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WELCOMING

THE STRANGER

ANGLICANLIFE.ORG.NZ

DIOCESE OF CHRISTCHURCH

ISSUE FORTY FOUR

MAKING A REAL DIFFERENCE: CHRISTIAN MOVERS AND SHAKERS PUTTING THE BREAKS ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING ART FOR THE HEART

EAT WELL AND COOK OFTEN

OCT / NOV 2016

RISKY LIVING

A TOURIST’S DILEMMA TEAM HOSPITALITY


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WELCOMING THE STRANGER

ART FOR THE HEART

EAT WELL AND COOK OFTEN

A TOURIST’S DILEMMA

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FROM THE BISHOP: Every Christian’s calling

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THE BRIEF THEOLOGICAL THOUGHTS: An open invitation ARTICLE: Chapel Chat ARTICLE: Faithful in small things

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CAPTURED: Psalm ‘Haere mai’ by Joy Cowley GLOBAL DISPATCH: Busy Fingers CULTURE WORKPLACE: Team Hospitality

AnglicanLife is published bi-monthly by the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch. Editor / Cathy Maslin/editor@anglicanlife.org.nz, Contributing Writers / Jo Taylor-de Vocht, the Rev’d Indrea Alexander, Contributors / + Victoria Matthews, Grace Le Heux, Graham Braddock, Amanda Ladd, Catherine Williamson, Peneha Harris, Jill Maslin, Joy Cowley, Jenny Wilkens, Anne McCormick, Simone Bruce, Faith Turner-Walker, Willem de Vocht, Sophia Bayly, Jonny Schwass, Advertising Enquiries / Ivan Hatherley / ihatherley@clear.net.nz, Editorial Enquiries / Jo Taylor-de Vocht/editor@anglicanlife.org.nz, Design / www.baylymoore.com, Printed by / Toltech Print, Sustainability / AnglicanLife is printed on recycled paper using vegetable-based inks. Cover image / Rostislav Zatonskiy©123RF.com

The Transitional Cathedral, Latimer Square

Further details at www.christchurchcathedral.co.nz | admin@christchurchcathedral.co.nz | (03) 3660046 THE BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS. A SERVICE OF BLESSING FOR ANIMALS HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SPCA. ALL ANIMALS ARE WELCOME - BRING YOUR PET FOR A BLESSING! SUNDAY 9 OCTOBER AT 2.00PM LUNCHTIME CHOIR RECITAL: CHILLINGHAM VOICES FROM NSW. MONDAY 10 OCTOBER AT 1.00PM ORGAN RECITAL FOR ALL SAINTS: JOHN LINKER, CATHEDRAL MUSIC DIRECTOR TUES 1 NOV AT 1.10PM CATHEDRAL CHOIR REUNION SERVICE: FOR ALL EX-CATHEDRAL CHORISTERS. SUN 6 NOV FROM 3.00PM ADVENT SUNDAY 27 NOVEMBER AT 7.30PM: THE ADVENT CAROL SERVICE. THE CATHEDRAL CHOIR SINGS THE MUSIC OF ADVENT WITH THE TRADITIONAL READINGS. SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS OF REGULAR SERVICES AND SPECIAL SERVICES


FROM THE BISHOP

EVERY CHRISTIAN’S CALLING Words: Bishop Victoria Matthews

“GRACE IS THE HOSPITALITY OF GOD, WHO FOREVER REACHES OUT TO THOSE WHO HAVE BECOME ISOLATED FROM GOD’S LOVE AND CARE.” The physical force of gravity exerts an extraordinary attraction on every piece of matter and pulls it towards the centre of the planet. That’s why it requires so much energy for a space shuttle to break free of planet earth and move into outer space. Curiously, in our own lives, there is also a strong pull towards the centre. In this instance, the strong attraction is towards the self and to care only for one’s own needs and desires. Rather like the space shuttle there needs to be a concentrated effort to break free of being exclusively self-centred in order to care for others who do not enhance our well-being in return. Unless we make this concerted effort to think of others and have a deep Christ -inspired commitment, to care for strangers and the vulnerable in our midst, there is not much chance we will ever practice Christian hospitality. It is only relatively recently that Christians have rediscovered the strong emphasis on hospitality throughout Scripture. Leviticus 19:33-34 tells us to love strangers because once we were strangers ourselves in Egypt. Romans 12:13 says, “Contribute to the needs of the saints; practice hospitality”, and in the Greek the words imply continuous action. 1 Peter 4:9 instructs us to “practice hospitality ungrudgingly to one

another.” Hebrews 13:1-2 states, “Let brotherly love continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for thereby some have entertained angels unawares”. Why this emphasis? Simply because God in Christ is hospitable to us who neither deserve nor even always want God’s sacrificial hospitality. God does not rest comfortably with us being strangers to God-self. Grace is the hospitality of God, who forever reaches out to those who have become isolated from God’s love and care. The ultimate act of hospitality is the death of God’s only Son on the cross, not for those who loved Jesus, but for those who hated and reviled him. So when we practice hospitality we open up our hearts and lives to the grace of God. We become a pipeline of the hospitality of God. In conclusion, I leave you with three suggestions; invite people into your home, keep an eye out for those who are lonely, and look for those who are bereft. Reject the notion that hospitality is a profession exclusive to the Martha Stewarts of this world. Hospitality is the calling of every Christian. +Victoria

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THE BRIEF

RISKY LIVING Photo: Robert Hainer©123RF.com Disciples of Jesus Christ are called to risky living. Take the plunge by getting in early to order the 2017 Lenten study book for small groups – don’t let the busyness surrounding the end of the year mean you miss out on this opportunity. Make it a church-wide option, or choose to use it with your existing small group. The upcoming study book is produced by Peter Carrell, Director of Theology House, and seven co- authors. It is designed for use during Lent, the six weeks leading up to Easter. Taking your group on a journey, it examines risks the Apostles took in the book of Acts, and explores how this translates into risky discipleship today. Included in the book are illustrations, scriptural reflections and references, alongside challenging discussion points. A popular annually produced resource it is easy to follow and offers groups an excellent springboard to grow in and act on their faith. Order now by contacting Jill Short, admin@theologyhouse.ac.nz or 03 341 3399. Print copies: $8 per person ($7 for early-bird orders placed before 1 December 2016). Kindle version: $6. Distribution will be in late January/early February 2017.

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PUTTING THE BREAKS ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING TEARFUND NEW ZEALAND Human trafficking is an organised criminal activity that uses deception, coercion and force, to transport human beings into forced labour and sexual exploitation. According to the International Labour Organisation there are approximately 21 million people in these forms of slavery today and it generates illegal earnings of $99US Billion. The Christian aid and development organisation, Tearfund, has partners in Thailand, Cambodia and Nepal, including highly specialised investigators, lawyers, counsellors and community workers. They work to prevent vulnerable people from being trafficked, convict traffickers, rescue victims and rehabilitate survivors. “The human trafficking industry places women and children in sexual slavery in countries that are relatively close to ours,” says NZ Tearfund CEO, Mr McInnes. “But the great thing is that now the push back is also growing, as is the determination of local authorities to stop it.” Fifteen percent of Thailand’s total human trafficking convictions in 2015 were the direct result of contributions made by Tearfund’s Kiwi supporters. For more information visit www.tearfund.org.nz

RETIREMENT ON THE HORIZON Words and photo: Sourced from Anglican Taonga The recent announcement of Archbishop Brown Turei’s intention to retire comes after he has served in ordained ministry for over 65 years. He currently holds the roles of Bishop of Aotearoa and Tairāwhiti. The news has been met with support and an acknowledgement of the contribution he and his family have made to the church over this time. Archbishop Brown has served in many capacities in his working life, first as a member of the 28th Maori Battalion and afterwards in ministry as a deacon, priest, chaplain and bishop. As he looks towards the changes in his own life he remarks on the future of the church, “Now is the season for new leadership, new vision and ideas, and a fresh wind of the Holy Spirit to come and lead the church forward. I am very excited about the new generation of young leaders waiting in the wings, and I can’t wait to see what God will do through them.”


THE BRIEF

A WORK OF ART Words: Fiona Taylor and the Rev’d Patricia Allan Image: Designed, printed and framed by Fiona Taylor This year Kia Kaha Friends, the Children’s programme at the Transitional Cathedral, have helped produce a remarkable piece of art. Elements used include cardboard, Cathedral cardboard tube, palm crosses, fern fronds paper and wallpaper. It was presented to the Cathedral by the children and blessed by Bishop Victoria Matthews. Regular worshipper and art specialist, Fiona Taylor, worked with the children aged 3-11 while they produced their individual drawings. These were then combined to create a collagraph plate used

to make the print. The four scenes represent Palm Sunday, the Last Supper, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection, and the placement of the Rose Window at the centre of the image provides it with a link to the old Cathedral. One of the aims held by the co-ordinators of Kia Kaha Friends, the Revd’s Patricia Allan and Hilary Barlow and their team, is to do their utmost to incorporate children into the worshipping life of the Cathedral congregation. 3


FEATURE

WELCOMING THE STRANGER A RE-EMERGENCE OF CHURCH AS SANCTUARY IN THE 21ST CENTURY Words: Grace Le Heux, Anglican Advocacy

St David’s Church, Cave

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FEATURE

“THIS CALL TO CARE FOR THE STRANGER, ESPECIALLY THOSE ENDANGERED AND DISPLACED IS PROFOUNDLY ROOTED IN OUR CHRISTIAN HISTORY AND IDENTITY.”

Many children are hardwired by their parents to understand stranger danger. Don’t talk to strangers. Don’t go with them. And certainly don’t trust them. More and more our world is reflecting this sort of fear — where divisions and differences shape our societies and communities. But Jesus, ever the radical, gives the church a different mandate – to welcome in the stranger. This call to care for strangers, especially those endangered and displaced, is profoundly rooted in our Christian history and identity. The examples of churches offering a physical place of sanctuary from persecution dates back thousands of years. In recent years, they are emerging once again — often in protest at the treatment of those deemed the foreigner, the stateless or the alien. The practice of church sanctuary has deep historical roots dating back to the Old Testament. A similar practice was seen in the cities of refuge established under Deuteronomic law, cities where those threatened by blood retribution could shelter. In England from 4AD up until the Reformation in the 17th century, the right of the churches to offer temporary shelter to those at risk from unjust punishment from authorities was enshrined in law. The concept of sanctuary is embedded in the Old Testament; a narrative which is marked by displacement, such as the exiling of Jacob’s descendants in Egypt, their years of wandering the desert after being delivered out of slavery, and later, the deportation of much of Jerusalem to Babylon. Through being uprooted, endangered and finding themselves in strange lands, the Israelites were reminded of their obligation to care for the exiled and the stranger in their midst — “for you were once foreigners in Egypt” (Exodus 22:21). Welcoming the stranger was not just an act of charity, but done out of a shared identity with the outcast. Beyond the Old Testament’s sense of identity with the stranger, the New Testament presents the marginalised, the outcast and the foreigner as those in whom we directly encounter God. In Matthew 25, Jesus presents himself as the stranger to be welcomed in or to be rejected. Perhaps, most telling, Jesus entered our world as one of the excluded. He was born into an oppressed group of people. He was a

refugee baby, whose family was forced to flee to a foreign land. God came among us as a displaced, vulnerable human. Today there are 65.3 million people, or one in 113, who have been displaced by conflict and persecution — the highest number ever recorded. At sea, a frightening number of refugees are dying each year; on land, many are fleeing only to find their way blocked by borders. If they do survive their journey, upon arrival many face 5


FEATURE

“IN MATTHEW 25, JESUS PRESENTS HIMSELF AS THE STRANGER TO BE WELCOMED IN OR TO BE REJECTED. PERHAPS, MOST TELLING, JESUS ENTERED OUR WORLD AS ONE OF THE EXCLUDED.”

latent fears and suspicions. Immigrants, especially those from places totally unfamiliar to us, can also face a similar welcome. Many governments have struggled to develop clear and practical policies for the acceptance of refugees and migrants, and provide for short or long term integration which respects the rights of all. In response, there have been pockets of churches around the world evoking the practice of sanctuary to address systemic injustices, and extend a compassionate hand to the stranger. Last September, Pope Francis called upon the churches to respond to the influx of refugees and asylum seekers with mercy and concrete action. “Faced with the tragedy of tens of thousands of refugees who are fleeing death by war and by hunger, and who are on a path toward a hope for life, the gospel calls us to be neighbours to the smallest and most abandoned, to give them concrete hope,” Francis said. “It’s not enough, he said, to simply tell the oppressed to ‘have courage, hang in there’. “May every parish, every religious community, every monastery, every sanctuary in Europe host a family, starting with my diocese of Rome,” Francis said. Making good on his commitment, he has since welcomed three refugee families to the Vatican. Across Europe, there are a number of churches who have risen to this challenge. In taking such steps, some churches have found themselves face to face with the law. Two asylum seekers, facing deportation back to Iraq, were offered sanctuary by a church in Reykjavik, Iceland. In the middle of the night, last July, police entered the church to find the pair, along with almost 30 others, standing behind the altar. In a vain attempt to peacefully deter the police the 30 encircled the asylum seekers. But the pair was forcibly removed into waiting police cars. “We have gotten to know these individuals and heard their stories, as well as hearing about the process they have to go through upon entering Iceland,” Vicar Tómasdóttir stated, adding that their church was still committed to offering sanctuary, and calling for change. Churches in Australia also made headlines earlier this year by 6

Participants in sanctuary training, Melbourne. Supplied by the Australian Churches Refugee Taskforce.

offering sanctuary to asylum seekers facing deportation to Nauru. As a result of the Australian High Court’s ruling which backed the legality of the offshore processing regime, 267 people seeking asylum, including 91 children, faced being sent back to Nauru. The outcry over this ruling lead over 100 churches, initiated by the Anglican Dean of Brisbane, to declare their churches as safe havens. As there was no legal precedent for church sanctuary to appeal to, sanctuary trainings were held in every state and territory. Hundreds of church leaders and parishioners came together to discuss and learn non-violent ways of protecting asylum seekers should they face being removed. During this time, here in New Zealand, Anglican Archbishops Brown Turei and Philip Richardson made a formal case for increasing the refugee quota. In a detailed written submission, they argued that New Zealand has been a minimal contributor, hitting well below its weight in comparison to other countries with similar size, populations and wealth. They reiterated the offer that


FEATURE

Anglican, Catholic and Canterbury Baptist church leaders had made last September. The churches would offer a one parish, one family scheme, with each church sponsoring either an individual or family. Reflecting upon this offer Jolyon White, the Director of Anglican Advocacy states: “This generous offer gave churches a tangible way of extending hospitality to the stranger, and it kept the issue before the government. Long term, the conversation needs to evolve — from how we make temporary space for others in urgent need, to how we make space within our communities for other communities to join. It’s important that those who have been violently up-rooted, are able to maintain social, cultural and religious ties with their community here.” In 2013, 11 Indonesian fishermen, who’d been exploited and under-paid while working on a foreign boat contracted by a New Zealand fishing company, disembarked here. In leaving their boat, they violated their visas. Despite promises from Immigration NZ to resolve this issue White and others, who had been advocating alongside the fishermen, felt the offer of help rang hollow. Sending these men home wasn’t an option; they had to stay to fight for their rights. After considering other options, White and his flatmates invited them to move into their lounge. “My flatmates and I took action because we knew their situation, had met them, and had become invested in a good outcome. We believed we had a Christian mandate to offer hospitality to those in trouble.” While the companies were never prosecuted, the end result was a better outcome than experienced by many others who have faced similar treatment. Some of the men were paid, and it put pressure on the government to address legislative loop-holes. The call to welcome the stranger isn’t an easy one. The practice of

Syrian girl waiting for transporation to the EU. Credit: Photootohp©123RF Stock Photography.

sanctuary offers to make space for the stranger when no other place will. The next few decades will continue to see people uprooted as a result of environmental degradation, climate change, famine, war and persecution. The challenge for us as the church, as the institution, and as the collective body of Christ, is to create meaningful space for the last, the lost, and the least, not just in our parishes but also in our communities, our homes, and our lives. When we become indifferent to the stranger, and do not embrace them, we miss the mark of being signposts pointing towards the coming of a more just, inclusive kingdom.

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THEOLOGICAL THOUGHTS

AN OPEN INVITATION Words: The Rev’d Jenny Wilkens, Vicar of St Luke’s in the City Image: Rublev’s Icon of the Trinity In my 20’s I spent a year living in France, my first experience of living in a land where I knew no one, and despite years of French studies, it was a shock struggling to make myself understood to the ticketseller at the railway station! But I was soon part of the school community where I taught English, and a church community who embraced this new friend from the end of the world. I joined in this church’s outreach to Cambodian refugees, who had recently arrived in France from the refugee camps of Thailand. Many had been learning English hoping to go to the USA but now found themselves in France, so I used my English to help them learn French. I found the copious cups of jasmine tea an acquired taste, but it was a joy to both give and receive hospitality, to experience the mutuality that came from the joyful discovery that I too came from their part of the world. I know I learned and gained so much from that experience of being foreigners together! Reflecting on our world currently one is so sorely tempted to fear and demonise the other — the foreigner, the refugee, the immigrant, the enemy. I have been re-rereading Croatian theologian Miroslav Volf ’s Exclusion and Embrace1, written out of his experience of the Balkan wars of the 1990s. He takes Iranaeus of Lyon’s beautiful concept of the Son and Spirit as the two arms of God reaching out to create and embrace humanity, and then extends this to the cross. 8

For humanity so often turns away from God, breaking the covenant relationship of love he offers, and by doing so becomes estranged from God and one another. Yet the cross shows the still outstretched arms of the crucified God where “while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son” (Romans 5:10). A picture many find helpful to understand this idea is Rublev’s Icon of the Trinity where the Son points to the chalice as a sign of his costly self-giving while simultaneously inviting us to take our place at the table, welcomed back into the embrace of the Trinity. Yet this invitation is not just for us to enjoy alone, rather we are called to recognise and invite to the Lord’s table all who have been reconciled at the Cross, even our enemies: “…in receiving Christ’s broken body and spilled blood, we…receive all those whom Christ received by suffering.”2 This is where the Eucharist is profoundly evangelistic — it is good news to share that invitations are issued to everyone to accept a place at the table, for all to find their deepest sense of belonging by being at home in God. Miroslav Volf, Exclusion and Embrace: a theological exploration of identity, otherness and reconciliation. Abingdon Press, Nashville, 1996. 2 Ibid., p.129 1


Call for an appointment or email: operations@anglicanliving.org.nz Call for an appointment or email: operations@anglicanliving.org.nz 24 Dorset St - 03 977 2320 24 Dorset St - 03 977 2320

437 Armagh St - 03 982 2165 www.anglicanliving.org.nz

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Aged Care | Among friends Aged Care | Among friends


CHAPEL CHAT Words: Cathy Maslin with Simone Bruce (Head Sacristan) and Faith Turner-Walker (Deputy Sacristan) of Craighead Diocesan School, Timaru Photos: Cathy Maslin and Kolourcare

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“MY MUM IS A TEACHER AND SHE CAN’T JUST SAY ANYTHING ABOUT HER FAITH. SHE JUST HAS TO SAY, ‘I CAN’T ANSWER THAT.’” “How can asking God to forgive you for the week’s wrong doings on a Sunday at church, transition you for more Christian caring and empathy throughout the next week?” Intrigued? This question is just one of those used to prompt discussion amongst students of the Craighead Diocesan School Chapel Committee during “Chapel Chat”. The venue is a local café which, incidentally, has a great breakfast menu. Faith, one of the Sacristans, remarked “Such an event attracts more people [because] food is such an ordinary part of our daily routine. If we held it as a separate event in a classroom less students would turn up.” Apparently the idea of daily bread including both physical and spiritual nourishment is still alive and well. The Chapel Committee is made up of students of all ages at Craighead. They are volunteers who give of their time and talents to maintain the Christian character of the school. Simone, the Head Sacristan, coming from a Christian background says the opportunity of going to Craighead has meant she feels her religion is “more accepted and more talked about. My Mum is a teacher and she can’t just say anything about her faith. She just has to say, ‘I can’t answer that.’” In contrast Faith was struck by the importance of Christianity in Year 10 after being paired to lead assemblies with another student who was involved with Chapel. She says the Christian character of the school has a “huge impact.” In her opinion it provides an opportunity to gain more knowledge about God and Jesus, and to learn God will be there to guide you through your whole life even after finishing school. She

has been constantly challenged to focus on her own personal development during each Chapel service, and she especially values the opportunity her role gives her to help others. A student led committee, the members take on a lot of responsibility at the school. This includes helping to run Chapel services, contributing to the Christian component at official school activities or ceremonies, and undertaking many social service initiatives. Simone said her role this year has helped her to develop “leadership skills like delegating tasks” and, she added with a smile, “needing to be more organised myself.” As the two responsible for coming up with discussion questions for “Chapel Chat” Simone and Faith recently had a great idea to change the format and give the students an opportunity to ask any questions they

had. “Before preaching we must listen” said the Rev’d Josh Taylor acting Chaplain for the day. He then added, “If space is provided for questions to be asked it gives an opportunity for the gospel to speak directly into what is currently on their mind and heart. It beats offering answers to questions they aren’t even asking.” The change in format was a success and is likely to be repeated. In the words of Simone and Faith, “Chapel Chat” is a “reward for the committee”, a “chance to get to know each other better, to focus on our spiritual growth,” and to be able to “talk with others who share a common interest.” Their comments express a common need hospitality meets within the Christian community, that of encouraging one another and strengthening faith. 11


FAITHFUL IN SMALL THINGS Words: Amanda Ladd and Catherine Williamson Illustration: Cienpies DesignŠ123RF.com

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Being seen, heard, noticed, and valued are essential for our functioning as whole people. Often it is the small acts of compassion, offered by people who are consistently faithful, that help restore a person’s sense of confidence and God given worth — “…a broken Spirit who can bear?” (Prov 18:14) Neither dependence nor independence sit well alongside the gospel we serve, the words inter-dependence or common good serve it better. With these come the recognition all of us will, at different times in our lives, have a need to receive as well as be given the blessed opportunity to give. Below follow two of many examples of generosity shown towards others within our diocese. Amanda Ladd, St Barnabas, Woodend “For over five years now a group of us at St Barnabas in Woodend have opened our door to a group of people from our neighbourhood. Recognising there were many people confined to home, or people who do not normally have the opportunity for contact with others, we undertook to meet this need by providing an opportunity to bring them together. Our initial contact with people is made through Presbyterian Support Services. “Everybody is collected by mini van from their homes, for a

Attendees of the day out with some gifts ready for Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes

day of activity and fellowship. We provide morning, afternoon tea and lunch. Those involved come from all walks of life so collectively many life experiences and skills get shared. Crafts, games and a devotion time are regular features in the day. Best of all everything is accompanied with lots of laughter and companionship. “Last year after a conversation over lunch the group became very enthusiastic about Operation Christmas Child and the joy it spread to children who would otherwise never experience Christmas. Their musings lead to action and the next month they turned up laden with items they had collected and made for our boxes. It was such a blessing to our parish as we yearly organise 70 gift boxes to be delivered to children in developing countries through Operation Christmas Child.” Catherine Williamson, Christchurch City Mission “In an effort to provide comfort and lift their spirits, the night-shelter for women run by the City Mission, offers hospitality by supplying items to each woman who stays with them. Everything is donated. “We have one group that provides pyjamas every month. They have been doing this for four years now. We also receive packs of soaps and toiletries, umbrellas, and hot water bottles. “I remember the reaction of ladies attending the day programme receiving Christmas parcels. It was overwhelming for them. They were unable to conceive a person they didn’t know would put themselves out to do something for them. “There are too many people who contribute to name them all here. The beauty of what is given lies in how every offering combines to make the whole possible. The gifts are also heartening for those of us who work here; others’ support encourages us in what we do and makes us a closer team.” The Bible says it is easy to be worn down by the cares of this world, and we are confronted daily by multiple requests for help. So let’s keep our eyes uplifted, celebrate all the good things happening in our region, and know the finishing remark when we give unconditionally of ourselves is “you did [it] for me” (Matthew 25:40). 13


ART FOR THE HEART Words and Artwork: Graham Braddock I IMAGINED LOOKING OUT FROM INSIDE AN ANCIENT BUILDING, AND DESIGNED A ROW OF FANCY PERFUME BOTTLES FOR THE FOREGROUND. THE BOTTLES ARE SYMBOLIC OF BEAUTY AS THE WORLD MAY SEE IT, BUT THE BRAND-NAMES ARE OVERWRITTEN WITH THE ASPECTS OF TRUE BEAUTY COMING FROM THE AROMA OF THE HOLY SPIRIT. THE OPEN HANDS SYMBOLISE THE OFFER OF JESUS TO RADIATE HIS CHARACTER FROM THE CORE OF EACH ONE OF US IF WE WILL YIELD TO HIM.

True Beauty © Graham Braddock

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I heard the prompting “get into fine art.” It was 1973 and I had been praying about my future career path. My previous experience was in graphic art, art prints and picture framing. My wife and I had three young children alongside a growing dream of moving to a lifestyle block just north of Auckland. I confess I had never studied at art school. Added to this was my consternation of picturing most artists as being weird, living in attics and starving. In answer to my feelings of inadequacy, the next words that came gently to my heart were, “How much can you believe me for?” I took those words very seriously and wrote in my diary what I would believe God for in terms of future income and ability as an artist. By 1975, rich with God’s blessings, we had just moved onto our own little farmlet and I held my first exhibitions, one of which was in Christchurch. That year I also had the privilege of winning the Kelliher and Cambridge Art Awards, and I set up my own Gallery in downtown Auckland. In the art world I was most well known for my landscape paintings. A trip to Israel provided new inspiration and I became excited about doing paintings that were visual parables. To me, art is a language that can speak silently but powerfully to churched and non-churched people alike. If anything, the historical over-reaction to any art as idolatry has meant the secular world has used art as a form of communication more broadly than the church. My idea of painting parables was formed around taking the viewer on a voyage

of discovery, where not everything unfolded at once, but truth came through without having to rely on interpretations from art experts. To me, the exciting thing is that God can use art to reveal his heart just as much as he can use written and spoken words. Paintings never argue, only speak when looked at and go on reminding and reinforcing what they have to say every time they are viewed. Actually, they can do more than that because our minds store memories in picture form. A good painting can sit in the mind, touch the spirit and influence our lives far more than we realise. I have seen this in one of my sons who had a picture of the inside of a Scottish cottage on his wall from the time he could pull himself up in his cot. Two objects in this artwork were a fishing rod and a rifle, now many years later fishing and hunting are both past-times he enjoys. There are endless possibilities for having visual talking points in our homes, places of worship, offices, schools and camp facilities. As well as providing a hospitable environment, hanging art on the wall opens the way to offer a life-giving message. Graham’s paintings are now available as very high quality one-off prints in whatever size and on whatever substrate a person may choose; from post cards, to posters, to murals and everything in between on paper, canvas, metal, acrylic or plastic sheet, framed or unframed. A full range of his best paintings available as art-prints, can be viewed on his website: www.grahambraddock.net or www.pixels.com/artists/graham+braddock He also has a child friendly “How to Draw” teaching resource at www.grahambraddock.com

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CAPTURED

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HAERE MAI Kia ora, my friend. Welcome. You bring honour to my house and a blessing to my whanau. Come in, spend time with us and we will talk, You and I, of good things. You know, when I was young I had a picture of You in my head, a young Jewish man in a long robe, and that is true, my friend, that is true, but you grew with me over the years and now I know that your whakapapa belongs as much here, as over there or anywhere else. You are one of our people, one with these mountains, one with this land. Haere mai e Hehu Karaiti, Welcome Christ Jesus, this is your home.

Words: Joy Cowley Photo: Bayly & Moore (Taken from Psalms for the Road by Joy Cowley: Published by Pleroma Press, Otane)

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GLOBAL DISPATCH

BUSY FINGERS Words: Anne McCormick, NZCMS mission partner, who, with her husband Anthony, has been in Cambodia since 2011. As parishioners of St Christopher’s, they are supported by them financially and in prayer.

YWAM group entertaining caregivers

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GLOBAL DISPATCH

Anne teaching a patient and caregivers to knit

Rose (Australian nurse intern) playing Jenga (tumbling towers)

The word hospital has a somewhat negative connotation, compared to its derivative companion, hospitality which is more pleasant. My role at World Mate Emergency Hospital (WMEH), in Cambodia’s second largest city, aims at changing a negative situation into a more pleasant one — helping patients fill in their time, lowering their stress levels and, indirectly, assisting their psychological and physical recovery. WMEH is a trauma hospital where patients are injured rather than sick. Among the main causes of injury for the victims are serious motorcycle and machine accidents —with the common culprits being sugarcane juicing machines and sewing machines in garment factories. Other injuries involve; falls by the elderly, and children who trip on the rickety steps up to traditional Cambodian pole houses; encounters with animals such as being kicked by a cow or attacked by a a bear; and landmine injuries — an unfortunate legacy of the dark and relatively recent Pol Pot regime. Why am I here? I offer a unique kind of hospitality to patients recovering from injuries who have a lot of free time on their hands, as do their caregivers. I started here with no equipment except a couple of colouring in books and a few crayons. My first task was to occupy two small boys with nothing to do but race each other up and down one of the wards in wheelchairs! With that, an activity programme called “Busy Fingers” was born. Now, almost two years later, I have cupboards stocked with books, toys, games, puzzles and handcraft supplies. I am greatly helped in this task by volunteers, both individuals

and teams, who willingly use their skills - magic, music, portrait drawing, knitting and crocheting, to name a few. They always leave having received a lot from interacting with the people here. Offering hospitality takes time, a gift we can give the patients. Sokhim, my Khmer assistant, and I have time to listen to and empathise with the caregivers, those who are helpless bystanders to the pain their relatives are experiencing. Theirs is a difficult and thankless task – performing personal care routines around the clock (in Asian hospitals, these tasks are not usually done by the nursing staff). My most memorable days are those when I meet former patients, returning for a check-up. They talk about their progress since leaving the hospital and usually thank me for my interaction with them while they were in-patients. One young woman recently limped up to me with her artificial leg, held out her arms and said, “Please hug me.” That was a bit of a tear-jerker! WMEH is an any faith rather than a Christian hospital, so I am not free to share my faith overtly. However, I can share by listening to, empathising with, and encouraging those I meet. I am privileged to be the hands and feet of Jesus to them. It is deeply rewarding work and I thank God that he is using me in this way, in this place, at this time. Anne and Anthony will be home on leave from May until September 2017. Contact NZCMS if you are interested in arranging for them to come and speak.

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CULTURE

MAKING A REAL DIFFERENCE CHRISTIAN MOVERS AND SHAKERS.

THE SERVANT QUEEN AND THE KING SHE SERVES BY MARK GREENE AND CATHERINE BUTCHER

BY GEORGE BRYANT Words: The Rev’d Jill Maslin At the heart of this book we discover the biographical and inspirational stories of 22 faithful Christian men and women. Thankfully they are alive and active and mostly ordinary New Zealanders; a refreshing change from compilations of long-dead, historical heroes from overseas! Each biography invites us into a life that serves God and makes a real difference; defined by the author as being of a long-lasting and transformative nature for NZ society. As a short-story read it is ideal as each biography stands on its own merits, given context by the introductory and closing chapters. As a resource, this book has a kind of watch this space quality as it draws the reader to further research certain biographies or some of the social justice initiatives that have come to life as a result. Day Star Books, Auckland, 2015. ISBN 978 0 994 103956

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Words: The Rev’d Indrea Alexander A fascinating exploration of Queen Elizabeth II’s faith is offered in this wonderfully shareable book, published to mark her 90th birthday year. The authors say, “Many commentators have noted the depth of her trust in God but few have explored it,” and they then proceed to do so in a way that is highly readable and inspiring. While the Queen keeps most of her opinions to herself, her religious beliefs are noted as “quietly held, authentic and wellknown”. The book draws significantly from Christmas broadcasts where she has spoken of Jesus’ birth, death and resurrection and called him an inspiration, role model and anchor. In keeping with her spiritual role under God, she promotes justice, forgiveness, reconciliation and love of neighbour, and treats people with consideration and respect. This book, a wonderful gift and ideal stocking-stuffer, is sold by the Bible Society at the cost-recovery-only price of $9.99.


CULTURE

SLOW FERMENT PIZZA DOUGH WILLEM DE VOCHT — FOOD AND CRAFT BEER ENTHUSIAST

Makes two large pizzas Ingredients The pizza dough: • 3 cups of high grade (strong) white flour • 1 cup of cold tap water • 1 teaspoon of Edmonds yeast (don’t be stingy and buy budget yeast!) • 1 teaspoon of salt Credit: Vitalii Shastun©123RF.com

I love a good pizza — fast, thrifty and tasty. Perfect for when you have people coming over or for a quick family dinner. An important step that is often overlooked when making pizzas is the dough. A good base contributes much of the flavour and is just as important as the toppings. It’s cheap and easy to make a really good pizza base and people will think you are a genius. The key to making perfect pizza dough (much like brewing a good beer) is slow controlled fermentation. Slower yeast fermentation helps the gluten to develop and adds more flavour to the dough. When it comes to toppings, I prefer New York style — the simpler the better. A decent tin of chopped tomatoes is sufficient for a sauce, grated mozzarella is best for cheese, and then all other toppings should be used sparingly.

Toppings: • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes (Watties chopped tomatoes in puree is best) • 1 500gm bag of grated mozzarella cheese • One or two other toppings like mushrooms, olives, anchovies, pepperoni, prosciutto etc. (remember less is more!) Steps The day before: • Mix the ingredients in a bread maker (dough cycle), mixer (with dough hook) or knead by hand. Add the salt and yeast on opposite sides of the bowl to prevent the salt from killing the yeast. You do not have to knead it for long as the gluten will develop naturally over time with the slow fermentation. • Leave the dough (covered with a loose plastic bag or damp towel) for at least 12-24 hours at room temperature. Assembling the pizza: • Pre-heat the oven to Old Testament hot on fan bake (at least 250°C). • Pre-heat the oven trays in the oven. • Knock out the air bubbles and then divide into two balls of dough on a floured surface. Roll out the dough to a ½-1cm thickness. • Take the hot trays out of the oven, flour them, and then make the pizzas quickly and directly on the hot surface. • Layer with tinned tomatoes, mozzarella cheese, and then the other toppings. Bake the pizzas one at a time. The pizza will be ready when the edges are brown and the cheese is golden. • Drizzle with cold pressed olive oil and garnish with rocket leaves (optional) to serve.

21


CULTURE

ADVERT

TE WAIORA HOUSE SPRINGS OF LIVING WATER Photo: Cathy Maslin Open to all who need some time-out, peace and quiet, or refreshment Te Waiora offers a welcoming environment in the rural setting of Hororata. Features of the house include: A lounge/dining room; a chapel with seating for around 25 people ideal for retreats, leadership days or workshops; a library, a commercial kitchen, five twin-bedded rooms with ensuites and desks for the use of individuals, couples or groups; tea and coffee making facilities; a deck, lawn, garden, and orchard perfect for a wander or the opportunity just to sit outdoors. Te Waiora is administered by an ecumenical Christian trust. The recommended payment for catered accommodation per night per person is $85 to cover costs. Enquirers are welcome to discuss a subsidy if needed to make a visit affordable. “Come to me, all who are weighed down, and I will refresh you� (Matthew 11:28). Enquire now: 03 318 0789; tewaiorahouse@xtra.co.nz; www.tewaiorahouse.org.nz

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DIALOGUE

EAT WELL AND COOK OFTEN JO TAYLOR-DE VOCHT CHATS WITH WELL-KNOWN LOCAL CHEF JONNY SCHWASS ABOUT HOSPITALITY AND HOW WE CAN USE IT TO CARE FOR OTHERS. JONNY OWNS HARLEQUIN PUBLIC HOUSE AND RESTAURANT SCHWASS. HE IS ALSO CATERING THE CHRISTCHURCH CITY MISSION’S UPCOMING FUNDRAISER “SUNDAY LUNCH.”

Credit: rawpixel©123RF.com

Jonny can you tell us why hospitality is important to you? “It is at the core of everything we do. It’s the art of being kind to people.”

As kiwi households what do you think we do well when it comes to hospitality and what could we do better? “We know how to feed people and we know how to be humble.”

Do you have any kind of philosophy around how you do hospitality? “Hospitality is the art of making someone feel better, it is the nurturing and kindness that sits in our hearts and souls. A great American restaurateur Danny Meyer explained it best when he said: ‘Virtually nothing else is as important as how one is made to feel in any of life’s many transactions. Hospitality exists when you believe the other person is on your side. The converse is just as true. Hospitality is present when something happens for you. It is absent when something happens to you. Those two simple prepositions — for and to — express it all.’ Our restaurants are a reflection of my personality and generosity.”

“We are all naturally wired to be kind but the modern world often forces us to be cautious with our generosity. I wish we could be more carefree with our hospitality.” Why do you think good hospitality is important to society? “It is the moral fabric that weaves our society together, the simple act of doing something selfless in the name of making another person feel restored.” What principles of hospitality do you want to pass on to the next generation? “Be kind, smile, and enjoy your life. Others will be drawn to your warmth and kindness. Eat well and cook often.” 23


WORKPLACE

TEAM HOSPITALITY Words: Peneha Harris

I’m Peneha Harris a parishioner and a volunteer here at St Johns Church, Timaru. I’ve being involved for over 15 years, not only in terms of my spiritual wellbeing but also in a very practical way serving on the Vestry (13 plus years) and setting up for services and groups. Another job I do to help people feel at home during a service is to set up and operate the projector for worship. For me I feel I need to get things right so people feel comfortable and can easily follow what is going on; in a sense the service relies on your part going smoothly. It doesn’t always happen that way but one can only try! Carrying out tasks to create a welcoming environment is (for me) very important as it represents the church, as not only brick and wood, but people. For me the reward is seeing all is as it should be, and the knowledge of having brought a smile to someone’s face, or being on the receiving end of a “thank you”. I get to see and to talk with individuals and contribute to the spiritual welcome of old and new members of St Johns.

24

In unpaid work no one person is more important than the other. I see what I do as being equally as valuable as what others do. I belong to a team, a hospitality team and that team is here to serve God. As a Vestry member I dealt with everything from tea to finance, and other challenges along the way such as being on hand to help where needed at Mainly Music. This is different from my experience of paid work where positions define some jobs as more significant than others. I may not be fired if I don’t turn up for work, however, I know my small efforts mean another person is there to share the load. My advice to volunteers is to always operate with an awareness of the others who are also making what is happening possible, and to take time to fully realise the part you play is important. These two things will lead you towards experiencing moments of immense gratification. Arohanui, Peneha


PERSPECTIVE

A TOURIST’S DILEMMA Words and Photo: The Rev’d Jill Maslin Contrived hospitality sits uncomfortably alongside my Kiwi upbringing. Yet here I am, coming into your home for dinner – invited yes, but the terms are clearly that of a commercial transaction. You provide and cook, set the table, serve and clean up afterwards and I pay the money for the experience. There will be neat and tidy entries on both sides of the ledger and that eases my Western worldview conscience a little. But I wonder how this resounds with the ideals of God’s hospitality; this kind of easy come easy go cultural tourism? In May of this year, our tour group were travelling from Cannakale to Izmir in Turkey and called into the small village of Demircidere for what the travel brochure calls, “An Insider Experience”. The group was small; it was obvious everywhere we went that Turkey’s high risk category was having a huge impact on the tourist industry with flow on effects for its economy. Our multi-lingual, highly educated and skilled tour guide, Torga, who obviously loved his country and his job, explained his vulnerable situation. He was deeply concerned about the welfare of his wife and young son, his people and their future. But today we are here to find out first-hand what life was like in a rural Turkish village. The spring sun was shining, the skies blue and the hills with olive trees and grape vines stretched in front of us. The pace slowed and the warmth of the air carried the yeasty smell of bread freshly baked in the communal oven at the centre of the village. The warmth of the greeting and our welcome was no ledger transaction. Nor was the love and pride with which we were shown around, seated at the table with our hosts and served. The food was deliciously local and with smiling gestures and Torga’s help as interpreter we spent precious time getting to know one another a little. Collectively we all brought something to the table. There are mountains and snow in New Zealand and yes, we worry about earthquakes. A safari in Zimbabwe is an experience, so is the

Women from the Village of Demircidere, Turkey.

corruption and currency blow-out. Political candidates for President in the USA are a joke. We all had our offerings. And we had our questions too like, “Where are the young people?” “They have all escaped and gone to university”, we are told, “they don’t see a future here. It is too isolated and we have to work hard to survive.” The country girl in me gets all that; my life has a lot in common with yours after all. “Thank you for inviting me, even though you don’t know me at all. I’ve appreciated every moment here and will remember you in my prayers often.” Hospitality is when we are valued for being ourselves and served by compassion. We are touched gently and warmly cared for. We are welcomed without condition and the story is heard.

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17/11/2014 7:18:47 p.m.

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