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POLIMODA INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FASHION DESIGN AND MARKETING FASHION BRAND MANAGEMENT MASTER 2018/19

MIDTERM PROJECT MARIA PAULA DANGOND ANKIT MANSINGHKA PIETRO PACE CAROLINE SCHOELLER


MOSCHINO

Index 1. Brand Analysis History Designers Genotypes Fall/Winter 2018/19, Spring/Summer 2019 Distribution Communication 2. Brand Identity Archetypes - Joker and Jester Analysis of the society Semiotic Maps Conflict Resolution Maps 3D Business Models Visions, Missions, Values 3. Benchmark and Positioning Maps

4. Hyperreality and Hyperrealism 5. Merchandising Strategy and Plan 6. Swot Bibliography Sitography Appendix

8 10 19 24 30 34 44 44 50 58 59 60 62 64 68 78 114 116 117 121

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BRAND ANALYSIS HISTORY Moschino was founded by Franco Moschino in 1983, that same year the first women’s collection was presented followed by the first men’s collection one year later. After a few years the brand launched “Moschino Jeans”, known today as “Love Moschino”. Moschino was also among the first luxury brands to cater to a larger audience by launching a more affordable line “Moschino Cheap and Chick” now called Moschino Boutique. After Franco Moschino’s death, the brand continued under the direction of Rosella Jardini, Moschino`s right hand, who shared his vision of society but had a different mission. Her designs were a little less irreverent than before and focused more on the aesthetics of fashion. In 1999 the brand was taken over by the Aeffa group, which helped Moschino to expand and enter new markets. In 2014, Jeremy Scott became the new creative director of Moschino. He brought the irreverence and humour back in Moschino’s collections.

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BRAND ANALYSIS DESIGNERS FRANCO MOSCHINO

The society in the 1980s inspired Franco Moschino to launch his own fashion brand, which according to him was “a tool to reflect ironically on society.� Franco Moschino was a fine arts student who originally aspired to be a painter. During his studies, he worked as an illustrator for major magazines and fashion brands. Even though, he was working in fashion, he never shared the values of the industry. Overtime he developed his view of fashion as an industry which victimises society and promotes consumerism. Through his brand, Moschino, he openly mocked the fashion system and this irreverence of his was a dominant theme in all his collections. Replacing classical catwalk presentations with private showings and raising social awareness campaigns towards drug abuse, climate change, violence, consumerism, pollution, racism and the aids crisis, were some of the initiatives Moschino carried out as a luxury brand. Franco Moschino was not just a designer, but a spin doctor who was known to laugh with his clients rather than at them.

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MOSCHINO

BRAND ANALYSIS DESIGNERS

SURREALISM

Franco Moschino was strongly influenced by the surrealist art movement of the 1920s. He used traditional methods of clothing construction to produce wearable, sexy clothes, which he then subverted with surrealistic elements. He was as much social commentator as designer, celebrating the excesses of the 1980’s with appliques, logos and slogans. Surrealism was a means of reuniting conscious and unconscious realms of experience so completely that the world of dream and fantasy was incorporated into the everyday rational world in “an absolute reality, a surrealism.”

FRANCO MOSCHINO

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Franco Moschino used the concept of collage to get his point across in society.

THE CONCEPT OF COLLAGE

The word “collage” can be traced back to the French word “coller”, which can be translated as “gluing”. The concept of a collage as an artistic medium is an old tradition in art. It was used in Japan in the 10th century. However, the classical modernism of the first half of the 20th century with the works of Pablo Picasso and George Braques shaped the success of the collage. In the second half of the 20th century, this artistic practice continued to flourish through its use by the Surrealists, the Dadaists, and even in emerging Pop Art. Technically speaking, the collage can be described as an assembly, a gluing of images on a neutral ground or on a ground which itself has an own meaning. The isolation of parts from a previously meaningful whole and the subsequent coupling of different elements creates something different, giving it a new meaning. The collage confronts the viewer with the unprepared merging of various contents or media, stimulating it from the passive recipient to the active co-creator and thus exerting an enlightening effect.

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BRAND ANALYSIS DESIGNERS JEREMY SCOTT

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MOSCHINO Current Creative Director of Moschino, Jeremy Scott, doesn’t criticize society and fashion as intensely as Franco himself did, and shies away from using surrealism in his designs. With a reputation as “Pop Culture’s most irreverent designer”, he views fashion as something which should be fun and not too serious. He regularly uses cultural references in his collections and is very active on social media. The result is the brand growing in terms of its awareness and profitability. A recent example would be the collaboration Moschino with H&M, in order to approach a younger clientele, thus boosting up their google search results by 70% in November 2018. His recent collections have raised awareness against fast fashion, overtly high

consumption of images in the digital world, capsule collections and the overdose of yearly collections by the fashion industry, but he has definitely not been as out spoken and critical as Franco Moschino was.

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BRAND ANALYSIS DESIGNERS

JEREMY SCOTT MOSCHINO’S CONTEMPORARY SYMBOLS Since Jeremy Scott took over, he has completely turned Moschino around with the infusion of contemporary symbolism and pop culture into the brand. He uses these identifiers, and has added commercial culture icons, incorporating mass symbols ranging from McDonald’s and Coca-Cola to “Sponge Bob” and “The Simpsons.” He uses contemporary symbols since the symbols of the late 20th century have changed their meaning as time goes by. Also, the current society does not relate to classical symbolism as in the past.

Moschino has been extremely profitable over the last few years and Scott´s strategy has worked very well, but it isn’t clearly evident why Moschino is selling so well. Jeremy Scott has not chosen his contemporary symbols at random; these symbols have always been in the news, when new collections were created. Below is a chart, based on research covering every collection Moschino showed, since Jeremy Scott became the new creative director.

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SYMBOLISM McDonalds

CONTEMPORARY NEWS

McDonalds was being criticised in the media for not making changes into its menu, due to allegations on promoting obesity and unhealthy food. Sales were also in steep decline.

Barbie

Barbie was criticised in several articles for promoting sexism and shallow materialism. Sales were in decline.

Street Graffiti

Death of a Graffiti legend and Google launched an online street art gallery to bring global graffiti to everyone.

Dangerous haute couture

Haute Couture was very strong in the early 2015.

Marlboro Cigarettes

A debate was going on about plain packaging laws during that time. Particularly in France, a law was passed to impose plain packaging laws on cigarettes that had stirred a protest from the industry and smokers.

2D garments with prints

NYWK last fashion show had introduced “click and buy� on the map, thus making fashion more digitally accessible.

Capsule prints

News regarding drug overdose.

Cardboard wastage/trash

News articles regarding the mountains of cardboard waste that were created by companies such as Amazon. Their free prime services allows users to order something and return it for free, thus creating an abundance of cardboard wastage which in the end pollutes the environment.

Detergent sprays/candies/ eyes burning

This was a reference to detergent pods, which look tempting like candies, so people eat them by mistake. There were news articles claiming that lots of children burn their eyes while playing with these pods.

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MOSCHINO

BRAND ANALYSIS GENOTYPES PROGENITORS •

Boucle jacket

Sweetheart neckline dress

Biker leather jacket

White t-shirt with slogan

Ball gown

Moschino belt

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BRAND ANALYSIS GENOTYPES IDENTIFIERS

THE CONCEPT OF SYMBOLS The Identifiers go hand in hand with the meaning of symbols, which are shaped by society. Franco Moschino tried to break the boundaries of communication by finding a universal language by using symbols such as the peace or the heart motifs as identifiers of the brand in the past. However, those symbols don’t transport the same message as they once did, since society is constantly changing. - Teddy bear (AW 1988): Used to promote his first fur free collection. Hype of the 80s and 90s pop culture, fans were throwing teddy bears on the stage – referred to the roots of fandom, and portrayed the spirit of materialism. - Golden Chains

- Peace: Its history began in Britain, where it was designed by graphic artist Gerald Holtom in February 1958 to be used as a symbol against nuclear arms. The design became synonymous with that Cold War cause. The letters “N” and “D” were used to represent “nuclear disarmament.” - Question mark: Franco used it to question the society, the fashion industry and encourage the people to try to get to the bottom of it.

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- Cow print (AW 1985) - Heart symbol: The template for the heart motif derives from the fig leave. The heart-shaped fruit of the fig tree is associated with love and sex in many cultures. Ancient Greeks and Romans decorated objects with heart-shaped fig and ivy leaves. The ivy leaf also symbolizes eternal love. Book illuminators and artists began to use the heart shape in the Middle Ages to depict affection between humans. The card “Queen of hearts” is one of the highest playing cards. In Christianity the heart is considered to be the origin of good and evil, which according to Christian understanding leads to a communication between Jesus and man. In the 17th century, Sacred Heart worship developed into a masscult. Numerous depictions of flaming or bleeding Jesus hearts were propagated. The inflationary use of the symbol has now supplanted its religious (mystic) meaning. - Clouds: Moschino was inspired by René

Magritte’s paintings.

surrealist

cloud

- Smiley: American commercial artist Harvey Ball, first created the design — known as the Worcester smiley — in 1963. Over time, the icon mutated into a signifier of various subcultures, personal freedom, anti-capitalist attitudes, drugs, and electronic music. - Crown (Christian iconography): Symbol of monarchy, represents: authority, power, legitimacy, victory, triumph, honour, and glory, as well as immortality, righteousness, and resurrection. - Playing card: “Queen of hearts” - Bow - Pearls (AW 1985): Symbol for upper class, establishment, link to the brand Chanel. - Golden Hoop earrings: Refers to the hip-hop movement.

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BRAND ANALYSIS FALL/ WINTER 2018/19 SPRING/SUMMER 19

Jeremy Scott incorporates the cultural influence of the pop culture into his designs by making statements through Enthusiasm/Humour in a direct and literal way. The brand´s designs are for placement in social media, actually an unreal world. The retail store expresses in an almost undepictable manner the brand’s meaning and mood, giving consumers a low experience.

FW 18/19

On the other hand during the FW18-19 collection, his criticism was about something very different and most important. He tried to call attention to the inhumane und intolerable immigration policy of US President Trump. He calls this campaign “Illegal Aliens”. On the catwalk he had the models use body paint in different colours, thus symbolizing that we all the same and equal regardless of skin colour.

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SS 19

In his attempt to criticise the fashion industry, Jeremy Scott makes an allusion to the “fast fashion” system. For his SS19 fashion show, he presented unfinished garments based on sketches and brought back some jersey designs. He tried to raise awareness about the very tight time schedule between the

collection presentations, but only shortly after making this statement, he started his collaboration with one of the most “fast fashion” industry on the market: H&M.

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BRAND ANALYSIS DISTRIBUTION RETAIL EXPERIENCE

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The distribution lines of the products of the label includes 77 % women´s pret à porte, 11 % footwear and leather goods. The remaining 12 % can be placed in fragrance, eyewear and watches (September 2017) Owned by Aeffe SpA and SINV Holding SpA (the pret à porte products) the label Moschino has expanded in Europe. Working with Allison Volta Mantovana for eyewear, Binda Group for accessories and Altana SpA for the Kids Collections, the product line has grown.

ASIA:

In 2007 Moschino signed an agreement with Scienward International Holdings for franchising and distributing their products in China. They are present with 40 stores in China, and a total of almost 60 stores in Asia.

EUROPE:

Present with almost 20 stores in Europe, most of them in Italy.

EASTERN EUROPE, UKRAINE, SOVIET UNION

Istanbul in Turkey, Dnipropetrovsk and Kiev in the Ukraine, Moscow, Yekaterinburg and St. Petersburg in Russia, Almaty in Kazakhstan.

NORTH AMERICA:

4 stores in Mexico and USA

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MIDDLE EAST:

Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia, Doha in Qatar, Dubai, Kuwait and Bahrain In the last decade many shopin-shops and corners have been opened in department stores worldwide like: Saks Fifth Avenue (USA), Saks in Mexico City, Isetan Takashimaya, Daimaru in Japan, Shinsegae, Lotte and Hyundai in Korea, Harvey Nichols, Harrods and House of Fraser in London, Printemps in Paris, Oberpollinger in Munich, El Corte Inglese in Madrid and La Rinascente and Coin in Milan. In 2009 Moschino launched www.moschino.com as its virtual boutique, providing customers across the globe an in-store experience.


MOSCHINO

RETAIL EXPERIENCE

For their visual merchandising, all the stores use the black and white colour scheme, keeping to a simple merchandising look. Moschino has a variety of products on sale, displaying them in a straightforward way. Visual merchandising doesn’t necessarily speak the language of the brand (collections).

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BRAND ANALYSIS COMMUNICATION PRESS

ABOUT FRANCO MOSCHINO:

mercifully, to the latter.“ [Appendix B]

Schiro, A. (1994). Franco Moschino, 44, Is Dead; Designer Known for Irreverence. [online] Nytimes.com. “Franco Moschino, the Italian designer known for bringing humor and irreverence to fashion, died on Sunday in a country house he had rented in Annone, Italy, outside Milan, where he lived and worked.” [Appendix A]

ABOUT JEREMY SCOTT:

MULVAGH, J. (1994). Obituary: Franco Moschino. [online] The Independent. ”THE ADJECTIVE ‘witty’, so promiscuously applied to contemporary fashion, can cut two ways. Designers can use it to laugh at or with their clients. Karl Lagerfeld belongs to the former school and Franco Moschino,

Fisher, A. (2014). Jeremy Scott: ‘I try to convey joy in the clothes I design’. [online] the Guardian. “Jeremy Scott’s outlandish outfits are as witty as they are outrageous. Having dressed everyone from Katy Perry to Rihanna, he’s now making over Moschino. Alice Fisher talks to him about the serious business of being pop culture’s most irreverent designer.“ [Appendix C] Widdicombe, L. (2016). Jeremy Scott’s Haute-Kitsch Runway. [online] The New Yorker. “Two years ago, Scott was named the director of the Italian fashion house Moschino, an

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irreverent brand that flourished in the nineteen-eighties but had declined since its founder, Franco Moschino, died of AIDS-related complications in 1994, at fortyfour. Scott’s appointment has made the label relevant again, but for a new audience. Moschino runway shows, in Milan, are happenings. Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, and the K-pop star CL populate the front row, and Scott’s designs tend to include at least one meme-worthy spectacle.“ [Appendix D]


MOSCHINO

ARTICLES: FLACCAVENTO, A. (2018). Moschino Spoofs the Fashion Cycle. [online] The Business of Fashion. “The show’s absurdist commentary on the senseless speed of fashion was fun, but take a step back and the joke is wearing thin at the brand.“ [Appendix E] Chavez, G. (2018). Franco Moschino, a Fashion Radical L’Officiel. [online] Lofficielusa. com. “My approach is a contradiction, I know, but why not? Why should I have to embrace the fashion business just because I work in it? Why should I?” [Appendix F] Petter, O. (2018). This is why the theme of Moschino’s

latest collection is making people furious. [online] The Independent. “Moschino sparks outrage with collection inspired by Trump’s immigration policies. Jeremy Scott has been accused of being insensitive to the current immigration crisis in the US“ [Appendix G] RABKIN, E. (2018). Op-Ed | Ironic Fashion Is Nothing New. [online] The Business of Fashion. “Many fashion commentators have called today’s use of irony “fresh.” But the fact is: irony in fashion is nothing new — what’s new is the rise of the next generation of fashion consumers who may not possess historical knowledge of fashion, and to whom irony seems fresh.” [Appendix H]

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RECENT INTERVIEW WITH JEREMY SCOTT: Maoui, Z. (2018). Exclusive: Jeremy Scott on Cîroc, Moschino and his H&M collaboration. [online] Gq-magazine.co.uk. “For me, fashion is a way of communicating and I have always used my work as a way of communicating. The idea of communicating with people and portraying my message through other medium is a really exciting and seductive thought.“ [Appendix I]


MOSCHINO

BRAND ANALYSIS COMMUNICATION ADVERTISING

Advertisements from 1990s Moschino Campaign- Moschino’s advertising campaigns in the 80s and 90s were used to rebel against luxury and commercialism with wit, imitation and humour and to raise awareness on racism, animal welfare and the AIDS crisis.

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Documentary

Jeremy Scott. The people’s Designer. (2015). Directed by V. Yudin. Vlad Yudin, Edwin Mejia. This documentary portrays Jeremy Scoot’s life as a designer, his view on the fashion industry and his vision for Moschino.

Exhibitions

Moschino’s last show, in October 1993, was a 10-year retrospective that ended with a stage filled with men, women and children dressed in white and red and wearing AIDS ribbons. It was followed by a retrospective exhibition in Milan’s Museo della Permanente called “X Years of Kaos.” First American retrospective at the Mint Museum Uptown in Charlotte, North Carolina, October 2015. The Mint Museum exhibit, which encompasses the designer’s work from 1983 to 1994, includes approximately 40 ensembles and fashion accessories.

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Books

Mariuccia Casadio, Luca Stoppini. (2001) „? Moschino“, Milan: Skira. Designed by Luca Stoppini, art director of the Italian edition of “Vogue,” this book presents the original, multicoloured, extravagant and transgressive fashion universe of Moschino using a decade of scintillating and often provocative shop windows. Moschino, F. and Castelli, L. (1993). Moschino. X anni di kaos!. Milan: Lybra Immagine Immagine. A coffee-table book with the same title and featuring Moschino’s clothing designs, paintings and advertising campaigns was published in Italy by Edizioni Lybra Immagine.

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BRAND ANALYSIS COMMUNICATION PAST INFLUENCERS

Pat Cleveland , now 66 years old,

“catwalk queen!” as she was called for her way of treading the catwalk, was the muse of Franco Moschino in the 80s. Pat Cleveland’s entrance, wearing Moschino’s iconic « Cow » dress (taken from the label’s Autumn/ Winter 1985-1986 collection), at the Moschino 30th anniversarythemed Spring/Summer 2014 Show (titled « For Fashion Victims Only »), she reinterpreted a scene from Carlo Vanzina’s « Nothing Underneath / Sotto il vestito niente » (in 1985, Franco Moschino had set up a show, at the Milano Centrale railway station, which was included in this thriller about a psychopathic murderer who kills top models).

Amalia Vairelli , the Somali beauty

who was the inspiring muse of Yves Saint Laurent for almost 20 years, was chosen by Franco for the Spring/Summer 1990 Fashion Show: her theatrical Vibrancy on the catwalk was memorable while she was parading with the Italian flag dress.

Gisele Zelauy ,

Moschino called her the new look of the 90’s. Her secret to success came from being herself and having fun all the while. Whatever the reason, the International fashion world fell head over heels for her. She wore the dress made with the trash bags of the year 1994. It was no coincidence that Moschino became intrigued by the talented actress Violeta Sanchez , who was the image of the brand for several shots: for the first denim campaign and for the 1988-89 fashion show, where she wore the coat with bears.

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PRESENT INFLUENCERS Jeremy Scott has built a career around a singular brand of popculture alchemy. He`s turning kitsch into fashion - Moschino collections referring on everything from road signs to fast food. Scott’s combatively frisky designs have a passionate following among celebrities such as Miley Cyrus, Madonna, and others, who are wearing his designs for red-carpet looks and concert costumes. He can be seen as the modernday Andy Warhol. He’s not afraid to bring out his inner child. It is no surprise that Katy Perry has been named as the new face of the fashion brand. As a loyal advocate and friend of Scott, she has worn his creations to nearly every red-carpet event. Also, Vincent Devine, famed fashion illustrator of Next Top Model, has created his own version of the campaign image to make the advert even more iconic.

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Inherently non-conformist and sometimes self-involved, this archetype desires freedom of expression and doesn’t like to feel stifled. He explores the heights of imagination through the core of creativity, structuring something into the tangible, in a way to have control in the otherwise uncontrollable world. Fighting to overcome his fear of being unoriginal he develops a point of view facing the criticism. Experimenting with beauty, mixing and matching colours, describes really well this character.

The Creative archetype contributes to society and provides structure to the world by bringing something into being — by realizing a vision. He gets deep satisfaction from both the process and the outcome of creating something that did not previously exist. This archetype trusts in the creative process above all else and lives for authentic self-expression.

THE CREATIVE ARCHETYPE

BRAND IARCHETYPES D E N -T I T Y JOKER AND JESTER MOSCHINO


MOSCHINO

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A character that is known for his fearless personality, who has lived in a powerful evolving society, which supports him in his strong and comprehensive behaviour. This man shows humour but at the same time brings awareness to society on the real and threatening social problems. Distinguishing actions and gaining inspiration for himself out of global problems, makes him stand out among the personalities of the fashion industry. As an individual he is not concerned with what others think: “Unconstrained by social rules and expectations, cavalierly, disregarding the consequences of his behaviour, absence of fear, and destructive.”

• Irreverent, amusing, morphing and ironic • At the same time protesting and criticizing

PAST ARCHETYPE: from JOKER

MOSCHINO

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The Jester is happy, irreverent, sometimes ironic and always willing to break the rules for the sake of fun, like that little devil who couldn’t care less about convention. In our stressed and stressful society, it is a kind of escape route, reminding us of the need to let go and occasionally get a good laugh. Nonetheless, the archetype may be associated with irresponsibility and pranks, which can shake a brand´s reputation if customer services are not taken seriously.

• foolish, marginal, frivolous, low brow

PRESENT ARCHETYPE: to JESTER

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The war, which on the western front took place mainly on the European mainland, saw the role of the United States as a strategic one, supporting the allies with military and humanitarian help. Post 1945 Europe was devastated to ruins, but the US economy boomed. After the war, US companies shifted from producing for military needs to producing consumer goods. In the 1950s US citizens realized that the ‘American Dream’ of settling down in a suburb, with a house and a car was a lifestyle that could be realised, By the end of the century many had made this American Dream come true. The major technological advances, such as the introduction of the credit card, mass manufacturing of ready to wear apparel and the availability of televisions at an affordable cost facilitated this dream. Men were expected to work, while women usually stayed home to take care of housework and children, but also to dress impeccably for social events with their husbands. Looking at women’s fashion, the hourglass silhouettes returned, consuming tons of materials, very different to the rationing of fabrics during the war.

The following analysis touches on the changes in our society from the end of the World War II. till the turn to the 21st century.

PAST

BRAND IARCHETYPES D E N -T ITY JOKER AND JESTER

MOSCHINO

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In the 80s change again took place. It marked the beginning of an era of over-consumption and materialism. Many of the social battles had been fought; some had been won, others forgotten. Now people started caring most about their own personal needs and wishes. This change was catalysed by a new surge of technological improvements, forms of entertainment and advertisements. Televisions had become affordable and common by now. People were watching shows like Dallas, Dynasty and movies like Wall Street, which continuously reinforced the idea of the ‘good life money can buy’ in American consumers’ minds. It became common to follow a celebrity’s lifestyle and

A turning point occurred in the 60s, an era of social and political upheaval in the USA, led by the baby boomers. Advertisers, who had relied on printed media and radio, now had access to new technology to convey their message in a more visual manner through television. Initially, television advertising used catchy slogans and repeated the USP of the product. Soon, advertisers shifted to more creative ways on targeting their clients, often exploiting them by promoting unhealthy products. This led to the consumerism movement that aimed to protect the rights of consumers by imposing more regulations on the advertising content. Other movements from major sectors of society took shape, such as anti-war movements against the Vietnam War. African-Americans fought for their rights, as did homosexuals, promoting race and sexual liberation. Women fought for equality, more work opportunities and the right to vote. Fashion played its part in the social upheaval of the time, in moving from pricey couture to affordable, casual street wear. This change was supported by mass apparel manufacturing, licensing of couture houses on cheap products and plagiarism of haute couture designs from Paris. Music during this time was a mix of folk (which focused on social issues) and rock and roll for teenagers.

MOSCHINO


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Major changes in society took place after the 1980s. Over-consumption and materialism became the norm. These changes can be attributed to overt capitalism, a strong advertising and entertainment industry as well as advancements in technology. A combination of all these factors helped to create material brands for consumers.

There was regular exchange of culture between the US and Europe in music, Hollywood cinema and fashion. Popular music genres during the time were hard rock and punk and nightclubs for these audiences like the Blitz Nightclub, opened everywhere. With the Introduction of the Walkman, portable music. was omnipresent. Advertisements started showing celebrities to promote products and consumers wanted to be right up there with the celebrities, as shown by ‘Madonna’s Material girl.’ Personal computers were now also smaller and affordable. The fashion industry thrived with these changes, Fashion in the 80s, was about excess. Bigger silhouettes, huge amounts of material, excessive make-up, brighter colours were some of the important aspects. Fashion was an important vehicle to show your status in society, another being the automobile. This was a continuous process as technology further developed and the focus shifted from fashion products to fashion brands and other new brands from the tech industry.

find oneself there. MTV allowed people to see bands from all over the world in action, instead of seeing static visuals in magazines or albums. By now, most of the European economies were well off with the US creating consumer markets abroad and selling their products internationally.

MOSCHINO


Our society has known material products and brands, two separate entities for quite a long time. Since the industrial revolution and earlier, trade was common in society and utilitarian products were available for consumption. On the other hand, brands are what we call the manifestation of the human condition, in other words, wherever there is a society brands will exist. It is human nature to associate emotions and status with symbols and words since humans have always lived in clans or tribes. This characteristic is evident in how connected humans are with their countries/ motherland, religion, caste, status etc. since these are all manifestations of the same process we call branding. What had changed after W.W, II is that through technology and advertising, the industry could link these feelings with material goods and project right into the homes of consumers in a more visceral manner using visuals, sounds, moods and emotions. Consumers could satisfy their emotional needs by just buying a product from their nearby store or could feel like a celebrity, by wearing apparel created by the same brand, that that celebrity was wearing. They could easily realise their dreams simply by buying something. This ease of buying your way into a world of happiness was thoroughly exploited by the industries.

It took place in the following manner: 1. Technology supports the mass manufacturing of goods and their distribution all over the world. 2. It also gives rise to new forms of entertainment on television, computers and smartphones, using the Internet and social media. 3. On these same platforms, the advertising industry can link mass manufactured products to the needs, emotions and status of the consumers.

MOSCHINO

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Present society has evolved dramatically since the 80s. The 80s era of materialism and overconsumption still persists today, but with significant changes in the way it manifests itself in current society. Major technological changes, which have since taken place are available and affordable, such as smaller computers, portable cell phones, the use of Internet and social media. These technologies made and make a constant impact on society since they are functional and convey status at the same time. With the Internet, the world became connected on a digital platform, which enabled advertisers to target their clients using this new medium. Social media caught on quickly as it created a new digital society where people could instantly interact with each other without being geographically close. This gave rise to a whole new virtual setting for status and selfexpression. The fashion industry went through some major changes during this time. Since, most of the cultural barriers had been overcome, fashion no longer needed to produce jaw-dropping designs. Everything and anything was accepted in this new world as it became difficult to shock people. Also, focus shifted from the design of the product itself to it´s marketing and branding, a change led by the American fashion brands Tommy Hilfiger, Ralph Lauren and others. They started selling affordable ready to wear products, packaged with an inclination towards status and luxury. Consumers became more obsessed with brands and started identifying with them. Also, self-expression through fashion was no longer the only way to go, fashion brands

PRESENT

BRAND IANALYSIS D E OF NTHE T SOCIETY ITY

MOSCHINO

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1980’s

Wealth and status

Liberation, freedom, individualism

Elegance and prosperity

Fashion brands, orther consumer Status, Beauty, Criticism, brands, social media, blogs, online Environment Awareness, communities Adventure

Fashion designs

1960’s

Post 2000

Fashion designs

ACTIVITY

SELF-EXPRESSION

Post WW II

PERIOD

EXPRESSED

MEDIUM OF

Today, in a highly capitalistic world, we are flooded with advertisements everywhere: on the street, on televisions, while using the Internet and social media platforms, etc. It has become difficult for corporations to create “emotions” through advertising; advertisements are only able to create expectations. The focus has shifted more to creating experiences for people rather than just expectations. Now the product, retail environment, customer service, etc. must create relevant experiences, resonating with their brand identity so that the client will buy and identify with the product. This new shift has forced corporations to be more honest and straightforward towards their consumers.

had competitors in the form of new tech brands for smart phone, pads and laptops as well as social media. Other world-shaking problems such as terrorism and global warming now occupy many in society. Furthermore the millennial generation is so flooded with images, which they do not really understand “surrealism” the way people die before the turn of the century.

MOSCHINO


SEMIOTIC MAPS

BRAND IDENTITY

MOSCHINO

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CONFLICT RESOLUTION MAPS

MOSCHINO

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PAST

JOKER

CLIENT

SURREAL HUMOR

TECHNOLOGY

BRAND I3DD ENTITY BUSINESS MODELS

CRITICISM

OCCASION AND USE

MOSCHINO

060 PAGE NUMBER


PRESENT

JESTER

CLIENT

POP CULTURE

TECHNOLOGY

3D BUSINESS MODELS

ENJOYMENT

OCCASION AND US

MOSCHINO

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062 PAGE NUMBER

Central: Idiosyncratic Expressive: Fun Instrumental: Sarcasm

VALUE:

To use fashion as a tool to reflect ironically on society.

MISSION:

The fashion system victimises society and promotes maniac consumerism.

VISION:

VISIONS, MISSIONS, VALUES

BRAND IDENTITY

PA ST

MOSCHINO


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Central: Pleasure-seeking Expressive: Amusement Instrumental: Playful

VALUE:

To play with the fake-reality in society.

MISSION:

Human experience has become a simulation of reality.

VISION:

PR ES EN T

MOSCHINO


PAST

BENCHMARK AND POSITIONING MAPS

MOSCHINO

064 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

065 PAGE NUMBER


PRESENT

BENCHMARK AND POSITIONING MAPS

MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO

HYPERREALITY AND HYPERREALISM

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MOSCHINO

MOSCHINO’S PROBLEMS Financially, Moschino is very strong since sales are quite high. But sales do not necessarily imply brand loyalty. To study loyalty of consumers to Moschino, a study was conducted to assess the reason why the products are selling. Why is Moschino selling? C O N T E M P O R A R Y NEWS IS ACTING S U B C O N S C I O U S LY ON PEOPLE’S MINDS PEOPLE ARE JUST INTERESTED IN THE FUN, PLAYFUL MANNER THE BRAND IS REPRESENTED

shows and capsule collections but do not show any long term connectivity with the brand. By using the pop culture symbols in a fun and playful way, Jeremy Scott has brought together parts of society by creating a superficial connection. This has led to a large increase in sales, represented by a clientele, which actively participates in the pop culture and whose lives revolve around consumer brands, pop art and self expression. Since, people are interested in the trendy products of Moschino, but not connecting emotionally with the brand, this is a short-term trend.

Based on our research at physical retail environments, it was found out that consumers are very excited about the products when a new collection comes out, but sales are stagnant during rest of the periods. People get excited about colourful, trendy fashion

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MOSCHINO

CONCEPT

Based on the intense analysis of the brand Moschino the concept for the re-merchandising strategy will focus on bringing the brand back to it´s critical roots: so that new issues in our society can be brought to mind and criticised. At the same time, the brand should retain the fun, playful manner that is in the consumer´s perception. The concept will explore the issue of hyperreality that our current society faces and sarcastically criticise this issue by using hyperrealism in order to create an even more successful outlook for the future.

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HYPERREALITY

In our postmodern society, where digital technology is highly advanced and a decisive component in our daily life, the line between „real“ and „fake“ gets more and more blurred. The concept of Hyperreality discusses this contemporary problem in which our consciousness has difficulties distinguishing reality from a simulation of reality. This simulation represents a “reality” non-existent in real life. Hyperreality allows the intermingling of physical reality with virtual reality. Individuals may find themselves for different reasons, more involved with the hyperreal virtual world and less with the physical real world. In our postmodern culture, which is dominated by TV, films, the internet and media, the character on screen may seem “truer” to us than the real person playing a fictitious role. One of the theorists who shaped the definition of Hyperreality is the French sociologist, philosopher and cultural theorists Jean Baudrillard. His book Simulacra and Simulation, published in the mid 1990s furthered the idea that our current society has replaced all reality and meaning with symbols and signs, and that human experience has become a simulation of reality.

MOSCHINO AND THE CONCEPT OF REALITY The brand Moschino has its roots in dealing with the concept of reality. Franco Moschino questioned reality through the idea of Surrealism. Many Surrealists recognized that the representation of an object’s actual appearance in the physical world might more effectively evoke sentiments, if the viewer could understand a deeper, unconscious reality. Franco Moschino took a similar approach, as did surrealist painters (i.e. Rene Magritte) to create hyper-realistic, dreamlike visions that peer into another dimension beyond the tangible. The label Moschino today, under the creative direction of Jeremy Scott employs several contemporary pop culture protagonists of the digital world, such as “Super Mario” or “Sponge Bob”. Additionally, Scott himself and the current brand Moschino are fervent advocates of digital world including social media platforms. If one considers the brand’s roots in dealing with the concept of reality and Moschino`s current development, which is strongly inspired by the pop cultural elements of the digital world (i.e. TV, film, Internet and media), it is evident that the blurring of “fake” and “real” in current society should be discussed. This will be the central aspect for the remerchandising project.

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HYPERREALISM The roots of the art movement “Hyperrealism” can be traced back to the Realism Movement of the late 19th century and the American Photorealists in the late 1960s and early 1970s, who correlate with the development of photography. The goal of the Realist painters was to depict the reality in daily life scenes and thus reject the dominant Romanticism Style of the time. The genre of Photorealism in the third quarter of the 20th century aimed to reproduce a scene as realistically as possible, through the medium of painting, so that the human eye could not distinguish between the original photo and the resulting painting. “Hyperrealism” began in the early 1970s and got its name from the Belgium art dealer Isy Brachot, who hosted an exhibition 1993 in his gallery in Brussels called „L’hyperréalisme“, featuring works by American photorealists. In the following 30 years, this new art movement strived to portray images in an ultra-realistic manner, so that these looked more real than the actual reality, which leads to an almost grotesque representation of reality in art.

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MOSCHINO

HYPERREALISM IN CONTEXT WITH HYPERREALITY

Its strong mission character to make a mark in society and the intellectual approach of Franco Moschino defined the past Moschino. Today the brand’s success is carried by Scott`s incredible ability to capture the “Zeitgeist”, in using popular contemporary icons to win millennials. The concept of hyperreality can be seen in context with the early brand`s intellectual critical approach, while the depiction of a pop culture Image through Hyperrealism visualizes the current Moschino`s success and spirit of the times. By commingling the successful past and present Moschino values the new re-merchandising concept will lead to an even more successful future of the brand. Visually speaking, the art movement „Hyperrealism“ will be used to sarcastically visualize the critique against the concept of Hyperreality. By depicting a pop culture protagonist from the media world (which already seems real to the society) using the art medium of Hyperrealism, the painting figure looks even more real than the actual self. This gives a thought-provoking impulse and questions the blurred vision on “fake” and “real”. This Imagery will dominate the re-merchandising concept of the Pre-Fall 2019 collection and should speak out against the phenomena of Hyperreality.

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MOSCHINO

RE-MERCHANDISING STRATEGY TAILORING The profound analysis on the fashion forecast trends for 2019/2020 has shown that tailoring will emerge in the following years as a long-term trend. The street wear trend will certainly not disappear one second to the next, but it can be considered a short-term trend. Especially for millennials, the tailoring trend will probably become more and more interesting. Quoting Deirdre Reynolds from the “Irish Independent”: “The athleisure trend has slowly gained pace over the past few years. And now top-end designers are saying they’re going to have to rethink how they tailor even the most formal suits and office attire in order to attract young people who are just not used to dressing up.” Moschino is the right brand to catch this opportunity, because the fashion house is strongly rooted in the technique of tailoring, as Franco Moschino focused on tailoring in the 1980/90s. It is now trendy among Millennials. The brands product merchandising in the stores is incoherent with the runway collections. While the runway collection depicts tailored, extravagant pieces, the merchandise being sold in the stores mainly consists of jersey T-Shirts, sweatshirts and basic pieces. This merchandise strategy in the stores offers clients a very narrow range of usable products/of occasion of use. By taking into consideration the tailored archive pieces of Franco Moschino’s past collections and introducing modern tailored products like blazer dresses, oversized suits, blazers, high- waisted pleated trousers, jumpsuits and bermuda shorts Moschino is expanding its palette, so that clients have a wider wearable choice, a perfect mix of street wear and tailoring. Width of collection The trading for the first 8 weeks of the Pre-Fall 19 collection, will consist of 61 ready-to-wear pieces. The decision to trade this number of pieces is based on the following information:

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MOSCHINO

1) Based on background information given by the Sales Assistant in Moschino’s Milan store, clients often seem to be confused by the huge selection offered in the store, which makes the buying decision difficult. The remerchandising strategy will focus on adjusting this. A smaller range of choices, which never-the-less offer diverse styling combinations should be able to drive them down the sales funnel. 2) The overall concept focuses on taking the brand back to its critical roots. The re-merchandising strategy will present a small and very focused collection, which highlights the changes Moschino is going through as a brand. 3) The merchandise for the first 8 weeks of trading will consist of 60 pieces. This number was calculated based on the standard trading period, which is 26 weeks and the past collection, which showed 180 products. [Appendix K] Instead of overwhelming the customer with products and choices, which often remain in the stores for a long period of time, the re-merchandising strategy will focus on several smaller “drop ins” during the season, in order to surprise the customer and make the product more exclusive. The idea of several “drop ins” during the year reflects the shoppers changing interests and will persuade her to visit the store more often. Quoting Lisa Gersh, chief executive of Alexander Wang in an interview with The Wall Street Journal : “Someone coming into the store knows there is going to be something there they didn’t see a month ago, and they´re going to come back” The first “drop” of the Pre-Fall collection will include 35 ready -to -wear pieces. After the first 4 weeks the second drop with 26 pieces will be launched in the stores. The “drop ins” in the stores will be categorised in several “stories”, in order to support the visual merchandising in the stores, to create excitement for the customers and to guide the wholesale buyers through the buying process. The first story has the theme of the hyper realistic Batman world in combination with solid colour pieces, focusing more on light materials like cotton and silk. While, the second drop will depict the check pattern pieces made from heavier materials like wool. Both stories will be supported by the hyper realistic identifier prints.

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MOSCHINO

REFLECTION OF HYPERREALITY AND CRITICISM IN THE PRODUCT MERCHANDISING Since the overall concept focuses on criticising Hyperreality through Hyperrealism and that the brand is being taken back to its critical roots, the product merchandising strategy will focus on increasing the percentage of critical and hyper realistic prints on the products. The theme of the Pre-Fall 2019 Collection will be based on the Batman world in hyper realistic imagery. The Batman world with its protagonists Riddler, Joker, Batman himself and Catwoman as well as the Batman Logo fits perfectly into the Moschino universe, because it embodies the brands archetype (the joker) and identifiers like the question mark (the Riddler). The pop culture characters illustrate the concept of hyper reality.

Fabrics:

The collection will consist of following materials: wool, organic cotton, silk, cashmere, calfskin, polyester and polyamide.

ETHICAL-fabrics

The Pre-Fall 19 collection will also introduce limited pieces made of organic cotton in order to support the emerging sustainability trend and to furthermore call attention to the brand’s history in raising awareness on social issues. The aim is not to be perceived as a sustainable brand, but to have a subliminal effect on consumers that sustainability for Moschino is not a selling tool, but something to be taken for granted. Looking at the McKinsey & BOF study “State of Fashion” 2017, which states that ecosustainable fashion will be one of the 10 megatrends of the fashion industry in the next ten years, we see that Moschino is right there. The report states that “over 65% of consumers in emerging markets, China and India at the top the list, and 32% of consumers in Europe and the United States do active research before their purchases and are interested in sustainable fashion.”

PRICING

The re-merchandising strategy will focus on the same pricing range as previous collections. The products, which are produced from the introduced organic cotton, as well as the printed tailored products will be higher priced, since they are the “story telling” pieces. These “story telling” pieces carry the brand identity of Moschino, and a high price assures that people who share values with Moschino get access to the tribe. They are also constructed with higher quality materials. In general, the collection is divided in 3 pricing categories- entry-level, mid-range and high-end. The price range for each category depends on the category itself. A balanced ratio of all prices are maintained in each category as per the past collection.

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MOSCHINO

CATEGORIES

Moschino’s last AW 18 collection consisted of almost 30 % jersey pieces in street wear style, including dresses, T-Shirts, sweatshirts and sweatpants. According to information given by the Store Assistant in Milan and the advertising strategy on social media platforms, such as Instagram, the jersey pieces have the most selling power in the ready- to- wear category. Regarding the emerging tailoring trend, the merchandise strategy for the Pre-Fall Collection in the stores will focus on the street wear jersey pieces and reintroduce tailored pieces as well as jersey tailored pieces. The collection will still be categorized in Outerwear, Dresses,Trousers,T-Shirts, Knitwear, Blouses/ Tops, Skirts and Fleece wear. Dresses: The category dresses currently makes up the highest percentage of all categories. A new product line with blazer dresses is to be produced following the tailoring trend. Jersey and untailored pieces will be reduced, but not completely eliminated. As an alternative to jerseys, turtleneck dresses (made of polyamide and spandex) will be added in the collection. Outerwear: For jackets, the strategy is to reduce bomber jackets and replace them with tailored double breasted and oversized single-breasted blazers. Trench coats, double-breasted woollen coats and belted oversized coats will also be added. T-Shirts: Based on the information collected from the sales assistant from the Moschino store in Milan, this category is most important for the sale of the brand. In order not to risk the highincome sales, the brand will continue to produce the same amount of printed T-Shirts, which will help support the new tailored pieces. Trousers: The brand will reduce the amount of sweat pants and add pleated trousers, tailored wide trousers and pleated jersey trousers. Shorts: According to fashion forecast trends for 2019/20, shorts will be introduced as a new product category, including tailored knee-lengths bermuda shorts. Skirts: The category skirts, will still focus on the carry over pieces of the last collection, but will introduce some tailored pencil skirts. Jumpsuits: A product category with jumpsuits will be introduced as part of the re-merchandising strategy.The jumpsuits will replace the ballgowns, regarding the Millennials customer need. Knitwear: The knitwear category will be mostly carryovers. Hooded knitwear sweaters and knitwear tops will be introduced. Blouses/tops:This category will mostly be carryovers from the last collections. Fleece wear:The amount of Fleece wear will be generally reduced, but new fleece blazers will be added to the product line.

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MOSCHINO

BUSINESS/ MARKET TRENDS This year fashion companies will need to look at opportunities and not just at surmounting challenges. They must be sensitive to consumer demands in terms of sustainability, customization and “self-disrupt” their own identity and the sources of their old success to realize these changes and win new generations of clients. The following will explore the main trends for 2019: ideas and discussions that will animate the fashion industry for the next year. Digital Era In the fashion industry, a digital transformation process has been underway for a long time working to push an entire economic sector towards a 4.0 dimension. This dimension will be completely focused on direct relationships with customers and, in general, on the implementation of activities by customer relationship management. The digital customer is no longer limited to passive reception of the product and its acceptance, but is affirmative in his positioning of absolute dominance on the market: In short, today’s customer is digital before, during and after the purchase. We can no longer think of separating the strategies of the brand between online and offline as interaction with the public has become fundamental. [Appendix J] Sustainability To dress in a conscious way is undoubtedly the best way to become a responsible consumer. Ethical fashion and eco-sustainable fashion are two such examples. In recent years more and more companies and consumers, who are convinced that respect for the environment and for personal health can also be transported through clothes, have picked up these trends. Fashion is the second most polluting industry in the world and producers have become aware of this. In the fashion industry, the main problems in design and production of “green” products derive from a lack of awareness, which leads to not dealing with sustainability from the earliest stages of development of new products. Another example is the lack of specific tools to evaluate the impact on the environment of materials, colours and printing techniques. The McKinsey & BOF study “State of Fashion” 2017, however, states that eco-sustainable fashion will be one of the 10 megatrends of the fashion industry in the next ten years. But also, that “over 65% of consumers in emerging markets, China and India at the top the list, and 32% of consumers in Europe and the United States do active research before their purchases and are interested in sustainable fashion”. According to the study, about 20% of them could translate this interest into a purchase decision, making sustainability one of the criteria used to choose what to buy and how much they are willing to pay.

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MOSCHINO

Sustainable fabrics: - wool - organic cotton - sustainable viscose - Polypropylene Tailoring The shift to a casual form of dress has been a reaction to the growth of athleisure concepts, a less formal workplace and, consequently, a demand for comfort. Whilst this look remains dominant, as the market has become saturated, it leaves female shoppers wanting something fresh and different. Millennials have been blamed for the adoption of many things, among them package holidays, voicemails, and golf. And now it looks as though they have another takeover in sight: the traditional suit. “The athleisure trend has slowly gained pace over the past few years. Now top-end designers are saying they’re going to have to rethink how to tailor even the most formal suits and office attire in order to attract young people who are just not used to dressing up.”, quoting Deirdre Reynolds from the “Irish Independent. Waking up “The younger generations’ passion for social and environmental causes has now reached the critical masses, forcing brands to become more scope oriented in order to attract both consumers and talent. Consumers will reward players that take a strong stance on social and environmental issues.” quoted from McKinsey & BOF, The State of Fashion 2019 Self-disruption “Self-disruption is the number one trend that fashion executives predict will shape the fashion industry in 2019. Traditional brands are beginning to disrupt their own business models and image, in response to a new breed of small emerging brands that are accelerating due to decreasing brand loyalty and a growing appetite for something new.” Quoted from McKinsey & BOF, The State of Fashion 2019

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MOSCHINO

STRENGTH AND WEAKNESS OF CURRENT AND PAST COLLECTIONS STRENGTHS (PAST COLLECTION) Franco Moschino’s past collections are defined by their originality and creativity. The pieces of the collection communicate a strong message, raising awareness of social issues, without losing their playful, surrealistic touch. By using appliques, logos, slogans, fake fur and striking symbols Franco Moschino’s collections had a strong recognition factor. One of Moschino’s strengths was his use of traditional methods of clothing construction to produce wearable, sexy clothes, which he then subverted with surrealistic elements. Standout colours: - Black - White - Red - Brown - Gold Standout prints (identifiers / symbols): - MOSCHINO logo - Teddy Bear - Chains - Double question mark - Peace motive - Cow print - Heart Symbol - Clouds - Crown - Smiley face Genotypes: - Boucle jacket - Sweetheart neckline dress - Biker leather jacket - White t-shirt with Moschino print Words to describe: • Smooth • Glossy • Sexy • Empowering • Emotional

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MOSCHINO

WEAKNESSES (PAST COLLECTION) The brand spoke out with disregard of consumer wishes. All was based on Franco´s thoughts, not on those of his clients. STRENGTHS (PRESENT COLLECTION) Bringing to the market new designs with colourful garments has created an intense connection between Moschino and the pop culture consumers. A lot of products, especially the fleece wear pieces are available in several colours, which gives the customer a lot of different choices. Some pieces / collections have recreated memories and so seem to be able to evoke a positive state of mind for the consumers. Other pieces / collections evoke immediate understanding and thus create a superficial reaction and recognition. This strategy has immensely boosted the brand’s income, making it a must-have brand. Standout colours: - Black - White - Pink - Orange Standout prints (identifiers / symbols): - MOSCHINO logo - Bear - Chains - Double question mark - Pin - Other logos (Mc Donald’s, Barbie, star wars, etc). Standout best sellers (cloth) - Hoodies - T-shirts - Leather Jackets - Sweatshirt-Dresses WEAKNESSES (PRESENT COLLECTION) Moschino focuses on the short-term trend: casual wear. The pieces of the latest collections do not give clients enough usable or ample opportunity for wear. The variety of fabrics is quite limited and the use of polyester is often not coherent with the high asking price.

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MOSCHINO

COMPETITOR ANALYSIS Moschino’s competitors, like Balenciaga and Vetements are up ahead in following the tailoring trend and already have an ample production of street wear and tailored pieces. Price Points (in Euros)

BRANDS / CATEGORIES

MOSCHINO BALENCIAGA

GIVENCHY

Knitwear

385-695

350-1250

690-1790

-

T-shirts

125-595

295-450

320-790

180-450

Skirts

290-990

695-1290

690-2190

630-1590

430-1020

995-2150

1490-2790

800-2400

285-1200

495-2250

750-990

450-1590

Skirts

450-1300

450-1390

490-2190

570-1450

Dresses

800-1885

1690-4500

1590-9990

1145-2590

Dresses T-shirts

VETEMENTS

The lowest price points for Balenciaga and Givenchy are around 300 Euros. That’s the minimum amount a consumer needs to spend to become a part of the tribe. For Moschino, the minimum price point for t-shirts is 125 Euros, which allows the customer to enter the brand more easily and supports the sales strategy targeting millennials.

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MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO


MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO

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MOSCHINO

Category

No.

Coats

Jackets

Picture

Name

Description

Fabric

Print

Colour

1

Tailored doubleface coat

Single breasted coat features peaked lapels, a front button fastening, long sleeves, front flap pockets and a rear central vent. Features hyperrealistic riddler print all over

Outer: 80 % Viscose; 20% silk Lining: 100 % cupro

Hyperrealistic riddler print

Multi

2

Straight double breasted coat

wool double-breasted coat, front fastening, with long sleeves and front flap pockets, featuring on the backside "Fashion is a riddle only Moschino can solve"

Outer: virgin wool 100% Lining: 100 % cupro

solid

Black

3

Tailored double breasted coat

wool double-breasted coat, front fastening, with long sleeves and peaked lapels

Outer: virgin wool 100% Lining: 100 % cupro

checks

Dark Blue

4

Trenchcoat

5

Belted oversized coat

Belted robe coat, patch pockets, long length, and a straight hem, featuring Question mark print and quote in the back: "Waist of Reality"

Outer: virgin wool 100% Lining: 100 % cupro

Identifier

Light beige

6

Double breasted blazer

Wool double-breasted blazer, classically constructed. This staple piece features peaked lapels, front flap pockets, long sleeves and button cuffs

Outer: 100% virgin wool Lining: 100 % cupro

checks

Dark Green

7

Double breasted blazer

Silk double-breasted blazer, classically Outer: 80 % constructed with Queen of hearts print. Viscose; 20% this staple piece features peaked silk lapels, front flap pockets, long sleeves Lining: 100 % and button cuffs cupro

Hyperrealistic queen of hearts print

Dark Grey

Long trench coat featuring a classic collar and a belted waist, with long 100 % Cotton, Hyperrealistic sleeves and buckle detailing at the water-repellend Batman Print wrists. Featuring hyperrealistic Batman print

0102 PAGE NUMBER

Dark Green


MOSCHINO

Size

Price Euro

Price USD

Price Yen

Price HKD

Price RMB

Entry-Level/ MidRange/ High-End

Drop

IT36-IT48

2300

2622

287270

20562

19987

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

1100

1254

137390

9834

9559

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

1490

1698,6

186101

13320,6

12948,1

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

1890

2154,6

236061

16896,6

16424,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

1395

1590,3

174235,5

12471,3

12122,55

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

1100

1254

137390

9834

9559

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

1545

1761,3

192970,5

13812,3

13426,05

high-end

1

0103 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Dresses

8

Bomber jacket

Twill bomber jacket with hyperrealistic Heart print for the Pre-Collection Fall 19. Classic collar front closure with metal zipper, side pocket and ribbed elastic cuffs

100% Polyamide

Hyperrealistic heart print

Blue

9

Oversized blazer

Oversized Blazer featuring notched lapels, a front button fastening, long sleeves, front flap pockets and a straight hem

Outer: virgin wool 100% Lining: 100 % cupro

Hyperrealistic Batman Print

Mocca

10

Iconic double breasted biker jacket

solid

Light Blue

11

Denim jacket

Moschino Logo print

Blue

12

Belted blazer dress

Quote: "Moschino reality"

Black

13

Blazer dress

biker jacket in calfskin with doublebreasted front closure, Regular fit, Outer: 100 % Collar with lapels, Front closure with Calfskin leather zip and buttons, Two front pockets with Lining: 100 % zip, Patches on cuffs with snap cupro buttons, Front bottom with loops and belt with adjustable buckle

Blue Western denim jacket features a classic collar, a front button fastening, two chest pockets, long sleeves, side pockets and screened Moschino Logo print

100 % cotton

Made from a virgin wool blend, this Outer: Virgin Blazer dress has long sleeves, peaked wool 100 %, lapels, front flap pockets. Quote in the Lining: 100 % back:" Moschino reality" Cupro

Made from light cotton, this Blazer Outer:100 % Hyperrealistic dress has long sleeves, peaked lapels, Cotton Lining: Cat woman front flap pockets. Hyperrealistic Cat 100 % Cupro print woman print

0104 PAGE NUMBER

Orange


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

990

1128,6

123651

8850,6

8603,1

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

1590

1812,6

198591

14214,6

13817,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

1190

1356,6

148631

10638,6

10341,1

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

890

1014,6

111161

7956,6

7734,1

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

890

1014,6

111161

7956,6

7734,1

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

1295

1476,3

161745,5

11577,3

11253,55

high-end

1

0105 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

14

Tube dress in black crĂŞpe, slightly Tailored short dress fitted at the waist by a dark green belt with patent leather in patent leather with metal buckle. belt Regular fit, crew-neck, sleeveless, Rear closure with concealed zip

Outer: 60 % wool, 40 % Polyamide. Lining: 100 % cupro

solid

Black

15

Stretch high neck jersey dress

stretch high-neck jersey dress features a roll neck, long sleeves, an 70 % asymmetric hem and thin panels at the Polyamide, 30 torso. Featuring hperrealistic queen of % Spandex hearts print

Hyperrealistic queen of hearts print

Multi

16

Stretch high neck jersey dress

stretch high-neck jersey dress features a roll neck, long sleeves, an 70 % asymmetric hem and thin panels at the Polyamide, 30 torso. Featuring hperrealistic riddler % Spandex print

Hyperrealistic riddler print

Light Blue

17

Blazer dress

Made from light cotton, this Blazer Outer:100 % dress has long sleeves, peaked lapels, Cotton, Lining: front flap pockets 100 % Cupro

solid

Dark Green

18

Double breasted Double brested blazer dress, featuring check print wool long sleeves and patched pockets blend blazer dress

Outer: 60 % wool, 40 % Polyamide. Lining: 100 % cupro

checks

Light Blue

19

T-Shirt short dress

stretch cotton jersey dress, Oversize fit, ribbed crew-neck, Short sleeves featuring hyperrealistic bear print and stripes in the bottom part

100 % cotton

Hyperrealistic bear print

Brown

20

Hooded short dress

Hooded short dress, Oversize fit, Front kangaroo pocket, ribbed cuffs and bottom, Silver-finish metal details featuring hyperrealistic heart print

100 % cotton

Hyperrealistic heart print

Dark Green

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MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

490

558,6

61201

4380,6

4258,1

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

695

792,3

86805,5

6213,3

6039,55

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

790

900,6

98671

7062,6

6865,1

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

1195

1362,3

149255,5

10683,3

10384,55

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

795

906,3

99295,5

7107,3

6908,55

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

395

450,3

49335,5

3531,3

3432,55

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

395

450,3

49335,5

3531,3

3432,55

entry-level

2

0107 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

T Shirts

21

T-Shirt short dress

stretch cotton jersey dress, Oversize fit, ribbed crew-neck, Short sleeves featuring hyperrealistic cat woman print

100 % cotton

Hyperrealistic Batman print

White

22

Hooded short dress

Hooded short dress, Oversize fit, Front kangaroo pocket, ribbed cuffs and bottom, Silver-finish metal details featuring hyperrealistic peace sign print

100 % cotton

Hyperrealistic Peace sign

Dark Blue

23

Double breasted check print wool blend blazer dress

Double brested blazer dress, featuring long sleeves and patched pockets

Outer: 60 % wool, 40 % Polyamide. Lining: 100 % cupro

check, Hyperrealistic Riddler

Light Purple

Teddy bear t-shirt

Brown t-shirt with blue and white stripe in the bottom in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic Teddy print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Bear identifier

Brown

25

Real heart t-shirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic heart print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Heart identifier

White

26

Batman t-shirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic batman print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Hyperrealistic Batman print

White

27

Question mark tshirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic question mark print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Questionmark identifier

Lavender

28

Queen of hearts tshirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic queen of heart print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Queen of Hearts identifier

White

24

0108 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

345

393,3

43090,5

3084,3

2998,05

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

395

450,3

49335,5

3531,3

3432,55

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

795

906,3

99295,5

7107,3

6908,55

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

180

205,2

22482

1609,2

1564,2

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

180

205,2

22482

1609,2

1564,2

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

470

535,8

58703

4201,8

4084,3

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

145

165,3

18110,5

1296,3

1260,05

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

180

205,2

22482

1609,2

1564,2

entry-level

2

0109 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

29

Riddler t-shirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic riddler print on the front. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Hyperrealistic Batman print

White

30

Catwoman t-shirt

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Hyperrealistic catwoman print on the left sleeve. Regular fit Ribbed crewneck Short sleeves

100% Cotton

Hyperrealstic Catwoman print

White

White t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Batman team t-shirt Hyperrealistic batman team print on 100% Cotton the left sleeve. Regular fit Ribbed crewneck Short sleeves

Hyperrealistic Batman world print

White

31

Trousers

32

Pleated trouser

Pleated wool Trousers, high waisted, featuring two front pockets, belt loops

Outer:100 % wool, Lining: 100 % cupro

checks

Green

33

Wide-leg trouser

Pleated wide-leg black trousers, crafted from cotton and features front pleats

Outer:100 % wool, Lining: 100 % cupro

Hyperrealistic Batman print

Black

34

Pleated trouser jersey

Pleated jersey trousers, high waisted, featuring two front pockets

100 % cotton

solid

Grey

35

Culotte trouser

Tailored culottes, crafted from a wool Outer: Viscose blend, they feature a side zip fastening, 85 %, wool 15 Moschino Logo belt loops, two front pockets and a %, Lining: 100 print flared style % Cupro

0110 PAGE NUMBER

Rose


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

325

370,5

40592,5

2905,5

2824,25

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

325

370,5

40592,5

2905,5

2824,25

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

325

370,5

40592,5

2905,5

2824,25

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

595

678,3

74315,5

5319,3

5170,55

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

890

1014,6

111161

7956,6

7734,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

385

438,9

48086,5

3441,9

3345,65

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

675

769,5

84307,5

6034,5

5865,75

mid-range

2

0111 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Skirts

Knitwear

36

Wide-leg trouser

High-waisted suit trousers feature belt loops, a button and zip fly, side slit pockets, rear welt pockets, a wide leg and a long length

100 % cotton

solid

Orange

37

Pleated trouser

Tailored pleated trousers, high waisted, tappered leg featuring Queen of Hearts print

Outer: 60 % viscose, 40 percent silk, Inner: 100 % cupro

Hyperrealistic Queen of Hearts print

Multi

38

A-line short skirt

Virgin wool blend, this a-line short skirt from Moschino features a high waist, front zipped pockets, an a-line shape, a rear zip fastening and a short length.

Outer: 75% Wool, 25% polyamide. Lining: 100 % cupro

Hyperrealistic Batman print

Light Green

39

Leather pencil skirt

unprinted

Grey

40

Woolen pencil skirt

Virgin wool pencil skirt, button front fastening and two front pockets

Outer:100 % wool, Lining: 100 % cupro

checks

Dark Green

41

Denim skirt

Fitted leather pencil skirt, featuring a slash in the back and Moschino logo

Outer:100 % wool, Lining: 100 % cupro

Moschino Logo print

Dark Blue

42

Merino wool sweater with modified Moschino batman logo print

Made of the finest merino wool, this sweater is decorated all over by modified new Moschino batman logo on the front with print "For real!". Oversize fit Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom

100% Pure Wool

Moschino Logo and Quote

Black

43

Cotton pullover with modified Moschino batman logo print

100% Cotton

Moschino Logo

Grey

Outer: 100 % Fitted leather pencil skirt, featuring a Calfskin leather, slash in the back and Moschino logo Lining: 100 % cupro

Made in pure cotton, the antique pink pullover is embellished by the modified Moschino batman logo print with "Reality". Oversize fit ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom

0112 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

340

387,6

42466

3039,6

2954,6

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

990

1128,6

123651

8850,6

8603,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

595

678,3

74315,5

5319,3

5170,55

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

1100

1254

137390

9834

9559

high-end

2

IT36-IT48

390

444,6

48711

3486,6

3389,1

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

390

444,6

48711

3486,6

3389,1

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

375

427,5

46837,5

3352,5

3258,75

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

395

450,3

49335,5

3531,3

3432,55

entry-level

1

0113 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

blouses/tops

Fleecewear

44

Hooded knitwear sweater

45

Plaited sleeveless Sweater in plaited-knit wool blend, knit turtleneck featuring a Turtleneck and a relaxed fit sweater

46

Knitted turtleneck blouse

47

48

49

50

50% wool, Hyperrealistic 50% cashmere Batman print

Beige

60 % wool, 40 % cotton

Hyperrealistic Catwoman print

White

Knitted blouse features a turtle neck, short sleeves, a ribbed hem and cuffs, a logo to the chest and a slim fit.

100 % wool

Questionmark print

Orange

Jersey blouse

Fitted jersey blouse with front button fastening and long sleeves

100 % cotton

solid

Light Green

Flared hem shirt

Flared hem shirt showcasing an asymmetric style, a classic collar, a front button fastening, long sleeves, button cuffs, a pleated design and a rear buckle fastening.

80 % cotton, 20 % silk

solid

Black

100 % cotton

solid

Light Purple

Hyperrealistic bear print

Grey

Knitted hooded pullover, V neck, wide

Short cotton sweatshirt with hood, Short hooded zipper featuring Metal front zip closure, ribbed sweatshirt sleeve hem and metal details.

Double breasted blazer

Jersey double-breasted blazer, Outer: 100 % classically constructed, with Jersey Cotton, hyperrealistic bear print, features Lining: 100% peaked lapels, front flap pockets, long Cupro sleeves and button cuffs

0114 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

890

1014,6

111161

7956,6

7734,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

695

792,3

86805,5

6213,3

6039,55

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

590

672,6

73691

5274,6

5127,1

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

595

678,3

74315,5

5319,3

5170,55

mid-range

1

IT36-IT48

490

558,6

61201

4380,6

4258,1

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

450

513

56205

4023

3910,5

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

690

786,6

86181

6168,6

5996,1

mid-range

2

0115 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Shorts

Jersey sweatshirt, regular fit, Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom, featuring 100 % organic hyperrealistic Riddler print. Backside: cotton "Fashion is a riddle only Moschino can solve"

51

Crew-neck sweatshirt

52

Hooded sweatshirt

Jersey hooded sweatshirt featuring Oversize fit, Question mark print, two side pockets, ribbed cuffs and bottom, metal details

53

Belted jersey blazer

Crafted from jersey, features narrow lapels, long sleeves and a fitted silhouette

100 % cotton

Peace sign print

Dark Grey

54

High waisted bermuda shorts

Tailored shorts featuring a knee length and a high rise, two front pockets

Outer: Wool 100%, Lining: 100 % Cupro

solid

Mocca

55

Pleated bermuda shorts

Pleated tailored shorts featuring a knee Outer: Wool length and a high rise, two front 100%, Lining: pockets 100 % Cupro

Hyper reality print

Green

56

Pleated high waisted bermuda shorts

Tailored shorts featuring a knee length and a high rise, two front pockets

solid

Black

57

Pleated bermuda shorts

Pleated tailored shorts featuring a knee Outer: Wool length and a high rise, two front 100%, Lining: pockets 100 % Cupro

Hyperrealistic bear print

Light Purple

0116 PAGE NUMBER

Hyperrealistic Riddler print

Black

100 % organic Question mark cotton print

White

Outer: 100 % cotton. Lining: 100 % cupro


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

990

1128,6

123651

8850,6

8603,1

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

990

1128,6

123651

8850,6

8603,1

high-end

2

IT36-IT48

745

849,3

93050,5

6660,3

6474,05

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

345

393,3

43090,5

3084,3

2998,05

entry-level

1

IT36-IT48

575

655,5

71817,5

5140,5

4996,75

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

390

444,6

48711

3486,6

3389,1

entry-level

2

IT36-IT48

575

655,5

71817,5

5140,5

4996,75

mid-range

1

0117 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Jumpsuits

Outer: Wool 100%, Lining: 100 % Cupro

58

High waisted bermuda shorts

Tailored shorts featuring a knee length and a high rise, two front pockets

59

Heart neckline jumpsuit

Black fitted evening Jumpsuit, sleeveless, featuring Question mark print

60% Silk, 40% Question mark Viscose print

Black

60

Tie jumpsuit

Evening sleeveless blazer style jumpsuit featuring a heart neckline, notched lapels, decorative buttons, fitted silhouette, long length and rear pockets

60% Silk, 40% Viscose

solid

Rose

61

Midnight blue crĂŞpe satin wrap jumpsuit

Evening jumpsuits , featuring long sleeves and wrap details

100 % silk

Hyperrealistic Batman print

Dark Blue

0118 PAGE NUMBER

checks

Dark Blue


MOSCHINO

IT36-IT48

595

678,3

74315,5

5319,3

5170,55

mid-range

2

IT36-IT48

2585

2946,9

322866,5

23109,9

22463,65

high-end

1

IT36-IT48

2500

2850

312250

22350

21725

high-end

2

IT36-IT48

2985

3402,9

372826,5

26685,9

25939,65

high-end

1

0119 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGTH

WEAKNESSES

-Strong heritage of raising awareness on social issues. - Financially sound. -Playful Brand image. -Use of pop culture elements, which connect with millenials.

- Disconnect between runway collection and collection in the stores. - Currently not preceived as a mission brand.

OPPORTUNITIES - To become a mission brand for the new generation, which is increasingly becoming aware of the social issues in society. -Tailoring trend rooted in the DNA of the brand.

THREATS -Competitors might have a stronger influnce on raising awareness on social issues. - Projected global economic slowdown might reduce consumer spending power.

0120 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

BIBLIOGRAPHY Baudrillard, J. (1994). Simulacra and simulation. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Busch, D., Klanten, R. and Hellige, H. (2013). The age of collage. Berlin: Gestalten. Casadio, M. Stoppini, L. (2001) „? Moschino“, Milan: Skira. Chomsky, N. (2015). How the world works. [S.l.]: PENGUIN USA. Craig, B. (2009). Collage. Assembling Contemporary Art. London: Black Dog Publishing. Harari, Y. (2017). Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. New York: HarperCollins. Millman, D. (2013). Brand thinking and other noble pursuits. NEW YORK: Allworth Press. Moschino, F. and Castelli, L. (1993). Moschino. X anni di kaos!. Milan: Lybra Immagine Immagine. Steele, V., Menkes, S. and Nippoldt, R. (2012). The Collection of the Museum at FIT. Fashion Designers. Cologne: Taschen America Llc. Watson, L. (2015). Fashion Visionaries. London: Laurence King Publishing.

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SITOGRAPHY Adhav, L. (2018). Jeremy Scott’s “Illegal Alien” Ad Campaign Featuring Gigi Hadid Gets Backlash. [online] Cosmopolitan. Available at: https:// www.cosmopolitan.com/style-beauty/fashion/a21946259/jeremy-scottmoschino-illegal-alien-ad-campaign-controversy/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Aeffe.com. (n.d.). Aeffe Group. [online] Available at: http://www.aeffe. com/home.php [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Álvarez, P. (2019). Milan Fashion Week 2018: | Moschino Primavera Verano 2019. [online] Telva.com. Available at: http://www.telva.com/pasarelas/ milan-fashion-week/album/2018/09/20/5ba3fb0b01a2f14ba88b45fb. html [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Anon, (2018). [online] Available at: https://trends.google.es/trends/ explore?q=moschino&geo=ES [Accessed 21 Nov. 2018]. Balkhi, S. (2018). 3 Digital Marketing Trends to Look Out For in 2019. [online] Business 2 Community. Available at: https://www. business2community.com/digital-marketing/3-digital-marketingtrends-to-look-out-for-in-2019-02141075 [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Berg, B. and Amed, I. (2019). [online] Cdn.businessoffashion.com. Available at: https://cdn.businessoffashion.com/reports/The_State_ of_Fashion_2019.pdf [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Bredekamp, H. and Maria Stafford, B. (2006). One step beyond. [online] Tate.org.uk. Available at: https://www.tate.org.uk/contextcomment/articles/one-step-beyond [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. CELENTANO, R. (2018). Cosa indosseremo il prossimo inverno? Ecco qualche anticipazione dalle passerelle. [online] Snap Italy. Available at: https://www.snapitaly.it/tendenze-moda-2019/ [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Chavez, G. (2018). Franco Moschino, a Fashion Radical - L’Officiel. [online] Lofficielusa.com. Available at: https://www.lofficielusa.com/ fashion/franco-moschino-a-fashion-radical [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019].

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De Lacerda, M. (2016). How to Work the Jester Archetype. [online] Project M London. Available at: http://projectmlondon.com/ en/2016/09/08/archetypes-the-jester/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019] Ewald, J. (2017). The Joker: A Character Study of a Modern Madman. [online] Rc.library.uta.edu. Available at: https://rc.library.uta. e d u /u t a - i r / b i t s t re a m / h a n d l e / 1 0 1 0 6 /2 6 8 5 3 / E WA L D -T H E S I S - 2 0 1 7. pdf ?sequence=1&isAllowed=y [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Fisher, A. (2014). Jeremy Scott: ‘I try to convey joy in the clothes I design’. [online] the Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian. com/fashion/2014/sep/14/jeremy-scott-fashion-designer-moschino [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Flaccavento, A. (2018). Moschino Spoofs the Fashion Cycle. [online] The Business of Fashion. Available at: https://www.businessoffashion. com/articles/fashion-show-review/moschino-spoofs-the-fashioncycle [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Gosalves, R. (2014). Moschino 30 years on: Italy’s most light-hearted label enters a new. [online] The Independent. Available at: https:// www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/features/moschino-30years-on-italys-most-light-hearted-label-enters-a-new-era-9141670. html [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Harris, Z. (2018). Why this new Moschino campaign has caused upset. [online] Harper’s BAZAAR. Available at: https://www.harpersbazaar. co m /u k /f a s h i o n /f a s h i o n - n ews /a 2196 19 75 / j e re my- s co tt- m o s c h i n o alien-nation/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. HYPERREALITY. (n.d.). Jean Baudrillard. [online] Available at: http:// enterhyperreality.weebly.com/jean-baudrillard.html [Accessed 5 Jan. 2019]. Italiana, C. (2012). THE HISTORY OF ITALIAN FASHION: MOSCHINO • Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana. [online] Cameramoda.it. Available at: https://www.cameramoda.it/en/associazione/news/920/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Lansroth, B. (2015). Hyperrealism in Art - Ultimately, Is it Art or

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Skill?. [online] Widewalls. Available at: https://www.widewalls.ch/ hyperrealism-art-style/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Matthew, S. (2017). Obsessed With Icons, Jeremy Scott Becomes One. [online] Nytimes.com. Available at: https://www.nytimes. com/2017/02/22/fashion/jeremy-scott-moschino-in-the-studio-milanfashion-week.html [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Mann, J. (2016). Surrealism. [online] Artsy. Available at: https://www. artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-what-is-surrealism [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Maoui, Z. (2018). Exclusive: Jeremy Scott on CÎroc, Moschino and his H&M collaboration. [online] Gq-magazine.co.uk. Available at: https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/jeremy-scott-ciroc-moschino [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. McFarland, J. (2018). Interview: Jeremy Scott on hard work, social media and the H&M Moschino collection. [online] Thetimes.co.uk. Available at: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/interview-jeremyscott-on-the-good-side-of-social-media-and-the-new-h-m-moschinocollection-8c7sgwdkh [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Mulvagh, J. (1994). Obituary: Franco Moschino. [online] The Independent. Available at: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/ people/obituary-franco-moschino-1450166.html [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Petter, O. (2018). This is why the theme of Moschino’s latest collection is making people furious. [online] The Independent. Available at: https://www.independent.co.uk/lifestyle/fashion/moschino-gigi-hadid-alien-nation-collection-jeremyscott-trump-immigration-us-a8419101.html [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Pike, N. (2015). Why Is Everyone So Crazy About Moschino?. [online] Vogue.co.uk. Available at: https://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/moschinoa-fashion-history-jeremy-scott [Accessed 22 Nov. 2018]. Professionaldatagest.it. (2018). [online] Available at: https://www. professionaldatagest.it/news/fashion-digital-3-trends-per-il-2019/

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[Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. RABKIN, E. (2018). Op-Ed | Ironic Fashion Is Nothing New. [online] The Business of Fashion. Available at: https://www.businessoffashion. com/articles/opinion/op-ed-ironic-fashion-is-nothing-new [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Rasool, A. (2018). Jeremy Scott Is Getting Called Out for Making Moschino’s “Alien Nation” Campaign About “Illegal” Immigration. [online] Teen Vogue. Available at: https://www.teenvogue.com/story/ jeremy-scott-moschino-alien-nation-campaign [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Reynolds, D. (2018). Suitably slouchy: How millennials are reinventing tailoring - Independent.ie. [online] Independent.ie. Available at: https://www.independent.ie/style/fashion/style-talk/suitablyslouchy-how-millennials-are-reinventing-tailoring-37401308.html [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. STEFF, Y. (2019). The Top Trends of Pre-Fall 2019. [online] Vogue. Available at: https://www.vogue.com/article/pre-fall-2019-fashiontrend-report [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Griffin, E. (2018). Fashion retail: Tactical tailoring - WGSN Insider reports. [online] WGSN Insider. Available at: https://www.wgsn.com/ blogs/tactical-tailoring/ [Accessed 20 Jan. 2019]. Schiro, A. (1994). Franco Moschino, 44, Is Dead; Designer Known for Irreverence. [online] Nytimes.com. Available at: https://www.nytimes. com/1994/09/20/obituaries/franco-moschino-44-is-dead-designerknown-for-irreverence.html [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Taggart, E. (2018). The Evolution of Hyperrealism: From Religious Paintings to Simulated Reality. [online] My Modern Met. Available at: https://mymodernmet.com/hyperrealism-history/ [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019]. Todorova, D. (2018). H&M Moschino Collaboration Is Now Available To Shop. [online] COOLS. Available at: https://cools.com/hm-moschinocollaboration-fall-2018/ [Accessed 22 Nov. 2018]. Widdicombe,

L.

(2016).

Jeremy

Scott’s

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Runway.


MOSCHINO

[online] The New Yorker. Available at: https://www.newyorker.com/ magazine/2016/03/21/jeremy-scotts-new-moschino [Accessed 22 Nov. 2018]. W. Wolny, R. (2017). Hyperreality and Simulacrum: Jean Baudrillard and European Postmodernism. [online] Journals.euser.org. Available at: http://journals.euser.org/files/articles/ejis_may_aug_17/Ryszard. pdf [Accessed 10 Jan. 2019].

APPENDIX APPENDIX A Franco Moschino, 44, Is Dead; Designer Known for Irreverence By ANNE-MARIE SCHIRO SEPT. 20, 1994 Franco Moschino, the Italian designer known for bringing humor and irreverence to fashion, died on Sunday in a country house he had rented in Annone, Italy, outside Milan, where he lived and worked. He was 44. The cause of death was cardiac arrest associated with complications from an abdominal tumor, said Marco Gobbetti, the general manager of the Moschino fashion house. His last show, in October 1993, was a 10-year retrospective that ended with a stage filled with men, women and children dressed in white and wearing AIDS ribbons. It was followed by a retrospective exhibition in Milan’s Museo della Permanente called “X Years of Kaos.” A coffeetable book with the same title and featuring Moschino’s clothing designs, paintings and advertising campaigns was published in Italy by Edizioni Lybra Immagine. Mr. Moschino was as much social commentator as designer, delighting in ridiculing the excesses of the 1980’s with whimsical appliques, logos and slogans. His humor often took the form of outrageous sendups of fashion icons like the Chanel suit, which he once parodied by embroidering the words “This is a Waist of Money” where the traditional gold chain belt would have been. “He put humor into fashion, but at a high-quality level,” said Kalman

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Ruttenstein, the vice president for fashion direction at Bloomingdale’s, which has an in-store Moschino boutique. “The Moschino style was established in a few short years and is easily recognized the world over.” The designer himself became easily recognized after his mustached, crew-cut image was used in advertising campaigns that pictured him in a variety of guises including Popeye, a Mafioso, a child and a transvestite. Strongly influenced by the Surrealist art movement of the 1920’s, Mr. Moschino was known to decorate a dinner suit with real cutlery, to use dozens of miniature teddy bears as a hat and scarf, to fashion the bodice of a strapless dress totally of gold safety pins and to make a skirt that was nothing but vertical rows of zippers. He covered the backs of jackets with images like a pair of women’s eyes or an oversize playing card. He once showed a man’s white shirt with exaggeratedly long sleeves that were wrapped around the body to simulate a straitjacket. On the back were the words “For Fashion Victims Only.” He also made totally wearable, well-cut suits and dresses that he showed with wildly crazy hats fashioned like a bishop’s miter, an airplane, a giant light bulb or an assemblage of life preservers. “I’m not a fashion designer,” Mr. Moschino was quoted as saying in a 1991 article in The New York Times. “I’m a painter; a decorator. I’m not the author of a new era.” He indeed was a painter and fashion illustrator before taking his first job as a designer in 1976 for an Italian ready-to-wear company called Cadette. He formed his own women’s fashion business in 1983. Lacking dressmaking technique, he sketched ideas for his staff to execute. The business grew to include men’s wear, leather goods, jewelry, shoes and perfume. He first attracted attention by putting on wildly theatrical fashion shows that might have had circus performers appearing on stage with the models or dozens of models waving huge Italian flags as a finale. He once interrupted a fashion show and ushered the models offstage, leaving the audience waiting for the show to resume; it didn’t. Mr. Moschino was born in Abbiategrasso, an industrial town 14 miles from Milan, where his family owned an iron foundry. He was buried yesterday in a family plot in the town cemetery. His survivors include his mother, Pinuccia, and his brother, Angelo, both of Abbiategrasso.

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APPENDIX B Obituary: Franco Moschino JANE MULVAGH Wednesday 21 September 1994 00:02 Franco Moschino, fashion designer; born Abbiategrasso, Italy 27 February 1950; died Brianza, Italy 18 September 1994. THE ADJECTIVE ‘witty’, so promiscuously applied to contemporary fashion, can cut two ways. Designers can use it to laugh at or with their clients. Karl Lagerfeld belongs to the former school and Franco Moschino, mercifully, to the latter. When one thinks of Moschino’s clothes, one thinks of words - puns and rubrics. A jacket with ‘Waist of Money’ printed along the waistband. ‘A shirt for fashion victims only’ embroidered across a garment with 10ft sleeves; ‘I’m full of shirt’ on another. A camel- hair coat, with a camel and the words ‘hair coat’ stitched on its back. A little black dress printed with a goose and captioned ‘I Love Fashion’. Moschino was a spin doctor and stylist rather than a designer. He experimented with the messages and symbols applied to a fairly classic array of garments rather than inventing new shapes or fabrics in the way that, for example, Issey Miyake does. Moschino belonged to that long line of stylists who use fashion as protest. But rather than protesting against the Vietnam war (Yves Saint Laurent), the Establishment (Vivienne Westwood), environmental abuse (Katherine Hamnett) or even that vainglorious act of gesture politics the Gulf war (Valentino), he protested against the fashion system and its manic consumerism. His styles were the clothing industry’s equivalent of viral streptococcus, the body devouring itself. Brought up in Italy, as a boy Moschino loved to go into his father’s iron foundry late at night and draw crazy images in the deposits of dust that clung to the walls. His father hoped that he would join the family business but Franco insisted on studying fine art instead. He ran away to Milan and enrolled at the Accademia di Belle Arti where he studied from 1968 to 1971, supplementing his student budget with design and illustration commissions for fashion houses and magazines. On graduating, he worked as a sketcher for Versace from 1971 to 1977 and as a designer for Cadette until 1982. In 1983 he established his own label. On a technical level, he was an excellent cutter and the silhouettes he created were flattering. Moschino’s reference library,

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according to his assistant and friend Lida Castelli, was the street rather than books, films and art galleries. ‘He kept his eyes open and was very sensitive, watching all the time,’ she recalls. The Eighties were the dizzy heyday of high fashion’s diffusion. In a two-way frenzy fashion sped up from the street and down from the large clothing empires. It was disseminated overnight from the fashion capitals down the ranks and across the globe. Marshall McLuhan’s global village was epitomised by fashion’s long, long reach. Stretching from the Third World, where it was manufactured and plagiarised, to every provincial town in the West, where it was voraciously consumed, fashion became the popular culture. With Warholian opportunism it was marketed with the evangelising credo: ‘If I’ve got the jacket I too can live the lifestyle.’ A reaction was inevitable and Moschino voiced that dissent. Not only did his clothes question what became known as the fashion system - the ludicrous cost, ubiquitous ‘styling’, and 15-minute relevance but his very advertising underscored his anarchic scepticism. Flicking through glossy magazines your eye would suddenly be arrested by Moschino’s black humour. A full-page advertisement depicted a vampire admonishing you, ‘Stop The Fashion System]’ The irony of this protest was that it too became fashion: gobbled up by that giant that sees, takes, makes fleetingly fashionable, devours and throws away. By the time the Princess of Wales, that inveterate fashion shopper, had donned a Moschino, one wondered whether the whole thing had backfired. Did it make sense to question a money-making consumerism by selling fashion to the very victims that you claimed to be weaning off the fashion drug? His supporters, mainly those in and on the fringes of the style world, pop stars, actors and the visually literate service industry, supposed that by donning Moschino they ‘got the joke’; that they had somehow side-stepped the system. They had still had to pay for the joke, and an expensive one at that. And does a mass-manufactured joke, repeated many thousands of times across the world, make the wearer seem such a witty anarchist? It was clever, it was heartfelt, it hit a contemporary nerve which made it eminently fashionable and perhaps, in some small way, it fuelled the questioning which, along with recession, consumer overload and the environmental problems, led to the sobriety of the Nineties. This season every Moschino garment is sold with a letter from him. It is a manifesto and reads: ‘all human, racial, religious, and last but

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not least, environmental values have been destroyed’. He goes on to announce that environmental concern is ‘the only true and honest Fashion Trend’ and cites ways in which his production processes have taken this into account. One hopes that such conscience- prickers have a lasting effect, beyond their own, and in Moschino’s case short, lifespan.

APPENDIX C Jeremy Scott: I try to convey joy in my clothes Alice Fisher Jeremy Scott’s outlandish outfits are as witty as they are outrageous. Having dressed everyone from Katy Perry to Rihanna, he’s now making over Moschino. Alice Fisher talks to him about the serious business of being pop culture’s most irreverent designer “I think it was a bad move,” says designer Jeremy Scott in a grave tone. “The cargo trousers and vest are a very sterile combination – he should have stayed classic.” Scott, new creative director of the Italian house of Moschino, 39-yearold esteemed member of the fashion industry and go-to costumier for the pop world’s elite, is discussing the unsuccessful makeover of a cultural icon. “I wish they’d called me,” he says sadly. “That would have been a savvy PR move.” The style transformation under discussion is that of Ronald McDonald, the clown who’s acted as mascot for the world’s most popular burger chain since 1963. In April this year he gave up his traditional costume (created by performer Coco the Clown in 1966) for a more utilitarian uniform. This is not a fashion move you could discuss with many designers – it’s hard to imagine Miuccia Prada giving two hoots – but Jeremy Scott has a vested interest. In February at his debut Moschino show in Milan, he kept the audience waiting for an hour before sending out a collection about fast food and fast fashion. There were sweaters emblazoned with morphed McDonald’s arches, bags that looked like Happy Meal boxes and a dress patterned with a Fritos crisp bag. It really annoyed a lot of people. Some newspapers reported that McDonald’s employees

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felt humiliated by the collection. Others ruminated on the perils of glamourising fast food. One report even began by saying that while the Moschino show unfolded Kiev was burning (the show was held as the Ukrainian revolution started). Despite this, the capsule range of 10 items from the show which went on sale the next day instantly sold out (the full collection launches this month). The designs have already been worn by Katy Perry, Beyoncé and Miley Cyrus. It’s fair to say that he started at Moschino not with a whimper but a bang. “McDonald’s is part of our everyday lives,” says Scott when we meet for breakfast at Claridges in London four months later. “When I design I always pull from things that are significant to me. In my work I search for happiness and then try to convey that joy in the clothes.” An answer which doesn’t explain if he was making fun of the poor who wear these clothes toiling in the fast-food industry or the rich who pay to wear his luxe versions of them. When we eat together he orders a six-egg-white omelette with spinach because he’s a devout vegetarian, so I can’t imagine that he orders many Big Macs. But that doesn’t mean that Scott is wrong or even insincere to riff on junk food in his collection. It is a part of everyday life. He says he doesn’t like to over-analyse things. Fair enough: there are plenty of fashion editors happy to do that for him. “I’m not anti-intellectual, but primarily I try to feel things. Emotions aren’t always rational; it’s not possible to put them into words.” Being led by his feelings has worked well for Scott. Though his name might not trip off the tongue as easily as, say, Alexander McQueen or John Galliano, he burst on to the 90s fashion scene around the same time as these designers and quickly established himself as one of the terriblest of the era’s enfants. He was raised in Missouri, the youngest of three children, with a civil engineer and a teacher for parents. He says he always knew he wanted to be part of fashion. “I was enthralled by it. That was where I wanted to be, in the pages of fashion magazines.” He trained at the Pratt School of Design in New York and then booked a flight to Paris as soon as he graduated in 1996. Like many of Scott’s decisions, this was part grand design, part impulse. Though he’d had French lessons since he was 14 – because he was determined to make it in fashion’s capital – he had no firm plan. But soon after he arrived he bumped into a PR for Jean Paul Gaultier in the street who liked his hair (an asymmetric mohawk he’d styled himself, he’s cut his own hair since

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he was five) and who introduced him to all the right people. He got a job promoting parties at the Folies Pigalle nightclub and quickly became a face on the Paris scene. His first fashion collection came in 1997. Held in a bar near the Bastille, it was themed around car crashes. Models wore paper hospital gowns and shoe heels bandaged to their feet. His reputation grew with each collection. He sent bin-bag dresses, four-armed jumpers and wonky heels down the catwalk. Scott closed one show by throwing fake banknotes with his face printed on them into the audience. In case anyone failed to get the message, at the close of another show, he shouted: “Vive l’avant garde!”, and left yellow T-shirts stamped with the message on every seat. His work was equally praised and hated, but whatever your opinion he became a superstar. Devoted fans followed him down the boulevards when he walked through Paris; he was always on TV. Karl Lagerfeld told Le Monde that Scott was the only designer who could replace him at Chanel. Then in 2001 he announced that he was quitting Paris for Los Angeles. At the time that was like turning down Glastonbury to play Guildford summer festival. Even his admirers were annoyed. “It was the hardest decision I ever had to make in my life because it didn’t make sense. I remember when I told Anna Wintour, she said: ‘You mean New York.’ Well, the word LA just came out of my mouth, so… Her face just scrunched and she said: ‘Why?’ I feel vindicated today: the city has become so important for fashion. That’s why I should follow my instincts.” Does he ever miss Paris and the adoration he basked in there? “Never. Not at all. I still go there every six months for work anyway, so I get to have a nice croissant. They’re very good at croissants.” So while John Galliano was lauded at Dior and Alexander McQueen turned his label into an international brand through a deal with fashion conglomerate Kering, on the path that most promising designers in the 90s followed, Scott did his own thing. He cemented his reputation as a cult label with a hardcore, fervid following of fans, particularly in Asia (“I’ve met people with my prints tattooed on them, my face tattooed on them – I have that commitment and love”). He set up lucrative deals with brands, such as Swatch and Adidas. His Jeremy Scott for Adidas range has been a sell-out hit since 2008. He also established the relationship with the entertainment industry

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that had in part prompted the LA move. You may not know Scott’s name, but you do know his designs. Britney Spears’s air hostess outfit in the “Toxic” video is his. Lady Gaga’s outfit in “Paparazzi”. Rihanna, Beyoncé and Katy Perry are long-term friends and fans. Look at Scott’s Instagram and you’ll see photos of him clubbing with Rihanna or dining with Perry. He was Miley Cyrus’s date to last month’s MTV Video Awards and she unveiled her first art exhibition at the Jeremy Scott fashion show this week. “I have a way of synthesising [pop stars] message,” says Scott. “I help them do their job better and that helps my job. I understand the language of pop culture, and these people are totems of pop culture.” So it was a surprise when it was announced last November that Jeremy Scott would become Moschino’s creative director. The superficial fit is obvious: the label, founded in 1983 by Franco Moschino, has a similarly irreverent approach. Its big hits include a jacket with “waist of money” embroidered on the waistband and smiley-face biker jackets. Like Scott, Moschino saw fashion as a form of protest. But unlike Scott’s label, Moschino’s is a brand owned by a parent company, the Aeffe Group. The name comes with subsidiary lines such as the Cheap and Chic line, jeans, childrenswear, perfume and even a hotel in Milan. In terms of business, it’s everything that Scott has avoided. This isn’t a move he’s made lightly. “I needed to feel that I could carry on being fiercely independent within the brand, that I’d have parole to do that. I feel I have it. I’ve felt it even more so since I’ve started work there. It’s exciting that there’s an infrastructure that allows me to design something in such a large amount that it could actually make a cultural difference.” Scott is obviously ambitious, as keen to succeed in fashion as when he was a kid in Missouri or a young designer in Paris. But his Moschino debut showed that at the same time he still can’t help but stick his tongue out at the industry he loves. As a well-educated man who learnt his trade at one of New York’s traditional colleges, who has worked for nearly 20 years in fashion, doesn’t he ever get the urge to even pretend to toe the line with the industry’s expectations? To say that his collections have loftier inspirations than, say, McDonald’s? “No one’s ever posed that question before,” he says. “I’m stumped in a wonderful way. Chapeau.” He mimes doffing a cap. “I don’t know the answer, actually. I honestly don’t know how to do things differently. I would love to know how other designers work. There is a lot of

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thought behind my designs, there are bigger ideas there, but I just don’t tell people that. “Funnily enough, though, I don’t always know when criticism is coming. I don’t know why people get bent out of shape by what I do. I mean, there are many things in the world that aren’t for me. In large part it’s water off a duck’s back though. I get love from fans in a big enough dosage that it acts as a shield, and I would not sacrifice that love in order to please the industry.” Which is probably why he’s happy to moan about the business of fashion, even though he’s more a part of it than ever. He despairs of the homogeneity of the global industry now that conglomerates, such as LVMH and Kering, dominate. “When I started out there were individual fashion houses. Now it’s like the Montagues and Capulets, these warring factions. The beauty used to be that there were so many personalities and styles. When Vogue used to run the seasonal feature The 10 Collections That Matter, they would be uniquely different. Now it all feels the same.” Knowing what he does about the business, if there was a kid in Missouri dreaming about making it in fashion today, would he tell him to go for it? Scott thinks for a minute. “Yes. And I would hope that I’d be an emblem for that kid.” It’s safe to say he probably is. Vive l’avant garde!

APPENDIX D Barbie Boy How Jeremy Scott remade Moschino for the Instagram era. By Lizzie Widdicombe March 21, 2016 Issue Fans of the mid-century architect John Lautner have a special affection for the Sheats-Goldstein Residence, a glass-and-concrete marvel near Beverly Hills, from 1963. The house’s modern interior seems to be carved into the side of a canyon, and the built-in concrete furnishings suggest that both the Flintstones and the Jetsons would be at home there. The house’s owner, the real-estate mogul James Goldstein, recently announced plans to donate it to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, whose curators appreciate its austere beauty.

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It’s a black-turtleneck kind of place. So a Lautner aficionado arriving one recent evening might have been surprised to see men wearing Looney Tunes jerseys and track suits covered in trompe-l’oeil gold plaques. Women wore sweaters decorated with cartoon characters— Bart Simpson, Shrek—and dresses that doubled as street signs: the bust of a stop-sign-like dress commanded “SHOP.” People carried their iPhones in cases that appeared to be Windex bottles or cartons of McDonald’s French fries. At ground level, herds of strange footwear scurried around: silver Adidas sneakers with wings sprouting from the ankles, fuzzy ones with tails and tiger stripes, high-tops with green Teddy bears for tongues. The clothes, which looked like the spawn of Lewis Carroll and Kevin Federline, were by the fashion designer Jeremy Scott. He was throwing a party in the Sheats-Goldstein house’s private night club to celebrate his ten-year collaboration with the French leather-goods company Longchamp. (It makes bags for front-row guests at his fashion shows.) Scott was near the dance floor, posing for Instagram pictures. He isn’t tall, but he’s physically striking, with a strong nose, blue eyes, and hair shaved on the sides. He wore black tails over an outfit of his own design: a shirt and pants patterned with vintage ray guns. He’d paired it with a silver crown and spats. Rocking back and forth on his feet, like a seven-year-old at his birthday party, he introduced me to some executives from Mattel, saying, “Did you meet my Barbie friends?” Scott, who is forty, is the designer of choice for pop stars: he made the futuristic flight-attendant dress that Britney Spears wore in her “Toxic” video and the beach-ball-inspired number that Katy Perry wore during last year’s Super Bowl halftime show, the one with the dancing sharks. His eponymous fashion line specializes in youthful, exuberant kitsch. (He described his most recent collection, shown in New York, as “Dolly on molly”: it featured rubber cowboy boots, bouffant hairdos, and a dress bedecked with plastic trinkets.) Two years ago, Scott was named the director of the Italian fashion house Moschino, an irreverent brand that flourished in the nineteeneighties but had declined since its founder, Franco Moschino, died of AIDS-related complications in 1994, at forty-four. Scott’s appointment has made the label relevant again, but for a new audience. Moschino runway shows, in Milan, are happenings. Katy Perry, Miley Cyrus, and the K-pop star CL populate the front row, and Scott’s designs tend to include at least one meme-worthy spectacle. A streetscape-themed show, last fall, included models in hard hats and a working car wash

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that sprayed bubbles. His most recent Moschino show, in February, was titled “Bonfire of the Vanities”—a reference not to the Tom Wolfe novel but to the original one, in Renaissance Florence, when religious fanatics burned books, cosmetics, and art. Models danced down a runway lined with Persian carpets, wearing gowns that were charred or burned, and, in some cases, billowing smoke. A typical response from one of Scott’s fans on Instagram: “did you seeeeeeeeeee thisssss omggggg.” The excitement has translated into profits for Aeffe, Moschino’s parent company: in the past year, sales are up twenty per cent. Ken Downing, the fashion director at Neiman Marcus, told me, “The ability to take a brand that had such deep roots in an eighties sensibility and bring back the humor, the extravagance of production, and take the tonguein-cheek chic of the brand and reinvent it for a new customer has been nothing short of brilliant.” Designers succeed for different reasons. Some, like Phoebe Philo, of Céline, or Rei Kawakubo, of Comme des Garçons, change the basic shape of clothes. Some, like Karl Lagerfeld, at Chanel, redefine our understanding of status—or of cool, as Hedi Slimane did when he brought the rock-and-roll-waif look to Christian Dior, in the early aughts. Jeremy Scott doesn’t do any of these things. In his world, he likes to say, “nothing’s ever in and nothing’s ever out.” He isn’t interested in fashion diktats of the kind that pervade Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. He once wrote a manifesto, in the Guardian, declaring that a fashion designer should be a “communicator,” adding, “No one likes being preached at; I don’t subscribe to that in any way.” Kim Hastreiter, the editor of Paper, told me, “Jeremy’s not a normal fashion person. He’s a culture person.” Like Warhol and other Pop artists of the twentieth century, Scott is drawn to American consumer culture. His favorite device is not the silhouette but what he calls the “icon.” “It’s any immediately understood concept that I’ve subverted or added to on its journey,” he said. “It could be a Windex bottle or Mickey Mouse.” At Scott’s début show for Moschino, in 2014, a model wore what appeared to be a Chanel jacket—bouclé wool, contrasting trim. Scott had kidnapped this icon of timeless chic and taken it on a journey to McDonald’s: the jacket was ketchup-red, its trim bright yellow. The model carried a matching faux-Chanel bag—quilted leather, gold chain—that bore an “M” whose golden arches had been bent into the shape of a heart. The over-all impression was of Jacqueline Kennedy

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taking your order at a drive-through window. At his most recent show, a handbag that looked like a box of Marlboro Reds bore the warning “Fashion Kills.” Scott calls his use of iconography “intuitive.” His collections often channel the fashion world’s latest party chatter. The McDonald’sthemed show riffed on “fast fashion”—the phenomenon, popularized by Zara and H&M, of consumers churning through knocked-off runway trends. This year, the talk in fashion circles has grown apocalyptic, as shoppers are increasingly unwilling to wait six months to buy the clothes they’ve seen on Instagram. Scott’s house-on-fire collection made that feeling literal. “Are we burning down our house?” the fashion critic Vanessa Friedman asked, in the Times. “In the midst of fashion month, it’s a legitimate question.” As a communicator, Scott has all the subtlety of a Times Square billboard. “I’m happy that my work is connecting to people in a very visceral way,” he told me. “It’s all I’ve ever wanted to do. I want my work to connect to people, to touch people.” Some people remain untouched. Scott doesn’t see eye to eye with minimalists. “It just seems un-fun,” he told me. “And it’s uninspiring and unseductive to me.” And, while he has devoted followers in the fashion world, including Sarah Andelman, of the influential French boutique Colette, and Anna Dello Russo, of Japanese Vogue (a woman known for once wearing a hat shaped like a slice of watermelon), he’s not a critical darling. Friedman called his fast-food-themed collection “a series of bad jokes.” A reviewer for Women’s Wear Dailydocumented the hysteria surrounding a collection that had a Barbie theme and concluded, “Life is far too short to devote one iota of energy to analyzing these clothes.” As with Bernie Sanders, there is a generational component to Scott’s popularity. Humberto Leon, of the store Opening Ceremony, told me, “He’s a champion of the kids, and kids are a champion of him.” Scott was an early proponent of blending high fashion with “street” style, and his collections always include items like T-shirts and iPhone cases, aimed at young fans who want a piece of the action but can’t afford a three-thousand-dollar jacket. His bright designs do especially well in the Instagram era, where, as he told me, pinching his thumb and forefinger together, “You only have a screen that’s this big to make an impression.” At the Longchamp party in L.A., I met a young stylist named Wayman Bannerman, who told me, “I think he really speaks to the millennials.” He went on, “It’s very much our flapper. Our Rosie

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the Riveter. Our minidress. Our bell-bottoms.” Nearby, Quincy Combs, son of Sean, was posing for pictures in a blue backpack that bore the slogan “Fresh” superimposed on the Windex logo. His T-shirt read “It’s Very Expensive Being Moschino.” Combs was a recent convert: “I had no clue who he was. I just saw the Adidas shoes with the wings on it. I said, ‘Those are fresh! I’ve got to get those!’ ” He paused, and then said, with wonder, “Who thinks of cool stuff like that?” “We see strong evidence that North Korea has developed atomic hot wings.” Jeremy Scott may be a showman, but he’s not an exhibitionist. “I’m an introverted extrovert,” he told me. “My job sets me apart, but I’m not hammy and don’t need attention.” Beloved by party people, Scott doesn’t drink alcohol beyond the occasional glass of champagne. He is a careful curator of his own image: in photographs, Scott can look scary, with his semi-shaved head, frequently bare chest, and fierce glare. But he’s a hugger who’s fond of hokey turns of phrase—“Yes, ma’am,” “Sweetie,” and “Mah darlin’ ”—delivered in a Southern accent. (He’s from Missouri, and never seems to forget it.) Once, when I asked him to name a favorite piece from a collection, he responded, “It’s like asking a mother to choose one of her children.” He added, “Naughty lady. She naughty,” and poked me in the ribs. Scott’s friends, especially the female ones, invariably describe him as “gentle” and “kind.” But he has a stubborn streak, and the powerful person’s trick of speaking so softly that you have to lean in to hear him. One day in November, Scott was working at the Moschino headquarters, an elegant old building in the center of Milan. He has an office on the first floor—at the moment, it’s sparsely decorated, with a modified Louis XV table, a few chairs whose backs are furry Teddy bears, and a Ronald McDonald cookie jar on a shelf. (Scott collects them.) But he spends most of his time in two bleak workrooms down the hall. Scott sat on a rolling office chair in one of the workrooms, surrounded by a few staff members. He was wearing a take on a farm-boy outfit: denim overalls with a heart pattern on them, from an earlier Moschino men’s collection; a red-and-black gingham shirt; pink high-tops; and a camouflage cycling cap with the bill turned up to reveal the slogan “Life’s a Beach.” It was early afternoon, and he had just shown up for work. Scott splits his time between Los Angeles, where he lives, and Milan, where the company’s design staff is based. He doesn’t bother adjusting to the time change. He just works on L.A. hours in Europe.

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Scott was flanked by designers and by Pablo Olea, his P.R. director, who wore a football jersey with a snarling black jaguar over a flannel shirt. The workroom was quiet. Scott was thinking. Before him stood a male model, wearing a look from Moschino’s 2016 spring men’s collection: a hot-pink suit with a yellow shirt and a light-pink tie. The clothes were in bright, supersaturated colors printed with trompel’oeil shadow effects, as if the model had stepped out of a Dick Tracy comic strip. Scott wasn’t looking at the clothes—they were finished. He was studying the shoes: a pair of black jackboots, with the pants tucked in. There was a silver plaque on the sole that said “Moschino.” “I don’t like the plaque,” he said. “Can we just pry them off ?” An employee handed him a pair of pliers, and he began to operate. Even those who dismiss Scott’s work agree that he is the perfect successor to Franco Moschino, who was sometimes called the court jester of Italian fashion. Moschino started as a painter, and found his way into fashion after working as an illustrator for designers like Gianni Versace. Being a fashion designer is “a superficial, stupid job,” he once said. “The social-psychological aspect is more interesting.” In the early eighties, when Moschino began designing, Italian fashion was in thrall to a glitzy decadence—Armani and Versace were ascendant—and Moschino was appalled by the industry’s selfseriousness and status obsession. Inspired by the Surrealists, he filled his shows with absurd elements—playing cards, cow prints, rubber pig noses, question marks—and parodies of the latest trends. He created a necklace made of pearls and Rolex watches, mocking the era’s conspicuous consumption; a dress made of bras, lampooning the underwear-as-outerwear craze started by Madonna; a shirt with the arms tied, so that it became a straitjacket. The back said “For Fashion Victims Only”—the well-placed slogan was one of Moschino’s favorite devices. At Moschino, Scott does many of these things, too. He even uses Franco Moschino’s favorite symbols: cow prints, question marks. “I play with Moschino codes now,” he told me, but, he added, a lot of it is just Jeremy Scott, with a bigger budget. “There are things I’ve done in my past that could have been Moschino things.” For all of Franco’s mockery of the fashion world, his designs appealed most to fashionistas. Scott’s designs appeal to people who merely like Looney Tunes. And, while Franco’s ad campaigns addressed issues ranging from animal cruelty to AIDS, Scott’s work isn’t overtly political, although he has ventured

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into politics. During the Iraq War, he created an army helmet with Mickey Mouse ears. (Rihanna wore it in a music video.) He told me, “It was poking fun at how childish and silly war is.” It’s harder to tell what comment he is making about American consumer culture. After Scott’s Barbie collection for Moschino, he created a limited-edition doll for Mattel. Moschino Barbie, which goes for more than three hundred dollars on eBay, celebrates bubblegum consumerism: she’s loaded with accessories—purse, cell phone—and dripping with mini Moschino bling. Scott created a TV commercial for the toy, which he wrote and art-directed, based on toy commercials of the eighties and nineties. In the ad, a little boy, with his hair shaved into a fauxhawk, so that he resembles a pint-size Jeremy Scott, plays with the doll. (“A loose concept,” Scott said.) The boy beams into the camera and says, “Moschino Barbie is sooo fierce!” It was the first Barbie commercial to feature a boy, and it created a minor sensation. Scott was thrilled. “It’s not a fashion story—it’s a news story,” he told me, in Milan. “I mean, I’ve done something that’s affecting culture.” He and the design staff gathered around his laptop to watch a news clip from ABC. The ad rolled, and a male announcer interjected awkwardly, “O.K. Interesting. But I wonder what some people would say about having this kid—this male child—advertise this.” Scott laughed. “ ‘Maaaale child,’ ” he said, mocking the announcer. “He is such a dork. How can you be, like, ‘Yeah, we’re all on board!’ and then be, like, ‘This maaaale child.’ Stick to your script, dude.” Scott has helped to create the problem he was alluding to with his “Bonfire of the Vanities” collection: too much fashion, too fast. In Franco Moschino’s day, a designer was responsible for just two collections a year. These days, as a Moschino staff member told me, “the customer likes to see variety,” and it’s common for a major fashion house to turn out five or six collections a year. (Karl Lagerfeld has said, “Fashion is a sport now: you have to run.”) Scott still produces two collections a year for his own line, a balancing act that he called “normal and easy.” For Moschino, he produces two main collections, of around two hundred and twenty pieces each; a women’s “pre collection,” around two hundred pieces; and two men’s collections—all with bags and accessories. Beginning with his “Fast Fashion” collection, in 2014, Scott began making an extra batch called a “capsule collection”: between twenty and thirty pieces that hit stores the day after the show, to capitalize on the social-media frenzy.

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Scott designs by giving detailed instructions to a staff of around forty-five people. He is a fan of theatrical runway moments. For the evening-wear portion of the “Fast Fashion” show, Bill Shapiro, the head designer for women’s clothes, recalled, “He said, ‘I envision an opera cape and someone coming to the opera.’ ” Shapiro acted out the part of a fancy woman in a cape—“ ‘But, instead of it being just a solid fabric, it’s covered in—a beer can! A redneck beer-can print! Or there’s someone in a gorgeous, flouncy evening dress—but it’s inspired by greasy potato chips!’ ” For all Scott’s love of lowbrow, he’s an equal-opportunity enthusiast. The collections he was working on when I visited shared a more esoteric reference point: they were an homage to the British artists Gilbert & George, whose graphic, photo-based works often include pictures of themselves dressed in business suits. “I’ve loved their work for so long, I don’t know when I ever didn’t know about it,” Scott told me. The artists had given him access to their archives, and he’d found one print, from 2004, that shows a man wearing a Moschino sweater with a peace sign on it. The sweater is reflected in a mirror. “Our print is already warpy; they made it warpier,” Scott said, with satisfaction. From early afternoon until around 1:00 A.M., Scott reviewed men’s accessories. An item would be presented to him—a cap, a shoe—and he would play with it absentmindedly and finally nod, or order some tweak. Ideas were communicated in fashion shorthand. The most common word—the universal designation of goodness—was “cute.” It could apply to a range of items, from a bondage-themed boot to a black leather sneaker decorated with the wavy peace signs. (Scott pronounced that “super cute.”)

APPENDIX E Moschino spoofs the Fashion Cycle BY ANGELO FLACCAVENTO SEPTEMBER 20, 2018 22:26 MILAN, Italy — Jeremy Scott’s method at Moschino is rather formulaic. He chooses a theme — the more absurd, or pop, the better — and explores it this way and that, hammering the audience almost ad nauseam. It makes for some serious entertainment, and for some serious repetition as well.

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This time round, the starting point of the collection was interesting. Scott started ruminating on the senseless speed of the fashion cycle, with designers being forced to deliver new stuff almost on a daily basis, and took off from that. Basically, his idea was to present clothes he was not able to fully finish due to a short deadline: evening dresses still attached to the roll of fabric, ensembles filled with marker strokes like hastily completed drawings on a piece of paper; scribbled stockings. It went on and on, but it was fun — nothing to do with cerebral deconstruction. The 1980s silhouette redolent of Ungaro and Saint Laurentadded another layer of absurdity. Ultimately, however, at Moschino the joke is wearing thin. The scope and width of Franco’s irony has been reduced to a silly gimmick. Jokes are fun, but there is more to Moschino than jokes: deranged classicism, for instance; a twisted bourgeois spirit; spirited couture. Maybe it is time to move on. APPENDIX F Franco Moschino, a Fashion Radical On his birthday, we remember the late designer’s subversive career. 02.27.2018 by Gabriel Chavez In the summer of 1971 a 21-year-old Franco Moschino, then a fresh graduate of the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Milan, worked as an illustrator for a young, burgeoning Gianni Versace. Moschino, encouraged by Gianni, created the Moschino label in 1983 and debuted his “Couture!” line that same year to the frenzy of the fashion world, who ate up his “waist of money” fashion witticisms like candy. The press heralded Moschino as Italian fashion’s enfant terrible, often comparing him to the likes of Jean Paul Gaultier, and went so far as naming him fashion’s official court jester, a label he would later loathe. Moschino’s farcical interpretation of fashion was rooted in his paradoxical approach to the fashion industry. He ridiculed the industry’s hierarchies by parodying emblems of high culture, like the Chanel dinner suit, and crafting them with low brow materials like denim, or adorning them with real silverware. “Funny clothes have to be extremely well made because that is where you find the chic. It’s easy to be funny with a T-shirt, but it’s more clever with a mink coat.

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After all, if caviar was cheaper it would taste much less interesting” he said in a 1994 interview with British GQ. The brilliance of Moschino’s technical arsenal lie at the crossroads of the post-modern and the surreal. He employed ironic self-awareness, well-crafted parody, sincere humor, and thoughtful juxtapositions throughout his designs. The words “This is an advertisement!” were front and center of visual campaigns. Models for the Moschino fragrance sipped from perfume bottles as if it were Coca-Cola. Events and parties were elaborate circuses of installation, performance, and celebrity that resembled a campy rendition of the Rothschild’s Surrealist Ball (his 10-year retrospective “X Years of Kaos” in particular). Moschino even starred in his own campaign, taking on a new persona for each Moschino product advertised. He championed freedom and challenged conventions of taste, asserting that “good taste doesn’t exist.” On the runway, his theatrical presentations imitated an openair market, presented models on their hands and knees, or resulted in Moschino storming onto the runway declaring that fashion is over. Jeremy Scott’s revival of the Moschino brand exhibits similar collisions of high and low culture. Scott brings aliens, cardboard, and McDonald’s to the Moschino runway and releases capsule collections featuring the iconography of the Powerpuff Girls, Spongebob, and Candy Crush. The range of celebrities who wear Scott’s Moschino, from Cardi B to Madonna to Michelle Obama, demonstrate the sheer success and versatility of Scott’s creative directorship. And while the label’s satirical origins and eccentric devices are embedded in each collection, there’s something inherently different about Franco Moschino’s sense of “bullchic.” “My approach is a contradiction, I know, but why not? Why should I have to embrace the fashion business just because I work in it? Why should I?” Perhaps the crux of the difference lies in Moschino’s general outlook on fashion and society. While Scott uses his sense of gaiety and eclectic style to bring happiness through fashion, Moschino used his artistic abilities to curate ironic collections, experiences, and campaigns that criticized fashion’s role in society. “Fashion is absolutely tacky. Being fashionable is not positive at all. Fashion is over. Let’s talk about something worthwhile. Fashion kills people. It is Fascism. As a designer, I have to convince you to change–to cut your hair, to change the frames of your glasses. You’re a creature of the fashion system, a

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Muppet, not yourself,” Moschino explained in a 1989 interview with New York Magazine. It’s no surprise that Moschino grew weary after his extensive commercial success within the very industry he criticized. “I don’t want to sound silly, but I feel sometimes as though I am in a golden prison. I can do exactly what I want, but in reality people expect me to do more of the same. A Moschino design must look and feel like the kind of Moschino design the public understand. Every year I’m expected to be just as banal, silly, stupid and vulgar as I have been in the past. Sometimes this business is just a horrible, horrible machine.” “I myself am not doing clothes anymore. ‘Moschino’ is not my name anymore. Fashion is a source of money. It gave me celebrity, and I use this to be heard.” In the following years Moschino’s campaigns and installations turned towards combating the social issues of the era, raising awareness of drug abuse, climate change, violence, consumerism, pollution, racism, and the AIDS crisis. Moschino himself died in 1994 from AIDS complications. He was 44. In the year before his death, Moschino remained a formidable businessman. He launched his “Ecouture!” line, solely using environmentally friendly materials and dyeing processes. He opted for faux fur in his collections and through his “Smile!” campaign donated proceeds to shelters for children with AIDS. Franco Moschino remains a fashion radical whose wit, humor, honesty, free spirit, and critical lens became his legacy. The questions he asked of fashion then are the same questions we ask of fashion now. And though there is still no clear answer, Moschino reminds us to leave something progressive along on the way.

APPENDIX G MOSCHINO SPARKS OUTRAGE WITH COLLECTION INSPIRED BY TRUMP’S IMMIGRATION POLICIES Jeremy Scott has been accused of being insensitive to the current immigration crisis in the US Olivia Petter Wednesday 27 June 2018 12:30 Top of Form

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Bottom of Form Moschino has come under fire for its latest campaign ‘Alien Nation’ which is inspired by Trump’s strict immigration policies. Starring Gigi Hadid and Kaia Gerber, the campaign was launched on Instagram by the brand’s creative director Jeremy Scott, who uploaded a snap of Hadid covered in blue body paint alongside a caption reading: “the only thing illegal about this alien is how good she looks,” which has since been removed. Scott’s campaign aims to highlight the Trump administration’s severe approach towards who he calls “illegal aliens”, but the fashion designer’s concept has been heavily criticised by social media users as exploitative and insensitive to issues facing US migrants. The designer, who also runs his own eponymous brand posted a response to the criticism on Instagram, explaining that the campaign is intended to “open a discussion on what exactly an ‘alien’ is.” “Are they orange, blue, yellow, green? Does this matter? They are our friends, neighbours, co workers, relatives and people we love.” But people remained unhappy, responding to his new caption saying: “Changing the caption doesn’t change the fact this whole campaign just brings you profit,” wrote one person. “You want to start a discussion? Stop painting the same models blue and calling it revolutionary. Actually change the fashion game by hiring models that need to be represented. Get out in the street and do something worthwhile. Until then, you’re just another white man making money off the suffering of real people.” Others added to the criticisms by labelling the campaign “tone deaf ” and “ignorant”. In spite of the outrage, many fans of the brand praised the designer for his “alien” concept, with supermodel Linda Evangelista commenting a series of love hearts on his Instagram post. Scott sent models down the runway sporting a range of body paints at Moschino’s autumn/winter 2018 show in February, explaining his political motivations to Vogue at the time: “I’m not anti-alien,” he said, “I don’t want to build a wall.”

APPENDIX H Op-Ed | Ironic Fashion Is Nothing New For many fashion commentators, the irony of designers like Jeremy

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Scott, Demna Gvasalia and Virgil Abloh feels fresh, but we’ve been here before, observes Eugene Rabkin. BY EUGENE RABKIN MARCH 30, 2018 05:26 Since “The Rise of the Fashion Hipster,” there’s been a slew of articles identifying irony as the key aesthetic driver of contemporary fashion. Certainly, irony is at the heart of the work of designers like Jeremy Scott at Moschino, Demna Gvasalia at Vetements and Balenciaga and Virgil Abloh at Off-White. Abloh has taken irony to new heights by simply putting the name of the product he has created in quotation marks on the thing itself (i.e. “little black dress” printed on a little black dress). One need not be an art scholar to see this as a fairly obvious nod to the infamous 1928 Rene Magritte painting “The Treachery of Images,” which depicted a smoking pipe with the words: “Ceci n’est pas une pipe.” And while that painting said something — namely that images can be deceiving — Abloh’s inversion of this principle, that the thing is exactly the thing, even in quotation marks, does not actually say much. The best case that can be made for this kind of facile irony is also the worst case: here is the thing either way you slice it, so you might as well buy it from me. Many fashion commentators have called today’s use of irony “fresh.” But the fact is: irony in fashion is nothing new — what’s new is the rise of the next generation of fashion consumers who may not possess historical knowledge of fashion, and to whom irony seems fresh. Much of what we are witnessing in contemporary fashion is a revival of the 1990s, when the current generation of ironic designers were teenagers awed by what they were seeing on the catwalk. And, low and behold, in the 1990s there was a strong undercurrent of irony in fashion. Irony was the weapon of choice for those who longed to escape the mind-numbing banality of contemporary culture. Here are some examples. At a Spring/Summer 1991 show of Moschino, a model comes out wearing a white dress shirt with the words “Too Much Irony!” printed on the back. Moschino again; in a Spring/Summer 1994 show a model wears a hanger on her head and a plastic garment bag with “Aeffe” — Moschino’s manufacturer — printed on it. This is not a far cry from Demna

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Gvasalia’s “Kering” hoodie shown in his second men’s Balenciaga collection in 2017. Dolce & Gabanna, Spring 1992: a male model sports a “Sicilians are Sensational” T-shirt, complete with what today would be a heart emoji. Even Hussein Chalayan, who usually took himself seriously, sent a dress down his Spring/ Summer 2006 runway with the Absolut vodka logo on it. Other examples abound, but I will stop here. That irony entered fashion in the 1990s makes total sense — Generation X was the first generation of well-educated people who also grew up watching ungodly amounts of TV, commercials included. It was the first generation who had to dodge salesmen at every waking moment of their lives, but who were also simultaneously defined by branding, for the simple fact that it became inescapable. American writer, David Foster Wallace, the most brilliant commentator Generation X has produced, noted that it seemed perfectly normal for his generation to align brands with character traits. These were mimetic shortcuts that simply became second nature in an ad-saturated culture. Irony was the weapon of choice for those who longed to escape the mind-numbing banality of contemporary culture. But the marketing departments of big corporations and ad firms they used also hired smart young people, and the first principle of marketing is that you need to speak the language of the consumers. Therefore, irony quickly entered the parlance of TV and advertising, and so the last escape hatch was closed. Fast-forward to today and the internet seems simply like another version of TV, and the millennial generation does not seem all that far removed from Gen X in its attitudes towards many aspects of contemporary culture. The millennials are still described as supposedly hard to sell to, because they have sucked in advertising with their mothers’ milk. They still play the cat-and-mouse game with the ad men. “Authenticity” is still suggested as the main value of Instagram influencers hired to peddle product, despite the fact that authenticity and marketing are antithetical by nature. How long this cycle will continue is anybody’s guess. I would argue that it won’t be long before irony as the prevailing aesthetic and consumption attitude will fall away. Wallace rightly noted that irony is a defeatist attitude because it’s not a constructive one. Irony is tiring because there is a certain cynicism at its core, despite it’s wink-wink enthusiasm, and because humans do have a constructive mindset. But will irony be rediscovered at some point by a future generation of

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fashion designers and consumers? You bet.

APPENDIX I Exclusive: Jeremy Scott on Cîroc, Moschino and his H&M collaboration The Moschino designer discusses his collaborations with Cîroc and H&M BY ZAK MAOUI Friday 21 September 2018 Jeremy Scott is widely associated with psychedelic colours, that McDonald’s collaboration he did for Moschino and his upcoming H&M collab. And now he can add, somewhat unexpectedly, Cîroc to that list. The Moschino creative director unveiled a brand-new collaboration with the brand during Milan Fashion Week and it’s as wacky as you’d expect. Cîroc has an illustrious history of collaborations, largely thanks to brand ambassador P Diddy’s involvement, which has included campaigns with French Montana and even Brit streetwear favourite Palace Skateboards. Ahead of his Spring/Summer 2019 womenswear collection yesterday, Scott took to the streets of Milan to promote Cîroc’s latest collaboration, which includes a fantastically fun campaign. For the collaboration, which sees him design a series of unique bottles for the brand, Scott has enlisted the help of model River Viiperi, actor Thando Thabethe, musician Wizkid and actor Golden Barbie, aka Jasmine Sanders. Ahead of the launch, we spoke to Jeremy Scott to discuss how the collaboration happened, what’s coming up for him and what he thinks the role of a designer is in 2018. GQ: How did the Cîroc collaboration come about? Best street style: Paris Fashion Week Men’s AW19 BY ROBERT SPANGLE Well, they had reached out to us and were interested in doing something with Moschino. I thought it would be a fun idea – you know me, I am all for fun – and I liked the team’s enthusiasm about my own personal vision.

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Was working with an alcohol brand always in your sight? Well, for me, I am a designer and I love designing. I love creating and bringing my vision into different worlds. I mean, obviously I focus on clothes and accessories and all that jazz, but I have also designed cars and baby strollers and other things a little bit more outside of what my other contemporaries do. I love being part of pop culture and being involved with many different assets of people’s lives and so doing something with Cîroc was exciting because it was a bit like, “Oh, OK, we could do this custom bottle, create and design a cool campaign around it and have a fun launch.” Those are the kind of things I like to do because it does reach out to people and it does touch other people’s lives, and I think for me that is the magic carpet that fashion is. I could be a fashion designer, but I can also pour my creativity into other vessels. I think it’s important for a designer to explore other avenues. So a designer shouldn’t just stick to fashion? Totally. For me, because it’s the way I see the world, the way I see culture, the way I see life, and it’s the way I create and live and its normal in that way. It is what revs my engine, revs my motor. For me, fashion is a way of communicating and I have always used my work as a way of communicating. The idea of communicating with people and portraying my message through other medium is a really exciting and seductive thought. Can you describe the collaboration in three words? Fun, fun, fun. You didn’t say they had to be different words. It is more about personality than beauty. Is it how you envisioned it when you first got approached? Actually, no. It’s actually more vibrant than I thought I would want it to go, so that’s exciting and that makes it more authentic and genuine to my vision than I actually imagined. Anything that has advertising attached to it typically comes with a lot of obstacles and opinions, but, in the end, the collaboration with Cîroc turned out to be very fun and colourful and a clear line to my world. How did the Wizkid, River Viiperi and Golden Barbie collaboration come about? River and Jasmine started modelling with me, actually. Jasmine’s first runway show was with me. River has also been with me from the beginning. I was thinking of people I adore as ambassadors and have the right personality to be a part of this. That’s the thing: I think it is

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APPENDIX J Business / Market Trends research Digital Micro-trends - customization: unrepeatable, frictionless and fast experiences. The need for speed by the new digital fashion shopper is felt in all its urgency, not just in the area of search and web rooming, but also through a constant dialogue during and after the purchase (i.e. the current proliferation of mobile payment services). The ideal shopping experience will be by definition unique, built to measure for the customer and smooth (without interruptions). The challenge of the great fashion players will be based on their ability to equip themselves in time with the technological infrastructures necessary to guarantee 24/7 availability. The quality of communication with the customer needs to be rethought as well as all activity concerning the management of customer services and clientele. Artificial intelligence and “Big Data & Analytics” are key elements that will soon introduce new concepts to the general public such as “Dynamic Pricing”. -artificial intelligence: “It will be able to analyse consumer behaviour and search for patterns, utilizing data from social media platforms and blog posts to help businesses understand how users and customers find their products and services. Businesses adopting artificial intelligence in 2019 will be able to save costs and accelerate growth, getting an edge over their competitors.” Nidhi Dave from Single Grain, digital marketing agency. Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco -programmatic advertising: “Programmatic advertising means using artificial intelligence to automate ad buying so that more specific clients can be targeted. Real-time bidding or auctions, for example, are types of programmatic ad buying. This automation is much more efficient and faster, which means more intense transfer and lower customer acquisition costs.” Nidhi Dave from Single Grain, digital marketing agency. Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco-chatbots:


“Many customers prefer interacting with chatbots as they are responsive, give answers promptly, accurately recall your entire buying history and never lose patience. These virtual assistants offer outstanding customer service, meeting customers’ expectations and automating repetitive tasks – which means you can focus on more important work.” Nidhi Dave from Single Grain, digital marketing agency. Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco -personalization: “If you want to stand out in 2019, you need to personalize your marketing – and that means personalized content, products, emails, and more. With the availability of data like purchase history, consumer behaviour and links clicked, custom content has never been easier. In fact 96% marketers believe that personalization advances customer relationships.” Nidhi Dave from Single Grain, digital marketing agency. Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco -video-marketing: These numbers show the importance of incorporating video into your digital marketing strategy in 2019: • 70% of consumers say that they have shared a brand’s video. • 72% of businesses say video has improved their conversion rate. • 52% of consumers say that watching product videos makes them more confident in online purchase decisions. • 65% of executives visit the marketer’s website and 39% call a vendor after viewing a video. Nidhi Dave from Single Grain, digital marketing agency. Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco


MOSCHINO

more about personality than beauty, you know, and for people to have fun and to have a good attitude, and they have that. Wizkid has worn stuff I have designed and I just think he is sensational. We had never actually met, so it was a great excuse to finally do so. I found him amazing and super energetic and his enthusiasm is amazing. And your H&M collaboration is just around the corner. How’s that looking? So, yeah, I have this itty-bitty collaboration that’s launching 8 November, with a small company you have probably never heard of called H&M. I snuck a deal with them and no one will probably even hear about it. It’s ready to go and it is going to be the biggest thing I’ve done. You will not be able to escape it. There will be a show on 24 October in New York as well, and then the actual launch takes place on 8 November. You always have to keep your dreams a secret What would you say is your dream collaboration? Well, if I told you my dream collaboration then it wouldn’t come true. And you always have to keep your dreams a secret.

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APPENDIX K Range Plan Fall Winter 2018/19 Category

Photo

Outwear

1

2

Name

trend

core

BOUCLÉ WOOL JACKET WITH BIKER DETAILS

Description

Fabric

Jacket made of bouclé wool inspired by the '60s and characterized by metal details typical of the iconic Fabric: 89% Pure biker jacket. Regular fit, Mandarin wool, 11% collar with snap button, Zip front Polyamide, closure and concealed snap button, Lining : 60% Acetate Two zipped front pockets, Cuffs with zip, Ring zip puller, Silver finish metal details, Lined inside

Colour

Price / Euro

Size

CONFETTI PINK

1,180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

LEATHER OVERCOAT

Double-breasted overcoat in leather, tangerine colour, embellished by coated buttons, in ‘60s style. Slim fit, Collar with lapels, Front closure with zip and double zip-tab, Front decorative buttons, Two front pockets, Belt to tie on the waist, Quilted rear appliqué on the waist, Front and rear windbreaker flaps, Silver-finish metal details, Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Calfskin

TANGERINE

1,885.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 100% Calfskin

CONFETTI PINK

1,545.00

IT 36 - IT 48

3

core

DOUBLE BREASTED BIKER JACKET IN CALFSKIN

Pink biker jacket in calfskin with double-breasted front closure embellished by coated round buttons in ‘60s style. Regular fit Collar with lapels Front closure with zip and buttons Two front pockets with zip Patches on cuffs with snap buttons Front bottom with loops and belt with adjustable buckle Rear bottom with ribbed quilted band Silver-finish metal details

4

basic

STRIPED SHORT JACKET IN NEW ZEALAND WOOL

Double-breasted jacket in New Zealand stretch wool characterised by the coated button closure, in ‘60s style. Slim fit Korean-style collar Front closure with buttons Two front pockets

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

MULTICOLOURED

800.00

IT 36 - IT 48

5

basic

striped double breasted coat

This pink virgin wool striped double breasted coat features notched lapels, a front button fastening, front flap pockets and a straight fit.

Fabric: virgin wool 100%

FUCHSIA

1.035,00

IT 36 - IT 48

TANGERINE

1,795.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 80% Pure wool, 20% Polyamide,

MINT GREEN

980.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Jacket made of bouclé wool inspired by the '60s and characterized by metal details typical of the iconic biker jacket. Regular fit Fabric : 89% Pure Mandarin collar with snap button wool, 11% Zip front closure and concealed snap button Polyamide, Lining : Two zipped front pockets 60% Acetate Cuffs with zip Ring zip puller Silver finish metal details Lined inside

TANGERINE

1,180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

6

7

8

core

trend

trend

Coat in eco-fur, tangerine colour with contrast details in black patent leather and Biker-style applied belt. Regular fit Long sleeves Two side pockets COAT IN ECO-FUR WITH A front pocket with zip Fabric : 74% Mohair, PATENT LEATHER DETAILS Front closure with zip and concealed 26% Cotton snap buttons Belt with adjustable buckle Silver-finish metal details Rear waist-high patent leather appliqué Lined interior

SHORT JACKET IN FELT

BOUCLÉ WOOL JACKET WITH BIKER DETAILS

Short mint green jacket in pure wool, ‘60s style, characterised by typical details of the biker jacket. Regular fit Collar with lapels ¾ sleeves Sleeve bottom with zip Two front pockets with zip Front closure with double-tab zip Silver-finish metal details Lined interior


MOSCHINO

9

10

11

core

core

trend

COAT IN MOHAIR

Double-breasted coat inspired by the ‘60s bon ton style, in solid colour fuchsia mohair. Regular fit Collar with lapels Fabric : 74% Mohair, Front closure with concealed snap 26% Cotton buttons Two side pockets Sleeve bottom with buttons Lined interior

COAT IN MOHAIR

1,595.00

IT 36 - IT 48

DOUBLE-BREASTED BIKER JACKET IN CALFSKIN

Black biker jacket in calfskin with double-breasted front closure embellished by coated round buttons in ‘60s style. Regular fit Collar with lapels Front closure with zip and buttons Two front pockets with zip Patches on cuffs with snap buttons Front bottom with loops and belt with adjustable buckle Rear bottom with ribbed quilted band

100% Calfskin

BLACK

1,545.00

IT 36 - IT 48

SHORT JACKET IN FELT

Short fuchsia jacket in pure wool characterised by metal details, typical of the biker jacket. Regular fit Collar with lapels ¾ sleeves Sleeve bottom with zip Two front pockets with zip Front closure with double-tab zip Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 80% Pure wool, 20% Polyamide, Lining : 60% Acetate

FUCHSIA

980.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 80% Pure wool, 20% Mohair

PURPLE

895.00

IT 36 - IT 48

12

basic

FELT CLOAK WITH BIKER DETAILS IN PATENT LEATHER

Cloak in wool velour and mohair decorated with details in black patent leather and metal, typical of the iconic biker jacket. Loose fit Collar with lapels Two side openings for the arms Front zip closure Front decorative flap with snap button Patent leather details Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

13

basic

QUILTED VINYL SHRUG

Lightly padded quilted vinyl shrug with high collar and front closure. Sleeveless Front neck closure with concealed hook Lined inside

70% Polyester, 30% Polyurethane

BLACK

440.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

JACKET IN ZIG-ZAG LUREX JACQUARD

Jacket in zig-zag light blue lurex jacquard embellished by piping in tone-on-tone patent leather and jewel buttons. Regular fit Collar with small tips Front zip closure Two front pockets with flap and button Two side pockets Cuffs with button Buttons on rear bottom Lined interior

Fabric : 85% Polyester, 15% Polyamide, Lining : 48% Acetate

AZURE

995.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

FELT COAT WITH BILLBOARDS MULTICOLOUR PRINT

The Billboards print is inspired by the works of artist Ben Frost, a multicolour pattern that decorates the double-breasted coat in felt allover. Regular fit Collar with lapels 3/4 sleeves Front closure with exposed buttons and concealed snap buttons Two side pockets Lined interior

Fabric : 80% Polyester, 18% Viscose, 2% Other fibres

MULTICOLOURED

1,295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

LONG BOMBER JACKET WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Bomber jacket in black nylon with yellow Couture Wars print on the front and shorter rounded bottom on the front. Regular fit Stretch ribbed V-neck Front closure with snap buttons Two front pockets Stretch ribbed cuffs and bottom Padded and lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide, Lining : 60% Acetate

BLACK

990.00

IT 36 - IT 48

14

15

16

0155 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

17

trend

Bomber jacket in black nylon embellished by white star print allover and Ufo Teddy with logo on front and back. Regular fit Stretch ribbed collar, cuffs and BOMBER JACKET IN NYLON bottom WITH UFO TEDDY PRINT Front zip closure Two front pockets with flap and snap button Pocket with zip on left sleeve Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide

BLACK

1,250.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 80% Pure wool, 20% Polyamide, 48% Acetate

BLACK

1,995.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric: polyester 70%. polyurethane 30%

BLACK

1.395,00

IT 36 - IT 48

18

core

PARKA IN PURE WOOL AND CRYSTAL TEDDY DECOR

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in precious Crystal Teddy version, entirely made in Swarovsky crystals, decorates the rear of the black parka with hood and removable ecofur appliquĂŠ. Oversize fit Coulisse on hood, waist and bottom Two front pockets with flap and snap button Front closure with zip and snap buttons Longer rear bottom with slit Silver-finish metal details Quilted lined interior

19

trend

belted glossy raincoat

This black belted glossy raincoat from Moschino features a belted waist, a front button fastening, a metallic sheen, a buckle-fastened high standing collar and buckled cuffs.

20

core

faux fur coat

This black mohair wool blend faux fur coat features a notched collar, Fabric: mohair 69%, an off-centre front button fastening cotton 31% and cropped sleeves.

BLACK

1.595,00

IT 36 - IT 48

21

trend

Couture padded parka

This black couture padded parka Fabric: Outer: features a front zip fastening, front polyamide 100%, zipped pockets, a faux-fur trimmed Lining: viscose 51%, hood and a printed logo to the rear. acetate 49%

Black

1.180,00

IT 36 - IT 48

22

trend

mock neck zipped coat

black virgin wool blend mock neck zipped coat featuring an off-centre front zip fastening, long sleeves, side zipped pockets, a straight fit and silver-tone hardware.

Fabric: Outer: virgin wool 80%, polyamide 20%, Lining: viscose 51%, acetate 49%

Black

1.495,00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

COUTURE WARS WINDBREAKER IN NYLON WITH RUCHES

Windbreaker in black nylon, slightly padded with tone-on-tone ruches and contrast Couture Wars print on the front. Regular fit High collar Stretch appliquĂŠ on sleeve bottom Two front pockets Front zip closure Coulisse on the bottom Silver-finish metal details Padded and lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide

BLACK

890.00

IT 36 - IT 48

23

0156 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

24

core

PARKA IN COTTON WITH PUNK VERBIAGE DECOR

Parka in military green cotton embellished by all-over Punk verbiage patches fixed by handapplied safety pins. Oversize fit Non-removable hood with coulisse Front closure with zip and buttons Two front pockets with flap and Fabric : 100% Cotton button Coulisse on waist and bottom Longer bottom at the back Front slit on the bottom Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

MILITARY GREEN

4,135.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Inspired by lingerie, the short bomber jacket in military green nylon is characterised by a demi-cup bustier appliqué in black satin and lace. Slim fit Fabric : 47% Acrylic, Stretch ribbed collar, cuffs and 41% Polyamide, 12% bottom Cotton Front zip closure Pocket with zip on left sleeve Bustier with cups Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

MILITARY GREEN

1,100.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

4,160.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BOTTLE GREEN

1,295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

1,550.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

1,495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

1,100.00

IT 36 - IT 48

25

trend

HORT BOMBER JACKET WITH BUSTIER

26

core

ECO-FUR COAT WITH PUNK VERBIAGE DECORATION

27

28

29

30

trend

WOOL COAT WITH GUÊPIÈRE DETAILS

core

DRESS IN PURE WOOL WITH PLEATED SKIRT

trend

trend

Black eco-fur double-breasted coat, entirely hand-decorated with Punk Verbiage patches fixed with safety pins. Oversize fit Collar with lapels Front closure with concealed buttons Two side pockets Lined interior

Fabric : 84% Modacrylic, 16% Polyester, Lining : 51% Rayon, 49% Acetate

Double-breasted coat in salt-andpepper effect bouclè wool in green shades, trimmed with a black lace appliqué at the bottom. The rear is Fabric : 55% Wool, embellished with a guêpière detail, 24% Polyamide, 14% in lingerie style. Regular fit Acrylic, 4% Crew-neck Polyester, 3% Alpaca ¾ sleeves Front closure with buttons Four front pockets Lined interior

Dress consisting of a black jacket in pure wool and a skirt in pleated chiffon printed with a work by artist Carlo Mollino. Regular fit V-neck with peak lapels Long sleeves Three front pockets Front closure with buttons Padded shoulders Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

Double-breasted coat in salt-andpepper effect bouclè wool in black shades with sleeves and belt in ecoleather, Biker style. Slim fit Neck with peak lapels Long sleeves in eco-leather Fabric : 55% Wool, COAT IN WOOL AND ECOFitted 24% Polyamide, 14% LEATHER Front closure with buttons Acrylic, 4% Two front pockets with flap Polyester, 3% Alpaca Front decorative pocket in ecoleather with snap button Adjustable belt Rear slit on the bottom Lined interior

BOMBER JACKET WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

Bomber jacket in nylon with Safety Pin Logo print detail on the front and Safety Pin Teddy print in patch version on the back. Slim fit Collar, cuffs and bottom in stretch cotton Front zip closure Two front pockets with flap and snap button Pocket with zip on left sleeve Padded and lined interior

0157 PAGE NUMBER

Fabric : 100% Polyamide


MOSCHINO

The iconic Double Question Mark logo in lacing version with buttonholes and black laces embellishes the back of the bomber jacket in military green nylon. Regular fit Stretch ribbed collar, cuffs and BOMBER JACKET IN NYLON bottom WITH DOUBLE QUESTION Front zip closure MARK DÉCOR Two front pockets with flap and snap button Pocket with zip on left sleeve Front belt detail with buckle on the bottom Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide

MILITARY GREEN

1,495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Bolero in stretch wool and cotton twill with tone-on-tone satin details, of design inspired by the classic men’s tuxedo. Regular fit Collar with satin lapels Long sleeves Closure with buttons on cuffs Satin buttons on front and back Tuxedo-style curled rear bottom Lined interior

Fabric : 68% Pure wool, 30% Cotton, 2% Other fibres

BLACK

895.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

WINDBREAKER MOSCHINO COUTURE

Windbreaker in lightly padded technical twill with Moschino Couture logo print on front and back. Classic collar Metal front zip closure Cuffs with elasticated inserts Two side pockets with concealed snap button Drawstring on the bottom Padded and lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide

BLACK

775.00

IT 36 - IT 48

34

trend

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear is reviewed for the FW18 PreCollection in Safety Pin patch version and decorates the white dress in stretch cotton jersey. Oversize fit Front Safety Pin Teddy print Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

Fabric : 97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

WHITE

645.00

IT 36 - IT 48

35

core

SHORT DRESS IN PLUSH WITH CRYSTAL TEDDY DECOR

Short dress in black cotton plush embellished on the front by the logo décor and Crystal Teddy in multicolour crystals. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Hood with coulisse Front kangaroo pocket ribbed cuffs and bottom Silver-finish metal details

BLACK

1,020.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

TROMPE L'OEIL SHORT DRESS

Short dress in stretch cotton jersey with Moschino Couture logo printed on the front. Characterised by the Trompe l'Oeil technique, it creates the illusion to be a two-piece t-shirt Fabric : 97% Cotton, and mini skirt when in reality, is a 3% Other fibres single dress. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves Flared skirt

WHITE

550.00

IT 36 - IT 48

37

basic

SHORT DRESS IN PLUSH WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Short dress in black cotton embellished by the contrast Couture Wars print on the front and openings on the sleeves with double tab zip. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck Fabric : 100% Cotton Long sleeves Silver-finish metal zip Ribbed cuffs and bottom Two side pockets Zip-tab with lace details in cotton

BLACK

520.00

IT 36 - IT 48

38

trend

SHORT SATIN DRESS WITH UFO TEDDY PRINT

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in Ufo Teddy version embellishes the short dress in white stretch satin Fabric : 98% Viscose, with contrast star print all-over. 2% Other fibres Oversize fit Crew-neck Short sleeves

WHITE

675.00

IT 36 - IT 48

31

core

32

trend

BOLERO IN WOOL AND COTTON

33

Dresses

36

0158 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

39

trend

SHORT SATIN DRESS WITH UFO TEDDY PRINT

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in Ufo Teddy version embellishes the short dress in black stretch satin Fabric : 98% Viscose, with contrast star print all-over. 2% Other fibres Oversize fit Crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

675.00

IT 36 - IT 48

40

basic

FLEECE DRESS WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK EMBROIDERY

Plain-coloured shorts dress in cotton fleece embellished with ton sur ton embroidery of the iconic Double Question Mark logo. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Double Question Mark logo embroidery on the front Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom

CONFETTI PINK

430.00

IT 36 - IT 48

41

basic

KNITTED SHORT DRESS WITH BILLBOARDS INLAY

Black short dress in mixed mohair and pure wool with contrast pink crew-neck and multicolour Billboards inlay on the front. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

Fabric : 50% Mohair, 32% Polyamide, 18% Pure wool

BLACK

575.00

IT 36 - IT 48

42

basic

SHORT DRESS IN PURE WOOL WITH MOSCHINO COUTURE INLAY

Black short dress in pure wool with contrast inlay featuring Moschino Couture logo on the front. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

BLACK

515.00

IT 36 - IT 48

43

trend

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in Ufo Teddy version embellishes the short dress in pink stretch satin with SHORT SATIN DRESS WITH Fabric : 98% Viscose, contrast star print all-over. Oversize UFO TEDDY PRINT 2% Other fibres fit Crew-neck Short sleeves

PINK

675.00

IT 36 - IT 48

44

trend

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

Fabric : 97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

BLACK

645.00

IT 36 - IT 48

45

basic

Short dress in two-colour black and grey plush characterised by the SPACE DOUBLE QUESTION contrast print with Double Question MARK TWO-COLOUR Mark logo on the front. Regular fit Fabric : 100% Cotton SHORT DRESS Hood with coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

Short dress in grey cotton characterised by the contrast Couture Wars print on the front and zip on the sleeves. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck Long sleeves Fabric : 100% Cotton Silver-finish metal zip with double zip-tab Ribbed cuffs and bottom Two side pockets Zip-tab with lace details in cotton

GREY

520.00

IT 36 - IT 48

46

SHORT DRESS IN PLUSH WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear is reviewed for the FW18 PreCollection in Safety Pin patch version and decorates the black dress in stretch cotton jersey. Oversize fit Front Safety Pin Teddy print Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

0159 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Short cotton dress with Trompe l'Oeil effect. The front decorative zipper creates the illusion of a double dress. Regular fit Front Double Question Mark logo print Crew-neck Hood with coulisse Zip décor on the front Ribbed cuffs and bottom Silver-finish metal details

47

trend

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK LOGO

48

trend

LONGUETTE DRESS IN COTTON WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK DÉCOR

49

trend

SHORT DRESS IN FELT WITH BILLBOARDS PRINT

The Billboards print is inspired by the works of artist Ben Frost, a multicolour pattern that decorates the short dress all-over, with nonremovable detail tightened at the waist. Regular fit Crew-neck Sleeveless Rear closure with concealed zip Lined interior

trend

51

52

50

53

Fabric : 97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

BLACK

740.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Made in stretch cotton jersey, the black longuette dress is embellished with the Double Question Mark logo printed in relief on the front. Fabric : 97% Cotton, Regular fit 3% Other fibres Hood with coulisse Short sleeves Front kangaroo pocket Front slit on the bottom

BLACK

650.00

IT 36 - IT 48

MULTICOLOURED

875.00

IT 36 - IT 48

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON AND MOHAIR

Short dress in ‘60s style, characterised by the upper part in ribbed cotton and bottom part in mohair with black patent leather details. Slim fit High collar Fabric : 74% Mohair, Long sleeves 26% Cotton Side closure with concealed zip Waistband and decorative flaps in patent leather Internal bodysuit with hook closure Skirt with lined interior

FUCHSIA

850.00

IT 36 - IT 48

core

SHORT DRESS IN SATIN WITH BILLBOARDS PRINT

The Billboards print is inspired by the works of artist Ben Frost, a multicolour pattern that decorates Fabric : 79% Viscose, the short dress in stretch satin all19% Pure wool, 2% over, curled at the waist. Slim fit Other fibres. Lining : Crew-neck 60% Acetate Sleeveless Rear closure with concealed zip Lined interior

MULTICOLOURED

1,100.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

MOSCHINOEYES VIRGIN WOOL SHORT DRESS

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

SHORT DRESS IN NEW ZEALAND WOOL WITH BIKER DETAILS

CONFETTI PINK

790.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 80% Polyester, 18% Viscose, 2% Other fibres

Virgin wool short dress with intarsia, presented in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by creative director Jeremy Fabric : 100% Pure Scott with the exclusive wool collaboration of visual-artist Ben Frost. Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom

Light pink short dress in precious New Zealand wool, embellished by metal details inspired by the biker jacket. Regular fit Korean-style collar with snap buttons Front zip closure Two front pockets with zip Front flap with snap button Ribbed cuffs and bottom Loop zip-tab Silver-finish metal details

0160 PAGE NUMBER

Fabric : 100% Pure wool


MOSCHINO

54

55

trend

SHORT DRESS IN CRÊPE WITH PATENT LEATHER BELT

core

SHORT DRESS WITH JEWELS PRINT AND POLKA DOTS

Tube dress in black crêpe, slightly fitted at the waist by a belt in patent leather with metal buckle. Regular fit Crew-neck Sleeveless Rear closure with concealed zip Lined interior

Fabric : 89% Polyester, 11% Polyurethane. Lining : 60% Acetate

BLACK

730.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Short dress in georgette with Jewels and Polka Dots print characterised by metal details, typical of Moschino biker jackets. Regular fit Front zip closure Fabric : 90% Viscose, Sleeve bottom with zip 10% Silk. Lining : Collar with lapels 60% Acetate Front pocket Waist belt with adjustable buckle Rear padded appliqué Silver-finish metal details

MULTICOLOURED

1,200.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Short dress in ‘60s style, characterised by the upper part in ribbed cotton and bottom part in mohair with black patent leather details. Slim fit High collar Fabric : 74% Mohair, Long sleeves 26% Cotton Side closure with concealed zip Waistband and decorative flaps in patent leather Internal bodysuit with hook closure Skirt with lined interior

OCHRE

850.00

IT 36 - IT 48

SALMON PINK

645.00

IT 36 - IT 48

WHITE

775.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

695.00

IT 36 - IT 48

56

trend

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON AND MOHAIR

57

trend

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear is reviewed for the FW18 PreCollection in Safety Pin patch SHORT DRESS IN COTTON version and decorates the pink dress Fabric : 97% Cotton, WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY in stretch cotton jersey. Oversize fit 3% Other fibres PRINT Front Safety Pin Teddy print Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

trend

SHORT DRESS WITH LOGO DECOR AND LACES

trend

SHORT DRESS IN PLUSH WITH PUNK VERBIAGE DÉCOR

58

59

White short dress embellished by contrast laces with bow on the sides that exalt the silhouette and the logo recreated with black laces on the front. Regular fit Front Lacing logo décor Crew-neck Short sleeves Rear closure with concealed zip Silver-finish metal details

Fabric : 72% Acetate, 27% Viscose, 1% Other fibres

Short cotton dress with hood, characterised by Punk Verbiage décor on the front and patches fixed with safety pins. Oversize fit Hood with coulisse Fabric : 100% Cotton Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom Front kangaroo pocket Silver-finish metal details

0161 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

60

basic

Short oversize dress in cotton jersey DRESS IN COTTON JERSEY printed all-over with Punk Verbiage WITH PUNK VERBIAGE graphics. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton PRINT Crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

325.00

IT 36 - IT 48

61

basic

SHORT DRESS IN COTTON WITH PUNK VERBIAGE PRINT

Tube dress in cotton popeline printed all-over with Punk Verbiage graphics. Regular fit Fabric : 97% Cotton, Crew-neck 3% Other fibres, Sleeveless Lining : 6% Elastan Fitted at the waist Side closure with concealed zip

BLACK

645.00

IT 36 - IT 48

core

Inspired to the classic men’s double breasted style, the short dress in crêpe reveals the shoulders and is characterised by removable leather Fabric : 89% SHORT DRESS IN CRÊPE straps. Slim fit Polyester, 11% WITH LEATHER SHOULDER V-neck with peak lapels Polyurethane. Lining STRAPS Long sleeves : 6% Elastan Side closure with concealed zip front flaps Pocket with zip on left sleeve Padded and lined interior

BLACK

1,495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Inspired by classic men’s cloths, the black tube dress in crêpe is characterised by a tuxedo waistband Fabric : 89% and by the dove-tail bottom, typical Polyester, 11% of tuxedos. Oversize fit Polyurethane. Lining Crew-neck : 48% Acetate Sleeveless Rear closure with concealed zip Round buttons on the back

BLACK

1,295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Short dress in elastic interlock cotton jersey with contrasting printed Moschino Couture logo. Logo print Moschino Couture on the front Fabric : 97% Cotton, Hood 3% Other fibres Three-quarter sleeves Drawstring at waist with metal details Contrasting flared skirt

WHITE

645.00

IT 36 - IT 48

TAN / MULTICOLOUR

1,595.00

IT 36 - IT 48

62

63

core

SHORT DRESS IN CRÊPE WITH TAILCOAT

64

trend

MOSCHINO COUTURE BICOLOR DRESS

65

trend

LONGUETTE DRESS IN CHIFFON WITH MOLLINO PRINT

A Polaroid photo by artist Carlo Mollino is reproposed as print on the longuette dress in pleated black chiffon. Regular fit Crew-neck Curled ¾ sleeves Band appliqué under the breast Rear closure with button Side closure with zip and concealed snap buttons Closure with button on sleeve bottom Internal slip

0162 PAGE NUMBER

Fabric : 100% Polyester. Lining : 60% Acetate


MOSCHINO

A Polaroid photo by artist Carlo Mollino is reproposed as print on the silk longuette dress with pleated skirt. Regular fit V-neck Pleated short sleeves Grosgrain waistband Side closure with snap buttons and concealed zip Side slit Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyester

RUST

1,295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

66

trend

LONGUETTE DRESS IN SILK WITH MOLLINO PRINT

67

trend

MIDI SLIP DRESS

Inspired by the lingerie world, the army green washed silk slip dress is embellished with black lace inserts. Slim fit V neck sleeveless Slim and adjustable straps

???

MILITARY GREEN

775.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

LONGUETTE DRESS IN CHIFFON WITH MOLLINO PRINT

The contrast print inspired by the works of artist Carlo Mollino exalts the longuette dress in black chiffon with pleated skirt and slip in nude colour silk. Regular fit Collar with small tips Long sleeves Waist appliqué Cuffs with button Front closure with buttons Side closure with zip and concealed snap buttons Internal zip

Fabric : 100% Polyester. Lining : 60% Acetate

TAN / MULTICOLOUR

1,495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

PLEATED LONGUETTE DRESS WITH MOLLINO PRINT

A Polaroid photo by artist Carlo Mollino is reproposed as print on the pleated longuette dress with grey twill. Regular fit Crew-neck Bubbled short sleeves Waist curling Rear closure Side closure with concealed zip Sleeve bottom with concealed snap buttons

Fabric : 100% Polyester

BLACK

1,295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

LONGUETTE DRESS WITH MOLLINO PRINT

Light long-sleeve dress in silk printed with a work by artist Carlo Mollino. Regular fit Crew-neck Long sleeves Curling on shoulders and waist Rear closure with concealed button Side closure with concealed zip Cuffs with concealed snap buttons

Fabric : 100% Polyester

MULTICOLOURED

1,150.00

IT 36 - IT 48

SHORT DRESS IN DENIM STRETCH

The bustier dress in black stretch denim is supported by removable leather braces, an accessory inspired by classic men’s clothes. Slim fit Sleeveless Braces with removable buttons Front closure with buttons Two front flaps with buttons Fitted at the waist Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 98% Cotton, 2% Other fibres

BLACK

585.00

IT 36 - IT 48

68

69

70

71

basic

0163 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

72

73

74

75

core

trend

core

core

LONG DRESS IN CHIFFON WITH MOLLINO PRINT

A polaroid photo by artist Carlo Mollino is reproposed as print on the long evening dress in pleated chiffon. Regular fit Crew-neck Curled ¾ sleeves Band under the breast Rear closure with button Side closure with zip and concealed snap buttons Closure with button on cuffs Side slit Internal slip

LONG DRESS IN VELVET

Elegant long evening dress in bordeaux velvet, embellished with double thin shoulder straps, fitted at the waist and loose along the sides. Regular fit Fabric : 100% V-neck Cotton. ining : 60% Sleeveless Acetate Empire style Curling on the breast Rear stretch appliqué on the waist Side closure with concealed zip Flared bottom

Space Couture mermaid dress in fuchsia silk duchess satin fabric and silver sequins with cut-out on the neckline and iconic thunderbolt pattern on the side. Slim fit Crew-neck with rear closure with button LONG DRESS IN DUCHESS Bustier with cleavage line SATIN FABRIC WITH SPACE Long sleeves COUTURE SEQUINS Curling on front and back Side closure with concealed zip Sleeve bottom with concealed zip Internal waistband with adjustable hook closure Padded cups Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyester. Lining : 60% Acetate

Fabric : 100% Polyester. Lining : 60% Acetate

Dress in pink chiffon, almost entirely covered by silver sequins, characterised by a thunderbolt pattern that distinguishes the Space Couture dresses of the FW18 fashion show. Slim fit Single-shoulder Crew-neck with rear closure LONG DRESS IN CHIFFON featuring snap buttons Fabric : 100% Silk. WITH SPACE COUTURE Side closure with zip and concealed Lining : 60% Acetate SEQUINS hook Sleeve bottom with concealed zip Bustier with whalebones Padded cups Internal waistband with hook closure Bottom with train Lined interior

76

trend

SHORT DRESS IN LUREX JACQUARD

77

trend

MERINO WOOL SWEATER WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Short dress in lurex jacquard in pink tones, characterised by a '60s inspired shape, trimmed with a piping in light pink patent leather and fitted at the waist by a belt with adjustable buckle. Slim fit Korean-style collar Sleeveless Front zip closure Two side pockets Bubble skirt Coulisse on the bottom Lined interior

Fabric : 85% Polyester, 15% Polyamide. Lining : 6% Elastan

BROWN

2,195.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BORDEAUX

1,180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

SILVER

7,785.00

IT 36 - IT 48

PASTEL PINK

7,775.00

IT 36 - IT 48

ANTIQUE PINK

870.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

515.00

IT 36 - IT 48

KNITWEAR Made of the finest merino wool, this sweater is decorated all over by contrasting star intarsia and Ufo Fabric : 100% Pure Teddy on the front. Oversize fit wool Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

0164 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO KNITWEAR

78

trend

MERINO WOOL SWEATER WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Made of the finest merino wool, this sweater is decorated all over by contrasting star intarsia and Ufo Teddy on the front. Oversize fit Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

GREY

515.00

IT 36 - IT 48

79

trend

MERINO WOOL SWEATER WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Made of the finest merino wool, this sweater is decorated all over by contrasting star intarsia and Ufo Teddy on the front. Oversize fit Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

GREY

515.00

IT 36 - IT 48

80

trend

MERINO WOOL SWEATER WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Made of the finest merino wool, this sweater is decorated all over by contrasting star intarsia and Ufo Teddy on the front. Oversize fit Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

ROSE

515.00

IT 36 - IT 48

81

basic

COTTON PULLOVER WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY INLAY

Pullover in pure cotton embellished by Moschino Teddy Bear inlay in Safety Pin version on the front. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Front logo and Safety Pin Teddy inlays Ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

WHITE

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

82

basic

Made in pure cotton, the antique pink pullover is embellished by a front inlay with the Safety Pin Teddy OTTON PULLOVER WITH of the FW18 pre-collection. Oversize abric : 100% Cotton SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT fit Front Safety Pin Teddy inlay Ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom Long sleeves

ANTIQUE PINK

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

83

84

trend

CARDIGAN IN WOOL AND CASHMERE WITH BRACES

Inspired by men’s clothes, the cardigan in soft pure wool and cashmere, tobacco colour, is supported by removable leather braces. Oversize fit Ribbed V-neck Revealed shoulders Long sleeves Front closure with buttons Two front pockets Ribbed cuffs and bottom

basic

MOSCHINOEYES VIRGIN WOOL SWEATER

Virgin wool sweater with intarsia, presented in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by creative director Jeremy Scott with the exclusive collaboration of visualartist Ben Frost. Oversize fit Contrasting #Moschinoeyes intarsia on the front Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom

0165 PAGE NUMBER

Fabric : 70% Pure wool, 30% cashmere

TOBACCO

695.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

WHITE

440.00

IT 36 - IT 48


MOSCHINO

The New Zealand wool sweater is WEATER WITH MOSCHINO decorated with the iconic Moschino COUTURE INTARSIA Couture logo intarsia on the front. Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

BLACK

445.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 70% Viscose, 30% Polyester

GOLD

385.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Virgin wool and cashmere pullover Fabric : 70% Pure supported by removable leather wool, 30% cashmere braces.

BLACK

595.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 100% Pure wool. Lining : 60% Acetate

BLACK

540.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Straight line shirt made of New Zealand wool with multicolour stripes. Regular fit Round neck Short sleeves

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

FUCHSIA

590.00

IT 36 - IT 48

MOSCHINOEYES COTTON PULLOVER

Cotton pullover with Freckles placed print, introduced in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by the creative director Jeremy Scott with the exclusive collaboration of visual artist Ben Frost. Ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

MULTICOLOURED

595.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

COTTON SWEATSHIRT WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

White cotton sweatshirt with hood characterised by the new regular fit and Moschino Teddy Bear in Safety Pin version on the front. Regular fit Front logo and Safety Pin Teddy Fabric : 100% Cotton print Hood with coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

WHITE

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

COTTON SWEATSHIRT WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

Blackcotton sweatshirt with hood characterised by the new regular fit and Moschino Teddy Bear in Safety Pin version on the front. Regular fit Front logo and Safety Pin Teddy Fabric : 100% Cotton print Hood with coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

BLACK

505.00

IT 36 - IT 48

85

basic

86

basic

CARDIGAN IN LUREX

87

trend

WOOL AND CASHMERE PULLOVER WITH BRACES

88

trend

Polka dot cardigan in New Zealand wool with Moschino Jewels and Polka Dots printed silk front panel. Regular fit JEWELS AND POLKA DOTS Contrasting Polka dots intarsia WOOL AND SILK Front panel with jewellery and polka CARDIGAN dot placed print Ribbed front closure with covered buttons Ribbed neck, cuffs and bottom Semi-lined inside

89

trend

NEW ZEALAND WOOL STRIPED SHIRT

90

trend

91

92

Made in gold colour lurex, the cardigan with pearl buttons exalts the waist thanks to the stretch ribbed appliqué. Slim fit Ribbed crew-neck Front closure with buttons Ribbed cuffs

FLEECEWEAR

0166 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Pure cotton sweatshirt decorated with the iconic Double Question Mark logo embroidered in contrast on the front. Oversize fit Hood with drawstring Front pocket Ribbed cuffs and bottom Metal details

trend

COTTON SWEATSHIRT WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK EMBROIDERY

Fabric : 100% Cotton

BLACK

440.00

IT 36 - IT 48

94

basic

Cropped cotton sweatshirt with contrasting print, presented in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by creative director Jeremy Scott with the exclusive MOSCHINOEYES CROPPED collaboration of visual-artist Ben Fabric : 100% Cotton COTTON SWEATSHIRT Frost. Regular fit #Moschinoeyes logo print on the front Hood with drawstring Ribbed cuffs Raw cut bottom

WHITE

310.00

IT 36 - IT 48

95

basic

COTTON SWEATSHIRT WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK EMBROIDERY

Solid colour sweatshirt in pink cotton embellished by tone-on-tone embroidery on the front of the Fabric : 100% Cotton iconic Double Question Mark logo. Regular fit Ribbed crew-neck, cuffs and bottom

CONFETTI PINK

340.00

IT 36 - IT 48

96

trend

MOSCHINOEYES HOODIE

Cotton hoodie with placed print, introduced in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by the creative director Jeremy Scott with Fabric : 100% Cotton the exclusive collaboration of visual artist Ben Frost. Hood with drawstring Ribbed cuffs and bottom

MULTICOLOURED

585.00

IT 36 - IT 48

97

basic

MOSCHINOEYES HOODIE

Cotton hoodie with placed print, introduced in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by the creative director Jeremy Scott with Fabric : 100% Cotton the exclusive collaboration of visual artist Ben Frost. Hood with drawstring Ribbed cuffs and bottom

MULTICOLOURED

410.00

IT 36 - IT 48

98

core

HOODED SWEATSHIRT WITH CRYSTAL TEDDY

Hooded sweatshirt in cotton embellished on the front by the logo décor and Crystal Teddy in multicolour crystals. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Hood with coulisse Two side pockets Ribbed cuffs and bottom Silver-finish metal detail

BLACK

990.00

IT 36 - IT 48

99

trend

COTTON SWEATSHIRT WITH ZIP AND COUTURE WARS PRINT

Oversize sweatshirt in black cotton with contrast Couture Wars print on the front. Its peculiarity is the zip that creates an adjustable opening on the bottom. Oversize fit Hood with coulisse Fabric : 100% Cotton Front kangaroo pocket ribbed cuffs and bottom Metal zip with double tab on the bottom Silver-finish metal details

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

100

basic

Hooded SWEATSHIRT WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Blackcotton sweatshirt with hood characterised by the new regular fit and Moschino Teddy Bear Ufo version on the front.Hood with Fabric : 100% Cotton coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

93

0167 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

101

basic

Hooded SWEATSHIRT WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

Pink kcotton sweatshirt with hood characterised by the new regular fit and Moschino Teddy Bear Ufo version on the front.Hood with Fabric : 100% Cotton coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

ROSE

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

102

basic

Hooded SWEATSHIRT WITH UFO TEDDY INTARSIA

White cotton sweatshirt with hood characterised by the new regular fit and Moschino Teddy Bear Ufo version on the front.Hood with Fabric : 100% Cotton coulisse Long sleeves Ribbed cuffs and bottom

WHITE

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

103

trend

104

trend

105

BLOUSES/TOPS

Moschino logo has taken on many incarnations season after season making it part of the brand's DNA. chains printed loose blouse This black yellow silk chains printed loose blouse from Moschino featuring a classic collar, long sleeves and a button fastening

Fabric: 100 % silk

BLACK

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

tie neck blouse

The carefree Moschino mode is defined by classic Italian tailoring imbibed with a sense of pop culture extravagance and humour. This statement yellow tie neck blouse has been crafted in Italy from fine silk, and features long sleeves and a concealed button fastening.

Fabric: 100 % silk

YELLOW

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

tie neck blouse

The carefree Moschino mode is defined by classic Italian tailoring imbibed with a sense of pop culture extravagance and humour. This statement yellow tie neck blouse has been crafted in Italy from fine silk, and features long sleeves and a concealed button fastening.

Fabric: 100 % silk

ROSE

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

106

basic

ruffle neck sleeveless top

Made in Italy from silk, this solid black ruffle neck halter features a covered button keyhole closure at the back, a sleeveless design, a side invisible zip fastening and a fitted waist.

Fabric: 100 % silk

BLACK

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

107

trend

frilled long-sleeved blouse

This black silk frilled long-sleeved blouse from Moschino featuring a round neck with ruffles

Fabric: 100 % silk

BLACK

590.00

IT 36 - IT 48

0168 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

108

basic

classic plaid shirt

Made in Italy, this pink silk classic plaid shirt from Moschino features a classic collar, a front button fastening, long sleeves and a curved hem.

Fabric: 100 % silk

PINK

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

495.00

IT 36 - IT 48

109

trend

safety pin printed shirt

Crafted from a soft cotton blend, this head-turning AW18 design is adorned with bricolage style appliquĂŠ patches, printed with slogans, attached to the body with FABRIC: cotton 97% silver-tone safety pins. The design other fibers 3% otherwise stays true to the tenets of traditional Italian tailoring with a classic collar, a front button fastening, long sleeves with button cuffs and a mid-length curved hem.

110

core

long-sleeve fitted shirt

Make a statement in this white silk shirt that features a classic collar, long sleeves, fitted cuffs, a button fastening, a slim fit and a buckle detail to the collar.

Fabric: 100 % silk

WHITE

1.300.00

IT 36 - IT 48

111

basic

drawstring short sleeved shirt

This white cotton blend drawstring short sleeved shirt from Moschino features a classic buttoned collar, a front button fastening, short sleeves with a drawstring detail at the cuffs, a fitted silhouette, a curved hem and a logo tag.

cotton 77%, polyamide 20%, other fibers 3%

WHITE

450.00

IT 36 - IT 48

112

core

bow collar shirt

Crafted from white silk, this elegant shirt features long sleeves, a straight fit, a curved hem and a dainty bow collar. Wear yours tucked into a tweed skirt.

Fabric: 100 % silk

WHITE

1.300.00

IT 36 - IT 48

113

basic

pleated hem shirt

Crafted in Italy, this black and white silk pleated hem shirt from Moschino features a pointed collar, a sleeveless design, a front button fastening and a curved hem.

Fabric: 100 % silk

BLACK

505.00

IT 36 - IT 48

114

basic

pointed collar shirt

This white silk pointed collar shirt from Moschino features a front button fastening, long sleeves, button cuffs and a curved hem.

Fabric: 100 % silk

WHITE

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

0169 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

trend

belt detail top

Crafted in Italy from black virgin wool blend, this belt detail top from Fabric: Lining: 94 % Moschino features a v-neck with a Cupro, Outer: 93 & quilted trim, a sleeveless design, a virgin wool cropped length and a belt detail to the front.

BLACK

695.00

IT 36 - IT 48

116

trend

SHIRT IN COTTON POPELINE WITH BUSTIER

A basic article like the white shirt in cotton popeline in lingerie version with bustier appliqué in black satin and lace, with adjustable shoulder Fabric : 77% Cotton, straps. Slim fit 20% Polyamide, 3% Collar with small tips Other fibres Front closure with buttons and zip Bustier with quilted cups Cuffs with button Internally lined bustier

WHITE/BLACK

750.00

IT 36 - IT 48

117

basic

OVERSIZED COTTON TSHIRT WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear Safety Pin Teddy version decorates the oversized cotton T-shirt with logo on the front. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Safety Pin Teddy front print Ribbed neck Short sleeves

WHITE

180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

118

core

COTTON JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

The classic Moschino T-shirt for the Pre-collection FW18 is renewed with stretch cotton jersey and a new regular fit. Moschino Teddy Bear is reinterpreted in a Safety Pin patch version. Regular fit Safety Pin Teddy front print Ribbed neck Short sleeves

97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

ANTIQUE PINK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

119

core

COTTON JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH SAFETY PIN TEDDY PRINT

The classic Moschino T-shirt for the Pre-collection FW18 is renewed with stretch cotton jersey and a new regular fit. Moschino Teddy Bear is reinterpreted in a Safety Pin patch version. Regular fit Safety Pin Teddy front print Ribbed neck Short sleeves

97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

120

basic

COTTON T-SHIRT WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Black t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished with Couture Wars print on the front. Regular fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

LIGHT GREY

145.00

IT 36 - IT 48

121

basic

COTTON T-SHIRT WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Black t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished with Couture Wars print on the front. Regular fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

145.00

IT 36 - IT 48

115

T-SHIRTS

0170 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

122

basic

Cotton t-shirt with placed print, introduced in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by the MOSCHINOEYES COTTON Tcreative director Jeremy Scott with Fabric : 100% Cotton SHIRT the exclusive collaboration of visual artist Ben Frost. Crew-neck Short sleeves

123

basic

T-SHIRT IN COTTON WITH MOSCHINO COUTURE LOGO

T-shirt in white cotton jersey embellished by Moschino Couture logo on the front. Regular fit Crew-neck Short sleeves

124

basic

T-SHIRT IN COTTON JERSEY WITH MOSCHINO COUTURE PRINT

125

MULTICOLOURED

170.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 100% Cotton

WHITE

125.00

IT 36 - IT 48

T-shirt in black cotton jersey embellished by Moschino Couture logo print on the front. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

135.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in Ufo Teddy version embellishes the OVERSIZE T-SHIRT IN oversize black t-shirt in cotton with COTTON WITH UFO TEDDY logo on the front and contrast stars Fabric : 100% Cotton PRINT all-over. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

255.00

IT 36 - IT 48

126

trend

The iconic Moschino Teddy Bear in Ufo Teddy version embellishes the OVERSIZE T-SHIRT IN oversize black t-shirt in cotton with COTTON WITH UFO TEDDY logo on the front and contrast stars Fabric : 100% Cotton PRINT all-over. Oversize fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

BLACK

255.00

IT 36 - IT 48

127

trend

Pink t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Ufo Teddy T-SHIRT IN COTTON print on the front and black stars allJERSEY WITH UFO TEDDY Fabric : 100% Cotton over. Regular fit PRINT Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

CONFETTI PINK

230.00

IT 36 - IT 48

128

trend

Pink t-shirt in cotton jersey and regular fit embellished by Ufo Teddy T-SHIRT IN COTTON print on the front and black stars allJERSEY WITH UFO TEDDY Fabric : 100% Cotton over. Regular fit PRINT Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves

BLUE

230.00

IT 36 - IT 48

0171 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

129

trend

CROP TOP WITH LOGO PRINT AND BUSTIER INSERT

130

trend

T-SHIRT IN COTTON JERSEY WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK LOGO

131

trend

JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK EMBROIDERY

132

basic

133

trend

MOSCHINOEYES COTTON TSHIRT

basic

COTTON T-SHIRT WITH #MOSCHINOEYES PRINT

134

White cotton crop top with contrasting logo front print in lingerie version with satin and black lace bustier insert with adjustable straps. Slim fit Round neck Fabric : 100% Cotton Short sleeves Ton sur ton zip on the front Adjustable straps Concealed side zip Cups with internal underwire

Short t-shirt in cotton jersey embellished by the relief print of the iconic Double Question Mark logo. Slim fit Ribbed crew-neck Short sleeves Stretch appliqué on bottom

Fabric : 97% Cotton, 3% Other fibres

The cotton jersey t-shirt is decorated with the iconic embossed Double Question Mark logo embroidered on the front. Oversize Fabric : 100% Cotton fit Ribbed neck Short sleeves

WHITE

445.00

IT 36 - IT 48

ANTIQUE PINK

285.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

255.00

IT 36 - IT 48

This white cotton logo printed Tshirt features a ribbed round neck, short sleeves, a straight hem, a central printed logo and a relaxed fit.

Fabric : 100% Cotton

WHITE

180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Cotton t-shirt with Juicicle placed print, introduced in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by the creative director Jeremy Scott with the exclusive collaboration of visual artist Ben Frost. Crew-neck Short sleeves

Fabric : 100% Cotton

MULTICOLOURED

235.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Cotton T-shirt with placed print, presented in the #Moschinoeyes capsule collection, designed by creative director Jeremy Scott with the exclusive collaboration of visual- Fabric : 100% Cotton artist Ben Frost. Contrasting #Moschinoeyes print on the front Ribbed neck Short sleeves

WHITE

180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

215.00

IT 36 - IT 48

BLACK

215.00

IT 36 - IT 48

135

trend

The two-tone cotton jersey t-shirt with the contrasting Double Question Mark logo print features the iconic lightning pattern inspired JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH by the Space Couture dresses of the DOUBLE QUESTION MARK Fabric : 100% Cotton FW18 show. Oversize fit PRINT Double Question Mark logo print on the front Ribbed neck Short sleeves

136

trend

The two-tone cotton jersey t-shirt with the contrasting Double Question Mark logo print features the iconic lightning pattern inspired JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH by the Space Couture dresses of the DOUBLE QUESTION MARK Fabric : 100% Cotton FW18 show. Oversize fit PRINT Double Question Mark logo print on the front Ribbed neck Short sleeves

0172 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

137

basic

JERSEY T-SHIRT WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK

The cotton jersey t-shirt is decorated with the iconic embossed Double Question Mark logo printed on the front. Oversize fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Contrasting Double Question Mark Ribbed neck Short sleeves

ANTIQUE PINK

180.00

IT 36 - IT 48

138

basic

safety pin T-shirt

This black and white cotton safety pin T-shirt from Moschino features Fabric : 100% Cotton a round neck, short sleeves, a two tone design and a straight hem.

BLACK

325.00

IT 36 - IT 48

139

basic

printed T-shirt

Crafted from high quality cotton, this printed T-shirt from Moschino Fabric : 100% Cotton features a round neck, short sleeves and a straight hem.

BLACK

195.00

IT 36 - IT 48

140

basic

JOGGING IN FLEECE WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Cotton jogging trousers with Couture Wars contrast side print and elasticated waist. Regular fit Regular waist Drawstring on the waist Two side pockets with zip and zip tab Rear pocket Ribbed waist and ankles

Fabric : 100% Cotton

LIGHT GREY

340.00

IT 36 - IT 48

141

basic

JOGGING TROUSERS IN PLUSH WITH COUTURE WARS PRINT

Cotton jogging trousers with Couture Wars contrast side print and elasticated waist. Regular fit Regular waist Drawstring on the waist Two side pockets with zip and zip tab Rear pocket Ribbed waist and ankles

Fabric : 100% Cotton

BLACK

340.00

IT 36 - IT 48

142

basic

JOGGING IN FLEECE WITH DOUBLE QUESTION MARK LOGO

ANTIQUE PINK

285.00

IT 36 - IT 48

TOUSERS

Pink jogging trousers in cotton fleece with white Double Question Mark logo printed in relief on the front. Slim fit Slim Fit Fabric : 100% Cotton Regular waist Drawstring inside Two side pockets Ribbed ankles

0173 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

143

trend

COUTURE WARS TROUSERS IN NYLON WITH RUCHES

Trousers in black nylon, slightly padded, embellished by tone-ontone ruches on the sides and contrast Couture Wars print on the front. Regular fit Regular waist Stretch appliqué on waist and bottom Padded and lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyamide. Lining : 60% Acetate

BLACK

575.00

IT 36 - IT 48

144

basic

JACQUARD LUREX ZIGZAG TROUSERS

Trousers with side zip made of cropped-length jacquard lurex zigzag. Regular waist Concealed side zip closure Small side slits at the bottom Lined inside

Fabric : 85% Polyester, 15% Polyamide, Lining : 6% Elastan

AZURE

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

CLASSIC TUXEDO TROUSERS

Inspired by classic men’s clothes, the black trousers in wool and stretch cotton are characterised by a tuxedo waistband and tone-on-tone gros grain side bands. Regular fit Regular waist Two side pockets Waistband with rear hook closure Side closure with concealed zip Lined interior

Fabric : 68% Pure wool, 30% Cotton, 2% Other fibres. 60% Acetate

BLACK

695.00

IT 36 - IT 48

146

basic

LONG TROUSERS WITH PUNK VERBIAGE PRINT

BLACK

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

147

trend

NEW ZEALAND WOOL STRIPED TROUSERS

Flared trousers made of New Zealand wool with multicolour stripes. Regular fit Vertical stripes Regular waist Side zip closure Flared bottom

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

PINK

790.00

IT 36 - IT 48

148

basic

high-waisted skinny pinstripe trousers

Made from a virgin wool blend, these black trousers have a high waist, a skinny fit, and an allover pinstripe pattern.

virgin wool 97%. other fibers 3%

BLACK

385.00

IT 36 - IT 48

145

Black five-pocket trousers in cotton gabardine printed all-over with Punk Verbiage graphics. Regular fit Regular waist Fabric : 97% Cotton, Belt loops on the waist 3% Other fibres. Three front pockets Lining : 60% Acetate Two rear pockets Front closure with concealed zip and button

0174 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Crafted from pink cotton, these track pants feature an elasticated Fabric : 100% Cotton waistband, a slim fit, an embossed logo and fitted cuffs.

ROSE

295.00

IT 36 - IT 48

tailored trousers

Ideal for day-to-day workwear, these smart black tailored trousers from Moschino feature a button and zip fly, a straight fit and a regular length.

polyester 89%, polyurethane 11%

BLACK

390.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

skinny fit trousers

Crafted from a soft cotton blend, these skinny fit trousers feature a waistband with belt loops, a five pocket design, a concealed zip fastening and a skinny fit.

Lining: cupro 94%, spandex/elastane 6% Outer: cotton 82%, polyester 15%

BLACK

514.00

IT 36 - IT 48

152

core

metallic skinny trousers

Presented in a silver-tone, these Outer: sheep sheepskin metallic skinny trousers skin/shearling 100%, from Moschino feature a waistband Lining: cupro 94%, with belt loops, a low rise, a button spandex/elastane & zip fastening, a skinny fit and a 6% five pocket design.

Silver

1.200,00

IT 36 - IT 48

153

basic

high-waist tailored trousers

A tailored addition to the AW18 collection, these black virgin woolcotton blend trousers feature a high waist, a side zip fastening, a regular length and a slim fit.

BLACK

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

149

basic

embroidered logo track pants

150

basic

151

0175 PAGE NUMBER

virgin wool 68%, cotton 30%, other fibres 2%


MOSCHINO

154

trend

tailored trousers

Going down a more minimalist route than usual, these black virgin wool tailored trousers feature a fitted waist, two back buttoned welt pockets and a straight leg.

Fabric: polyester 100%, virgin wool 100%

BLACK

560.00

IT 36 - IT 48

155

basic

slim fit tailored trousers

These pink slim fit tailored trousers feature a high rise, a button and zip fly and a regular length.

Fabric: polyester 89%, polyurethane 11%

PINK

390.00

IT 36 - IT 48

156

trend

flared knit trousers

Crafted in Italy, these black virgin wool flared knit trousers from Moschino feature a high rise, a stretch fit, a flared skirt and a long length.

Fabric: virgin wool 100%

BLACK

695.00

IT 36 - IT 48

157

basic

slim-fit tailored trousers

Pink slim-fit tailored trousers from Moschino featuring a button fastening, a slim fit and a regular length.

Fabric: polyester 89%, polyurethane 11%

ROSE

390.00

IT 36 - IT 48

158

basic

logo print sweatpants

These cotton sweatpants feature an elasticated waistband, a slim fit and Fabric: cotton 100% a pull-on style.

WHITE

285.00

IT 36 - IT 48

0176 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Fabric: Outer: virgin wool 93%, polyamide 6%. Lining: acetate 60%, cupro 40%

BLACK

592.00

IT 36 - IT 48

button cropped trousers

These black button cropped trousers from Moschino feature a high waist, Fabric: triacetate a front button fastening, a cropped 79%, polyester 21% length and a wide leg.

BLACK

410.0

IT 36 - IT 48

wide leg trousers

these sophisticated black trousers Fabric: Outer: feature a high waist, a wide leg, triacetate 79%, side slit pockets and an elasticated polyester 21%, waistband with a graceful scalloped Lining: acetate 66%, trimming. polyester 34%

BLACK

356.00

IT 36 - IT 48

159

trend

zipped slim-fit trousers

160

basic

161

basic

These black virgin wool blend trousers feature an elasticated waistband, side zip details and a slim fit.

SKIRTS

MINI SKIRT IN BOUCLÉ WOOL

Bouclé wool mini skirt in ‘60s style, characterised by metal details, typical of the iconic biker jacket. Slim fit High waist Rear closure with concealed zip Two front pockets with zip Rear slit on the bottom Loop zip-tab Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 89% Pure wool, 11% Polyamide, Lining : 60% Acetate

TANGERINE

530.00

IT 36 - IT 48

trend

MINI SKIRT IN BOUCLÉ WOOL

Bouclé wool mini skirt in ‘60s style, characterised by metal details, typical of the iconic biker jacket. Slim fit High waist Rear closure with concealed zip Two front pockets with zip Rear slit on the bottom Loop zip-tab Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 89% Pure wool, 11% Polyamide, Lining : 60% Acetate

CONFETTI PINK

530.00

IT 36 - IT 48

164

trend

MINI SKIRT IN BOUCLÉ WOOL

Bouclé wool mini skirt in ‘60s style, characterised by metal details, typical of the iconic biker jacket. Slim fit High waist Rear closure with concealed zip Two front pockets with zip Rear slit on the bottom Loop zip-tab Silver-finish metal details Lined interior

Fabric : 89% Pure wool, 11% Polyamide, Lining : 60% Acetate

CONFETTI PINK

530.00

IT 36 - IT 48

165

basic

MINI SKIRT IN WOOL AND SILK WITH JEWELS AND POLKA DOTS PRINT

Mini skirt in black pure wool with front panel in Jewels and polka dots printed silk. Slim fit High waist Stretch ribbed waistband and bottom Side slit with buttons on the bottom Silk twill front panel

Fabric : 100% Pure wool, Lining : 60% Acetate, Padding : 100% Silk

BLACK

420.00

IT 36 - IT 48

162

163

trend

0177 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

Striped mini skirt in New Zealand stretch wool characterised by wrap closure with coated buttons, in ‘60s style. Slim fit Two front pockets

166

trend

STRIPED MINI SKIRT IN NEW ZEALAND WOOL

167

trend

FELT MINI SKIRT WITH ZIP

168

trend

FUCHSIA

169

basic

MINI SKIRT IN WOOL VELOUR AND MOHAIR

A-line mini skirt of purple colour made in soft wool velour and mohair. Regular fit High waist Side closure with zip and hook Two side pockets Lined interior

170

trend

MINI SKIRT IN LEATHER WITH ZIP AND BUTTONS

171

trend

172

173

Fabric : 100% Pure wool

MULTICOLOURED

550.00

IT 36 - IT 48

A-line mini skirt in mint green colour, made in soft wool felt and embellished by front zip. Regular fit Fabric : 80% Pure High waist wool, 20% Two front pockets with zip Polyamide, Lining : Rear closure with zip and concealed 60% Acetate hook Lined interior

MINT GREEN

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

A-line mini skirt in mint green colour, made in soft wool felt and embellished by front zip. Regular fit Fabric : 80% Pure High waist wool, 20% Two front pockets with zip Polyamide, Lining : Rear closure with zip and concealed 60% Acetate hook Lined interior

FUCHSIA

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric : 80% Pure wool, 20% Mohair, Lining : 60% Acetate

PURPLE

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Pink miniskirt in calfskin with double zip on the front and embellished by coated round buttons in ‘60s style. Regular fit High waist Front closure with zip and double zip-tab Front decorative zip Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Calfskin

CONFETTI PINK

990.00

IT 36 - IT 48

MINI SKIRT IN LEATHER WITH ZIP AND BUTTONS

Pink miniskirt in calfskin with double zip on the front and embellished by coated round buttons in ‘60s style. Regular fit High waist Front closure with zip and double zip-tab Front decorative zip Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Calfskin

BLACK

990.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

MINI SKIRT IN FLEECE WITH ZIP AND COUTURE WARS PRINT

Black mini skirt in pure cotton with Couture Wars print and practical zip on the front. Slim fit High waist Fabric : 100% Cotton Front closure with double-tab zip Ribbed stretch appliqué on waist and bottom Two side pockets with zip

BLACK

345.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

MINI SKIRT IN COTTON WITH PUNK VERBIAGE PRINT

Mini skirt in cotton popeline printed all-over with Punk Verbiage graphics. Slim fit Fabric : 97% Cotton, Regular waist 3% Other fibres Side closure with concealed zip Lined interior

BLACK

435.00

IT 36 - IT 48

0178 PAGE NUMBER


MOSCHINO

174

basic

MINI SKIRT IN LUREX

175

trend

LONGUETTE SKIRT IN SILK WITH MOLLINO PRINT

176

trend

zip front mini skirt

177

trend

178

Tube mini skirt in gold colour lurex, fitted and characterised by stretch Fabric : 70% Viscose, fabric. Slim fit 30% Polyester Regular waist Stretch waistband

GOLD

290.00

IT 36 - IT 48

MULTICOLOURED

595.00

IT 36 - IT 48

Fabric: Outer: virgin Spun from virgin wool blend, this wool 93%, Moschino skirt features a high polyamide 6%, waist, a quilted effect, an off-centre Lining: cupro 94%, , front zip fastening and a straight spandex/elastane hem. 6%

BLACK

530.00

IT 36 - IT 48

pinstripe mini skirt

Fabric: Outer: virgin This black virgin wool blend skirt wool 97%, other features a fitted waist, pinstripes, a fibres 3%. Lining: button fastening and a short length. viscose 51%, acetate 49%

BLACK

470.00

IT 36 - IT 48

basic

printed stretch skirt

This multicolour printed stretch skirt is crafted from virgin wool and features a high rise, a fitted silhouette and a short length.

Fabric: virgin wool 100%

MULTICOLORED

395.00

IT 36 - IT 48

179

core

contrast panel skirt

This black and pink contrast panel skirt from Moschino features a high waist, a fitted silhouette and a contrasting pleated black panel.

Fabric: silk 100%, polyamide 100%

CONFETTI PINK

2.495,00

IT 36 - IT 48

180

trend

high waist a-line leather mini skirt

SILVER

700.00

IT 36 - IT 48

A polaroid photo by artist Carlo Mollino is reproposed as print on the longuette skirt in pleated chiffon. Regular fit Regular waist Stretch waistband Side closure with zip and concealed snap buttons Lined interior

Fabric : 100% Polyester

Fabric: leather Metallic high waist a-line leather 100%, Lining: cupro mini skirt from Moschino featuring 94%, a high rise, a side zip fastening, an aspandex/elastane line style and a short length. 6%

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Re-Merchandising Strategy for Moschino.  

The project was carried out as part of the Fashion Brand Management Master's course at Polimoda.

Re-Merchandising Strategy for Moschino.  

The project was carried out as part of the Fashion Brand Management Master's course at Polimoda.

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