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School of Art & Design

Declaration Form 2014/15

Module: Negotiated Project Stage 1 Module Leader: Matt Gill Ref. no: FASH30001 I confirm that this work has gained ethical approval and that I have faithfully observed the terms of the approval in the conduct of this project. This submission is the result of my own work. All help and advice other than that received from tutors has been acknowledged and primary and secondary sources of information have been properly attributed. Should this statement prove to be untrue I recognise the right and duty of the board of examiners to recommend what action should be taken in line with the University’s regulations on assessment contained in its handbook. Signed .................................................................................................................... Date .......................................................................................................................


D O O N L I N E B RA N D S N E E D A N O F F L I N E P R E S E N C E ?

anna lewis

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FIG 1 COLLECTION FOR DIOR HOMME, MARK PILLAI, 2009


CONTENTS - INTRODUCTION 3|5 - THE ONLINE BOOM 7 |17 - THE DESIRE TO DISCONNECT 33|37 - A NEW SHOPPER DNA41|45 - THE TRANSITION 49|59 - THE CONSUMER 63|69 - THE BIG IDEA70|71 - THE BRAND 75|91 - THE CREATIVE IDEA 95|117 - THE LAUNCH & LOYALTY 121|131 - CONCLUSION 135|137


‘The surfeit of advertising media means it is no longer possible for big brands to dominate channels. Instead, everyone must strive to build consumer advocacy by crafting unique, relevant and engaging product experiences that consumers will want to talk about.’ Strang 2014

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FIG 2 BACK TO BASICS, 2012

INTRODUCTION


It appears the line between the online and offline retaail world has become blurred with offline brands vastly seeking to adopt an online channel whilst the physical world appears to be sitting inefficiently in the background. With over a billion users worldwide connected to the Internet it has become apparent for brands to focus and pay a close attention to their offer online. However, Trotter (2014) has noted ‘the time has come for businesses across the UK to understand that dovetailing their offline strategy is no longer a hit-and-miss luxury, but a necessity.’ With this new perspective on the offline retail scene we may now begin to see a new shift take place. This has lead me to question the notion: is there now a demand for online pure-plays to adopt an offline strategy?

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FIG 3 E-COMMERCE, 2013

I aim to explore this timely subject by adopting a number of primary and secondary research methods that demonstrate and reveal project specific outcomes. I shall consider academic theorists views on the matter as well as industry expert opinions to ensure a well-informed outcome.

Indeed, my intentions of this report aim to create a successful guide that locates potential gaps for a strategic recommendation to an online retail brand. I intend to discuss the rapid increase the Internet has undertaken, how this has transformed the retail world and where we see the future of this leading towards. The structure of the report will then follow to explore the emerging trends in consumer behaviour and how this will affect the way online brands will need to adapt in order to stay ahead. In order to analyse the success of how online brands could potentially utilize an offline strategy it is essential to speak of the brands transitioning to offline and so I will question the success of specific brands utilizing this and questioning why now? Accumulating this breadth of research will lead me to answer what the potential future of pure play online brands could entail. Thus ensuing an informed recommendation for a prospective online brand.

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THE ONLINE BOOM ||

THE EVOLUTION

FIG 3 COS MALE, 2012

BOOM TO BUST


A look at the rise and fall of the dotcom bubble and the effect the Internet has had on todays consumer.

We are only just beginning to witness the potential of the Internet and living in a wired world, but as technology develops onwards its easy to overlook the significance it has had on society since cyberspace was released in 1991 (Hanlon, 2014). To instigate this study, it is important to initially look at the overwhelming rise of the Internet on a global scale and the social transformation society has undertaken as a result of this.

FIG 5 ONLINE VERSUS OFFLINE, PAUL WHITTY, 2000

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With the advent of the Internet in the 1990’s came a reconfigured landscape of consumerism. Of course, in the initial stages, the rapid growth and major influx of new dotcom e-tail brands captivated the retailers and consumers attention (Lindstrom 2001). This brand new platform for shopping allowed consumers to have at their fingertips what bricks-and-mortar had failed to offer: unlimited selection, no geographic barriers, low FIG 6 KEYBOARD, 2008

prices and no queues. These days of the ‘dotcom bubble’ proved optimistic and suggested the Internet was to change the way we shopped forever (Edwards, 2014). It was inevitable to see how this new retail platform could become a shadow over the traditional brick-and-mortar stores. Accredited theorist, Martin Lindstrom, denoted that:

‘By the end of the nineties the consumers focus had turned away from retail stores in favour of whatever the e-tailer could offer. Internet hype primed the consumer with high expectations of e-tailer service and an educated consumer was demanding that e-tailers keep their promises’.

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The dotcom bubble promised so much for retailers, offering a platform in which brands could reach a worldwide consumer at the click of a button. Internet brands emerged at an exceeding rate, creating euphoria among the world (Edwards, 2014). Investors carelessly endowed in online brands without acknowledging their prospect for a profit (Beattie 2013). Yet, this was not to last. Many claim the dotcom boom and bust was a result of too much too fast. The world was not ready for the flood of the Internet and optimistic companies were demonstrating to be profitless (BusinessInsider 2010).

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A look at the change the retail world has undertaken through the evolution of the internet.

Returning to the present, this is no longer the case. With e-commerce growing rapidly and consistently, accounting for 12% of total retail sales in the UK and expected to rise, it has become a key component within the retail market (Stephens, 2013). However, with the progression of more advanced technology and the smart consumer, a single channel retail offer is no longer an option in order to survive in this new climate. In an interview with Jonathon De Mello (See Appendix 6), head of retail consultancy at Harper Dennis Hobbs, he discussed the importance of a multi-channel experience, saying ‘ The UK’s most successful brands are, on the whole, those that have developed their multi-channel offer, but their physical stores are still crucial. Take Apple for instance, they attract significant sales and press coverage from their physical stores, even though electrical goods have been seen to sell strongly online.’ This shows the desiring appeal the offline world still holds in this internet centered world. FIG 7 APPLE STORE, JAMES ROGERS, 2013

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Physical retail stores are no longer seen as obsolete

The collision of online and offline worlds can also be

and the smart customer no longer has a desire to sit

seen to be combining through a cross platform strategy:

and buy on a screen and wait for delivery (Jones 2013).

‘click & collect’ service. The convenience factor that the

Convenience is a vital element in today’s consumers

consumers crave from their retail experience has been

purchasing experience, a key insight drawn from research

tested on the online retail scene. As I have mentioned

(See Appendix 7), and a crucial motivator. However, the

previously, consumers are still regularly frustrated by

convenience factor is not defined by the retailer itself but

delivery services, with 60% of people shopping online

rather its consumer. Choosing what is suitable for their

having problems with home deliveries (Williams, 2014).

personal lifestyle, they are shifting the power from the

Allowing consumers to own their retail experience, click

retailer to consumer. Subsequently, this is encouraging

& collect is emerging as a beneficial element as part of a

retailers to offer them options through a multi-channel

multi-channel strategy. When questioning whether pure-

experience (Jones 2013). Pure-play online brands are

play brands need an offline presence, a key successful

limiting their convenience factor by not ensuring the

strategy has proved to be this method. Conducting two

consumer can connect with the brand at any convenient

consumer focus groups, each representing a different

time, whether that be through mobile on the go, online

demographic, I found click & collect to be predominately

or in-store. A clear example of a pure-play brand that has

favourable in comparison to purely shopping online with

begun overcome this is Amazon, with their collection

a participant expressing ‘It allows me to find what I like

point Amazon Lockers (See Figure 9). Establishing that it

online, pick it up when its convenient for me and if I

was not convenient for many customers to wait at home

decide I don’t like it in person I can easily return in store’

for a delivery during a working day, they pursued to create

(See Appendix 7).

a platform in which the customer was able to collect from a convenient location and a time that suited them (Collins 2014). This progression has evolved Amazon as a brand, differentiating them from the pure-play brands that hold a clear disadvantage compared to a multi-channel retailer.

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FIG 9 AMAZON LOCKER DISPLAY ANNA LEWIS, 2014


Crossing the online to offline boundaries gives the consumer the convenience in which they desire. Large retailers are seeing the success of click and collect with John Lewis’ click & collect business going from 0% to 25% of their Internet sales in a period of three years (Williams 2014).Observing in-store behaviour in major retailers Topshop, Topman and Argos, I found click & collect to be a favoured method of purchasing items, with male consumers showing a majority (See Appendix 9). A further look at Argos, who were one of the earliest to adopt the click & collect method, see 30% of their sales due to this method. Embracing digital innovation, Argos has teamed up with pure-play brand eBay in September 2013 (BBC, 2013). This marriage of offline and online brands has built a philosophy around a digital strategy. Their concept store in London uses iPad’s to browse, check product reviews and order with a 60 second fast-track collection service for consumers pre-ordering or on mobile device (Rigby, 2013).

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Their consumers are also able to click & collect from Argos or eBay, collecting their orders from the fast-track points, incorporating a new distribution model which allows either immediate, same-day or next-day collection (Rigby, 2013). This successful adoption of the click & collect strategy is evidence to show how a pure-play brand can have an offline presence using convenience as its primary proposal. Argos’ managing director, John Walden, described this concept as ‘We are seeking to reposition our stores to support a digital future - in which digital channels are the primary interface for customers, but stores continue to be critically important as a national network for product collection.’ (Martin 2013) This innovative perception on the future of retailing sets Argos as one of the large players and inspiration for strategies proposal for pure-play online brands.

FIG 10 ARGOS COLLECTION POINT ANNA LEWIS, 2015

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Taking this knowledge into account, and the implications in which this study has developed to show, has enabled me to see what the future could entail for pure-play online brands. Retailers must strive to understand and adapt to the full retail-ecosystem, encompassing a full multi-channel retail experience, whether that be a retail store click & collect or online sales. With the savvier customer introduced to us in this Internet age, it is crucial to appreciate that they expect the same quality of service, product availability and price across all touch-points. Jonathon De Mello (See Appendix 6), additionally reviewed that if the retailer fails to achieve synergy within their ecosystem then the customer is likely to abandon their purchase. In 2001, Lindstrom stated that the gap between offline and online retailing will disappear with the growth of a clicks-and-mortar strategy. Pure-play brands will experiment more with an offline presence in order to survive the future retail environment in order to become part of the 80% portion of the consumers repeat shopping choices. Equally, a physical store will inevitably need an online presence. Today, in 2015, although a small number of pure-play brands are making the change and transferring their ethos to an offline presence, which I will look at in greater depth later on in this report, there are still pure play brands that are resisting this notion, creating a disconnection with their consumers. This is the very predicament I aim to discover through the breadth of this report. Is it crucial for pure-play brands utilise an offline strategy to continuously exceed the consumer’s expectation?

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THE SENSES

||

EXPERIENCE

FIG 11 DESIRING THE NEW, 2013

THE DESIRE TO DISCONNECT


FIG 12 NET-A-PORTER PACKAGING, ANNA LEWIS 2014

Lindstrom’s (2001) Darwinian competitive process theory speaks of two stages in the retail evolutionary process. The first is what we have seen to date, where the Internet has become a beneficial factor to our retail experience. However the second stage will see the revival of the offline retailers.

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Indeed, it is visible that the Internet is the platform

interacting with Net-A-Porter magazine, I feel like it is a

in which no other can compete on its endless product

personal and exclusive experience’. This evidently shows

selection and queue-less experience, so why are the

the need for a tactile experience in this digital world. This

consumers still seeking an offline experience? With

was also proved at the LSN Student conference where

the over-whelming phenomenon that is the Internet,

Founder of Oh Comely magazine was quoted saying

consumers are craving the ability to be able to switch

‘The offline world is immersive... Print brings you into a

off from technology. Undertaking two focus groups,

community as you have a sense that lots of other people

discussing the experience of online and offline, an

are reading it too, personal but socialable’ (See Appendix

experiment was undertaken where participants were

15). Lindstrom (2001) described this need, saying

asked to interact with a brand through its online website

‘human beings are still subject to their five senses, they

and via a physical presence of the brand (See Appendix

like to touch and see products before making decisions’. It

7). In comparison of the two, the verdict proved to be

is no surprise that a survey conducted on 87 participants

distinctive. Offline was the favorable, described as ‘it

exhibited 73% preferred the experience of shopping

was the excitement of the unknown, unexpected. When

offline with ‘feeling the product’ being the main desire (See Appendix 5).

FIG 13 FOCUS GROUP EXPERIMENT EXAMPLE, ANNA LEWIS 2014

FIG 14 FOCUS GROUP EXPERIMENT EXAMPLE 2, ANNA LEWIS 2014

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Undeniably, the traditional high street is not as appealing in this augmented-reality-revolved world as it once was. So how do we appeal to the senses while reviving the offline retail scene? This second stage of the Darwinian competitive process (Lindstrom, 2001) is already coming into play with the rise of show-rooming and experiential retail. Retailers have identified that their educated consumer is now resisting the online in favour of an experience and retailers are seizing the creative opportunity by delivering the element that online just can’t translate - an immersive and sensory experience that will intrigue and excite todays coveted consumer (Shopworks 2014). With this new understanding of the role of the physical store in today’s market, many retailers are building environments with the prospect of appealing to the consumer’s full sensory experience to enhance customer loyalty. Technology-maven Burberry proves its hierarchy in the experiential retail market with their flagship store in London epitomizing the enhanced shopping experience (See Figure 15). Radio frequency Identification tags that will trigger audio-visual content in screens embedded in the mirrors and RFI microchips help blur the lines between online and offline (Williams, A, 2012). Technology is allowing brands to set high expectations and then exceed them to develop stronger connections between the brand and its consumer.

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FIG 15 BURBERRY LONDON FLAGSHIP, ANNA LEWIS 2015

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FIG 16 DISCONNECTING 2014

A NEW SHOPPER DNA THE AGE OF THE CONSUMER

||

P E R S O N A L I S AT I O N


To proceed with this topic and the outcome of this project it is imperative to look at the age of the consumer and the way this is shaping the retail landscape. With knowledge comes expectation and the bar has been raised like never before for the retail industry, with brands

These include: honesty; in this connected world the truth is as important as ever. Social networking sites,

becoming shaped by their consumers wants and needs (Gao, 2014). Consumers have more power over a brand’s reputation than ever before. Forrester (2014) utters that

like YouTube and Twitter, have allowed the consumer a platform to express in a matter of minutes. Gen Y and Millenials now seek brands that reflect honesty. The age

the most successful brands should reinvent themselves

of consumer empowerment has seen the birth of show

to systematically understand this increasingly powerful consumer. Brands must become consumer obsessed and ‘the only sustainable competitive advantage is knowledge and engagement with customers.’ Without question

rooming, which has developed upon the next behaviour: illumination. This goes beyond simply describing to the consumers the features and benefits of a product but rather uses all available information to tailor a

technology has given consumers unprecedented level of control over their purchasing habits and preferences. With the rise of social networking sites and user-generated

consumers experience to suit their needs only. Amazon have described this process as ‘item-to-item collaborative filtering.’ With consumers seeking to use stores as a place

media, the consumer now has a voice, a voice to express

to only interact with a product but later buy online,

their opinions to the world (Stephens, 2013). According

retailers must illuminate their products in order to

to Stephens (2013), a renowned retail industry futurist, this new level of consumer control and their connectivity demands there are three new behaviors that all businesses will have to adopt in order to survive.

encourage purchase. Apple, for example, rarely talks of just the ram and bytes of their products but has designed their stores to clearly illuminate the beauty and creativity of their products. The final behavioral attribute retailers must consider, as a result of the age of consumerism, is immediacy. The rise of social media has allowed brands to understand what consumers really perceive their brand to be and allowed them to connect with consumers on a personal level. Queries and complaints could be dealt with instantly and their customers were now approachable personally. With the consumer taking priority, retailers must ensure they give immediate attention to the consumers’ needs and wants. The combination of honesty, illumination and immediacy will shape a strategy that affectively brings a brand into the age of the consumer.

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FIG 17 CONNECTING ONLINE 2014

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FIG 18 FLIPBOARD, 2012

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One thing physical stores can offer is a personalised experience - with one-to-one interaction more needs can be catered for. The rising trend of personalisation is due to this changing consumer attitude and their power they now hold over brands. According to Stephens (2013), it will soon become essential for all retailers to incorporate technologies that will recognise a consumer by their name when in-store and instantly be able to personalise their experience by examining their purchase history and preferences. The future will see in-store environments connecting consumers’ online and offline lives. A brand that really strives in catering personalisation is ‘Flipboard’, an app that allows its consumers to create their own magazine by collating different web pages together regarding their specific interests. Their aim is “to let people discover and share content in beautiful, simple, and meaningful ways” (Flipboard.com). This process of using online to encourage offline content takes the consumer on a journey, offering an experience that feels personal to them. In order for pure-play online brands to excel in the market, they will need to offer a personal experience that could potentially encourage offline behaviour.

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FIG 19, TRANSITIONAL LINES 2014

THE TRANSITION

A M A Z O N | B O N O B O S | W A R B Y PA R K E R | N E T- A - P O R T E R


Considering what has been found previously in this report, it is clear that it is now paramount that retailers must follow a multi-channel retail strategy. Online pureplay brands are seeking to build and retain a consumer base that is loyal. With online comes the risk that the relationship with customers is lacking intimacy in the purchase process, resulting in little loyalty built. To stay at an advantage within this competitive platform, online pure-play brands should utilise a new channel or take their brand offline to create a personal retail experience. A rapport with customers is easier to build face-toface. Looking at the current retail climate there is shift beginning to take place, with online pure-play utilising the second stage of the Darwinian competitive process and creating innovative forms of offline strategies. The four case studies in which I am about to discuss shows the success and negatives of their unique strategies and how their approach is inspiration for future strategies.

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FIG 19, KATE SPADE INTERACTIVE STORE FRONT 2013

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AMAZON

As one of the largest players in the online world,

Through conducting ethnographic research on a 22

Amazon started as an online bookstore but soon

year-old male consumer, who is a regular online shopper,

diversified to selling electronics, apparel, furniture and

I was able to identify the key strengths and weaknesses

toys. Their vision was big and Jeff Bezos, the founder, had

that could instigate potential future strategies (See

a business plan that would profoundly affect the way in

Appendix 8). Purchasing online, the participant found

which we shopped forever (Stone, 2013).

weaknesses within the initial process of selecting the

Today, we see Amazon test the boundaries once again,

delivery with no clear instructions to lead to delivery at

as they are seen to be further along the path to physical

the lockers. After using search engines to overcome this,

premises than its large player competitors. As I have

the participant could now have the product delivered to

previously mentioned the company now operates around

a convenient locker located close their university campus

300 Amazon lockers in the UK, at convenient locations

in a shopping center. Using these lockers, it limited the

like underground stations, libraries and supermarkets

purchase to Amazon products only as opposed to the

(See Figure 20). This incorporates the ‘click & collect’

cheaper options. The parcel could be held for three days

strategy, which has boosted sales and doubled deliveries

to make it convenient for the participant to retrieve

in the first year of implementation. Amazon is rapidly

whenever was suitable for them, yet this was only

increasing its locker availability, as it aims to make

possible depending on the opening hours of the center.

the purchasing process as convenient as possible for

The process of collecting the order was simple and the

consumers (Stephens, 2013).

participant was satisfied with the practicality of the

Developing from this, the company opened a physical

purchase process.

pop-up store in San Francisco. The store focused on providing a space for users of the brand to talk to web services. Although it didn’t prove sell many products within the space compared to the online site, it acted as a generator of brand recognition in a high-footfall area. Previously, Amazon has also experimented with Kindle retail pop-up stores. These staffed areas were used to demonstrate kindles performance and key features and customers could then purchase a kindle from vending machines (Whitney, 2014).

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FIG 20, AMAZON LOCKERS, ANNA LEWIS 2014

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BONOBOS

Online brand Bonobos, best known for its well-

With a successful platform in which to stand on, Bonobos

fitted men’s suits, began life as an accessible platform for

was never supposed to have a brick-and-mortar shop.

men to purchase smart wear. Their concept came about

‘We said we would never be offline, and then, we realised

when they found it was hard to find men’s trousers that

offline really works’, with the opening of their bricks-

would actually fit. Bonobos identified their consumer,

and-mortar guide shops (Deigel, 2014). These shops offer

discovering most men were not interested in shopping,

everything but a sale, with an opportunity to gain advice

and built a shopping experience via the medium of the

from stylists and try garments on for size. Bonobos set out

Internet (Koblin 2014).

to re-design the shopping experience, making the store more about connecting with the consumer than making a sale. Existing customers can now request an appointment online enabling a small number of customers in the store at one time (Bonobos.com).

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FIG 21, BONOBOS GUIDE SHOPS 2012

Personalisation now steps into play, as the stylists

This online to offline strategy has seen growth for

can guide the customers through the store and help

Bonobos. They have identified the trend of consumers

them discover what they want. Bonobos identified

trying before they buy and created a new platform for this,

their customer, recognising their needs and lifestyle,

opening up to new potential consumers who would have

creating an experience that pushed service over instant

previously been pessimistic at the idea of ordering items

gratification. Founder, Andy Dunn, said ‘the fit and

online before physically interacting with the product.

quality should speak for itself… you’re running around, and you want to jump to dinner or back to the office or to the gym. You don’t want to have to deal with this bag’ (Deigel, 2014). The Guideshop gives you one hour to receive a fully integrated personalised experience but you can walk out with your hands free to carry on with your lifestyle.


WARBY PARKER

Warby parker started as online pure-play brand

Developing their brand further, they began to offer

with the objective to revolutionize eyewear. Built upon

a five glasses for five days offer. This free service allowed

the concept of affordability eyewear, they ‘believe that

the consumer to try and test glasses they have seen

buying glasses should be easy and fun. It should leave

online for a five-day period. This initial branching out

you happy and good-looking, with money in your

into the offline world was popular among its consumers

pocket’ (WarbyParker.com) . As an eyewear company

and they were encouraged to develop this further. This

they initially offered a facial recognition on their website

then lead to a series of events that reflected the brands

so consumer were able to see a reflection of themselves

quirky style, including a ‘hush mob’ within The New

wearing a pair of sunglasses, eliminating the chance of

York Public Library in 2011 (Garcia, 2011). The event

dissatisfaction for consumers when purchasing.

consisted of various models wearing the glasses and


. Founder, Neil Blumenthal, was quoted saying ‘we

holding books with ‘Warby Parker’ written across it. In 2013, the company had been travelling all over America

believe the future of retail is at the intersection of

in a school bus refurbished into a ‘professors study’.

e-commerce and bricks-and-mortar. It’s about can we

This acted as a mobile vehicle to entice consumers to

create special moments. When you walk into the store,

purchase their glasses offline. These events heightened

most people are really surprised, because it doesn’t look

their consumers interest more and more with each

like any place they have ever been that sells glasses’

event, making it almost an imperative to open their first

(Kasperkevic, 2015). The store is simplistic in style and

physical store.

interaction, with only an option to try, leaving purchasing to the online site. ‘We quickly realized that while we were seeing all the benefits we expected from branding and marketing—the ‘halo’ effect of having a store open—stores could be a meaningful driver of sales and profitability, which was really unexpected’ (Kasperkevic, 2015). Warby Parker’s eight stores are now collectively turning a profit through the encouragement of trying in-store and buying online. Advantages to take from this example are, their stores allowed potential for a more personalized customer service. “Consumers want to be talked to in a personal way,” says Bruce Cohen, senior partner at retail consultant Kurt Salmon. “Once you get a good retail Sherpa—your curator of good taste and fashion that knows you— you become incredibly loyal’ (Kasperkevic, 2015). The accumulation of offline events built up consumer hype, opening an opportunity for an offline consumer base.

FIG 22, WARBY PARKER STORE 2012

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NET-A-PORTER

The luxury online fashion company has also translated

Establishing itself as the worlds premier online luxury fashion retailer, Net-a-Porter offers the style savvy

their brand offline in the form of a print publication,

customer unprecedented access to the trends of the

‘Porter’, described as a ‘high-end, thought-leading read

season from international labels. Since launching in June

to place on their coffee table’. The move from online

2000, Net-a-Porter has successfully established itself as a

commerce to published print proved to be a great one for

luxury brand, with impeccable packaging and unrivalled

the brand, providing context for their online site, allowing

customer care.

customers to shop the magazine (Binkley, 2014). This

Net-a-Porter have revolutionized consumers interaction

new platform has allowed Net-a-Porter to remain current

and perception with luxury through drawing them to a

in a world that is yearning for the tactile experience

new platform. However, dissatisfied with being a pure-

and provides a holistic brand experience. As a start-up

play brand, Net-a-Porter wanted to take themselves one

magazine, they already had the brand, the following and,

step forward and venture offline, opening a pop-up store

most importantly, the data. Their wealth of data collated

in London 2011. They set out to bridge the gap between

since the birth of Net-a-Porter in 2001, this can now be

online and offline retail with a one-night-only digital

used to inform their offline presence in order to create

shopping experience that bridges window displays with a

relevant experiences for their readers as well as the online

mobile app called ‘The Window Shop’. Their consumers

shoppers (Binkley, 2014).

were welcomed to use their smartphone to scan pictures

Conducting ethnographic research on a 52-year-old

of the items upon the wall through an augmented reality

female consumer, who commonly purchases from Net-

experience. The mobile phone app was adapted to

a-porter online site, I was able to identify the strengths

recognize a product from the photo which proceeded

and weakness within their strategy (See Appendix 8).

to open Net-a-Porter’s online store which could result

Ordering the magazine from their site, the participant

in a purchase (Thomson, 2011). This experience acted

found the experience of interacting with the brand

as a brand builder and enhanced sales potential. The

packaging and the tangible presence of the magazine

event proved to be successful, allowing consumers to

coincided well with the luxury status of the brand. Yet, the

shop through their app and have the items delivered to

participant felt there was little innovation in the content

their home. The online retailer also reached over 500,000

of the magazine, saying it looked like most magazines

Facebook fans following the event, and so launched

they would find on the shelves of any store. ‘Being a brand

a Facebook video app to reward its loyal customers

that represents modern luxury, they’re could have been

(Thomson, 2011).

additional opportunity for creativity’ (See Appendix 8).

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FIG 23, NET-A-PORTER WINDOW SHOP 2011

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CONSUMER JOURNEY THE JOURNEY || CONSUMER INSIGHTS

FIG 24, WHO? 2013


It is relevant to consider the consumer interaction when proposing a new strategy. The consumer is endlessly at the heart of a brand, the driving force behind sales and strategies. I will therefor discuss throughout this chapter how the age of the consumer will guide a new consumer journey approach to coincide with an online to offline strategy. FIG

25,

To accommodate changing consumer behaviour

CO NS UM E

and meet their high expectations it is vital to deliver a

RJ OU R

consumer-centric approach (Hughes, 2014). Churchill

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journey is composed of three factors; the social influence

201

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of culture and social class, the marketing influence of price, product placement and promotions and the

AW

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and Peter (2009) discuss that the consumer decision

EN

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LO YA LTY AD VO C

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They now expect retail to be accessible via several touch points in a way in which they are stimulated to interact with simultaneously. When asked about their decision journey, 90% of consumers over two demographics said they interact with the brand over multiple touch points before purchasing (See Appendix 7). If a brand works on situational influencing factors of the environment. These attributes to consumer behaviour will be a motivator towards a purchase. With the changing retail market and the development of consumer attitudes,

one platform it restricts the chance of a purchase. I have created a new consumer journey (See next page) that builds upon the new consumer.

which I have indeed discussed throughout this study, the decision journey is adapting to social, market and situational factors. Court (2009) converses the change of consumer behaviour in the consumer decision journey. The essential needs of consumers have not altered but rather the way they expect their needs to be fulfilled has transformed considerably. Formerly, the consumer decision was based on consumers behaving in a linear way (See Figure 25).

FIG 26, BURBERRY CROSS PLATFORMS , 2013

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CONNECTED EVALUATION Product or brand based research sees brands added or subtracted from consumers early consideration based upon online reviews, price and social media.

CONSIDERATION Consumers carry pre-concieved preferences enabling an early consideration for research.

TRIGGER A consumers decision journey is emotional and can be triggered by a need or a want


TIPPING POINT A finalised list of possible products is made but consumer is most likely to want to view products in-store to make a more informed decision. They will integrate mobile commerce in this experience.

THE NEW STRATEGY MUST TARGET HERE TO ENHANCE CONSUMER JOURNEY AND PERSUADE A PURCHASE

d ran b . atic nces T m L o e YA aut eri LO ith e exp w me ostiv co s np ger ed o g i s r a et nb som ctio e sel

P

OO YL

PURCHASE The moment of purchase and associated experience is central to how to consumer feels about the brand before consumption takes place. they will purchase on a platform that is convenient for them.

Post purchase consumers will review their experiences and purchases online via social media or reviews.

FIG 27, A NEW CONSUMER JOURNEY, ANNA LEWIS, 2015

CONSUMER CONTROL


With the consideration of taking an online community

These observations reiterated much of what has been

offline, it is necessary to consider the types of consumers

noted through my previous research, but I wanted to

who will utilise online purchasing as a key tool but

observe consumer behaviour from a retail point of

are seeking an offline presence as it is important to

view to identify their true needs and wants. Working

acknowledge that not everyone shops in the same way.

in retail in a high-footfall flagship store, I am able to observe a variety of behaviors to pinpoint an ideal strategy. Observing over four hour sessions, three groups were identified: Gen Z, Millennial’s and Gen X. Key insights drawn from this research revealed a great deal

After conducting a survey I wanted to speak to

of Millenials and Gen Z consumers would use click

consumers in their hot state to understand their

& collect, return items purchased online in-store and

behaviour in more depth, ensuring reliable responses.

searched for products in-store, crossing their online

Waiting outside high street shops and on the busy streets

and offline paths. Male consumers engaged more with

of Nottingham, I targeted a variety of consumers who

in-store visual merchandise and picked up the brands

were purchasing in-stores. I found females between

magazine more than females, showing their desire for

the ages of 19 – 23 were purchasing products they had

interaction with a brand while females frequently seek

originally seen online but were seeking to witness them

advice from sales advisors regarding product information

physically to have a more informed decision on purchase.

(See Appendix 9). The opinion of the sales assistants is

This demographic frequently spoke of using their mobiles

therefore clearly still valued by this customer despite the

while in-store, with one answer stating ‘I feel lost not

fact that ‘consumers have become much better informed

having my phone in-store as I almost use it as guide’.

and more demanding forcing sales staff to raise their gam’

Male shoppers were purchasing in-store for the instant

(Chynoweth 2014).

gratification of having the product there and then, but most stated they would choose to shop online over the store due to the ‘stressful experience of shopping in highly crowded shops’ and would often be seen shopping alone (See Appendix 10).

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Nathan Ogden 22

FIG 27, STREET STYLE, ANNA LEWIS 2014


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To take a pure-play online brand offline through an immersive retail experience to build a loyal consumer base and encourage multi-channel

FIG 28, MALE MODEL 2014

purchase behaviour.


THE BRAND


Throughout my findings there has been a profound need for brands to really identify a consumers personality and their desire for convenience and experience. Indeed, my collated conclusions resulted from consumer insight research, including ethnographic, offline survey, focus groups, questionnaire and various interviews with industry experts (See Appendix), has enabled me to assemble an innovative and thoughtful strategy that has the consumer at the forefront.

I am proposing to apply these insights to online pureplay brand, Mr Porter. This decision was informed by my collated research, showing that males tend to shop online due to offline not fulfilling their needs as a consumer. As a leading brand of luxury style to the male consumer, this strategy proposal will place Mr Porter at the head of innovation. I will initially reflect upon their existing strategy and how this can be developed into a successful

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FIG 30, MR PORTER MODEL 2015

multi-platform approach.


-55FIG 31, MR PORTER OUTFIT 2015


‘MrPorter.com is a balanced and complementary blend of content and commerce. It has a clean, masculine aesthetic with undertones of a broadsheet newspaper and the attention to detail of a magazine’ (Muttenthaler, 2014). Since its launch in 2011, Mr Porter has quickly established itself as the world’s leading style destination for men, combining unique combinations of content and commerce. As a ‘brother brand’ of leading online luxury women’s fashion site, Net-a-Porter, they collectively speak to five million unique users every month. The brand sees 800,000 monthly unique visitors to site encouraging 4,000 new customers each month. The site offers the male consumer a simplistic destination focused on a platform that has style at its forepart (Muttenthaler, 2014). They see themselves as the destination for style and expert advice on a global scale, an ethos that will be the focus of any potential strategy.

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S

THRENGHTS

- A GLOBAL SITE THAT SHIPS ALL OVER THE WORLD - ABLE TO GET CUSTOMERS TO COME BACK TO THE SITE THROUGH THEIR FOCUS ON EDITORIAL CONTENT LIKE THE JOURNAL, STYLE ADVICE AND DAILY EMAILS - PROVIDE A HIGH LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SERVICE WITH 24 HOUR CUSTOMER CARE AND PERSONAL SHOPPERS

W

EAKNESSES

- DO NOT HAVE A BRICKS-AND-MORTAR LOCATIONS SO THEY ARE UNABLE TO REACH THEIR CUSTOMERS PERSONALLY OR HAVE A WALK IN BUSINESS - THEY DO NOT PROVIDE CUSTOMER REVIEWS FOR PRODUCTS ON SITE - ARE NOT ABLE TO BE VERY PROMOTIONAL WITH THEIR PRODUCTS WHICH MAKES IT DIFFICULT TO COMPETE WITH MORE SALE SITES

- OFFER A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF HIGH QUALITY MERCHANDISE FROM OVER 140 BRANDS

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O

T

PPORTUNITIES

HREATS

- OPEN A BRICKS-AND-MORTAR STORE TO OPEN UP MORE SALE OPPORTUNITIES AND ALLOW CUSTOMERS TO PHYSICALLY INTERACT WITH THE BRAND.

- NEW COMPETITION FROM OFFLINE COMPETITORS AND NEW EMERGING ONLINE SITES OFFERING LUXURY MENS STYLE

- ALLOW CUSTOMERS TO POST PRODUCT REVIEWS ONLINE TO PROMOTE INTERACTIVITY

- NOT TRANSLATING BRAND ESSENCE ACROSS DIFFERENT PLATFORMS EFFECTIVELY COULD RUIN CREDIBILITY

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FIG 32, MR PORTER JOURNAL 2012

As a pure-play brand it is reasonable to say Mr Porter

The UK based online men’s shopping destination has

has trialed the offline before, utilizing an in-house

also translated its brand offline through collaboration in

print newspaper, The Journal (Siddall, 2014). ‘We

the form of a pop-up store (Forbes, 2012). To celebrate

don’t have a physical store space where our customers

the debut of the US hit show Suits, Mr Porter saw the

can immerse themselves, so telling the stories behind

opportunity to coherently work together to express the

our stocked brands in an immersive editorial space

brand image. The temporary store allowed the consumers

is absolutely necessary. It gives us an opinion and a

to engage with their online experience offline through a

space to connect with our customers’ (Harrison, 2014).

large interactive touch-screen monitor that allowed them

Conversely, conducting research on the male, style-

to play around and create their own looks. The customer

conscious consumer, they expressed that unless the

was then able to process an order right there in the

physical newspaper was handed to them directly or it was

store for delivery. The store also offered complimentary

accessible to purchase within their everyday lifestyle, they

shoeshine and grooming services to appeal to the target

are unlikely to interact with it offline (See Appendix 14).

consumer’s lifestyle (Forbes, 2012). This strategy created a great hype around the brand and allowed existing, as well as new, consumers to interact with the brand on a personal basis to build a longer-lasting relationship.

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With these initial offline intentions, Mr Porter has begun to build an offline strategy. However, employing the process Warby Parker undertook and their successful transition to offline, it is key to understand how this is the very beginning of the possibilities for Mr Porter to gain competitive advantage (See Appendix 19).

FIG 33, MR PORTER POP UP STORE 2014

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As previously mentioned, the current retail market sees the age of the consumer at the heart of any strategy. Lauterborn (1990), recognizes the importance of building long-term relationships between a brand and its consumer, aiming to attract loyalty amongst its consumers. A model devised by Lauterborn, reframes the approach to attract the customers, replacing the 4 P’s to the 4 C’s: Customer needs, Cost to the customer, Convenience and Communication. I will inherit this model by firstly getting to know the consumer personally to satisfy their needs and see that the strategy will meet these requirements.

A major benefit Mr Porter inherited while launching, was the site already had a large customer base of highly valued customers from their sister brand Net-a-Porter. Their target base was therefor directed at the styleminded individuals around the world. I have identified two consumer style tribes in which the potential strategy will adhere to. The two consumers will consist of an existing consumer that is already loyal to Mr Porter and a potential consumer who the brand can target through a new proposed strategy. Currently, their main consumer is that of a single male, between the ages of 25-34. With this in mind, I interviewed two consumers, one who currently fits this description and one who Mr Porter could potentially target through a new strategy, to examine further their style and likes to identify two consumer portraits. FIG 34, CONSUMER INSIGHT 2015

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FIG 35 THE URBAN SOPHISTICATES, ANNA LEWIS, 2015

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The Urban Sophisticates, the current Mr Porter consumer, are young adults ranging from 25 to 40 years old with an above average income and educated background. Their profession defines their sophisticated yet tasteful flair but they seek ways to always be ahead of the style game. This consumer is creative-minded, always looking for ways to push their imaginative limits, whether that be personal projects or immersing themselves in new experiences. Timeless appeal is what initially attracts them to a brand but they invest their loyalty in brands that identify their personal needs and tastes above all else. They seek primarily immediacy and illumination from their chosen brands. Their lifestyle is hectic and they expect brands to accommodate this by allowing touch points at every moment. Avid users of smart phones they are always connected but still seek a personal touch at any opportunity possible. the ages of 25-34.

FIG 36 MR PORTER CONSUMER, 2015 FIG 37 THE SKI-ING CONSUMER, 2015 FIG 38 THE COMMUTING CONSUMER, 2015

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FIG 39 THE CULTIVATED CANDIDATE, ANNA LEWIS, 2015

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The potential consumer would be The Cultivated Candidate, that of the millennial generation, the entrepreneurial consumer. This group will take over as the largest generation in the luxury market with incomes exceeding ÂŁ100,000. However, this consumer is not motivated by money or the latest brands but rather they crave experiences and validation. They see the richness in the storytelling of having an experience rather than investing in one materialistic product. This consumer will read online reviews when shopping for luxury items, will then learn about a product in a store but prefer to then purchase online (LuxuryInstitute, 2012). As the first generation of digital natives, they are early adopters of new technologies and social sites and will share their offline experiences via social networking sites. This consumer will be the ones to predominantly seek honesty and illumination from a brand.

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FIG 40 MR PORTER POTENTIAL CONSUMER, 2015 FIG 41 THE MILLENIAL CONSUMER, 2015 FIG 42 THE CITY CONSUMER, 2015


‘The men’s luxury goods market has gone from underserved to unstoppable- and its outperforming the women’s market’

As I have previously noted, it is fundamental for a brand to have a competitive advantage over their rivals. Having segmented the market and selected a consumer to target, it is now crucial to position Mr Porter amongst its main competitors. This rise in the men’s retail market enhances further the need for brands to find innovative ways to serve the male consumer. Mr Porter is one of the main leaders in the luxury menswear today but still faces competition from many. OKINI.com, ParkandBond.com and StudioHomme.com all carry similar brands, pricepoints, products and they all focus on being a men’s retail destination. Their offer is premium and their aesthetic clean and contemporary. However, incorporating an offline strategy opens up a new set of competitors. Looking at the perceptual map, Mr Porter currently lies as a brand ahead of mens style yet offering little multiple platforms for its consumers. With the new proposed strategy Mr Porter wil be the leaders in mens style with a multi-channel brand to put Mr Porter ahead of its competitors.

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This is where Mr Porter will sit after strategy Multiple Platforms

Trusted style advisor Limited style knowledge

Minimal Platforms

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THE CREATIVE IDEA

FIG 43, MENS STYLE 2014


‘The idea behind Mr Porter is that it is all about style rather than fashion – It’s an online destination with inspired stories and corresponding product to make shopping for men not only easy and enjoyable, but also comfortable and confident enough to shop.’ (Muttenthaler, 2014). Utilizing all research, both primary and secondary throughout this research journey, it has now directed me to a specific concept to build upon a strategy. The Big Idea will aim to take Mr Porter offline through an immersive retail experience by identifying and solving difficulties which Mr Porter and other pure-play online retailer’s encounter. To overcome these issues and following findings from contextual research, I have created a multi-channel, 360-degree integration between the online and offline platforms. The strategy will focus on the before, during and after purchase, recognizing the consumers new demands. This will be achieved through the creation of an offline, permanent bricks-andmortar store. A survey and two focus groups carried out demonstrated that consumers would most likely interact with a permanent store as they felt they were able to build a trusting relationship with the brand and it enables them to communicate with them personally at any time they desire, embracing the need for convenience for the consumer (See Appendix 5,6).

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Entitled The Portal this store concept optimizes the epicenter of all that Mr Porter exemplifies, a hub in which the desiring consumer can interact with. Mr Porter personifies style and exclusivity; both will be translated through a smart aesthetic and a personalised, specially adapted approach. According to WGSN (2015), future trends in retail are to see the rise of retailers looking to drive footfall via unique in-store experiences and service offers. To exceed this trend, the store will be more than a bricks-and-mortar store, but rather a fully integrated experience, where consumers can move from online to offline seamlessly. There will be opportunities to see the products personally as well as a chance to visit the in-store Barbour to cater for the hectic lifestyle of the consumer.

FIG 44, MR PORTER GROOMING, 2015

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FIG 45, MR PORTER PAPERBACK 2015

The aesthetic of the offline presence will reflect that of the current brand visuals – masculine, smart and stylish. The current site has a clean, refined and contemporary visual feel and many of the images are black and white, trying to keep the site uncomplicated (MRPORTER.com). Encompassing all aspects of brand-creation for The Portal, from logo and graphical elements, every element will embody the current brand. The logo for The Portal has been inspired by the bespoke handwriting font that Mr Porter uses both online and offline within its packaging (See Figure 46). The font represents a personalised finish that shows the move to offline as it feels ‘in the moment’ and tangible.

FIG 46, MR PORTER DELIVERY 2015

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THE PORTAL THE PORTAL THE PORTAL

FIG 47, THE PORTAL LOGO DESIGNS, ANNA LEWIS 2015

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For the in-store environment, secondary research was conducted in order to establish a trend aesthetic that is in keeping with the current brand identity. WGSN revealed the growing trend of ‘disoriented design’ created through symmetry and linear patterns for an experiential and immersive shopping experience. ‘The optical illusions, infinity feel and labyrinthine looks heighten the sense and increase alertness when in the store environment’ (WGSN 2015). The clean and stylish visuals of Mr Porter can be translated through The Portal in a ‘Disoriented’ design, adopted by luxury brands like Saint Laurent’s Milan store. The geometric aesthetic contrasted with the natural form of the marble creates a softened uniformity (See Figure 50). I also carried out primary research, observing store design that reflects innovative design, attracts a similar customer base and merges the online and offline (See Appendix 12). Many stores incorporated a gentlemans style ‘club’ design. To contrast with the linear and cleancut aesthetic of the store, the visual merchandising will reflect a gentleman’s style club to appeal to the timeless aesthetic the consumer looks for in Mr Porter and to bring personality to the store.

FIG 48, SAVILL ROW STORE, ANNA LEWIS 2015 FIG 49 &OTHER STORIES LONDON STORE, ANNA LEWIS 2015 FIG 50 SAINT LAURENT MILAN 2015 FIG 51ABERCROMBIE STORE LONDON 2015

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5 5 5 5

For a more detailed analysis of the brand guidelines please see The Portal Brand Bible which instructs the overall aesthetic and values of The Portal to ensure consistency and excellence (See Offline).

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‘Whatever fear guys have had about entering a

trained ‘Advisors’ to fulfill the need for physical

brick and mortar department store, Mr Porter draws

interaction and personal service, employing one of

it’s audience in with its intelligent mix of editorial,

the 4 P’s: Communication. To initially be entitled to

style advice, inspiration, and products that embrace

enter the store, the consumer will have to request

all aspects of a modern guy’s life.’ (Muttenthaler,

a membership via the online site. This reflects the

2014). With this strategy, Mr Porter will now exceed

exclusivity that Mr Porter portrays and gives the

expectation and becoming leaders in the offline

consumer the feeling they have been personally

world that once again eliminates men’s fear of bricks

selected, a key element found through my research.

and mortar. Adjusting to a full retail-ecosystem,

Once accepted by the team, the member is now

Mr Porter will translate their brand image into a

able to build up a personal profile. They are able to

bricks-and-mortar strategy but will re-define the

book an appointment to visit the store when it suits

traditional store concept to attain competitive

them, allowing them exclusive access to the personal

advantage. Inspired by Bonobos guide shops, as

service the store offers. Talking to male consumer

mentioned previously, The Portal will use their store

their main fear of shopping offline was the crowds

presence to physically offer style advice from highly

and queues. This exclusive access eliminates these fears, encouraging offline behaviour. Much like the Argos stores, Click & Collect will be the driving force behind the concept of the store, employing a convenient service, a key element of the 4 C’s. The consumer will be able to order online and collect from the store

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the same day or whenever suits their time, much like Amazon lockers yet with further contact. This also allows them to return any products accessibly, a key need expressed through talking to consumers (See Appendix 7, 14). The store will display only significant products that suit the current trends and events, which can then be brought to life by the in-store interactive mirror. This interactive mirror allows the user to build outfits on themselves and add to wish lists or order there and then in store to be delivered home. This strategy encourages the male consumer to move offline as there is little stress and the store is catered to their every need. In order to maintain Mr Porter’s reputation as a style authority for men, there will advice embedded within the interactive mirror, utlising an online presence in an offline world to create a fully integrated strategy.

FIG 52 THE PORTAL SHOP WINDOW, ANNA LEWIS, 2015


FIG 54 THE PORTAL VISUAL MOCKUP, ZAK BOXALL, 2015


FIG 55 THE PORTAL VISUAL MOCKUP, ZAK BOXALL, 2015


FIG 56 THE PORTAL VISUAL MOCKUP, ZAK BOXALL, 2015


FIG 57 THE PORTAL VISUAL MOCKUP, ZAK BOXALL, 2015


FIG 58 THE PORTAL VISUAL MOCKUP, ZAK BOXALL, 2015


Please watch Mr Porter Disc for a more detailed experience.


To expand the brand essence further, merchandise will be available to purchase that appeal to the target consumer. With a simplistic and masculine style, the merchandise will reflect the Mr Porter ethos. The canvas satchel on the right will be used in-store when customers come to collect their online orders, a subtle yet luxury element to their purchase experience that acts as a subliminal advertisement for the store. When conducting focus group research I found customers will build up trust with a luxury brand that take care over their delivery, therefor Mr Porter will reinforce this into all touchpoints in order to build loyalty (See Appendix 7).

FIG 59, THE PORTAL PHONE CASE ANNA LEW FIG 60 THE PORTAL PEN, ANNA LE FIG 61 THE PORTAL CANVAS SATCHEL, ANNA LEW

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WIS 2015 EWIS 201 WIS 2015

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The personal profile the consumer has already created can be accessed via The Portal app and used within the store as part of their interactive experience. Observational research in-stores proved the high integration of mobile shopping in a consumer’s shopping experience and many customers using their mobiles as a guide within the store, researching products and information (See Appendix 9). Therefor the app will display product information and reviews at their fingertips but the customer can signal an ‘Advisor’ in store to gain even more information by selecting the ‘Guide Me’ icon, fulfilling the need for human interaction. The user can also have themselves measured in-store and have this recorded onto their profile for future use to ensure best fit, exceeding the Mr Porter style ethos. Their ‘Desire List’ can scan over items in-store to collate a list of their favourite items they can purchase when they desire or share through social media, encouraging further interaction via different touchpoints. If they know they wish to buy items there and then they are able to add to the basket order straight away and purhcase, or ask an ‘Advisor’ to order their purchase if they are needing to leave in a hurry. The user is also able to access their loyalty account to keep updated with their points and whether they are entitled to exclusive deals and opportunities. The Interactive mirror in-store will automatically connect to the ‘My Wardobe’ section, saving any outfits created in-store.

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FIG 61 THE PORTAL APP MOCK UP, ANNA LEWIS 2015

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THE LAUNCH & LOYALTY

FIG 62 SMART MALE 2015


Mr Porter engages highly with its customers through facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and Foursquare. In the lead up to the opening of the store, Mr Porter will adopt a number of strategies to attract customers. The first being a social media campaign called ‘#WatchThisSpace’. While gradually uncovering exclusive elements of the launch and the store on social media using #WatchThisSpace, Mr Porter will also encourage its customers to share their exciting new experiences using this hashtag. This will build together a community of experience shares and will attract the potential Cultivated

FIG 63 INSTAGRAM CAMPAIGN MOCK UP, ANNA LEWIS 2015

Candidate consumer.

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FIG 64 THE PORTAL WINDOW CAMPAIGN, ANNA LEWIS 2015


Alongside this, a campaign will run on the exterior of the actual store prior to the opening, aiming to combine a high-tech encounter with genuine customer service. Enhancing the idea of the store merging the online and offline world, this campaign will blur these worlds even further. The store will display an interactive screen that allows audiences to connect and become part of the experience. Creating their own personal profile on the app, the consumer has already become part of the community and can therefore interact instantly. The #WatchThisSpace window will display popular products that the user can scan via the app. They are then able to add to their ‘I Desire’ inventory or order items instantly, encouraging online sales as well as promoting the launch. The integration of interactive technology with the retail environment is an integral aspect to match the expectations of the new retail consumer. Appealing to the on-the-go consumer and the Cultivated consumer, who appreciate immediacy, the window can initially become a place where passers by can select items they see in the windows and order them straight through their app.

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Alongside an extensive marketing plan, Mr Porter will collaborate with Barclays cycle hire to create a hype around the launch of the store. With a large consumer base of Mr Porter being those of the professional commuters, the bikes will intrigue this customer and erge

FIG 65, MR PORTER BIKE ANNA LEWIS 2015

them to explore more.


FIG 66 THE PORTAL BARCLAYS CAMPAIGN, ANNA LEWIS 2015

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The Portal strategy works on a 360-degree integration into the consumer journey, identifying where consumers interact at each stage of purchase. With a large database of existing customers, Mr Porter will utilize this information to highlight to its existing customers its exciting new venture. A positive element taken from ethnographic research was the pleasure and personal feel of receiving a physical parcel (See Appendix 8). Using this evidence, existing customers will receive a ‘Welcome Parcel’ that is personal to them. The pack reflects the Mr Porter aesthetic and will include their personal membership card (See Physical Cards) that they will need to activate online or via The Portal app, encouraging online and offline behaviour. They will use this card to swipe in when in the store, automatically gaining loyalty points and allowing the store to recognise they are present, which will allow the Advisors to approach their personal wants. The points earned can be redeemed online on all products or for services in-store, like the grooming station.

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After a consumer has left the store, the app will automatically send a thankyou message and rate you shopping experience notifcation (See Figure 67). This will then urge the consumer to stay engaged with the store after purchase and help The Portal improve their experience further by collating feedback. The app will also send push notfications to prompt the customer about store events and promotions, partically on saved items in

FIG 67, THE PORTAL PUSH NOTIFICATIONS, ANNA LEWIS 2015

their desire list.


6months

LAUNCH OF NEW CONCEPT STORE THE PORTAL

ASSESS SUCCESS OF NEW STORE GOAL: INCREASED SALES ONLINE DRIVEN BY IN-STORE EXPERIENCE CONSUMER PROFILES INCREASED

INSTAGRAM CAMPAIGN

BARCLAYS BIKE CMAPAIGN & #WATCHTHISSPACE WINDOW CAMPAIGN

1 month

week 2

week 1

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2 YEAR

1 YEAR

THE STORE WILL HOLD LIVE EVENTS TO BRING TOGETHER THE CONSUMER COMMUNITY AND INCREASE EXPERIENCES

IF THE SUCCESS OF THE NEW CONCEPT STORE PROVED TO SUCCESSFUL CONSIDER OPENING ANOTHER STORE IN A LARGE CITY TO REACH THE GLOBAL CONSUMER

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TO CONCLUDE


The aim of this report sought to uncover the future of the online retail scene, questioning the method of pureplay. The blurring line of online and offline has uncovered a whole new opportunity for consumers and brands alike. The thorough breadth of research, both primary and secondary sources, and academic findings has led me to draw a concise conclusion to apply to a successful strategic recommendation. Initially exploring the rise of the Internet and the way in which the age of consumers has transformed the retail landscape, I was able to identify the needs and want that brands should adopt. The rapid change in the nature of consumerism is an embodiment of the outcome of this study and indeed their desire to disconnect. Identifying a new consumer journey has allowed me to identify where online brands are limited.

a competitor advantage. Fundamentally, the strategic proposition I have cultivated encompasses all convenience, excitement, personalisation and gratification, the elements built from my body of research. Applying a fully integrated strategy that allows consumers to interact at any touch point will encourage loyalty and trust with any proposed brand. These components that profoundly resonate with the consumer and sets the brand apart from its competitors will help reconfigure the future of pure-play online brands, exposing the strong demand for an offline presence in this online orientated world.

Extruding the implications and restrictions of online, I have outlined and maintained the undeniable advantages an offline presence can provide thus encouraging a meticulously detailed proposition to apply to any online brand. From exploring Mr Porter as a successful online brand, identifying its consumers and competitors, I was able to consider its possible weaknesses. Proposing this new strategy would attract a new consumer, translate the brands ethos to the real world and give the brand

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12 -117-


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS LIST OF REFERENCES BIBLIOGRAPHY


Fig 1. Mark Pillai , 2009. Collection for Dior Homme [Digital Photograph] http://www.thefashionisto. com/10-men-editorial-dior-homme-kris-van-assche-his-mood-board-by-mark-pillai/ Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 2. 2012. Back to basics [Digital Photograph] http://nowandthan.tumblr.com/post/22375301861 Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 3. 2013. E-Commerce [Digital Photograph] http://www.webloyaltyuk.com/category/online-shopping/ page/6/ Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 4. 2013. Cos Male [Digital Photograph] http://teakandhemlock.blogspot.ca/2012/05/cos.html Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 5. 2000. Online versus Offline [Digital Photograph] http://www.iainclaridge.co.uk/blog/ Accessed: 10th January 2000 Fig 6. ThinkStock, 2008. Keyboard [Digital Photograph] http://www.womansday.com/life/15-keyboardshortcuts-you-probably-dont-know-114108?link=rel&dom=yah_life&src=syn&con=blog_wd&mag=wdy Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 7. James Rogers, 2013. Apple Store [Digital Photograph] http://www.appleatthecore.com/ home/2014/9/16/att-next-customers-may-need-to-rethink-heading-to-an-apple-store-friday Accessed: 11th January 2015 Fig 9. Anna Lewis, 2014. Amazon Locker Display [Photograph] Fig 10. Anna Lewis, 2015. Argos Collection Point [Photograph] Fig 11. 2013. Desiring the new [Digital Photograph] http://www.flickr.com/photos/93140230@ N06/8464706625/in/photostream/ Accessed: 12th January 2013 Fig 12. 2014. Anna Lewis, 2014. Net-A-Porter Packaging [Photograph] Fig 13. Anna Lewis, 2014. Focus Group Experiment [Photograph] Fig 14. Anna Lewis, 2014. Focus Group Experiment 2 [Photograph] Fig 15. Anna Lewis, 2015. Burberry London Flagship [Photograph] Fig 16. 2014. Disconnect [Digital Photograph] http://youclevergirl.tumblr.com/post/81576860774 Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 17. 2012. Connecting Online [Digital Photography] http://www.theguardian.com/small-businessnetwork/2012/oct/22/roundup-live-chat-social-media-for-business Accessed: 10th January 2015

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Fig 18. 2012. Flipboard [Digital Photograph] http://mashable.com/category/flipboard/ Accessed: 9th January 2015 Fig 19. 2014. Transitional Lines [Digital Photograph] https://www.flickr.com/ photos/8r1ght/12237459173/ Accessed: 11th January 2015 Fig 20. Anna Lewis, 2014. Amazon Lockers [Photograph] Fig 21. Robert Dyer, 2012. Bonobos Guideshop [Digital Photograph] http://robertdyer.blogspot. co.uk/2012/11/bonobos-bethesda-row-guideshop-lives-up.html Accessed: 9th January 2015 Fig 22. Warby Parker store, 2013 [Digital Photograph] http://ny.racked.com/archives/2013/04/11/tour_ warby_parkers_amazing_new_greene_street_flagship.php Accessed: 11th January 2015 Fig 23. Net-a-Porter Window Shop, 2011 [Digital Photograph] http://fashionfix.net-a-porter.com/newsflash/ celebrating-fashions-night Accessed: 9th January 2015 Fig 24. Who?, 2013 [Digital Photograph] http://www.lanciatrendvisions.com/en/trendwall/image/7656 Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 25. Anna Lewis, 2015. Consumer Journey Funnel [Image] Fig 26. Burberry Cross Platforms, 2013 [Digital Photographs] http://www.vogue.co.uk/news/2013/02/18/ burberry-launches-made-to-order-smart-personalisation-service---shop-from-london-fashion-week-catwalk Accessed: 14th January 2015 Fig 27. Anna Lewis, 2015. New consumer journey [Photograph] Fig 28. Anna Lewis, 2014. Street Style [Photograph] Fig 29. 2014. Male Model [Digital Photograph] http://felixinclusis.tumblr.com/image/18193146706 Accessed: 13th January 2015 Fig 30. 2015 Mr Porter Model [Digital Photograph] http://www.mrporter.com/journal/look-book/thekingsman-collection/186 Accessed: 7th January 2015 Fig 31. 2015 Mr Porter Outfit [Digital photograph] http://www.mrporter.com/en-gb/?spinlogo=1 Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 32. 2012 Mr Porter Journal [Digital photography] http://www.janmarcel.com/2012/12/06/the-mrporter-post/ Accessed: 9th January 2015 Fig 33. 2014 Mr Porter Pop-up Shop [Digital Photography] http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-JyH6ZFb5Dhw/ T9qsin0vPqI/AAAAAAAAuAA/gaIX2mDX9mE/s1600/mr+porter+suits+habituallychic+026.jpg Accessed: 9th January 2015

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Fig 34. 2015 Consumer Insights [Digital Photograph] http://www.mrporter.com/ journal/1406847600000-1409439600000 Accessed: 9th January 2015 Fig 35. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Urban Sophisticates [Digital Photograph] Fig 36. 2015 Mr Porter consumer [Digital Photographs] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 37. 2015 The Ski-ing consumer [Digital Photographs] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 38. 2015 The commuting consumer [Digital Photographs] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 39. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Cultivated Candidate [Digital Photograph] Fig 40. 2015 Mr Porter Potential consumer [Digital Photograph] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 41. 2015 The Millenial consumer [Digital Photograph] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 42. 2015 The city consumer [Digital Photograph] http://instagram.com/mrporterlive Accessed: 15th January 2015 Fig 43. 2014 Men’s Style [Digital Photograph] http://anchordivision. com/?reqp=1&reqr=nzcdYzA2LJqlMKWzMl5jLab= Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 44. 2015 Mr Porter Grooming [Digital Photograph] http://www.mrporter.com/en-gb/mens/lifestyle/ grooming Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 45. Anna Lewis, 2015. Mr Porter Paperback [Digital Photograph] Fig 46. 2014 Mr Porter Delivery [Digital Photography] http://g-ball1114-extendedpractice.blogspot. co.uk/2014/04/brief-12-mr-porter-brand-research.html Accessed: 10th January 2015 Fig 47. Anna Lewis, 2015. The portal logo designs [Image] Fig 48. Anna Lewis, 2015. Savill Row store [Digital Photograph] Fig 49. Anna Lewis, 2015. &Other Stories London Store [Digital Photograph] Fig 50. 2015 Saint Laurent Milan [Digital Photograph] http://www.ysl.com/corporate/en/saint-laurent-storelocator/ Accessed: 10th January 2015

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Fig 51. Anna Lewis, 2015. Abercrombie London store [Digital Photograph] Fig 52. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 53. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 54. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 55. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 56. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 57. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 58. Zak Boxall, 2015. The Portal Visual Mock-ups [Image] Fig 59. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal Phone Case [Digital Photograph] Fig 60. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal Pen [Digital Photograph] Fig 61. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal canvas satchel [Digital Photograph] Fig 62. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal App Mock up [Digital Photograph] Fig 63. Anna Lewis, 2015. Instagram Campaign Mock up [Digital Photograph] Fig 64. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal Window Campaign [Digital Photograph] Fig 65. Anna Lewis, 2015. Mr Porter Bike [Digital Photograph] Fig 66. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal Barclays Campaign [Digital Photograph] Fig 67. Anna Lewis, 2015. The Portal Push notifications [Image]

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I TUTORIAL RECORD SHEETS II METHODOLOGY III CRITICAL PATH IV CARTOGRAM V ONLINE SURVEY VI INDUSTRY INTERVIEWS VII FOCUS GROUPS VIII ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH IX OBSERVATIONAL RESEARCH X STREET STYLE XI INSTAGRAM CAMPAIGN XII IN-STORE RESEARCH XIII WORD ASSOCIATION XIV CONSUMER INTERVIEWS XV STUDENT CONFERENCE XVI 3D MODELLER BRIEF XVII CONSENT FORMS XVIII VISUAL INSPIRATION

XIX CASE STUDIES


APPENDIX I tutorial record sheets


APPENDIX II methodology


AIM

METHOD

SAMPLE SIZE

To understand the consumer decision journey and shopping behaviour.

Online survey (Appendix ) through Typeform, using mulitple choice and open questions.

To gain industry standard opinions to inform my subject field.

Industry Interview (Appendix)

To observe and converse with three demographics to reflect upon their personal needs.

Focus group consisting of conversation and activities. (Appendix)

6,6

To observe interaction with Amazon lockers to clarify the benefits and disadvantages of this offline transition.

Ehtnographic research on Amazon lockers. (Appendix)

1

To observe consumer interaction and anitcipation with recieving a luxury parcel.

Ehtnographic research on Net-a-Porter. (Appendix)

1

To observe consumers experience with online and offline shopping.

Instagram Campaign

To observe consumers in a hot state when shopping to find what they really prefer and why

Street style survey

87

3

14

11

WHO Sample of ages ranging from 18 to 41 both male and female.

Jonathon De Mello Warby Parler Carphone Warehouse

Shoppers aged 20-22 Shoppers aged 42-54

Male aged 22

Female aged 52

Male and female social media users

Male and female aged 18+


STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

Catalyst for further research. Reached a mass of people in a short period of time. Allowed me to start collating information on consumers habits.

Mainly answered by Millenials. Allowed no conversation. Short answers. More quanititive than qualitive.

Insightful facts that developed my work further Reliable source of informtation

Being industry many people I attempted to contact wouldn’t reply The users who I did contact were too busy to answer in detail

A varied amount of opinions that could varify my work Made a concious effort to choose participants who did’nt know about my project to get a more informed opinion

Only conducting two focus groups keeps opinions narrow, need further research on top of this

Could understand the strengths and weaknesses of an online to offline strategy from a consumers point of view observe interaction with the brand

Observing the interaction was restricted by location

Observing consumer interaction, recording participants reactions to the excitement to the luxury brand

This only displayed one persons opinions and reactions to the brand thus limiting outcome

Created a hype around my subject field creating conversation Could visually see the way in which consumers shop

Process proved hard to record

Able to speak to a range of consumers in their hot state creating valid answers

Trying to ask people on the street proved difficult as not many people were willing to take part


AIM

METHOD

To observe consumer behaviour when shopping in-store

Observational research

To gain inspiration from other stores

In-store research

To gain understanding of consumers opinions of the brand Mr Porter

Word Association

To gain insight in the Mr porter consumer as well as a potential consumer

Consumer Interviews

SAMPLE SIZE 2

WHO In Topshop and Topman stores

High street and luxury stores in London

7

Male consumers

2

Male aged 28 Male aged 22

This study aimed to answer the query ‘Do pure-play online brands need an offline presence?’. To identify a key understand of this subject I conducting both secondary and primary research to build upon a valid answer. Primary research was an integral element in this research process as I was able to make valid insights into what consumers want. Ethical guidelines were considered in these findings and full consent was made by every participant who took part. Through varied research methods, a vast breadth of quanititive and qualitive research has been collated to produce findings that are timely.


STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

As a sales assistant in these stores I was able to gain a workers perspective, acknowledging consumers needs through the questions they asked me

Being a large store and I had to also work, I was unable to catch every behaviour at every moment

Insightful look at how stores are reaching out to customers and collated key trends emerging in stores

Only visiting large stores in London could limit my visual inspiration

A range of words that helped me understand consuemrs opinions of the brand which helped incorporate the brand essence into my outcome

Let me understand their needs and wants from a brand that could translated in the strategic recommendations

Only asked a small group of people resulting in limited choice of answers

Only asked one person from each consumer group which could limit my outcomes


APPENDIX III critical path


CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH MARKET

CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH CONSUMER CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH CASE STUDIES CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH COMPETITORS

PRIMARY RESEARCH MARKET CONTEXTUAL RESEARCH CONSUMER

BIG IDEA

IMPLEMENTATION

WRITING

PRINT


APPENDIX IV Cartogram


APPENDIX V Online Survey


Before participants completed the survey, I enclosed an outline of the project and purpose of their answers. ‘The purpose of this survey is to gain an understanding and an insight into ‘Do online brands need an offline presence?’ from the view of you, the consumer. I am interested to find out about your consumer journey and your personal opinions on the subject. The information provided will be collated together to help enhance the future of retail experiences. By completing this survey you will not be identified individually and the results will be destroyed at the end of the project. Thankyou for helping!’

QUESTIONS ASKED > WHAT IS YOUR GENDER? > WHAT IS YOUR AGE? > WHEN BEGINNING TO MAKE A DECISION ON A PURCHASE ARE YOU MOST LIKELY TO...? > DO YOU PREFER TO EXPERIENCE OF SHOPPING ONLINE OR OFFLINE? > FROM LOOKING AT YOUR WARDROBE, WOULD YOU SAY THE MAJORITY OF THESE PURCHASES WERE MADE OFFLINE OR ONLINE? > FROM SHOPPING WITH PURE PLAY ONLINE BRANDS, DO YOU PERSONALLY FEEL YOU WOULD LIKE AN OFFLINE PRESENCE TO INTERACT WITH THE BRAND? > WHAT DO YOU ENJOY ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE OF SHOPPING ONLINE? > WHAT DO YOU ENJOY ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE OF SHOPPING OFFLINE? > IF AN ONLINE BRAND WERE TO EXPAND OFFLINE, ARE YOU MOST LIKELY TO INTERACT WITH...


APPENDIX VI Industry Interviews


EMAIL INTERVIEW WITH JONATHON DE MELLO HEAD OF RETAIL RETAIL CONSULTANCY HARPER DENNIS HOBBS

FROM ANNA LEWIS TO JONATHON DE MELLO DATE NOV 12, 2014 Hello Jonathan, I am messaging you to request whether I can ask you a few questions for my dissertation for my university degree. I am writing it on the power of online retail and whether there needs to be an offline presence in order to survive in the future of retail. The answers will only be used within my dissertation report and will be destroyed after the project is over. I understand you must be very busy but any insights will be extremely appreciated! Kind Regards Anna Lewis Fashion Promotion student: Nottingham Trent University, UK

FROM JONATHON DE MELLO TO ANNA LEWIS DATE NOV 15, 2014 Hi Anna, Yes of course, send over your questions and I will see if I can help you out. Best regards, Jonathon -Jonathan De Mello || Head of Retail Consultancy HARPER DENNIS HOBBS


FROM ANNA LEWIS TO JONATHON DE MELLO DATE NOV 15, 2014 Hello Jonathan, Thankyou very much for helping with my research! I have attatched the questions below but any sort of insight into this topic will be greatly appreciated! Do you feel brands that only stick to one platform (either purely online or brands with just a physical stores) are limiting their potential to attract customers? why? Do you believe that a multichannel experience for customers is crucial for brands to survive in this digital age? and why? Many Thanks, Anna Lewis

FROM JONATHON DE MELLO TO ANNA LEWIS DATE NOV 20, 2014 Hi Anna, I have attatched the clicks and bricks report, I hope that helps. In terms of the your questions I have touched upon these in the report. The most successful brands are, on the whole, those that have developed their multi-channel offer, but their physical stores are still crucial. Take Apple for instance, they attract significant sales and press coverage from their physical stores, even though electrical goods have been seen to sell strongly online. In order to survive in this day and age, brands should adopt the full retail-ecosystem, through stores, click & collecct, online etc. I hope that helps in someway. Good luck with the rest of your report. Best regards, Jonathon


EMAIL INTERVIEW WITH MIA NEAGLE WARBY PARKER

FROM ANNA LEWIS TO MIA NEAGLE DATE NOV 15, 2014 Hello Mia, I have been in contact with a member of your team, Mary, who very kindly forwarded on this email address to me. My name is Anna Lewis and I’m in my final year of Fashion communication and Promotion at Nottingham Trent University in the UK. I am currently developing my dissertation where I am looking into online to offline world and questioning ‘Do online brands need an offline presence?’. With Warby Parker transitioned into the offline world through its innovative stores, this couldn’t be more timely! I would like to carry out a case study on Warby Parker as inspiration for my work and wondered if a member of your team would kindly answer a small number of my questions. I know you are incredibly busy but any insights will be extremely appreciated! I have listed the questions below. Any answers will only feature in my dissertation report appendix. Many Thanks and I hope to hear from you very soon! Anna Lewis - What gave you the initial idea to move into the offline from being an online only brand? Were there restrictions from being online only? - Before opening your store you used other platforms to reach your consumers in the offline world (Like your Hush Mob and professors study), did these help build consumer loyalty and excitement surrounding your brand? - Do you find there is a difference in the type of consumer from those who purchase straight from the website and those who browse in store? -Do you feel it is important to have that physical interaction with your consumers? If so, why? - As a brand talking about your flagship store you were quoted saying ‘ we create special moments’, how do you go about doing this? and has it improved consumer loyalty?


FROM MIA NEAGLE TO ANNA LEWIS DATE NOV 25, 2014 Hi Anna, Thank you so much for reaching out to us! We’re thrilled you’re interested in including Warby Parker in your research—how flattering! Our founders and management team members are typically more than happy to answer questions about the company and truly value the power of learning; these are some of their favorite interviews. However, we have been receiving more requests from students for projects than we can accommodate. We truly wish we could participate in each and every one! I am just so sorry that I am not able to have them speak to you directly, but I’ve passed along a few articles that detail everything you need to know about the brand! Thanks again for reaching out to us, Anna! Please let me know if I can help with anything else. Best of luck on your research! Best, Mia


APPENDIX VII Focus Groups


.

I conducted two focus groups on two different avid shopper consumers to gain different insights and opinions on my research matter. Both focus groups were conducted in relaxed atmospheres to put the participants at ease to generate strong conversations and debates. The first focus group also consisted of an experiment where participants were asked to interact with Net-A-Porter online and via their offline magazine to see what they preferred. At the begining of each focus group I explained my research topic and a discaimer to give the participants an insight.

‘The purpose of this focus group is to gain an understanding and an insight into ‘Do online brands need an offline presence?’ from the view of you, the consumer. I am interested to find out about your consumer journey and your personal opinions on the subject. The information provided will be collated together to help enhance the future of retail experiences. By completing this focus group you will not be identified individually and the results will be destroyed at the end of the project. Thankyou for taking part.’


regre

Do you prefer shopping online or offline? Muxlow: Depends, with clothes I prefer shopping offline as I want to feel the product and try them on. Gray: I would rather buy food online as its more convenient but I would prefer to buy clothes offline as they always look and fit differently in person compared to online. I like to have things now, I don’t like waiting. Sheppey: Well I like online shopping for the pure fact that you get more chose like ASOS, billiant, so much choice and you would never be able to fit all that in a store, but theres nothing worse than ordering and it doesn’t fit. I also like to shop in the shop because im very feely touchy, especially with beauty products. I like the whole shabang! But the one thing I don’t like about shopping is the queues and the

crowds, it’s just too much! Ryan: I am pro enviroment so I am online all the way! Radford: I like online because I can’t be bothered with the people in shop and I can’t be bothered to wait to queue to try things on! Plus you can get next day delivery online. It is annoying when it doesn’t come in the right colour or size. But I guess I could just send it back.

Sheppey: I think it’s an up and down one because i think having something delivered is really exciting as its the anticipation of what you have bought but it’s always the worst when it’s not what you expected. Radford: I feel like when I go shopping I am excited at the prospect of buying something but get disapointed as I normally can’t find what I’m looking for.

So do you prefer looking online first then entering the store to have a more informed decision? Muxlow: Yes! Radford: Yeah definetly. Whyles: I like shopping at both but I’m very

fussy about the website I use, like I hate shopping on river Island’s website as it feels so messy and cluttered. But I love the Zara website as its simplistic and clean. I also do love shopping in-store but I tend to go at times when it’s not busy. I feel better when I actually look at the real product especially in stores like Topshop where they group together outfits and trends to make it easier for you. I’m a bit of mixture I like shopping on both channels.

How convinient is it for you to send back products from online that you don’t want?

Sheppey: I would only look at things like jewellery offline as I would never think to buy it online as when your in a store and you get excited over an outfit you’re buying and want to add accessories.

Muxlow: It’s annoying when you have to pay to send it back!

So are accessories more of an impulse buy offline?


Franklin: Yeah definetly, I am always drawn to the stuff near the tills, I would never buy that kind of stuff online. Gray: Theres also nothing better than when you’ve been shopping and you come home with all the bags! I love to spend hours browsing in-store! Ryan: One thing I do when I’m shopping in-store is take pictures of myself in potential outfits and send to friends to ask opinions. Franklin: I like getting products offline but I hate shops. I wish I could have a shop to myself. And someone who could personally take me round the shop and let me try everything!

What about some sort of app that could guide you around the shop?

Gray: No, I prefer human interaction and actually talking to someone.

So do you think thats the problem with online brands, theres no human interaction? Whyles: Sometimes, when theres something wrong with a product I would like to ask someone personally I guess.

Do many people use click and collect? What do you like about it? Everyone: Yes! Gray: It’s free and you can often pick it up way before it would be delivered anyway. It’s just so convenient. It allows me to find what I like online, pick it up when I want and if I decide I don’t like it I can return it.

So if you could choose an online brand to go offline who would it be?

So with a luxury brand like Net-a-Porter would you prefer to have an offline store?

Franklin: Etsy! I would love to have a sensory experience from this brand, so many products!

Franklin: Yeah but there would be alot of stuff to showcase.

Muxlow: I always think brands like notonthehighstreet.com would be good to have an offline because you never really know what their products actually look like.

Ryan: I would need to trust a brand like Neta-Porter to get it delivered home when buying luxury goods.

Gray: I think Missguided should have a store as their products always look nice online but they are always disapointing! Maybe not a store, but more like a base that you can talk to people and pick things out.

So if you could build up trust offline would that persuade you buy luxury items online? Ryan: Yeah Definetly.

So with brands you’ve purchased from

Ryan: I think I would like ASOS but not a previously would you prefer if more care store something a bit different more innovative.

was taken over the packaging?

Muxlow: Yeah if ASOS was to go offline I think it should focus more on the experience than selling clothes becuase they have so much products online they would’nt be able to put them all in a store but it would still be cool to interact with them.

Muxlow: I do feel sometimes clothes from brands like Asos do come screwed up.

Gray: They would have to do something new to compete with brands like Topshop on the highstreet.

From Interacting with the offline Neta-Porter and online which one did you prefer?

Sheppey: Zara had beautiful packaging which made me want to buy something else just for the experience.

Ryan: It would have to be more like a live event See Images. with mew technology. It shouldn’t be a store but rather a feature. Franklin: With luxury brands like Net-aPorter I don’t think I could bring myself to buy something so expensive online with out trying it out. I think Net-a-Porter is a very strange concept.


Do you think online brands need an offline presence? Moore: I think they do! I am constantly buying things online and they never turn out the way you think. I want to see the product and then I know nothing can go wrong with it! Mcintosh: Things online always come up too small for me. I ordered a dress the other week and was too small. Because I needed it for this event I had to wear it as I didn’t have time to send it back.

So why do you shop online in the first place? Mcintosh: Pure laziness and it’s convenient.

So to solve returning items online, would you prefer a more accessible option offline? Moore: Yeah like very.co.uk you can return your items to a newsagent but I guess thats not the most appealing of options! Something that sells the brand would be better.

What do you look for in a store if an online brand moved to a store platform? Quinn: Customer service! Smith: I want to feel the products above all else Moore: From my experience of onlime brands, you don’t always know what they are trying to say and who they are aiming at. I mean when you walk into Topshop you know its aimed at younger girls through the style but its hard to get that from online. Quinn: Yeah you can see who else shops there when your in a store, get more of a feel of the brand.

Would you prefer to interact with an experience rather than just a store? Mcintosh: I think for women, we want a more personal service. I would like a stress free experience.


Lewis: I want to avoid queues and sales. I want the shop to myself and it to be tailored towards my needs.

So you want the convenience online but the excitement of offline? Quinn: Yeah that would be perfect

How do you go about making a purchase decision? Moore: My most recent purchase I decided I would look in store with the intention of purchasing later online. So I found what I wanted in store came back to order it online but it had sold out! So I had to go back to the shop anyway. Lewis: I don’t really like trying on clothes but I like to see it in person before I buy it though. If they can come up with a way of showing clothes on you without trying on that would be perfect for me! Mcintosh: Yeah I always feel stressed anda bit depressed when using the changing rooms, they are never flattering!

Quinn: I tend to always go straight to store and will buy there and then if I find the right thing but I am still willing to risk buying online before I have seen it.

So, do you prefer shoppinh online or offline? See images.


APPENDIX VIII Ethnographic Research


WHERE? Amazon Lockers WHO? 22 year old male WHY? To test the effectiveness of a pure-play online brand utilizing an offline presence

Strengths > Parcel was held for 3 days making it convenient to pick up when the participant wanted >Simple collection process >Accessible location for participant to reach >Convenient

Weaknesses > No clear instructions when initially choosing to deliver to a locker > Limited to only Amazon products so had to choose the more expensive item >Relys on shopping centre opening hours > Although it was located in a shopping centre participant felt a locker on university campus would be better


WHERE? Argos WHO? 22 year old male & 21 year old female

WHY? To test the click and collect service

Strengths > Easy process from search to purchase > There are signs at every point to help you with the process > Able to reserve online and pick up in store quickly and effectively > The whole process proved to be very convenient and effecient >An option to pick up your ebay orders, combining online and offline

Weaknesses > The catalogue in which you search for products was dated and hard to navigate quickly > There was no consideration for the time in which you wait for your product, was standing in a small group of people, could use chairs. > The store was completely bare, no product promotions or anything to interact with > There was nothing that was personal to you as a customer


WHERE? Net-a-Porter WHO? 52 year old female WHY? To test interactivity with a pure-play online luxury brand

Strengths > Luxurious packaging made the experience feel exciting and intriguing > The brand is translated well through the offline packaging > The delivery has had care taken over which made the participant feel better about purchasing a luxury item

Weaknesses > They could have used this delivery to entice the consumer back in or offered some sort of loyalty > The participant felt although she was happy with her delivery she would have liked some sort of post purchase experience with the brand


APPENDIX IX Observational Research


TOPSHOP

ACTION

Looking for products they

GEN Z

MILLENIALS

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|

GEN X

have seen online

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Used Click & Collect

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Ordered in store on the ipad

Returned items ordered from

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the internet

Picked up physical magazine

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Tried an item on and then left

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purchase online

Used the in-store iPad

Had their mobile out whilst shopping

Interacted with the physical store experience


TOPMAN

ACTION

GEN Z

MILLENIALS

GEN X

||

Looking for products they have seen online

|||

|

|

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Used Click & Collect

Ordered in store on the ipad

Returned items ordered from the internet

Picked up physical magazine

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Tried an item on and then left purchase online

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Used the in-store iPad

Had their mobile out whilst shopping

Interacted with the physical store experience

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APPENDIX X Street Style


.

OFFLINE: FEEL

ONLINE: SELECTION

OFFLINE: INSTANT

OFFLINE: FUN


.

ONLINE: EASY

ONLINE: CONVENIENT

OFFLINE: TRY ON


OFFLINE: VINTAGE

OFFLINE: EXPERIENCE

ONLINE: LESS HASSLE


APPENDIX XI Instagram Campaign


.


INSTAGRAM CAMPAIGN The aim of this research was to create a hype around my topic via the power of the internet. using hastag #IWentShoppingAndIbought I was able to collate that 95% of participants answers showed their last purchase was in-store. This shows there is still a great need for the physical store and the excitement of showing your offline purchase to the online community.


APPENDIX XII Store Research


STORE RESEARCH

Visitng London I wanted to gain visual inspiration as well as research how stores are interacting with their consumers. Visitng 18 stores, focusing on stores that aimed at the stylish male, as well as other stores, I was able to see what this consumer desires. Regent Street, Savill Row and Dover Street market were all visited to gain a broad depth of visual research.


APPENDIX XIII Word Association


WHO IS MR PORTER?

Questioning a range of selected participants I asked them to note down one word they associate with the brand mr porter. This helped me identify consumers opinions on the brand, what could possibly be changed and what key words should also be translated through my strategy.


APPENDIX XIV Consumer Interviews


egre

INTERVIEW WITH AN ‘URBAN SOPHISTICATE’

Name_ Henry Brunsden Age_ 28 Occupation_ Managing director

Do you prefer shopping in-store or online? Why? I prefer shopping online purely because it’s quick and you can specifically look for something you want rather than browsing. Especially with my busy lifestyle, I am after convenience. When purchasing a new product how do you make a decision? When purchasing a luxury item I like to get to know the product from all angles before finally purchasing. For example, I bought a new watch recently, after searching the internet and looking on social media I found one I really liked but I wanted to feel it in person. So I visited the store tried it on, looked at the quality and tested the style. After really liking this specific one I later purchased online. What do you dislike most about shopping in-store? I tend to avoid going shopping in-store at peak times as I hate the busy crowds and queues. I also finding shopping in-store to be time consuming, I like to go in knowing what I need and leave quickly. What do you dislike most about shopping online? I partically hate the fact you are unable to try on things, I like to see products before I buy. As a full time worker delivery times always prove inconvenient for me as I am never home to revieve it. What draws you to Mr Porter the brand? I feel the brand itself reflects the lifestyle I am aspiring to acheive. I also appreciate their overall aesthetic.


INTERVIEW WITH A ‘CULTIVATED CANDIDATE’

Name_ Johnnie Valantine Age_ 22 Occupation_ fine art graduate

Do you prefer shopping in-store or online? Why? I would say I prefer shopping in-store purely because I like to browse physically rather than just staring at a screen When purchasing a new product how do you make a decision? I normally research around to see reviews and that but I would prefer to see it before I buy to make my own judgement What do you dislike most about shopping in-store? I don’t like how a lot of brands just focus on a sale rather than its customer so you get no experience. Apple is a store I regularly visit based purely on that fact. What do you dislike most about shopping online? Theres little interaction and you can’t see before you buy What do you think of Mr Porter the brand? It’s a brand I aspire to buy into, a strong focus on mens style which partically appeals to me


APPENDIX XVI Trend Conference


Key Insights > Oh Comely founder discussing the need for an offline presence in the form of a magazine as it creates community > The trend for disconnecting from the the online world and how there is now a change in the way we want to interact


STUDENT LSN CONFERENCE


APPENDIX XVII 3D Modeller Brief


APPENDIX XVIII Consent Forms


APPENDIX XVIII Visual Research


LAYOUT INSPIRATION


VISUAL INSPIRATION


TYPOGRAPHY INSPIRATION


IN-STORE INSPIRATION


APPENDIX XIX Case studies


CASE STUDY 1 // AMAZON As one of the largest players in the online world, Amazon started as an online bookstore but soon diversified to selling electronics, apparel, furniture and toys. Their vision was big and Jeff Bezos, the founder, had a business plan that would profoundly affect the way in which we shopped forever (Stone, 2013). Today, we see Amazon test the boundaries once again, as they are seen to be further along the path to physical premises than its large player competitors. As I have previously mentioned the company now operates around 300 Amazon lockers in the UK, at convenient locations like underground stations, libraries and supermarkets (See Figure 20). This incorporates the ‘click & collect’ strategy, which has boosted sales and doubled deliveries in the first year of implementation. Amazon is rapidly increasing its locker availability, as it aims to make the purchasing process as convenient as possible for consumers (Stephens, 2013). Developing from this, the company opened a physical pop-up store in San Francisco. The store focused on providing a space for users of the brand to talk to web services. Although it didn’t prove sell many products within the space compared to the online site, it acted as a generator of brand recognition in a high-footfall area. Previously, Amazon has also experimented with Kindle retail pop-up stores. These staffed areas were used to demonstrate kindles performance and key features and customers could then purchase a kindle from vending machines (Whitney, 2014).


CASE STUDY 2 // APPLE Apple is a technological retailer that full embraced a physical store strategy. They are notable for the way that they have embraced the role of the physical stores, despite the fact they are brand defined by technology. Apple sees bricks and mortar as being integral to the success of its online offer and vice versa.

Their stores incorporate the trend of experiential with focus on flawless customer service, providing in-store enjoyment. Their stores build and maintain the brand and ensure sales through its other channels, whether its itunes, website of phone.


CASE STUDY 3 // THE LOREAL GROUP The loreal group operates over 30 health and beauty brands across the world, with brands such as The Body Shop and Lancome. Each of the brands operates a multi-channel strategy, with a number of different routes to market. The channels are designed to complement eachother, rather than operate in isolation, which is a good example of the ‘retail ecosystem’. The brand understands the need for the customer to be able to purchase their cosmetics from which route they prefer.


CASE STUDY 4 // BONOBOS

Online brand Bonobos, best known for its wellfitted men’s suits, began life as an accessible platform for men to purchase smart wear. Their concept came about

opportunity to gain advice from stylists and try garments

when they found it was hard to find men’s trousers that

on for size. Bonobos set out to re-design the shopping

would actually fit. Bonobos identified their consumer,

experience, making the store more about connecting with

discovering most men were not interested in shopping,

the consumer than making a sale. Existing customers

and built a shopping experience via the medium of the

can now request an appointment online enabling a small

Internet (Koblin 2014). With a successful platform in

number of customers in the store at one time (Bonobos.

which to stand on, Bonobos was never supposed to have

com).

a brick-and-mortar shop. ‘We said we would never be

stylists can guide the customers through the store and

offline, and then, we realised offline really works’, with the

help them discover what they want. Bonobos identified

opening of their bricks-and-mortar guide shops (Deigel,

their customer, recognising their needs and lifestyle,

2014). These shops offer everything but a sale, with an

creating an experience that pushed service over instant

Personalisation now steps into play, as the

gratification. Founder, Andy Dunn, said ‘the fit and quality should speak for itself… you’re running around, and you want to jump to dinner or back to the office or to the gym. You don’t want to have to deal with this bag’ (Deigel, 2014). The Guideshop gives you one hour to receive a fully integrated personalised experience but you can walk out with your hands free to carry on with your lifestyle. This online to offline strategy has seen growth for Bonobos. They have identified the trend of consumers trying before they buy and created a new platform for this, opening up to new potential consumers who would have previously been pessimistic at the idea of ordering items online before physically interacting with the product.


CASE STUDY 5 // WARBY PARKER

Warby parker started as online pure-play brand with the objective to revolutionize eyewear. Built upon the concept of affordability eyewear, they ‘believe that

. Founder, Neil Blumenthal, was quoted saying ‘we

buying glasses should be easy and fun. It should leave

believe the future of retail is at the intersection of

you happy and good-looking, with money in your

e-commerce and bricks-and-mortar. It’s about can we

pocket’ (WarbyParker.com) . As an eyewear company

create special moments. When you walk into the store,

they initially offered a facial recognition on their website

most people are really surprised, because it doesn’t look

so consumer were able to see a reflection of themselves

like any place they have ever been that sells glasses’

wearing a pair of sunglasses, eliminating the chance of

(Kasperkevic, 2015). The store is simplistic in style and

dissatisfaction for consumers when purchasing.

interaction, with only an option to try, leaving purchasing to the online site. ‘We quickly realized that while we were

Developing their brand further, they began to offer

seeing all the benefits we expected from branding and

a five glasses for five days offer. This free service allowed

marketing—the ‘halo’ effect of having a store open—stores

the consumer to try and test glasses they have seen online

could be a meaningful driver of sales and profitability,

for a five-day period. This initial branching out into the

which was really unexpected’ (Kasperkevic, 2015). Warby

offline world was popular among its consumers and

Parker’s eight stores are now collectively turning a profit

they were encouraged to develop this further. This then

through the encouragement of trying in-store and buying

lead to a series of events that reflected the brands quirky

online.

style, including a ‘hush mob’ within The New York Public Library in 2011 (Garcia, 2011). The event consisted of

Advantages to take from this example are, their stores

various models wearing the glasses and holding books

allowed potential for a more personalized customer

with ‘Warby Parker’ written across it. In 2013, the

service. “Consumers want to be talked to in a personal

company had been travelling all over America in a school

way,” says Bruce Cohen, senior partner at retail consultant

bus refurbished into a ‘professors study’. This acted as

Kurt Salmon. “Once you get a good retail Sherpa—your

a mobile vehicle to entice consumers to purchase their

curator of good taste and fashion that knows you—

glasses offline. These events heightened their consumers

you become incredibly loyal’ (Kasperkevic, 2015). The

interest more and more with each event, making it almost

accumulation of offline events built up consumer hype,

an imperative to open their first physical store.

opening an opportunity for an offline consumer base.


CASE STUDY 6 // NET-A-PORTER

Establishing itself as the worlds premier online luxury fashion retailer, Net-a-Porter offers the style savvy customer unprecedented access to the trends of the season from international labels. Since launching in June 2000, Net-a-Porter has successfully established itself as a luxury brand, with impeccable packaging and unrivalled customer care. Net-a-Porter have revolutionized consumers interaction and perception with luxury through drawing them to a new platform. However, dissatisfied with being a pure-play brand, Net-a-Porter wanted to take themselves one step forward and venture offline, opening a pop-up store in London 2011. They set out to bridge the gap between online and offline retail with a one-night-only digital shopping experience that bridges window displays with a mobile app called ‘The Window Shop’. Their consumers were welcomed to use their smartphone to scan pictures of the items upon the wall through an augmented reality experience. The mobile phone app was adapted to recognize a product from the photo which proceeded to open Net-a-Porter’s online store which could result in a purchase (Thomson, 2011). This experience acted as a brand builder and enhanced sales potential. The event proved to be successful, allowing consumers to shop through their app and have the items delivered to their home. The online retailer also reached over 500,000 Facebook fans following the event, and so launched a Facebook video app to reward its loyal customers (Thomson, 2011).

The luxury online fashion company has also translated their brand offline in the form of a print publication, ‘Porter’, described as a ‘high-end, thought-leading read to place on their coffee table’. The move from online commerce to published print proved to be a great one for the brand, providing context for their online site, allowing customers to shop the magazine (Binkley, 2014). This new platform has allowed Net-a-Porter to remain current in a world that is yearning for the tactile experience and provides a holistic brand experience. As a start-up magazine, they already had the brand, the following and, most importantly, the data. Their wealth of data collated since the birth of Net-a-Porter in 2001, this can now be used to inform their offline presence in order to create relevant experiences for their readers as well as the online shoppers (Binkley, 2014).


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Dissertation back to the retail future final