGUAGE

Japanese I Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 st Prerequisite: None for 1 semester, nd teacher approval for 2 semester Fee: $20 Workbook


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 COURSE TITLE

COURSE CODE

Senior Field Studies Credit: 3.0 Spring semester th 12 Prerequisite: Consent of teacher and application Fee: $1,400.00

22101G05012 22101G05022

AIDE Miscellaneous-Aide Credit: .25 or .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Permission and signature of teacher Office Aide Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Office signature

22995G02511 Misc

Miscellaneous—Aide courses offer students the opportunity to assist instructors in preparing, organizing, or delivering course curricula or to assist other staff members in fulfilling their duties. Students may provide tutorial or instructional assistance to other students. Note: if the particular subject area is known, use the code associated with the Aide course within that subject area.

22051G05011 Main or Attendance offices

Office Aide courses provide students with the opportunity to work in campus offices, developing skills related to clerical office work. Duties may include typing, filing, record-keeping, receiving visitors, answering the telephone, and duplicating, among others. These courses emphasize appropriate work attitudes, human relations, and proper office procedures.

Guidance Aide Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Office signature

22052G05011

Guidance Aide courses provide students with the opportunity to work in the campus guidance office. Duties may include filing, record-keeping, assisting students, answering the telephone, and duplicating, among others. Students may also act as guides to new students. These courses emphasize appropriate work attitudes, human relations, and proper office procedures.

Library/AVC Aide Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Librarian signature

22053G05011

Library/AVC Aide courses provide students with the opportunity to work in the library or in media and audiovisual centers. Duties may include collecting, distributing, and categorizing materials; operating audiovisual equipment; assisting students and teachers; and performing clerical duties. Students typically gain experience in library science and/or media and audiovisual technology.

Comp & Information Sci Aide Credit: .5 per semester 10,11,12 Prerequisite: Mrs. Record Signature

10995G05011

Computer and Information Sciences – Aide courses offer students the opportunity to assist instructors in preparing, organizing, or delivering course curricula. Students may provide tutorial or instructional assistance to other students. Work at a student help desk assisting teachers with problems in the classroom, answer questions from other students, and develop “Tech Tips” to show on BCTN. In addition to the Service Desk, students will be asked to run diagnostics on computers, replace hard drives, DVD, keyboards, and LCD displays, set up computers and assist with computer inventory task, and assist in maintaining all necessary paper work.

35

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Leadership Credit: .5 per semester, year-long course 9,10,11,12 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, interview process, and interview Fee: $225

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is offered second semester to 35 seniors who have met graduation requirement (except English and electives) Students will participate in direct field studies in urban, rural, and wilderness settings. A hiking trip in Arizona, a river trip, a ten day farm family live in, a community service project, and urban field experiences are all part of the course. Credits are offered in Social Studies, English, Science, and Physical Education. The course is challenging and requires a high degree or commitment. The rewards are personal growth (physical and mental) and team experiences. A fund raising event will take place near the end of the first semester and students are encouraged to raise most of their required fee. Class fee is $1,400.00. Students must see the Senior Field Studies teacher during the first semester to apply for this program. Leadership courses are designed to strengthen students’ personal and group leadership skills. Typically intended for students involved in extracurricular activities (especially as officers of organizations or student governing bodies), these courses may cover such topics as public speaking, effective communication, human relations, parliamentary law and procedures, organization and management, and group dynamics. This course is the class students take who are elected members of the Bear Creek High School Senate.


BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014

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BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014

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BEAR CREEK COURSE GUIDE 2013/2014 Classes I would like to take Course Name

“Each day, make an aspiration to learn and do something new, avoid watching time fly by, and achieve whatever it may be."

NOTES

Course Code

“Even the greatest was once a beginner." “Strive in life today... You are tomorrow's future!" 38


BCHS Course Guide