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ASSOCIATED STUDENTS INC.

Annual Report 2014-2015


ASSOCIATED STUDENTS INC. Annual Report 2014-2015


STUDENTS SERVING STUDENTS


TABLE OF CONTENTS Mission, Vision, Values & Motto

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ASI Executive Director’s Letter

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ASI President’s Letter

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ACHIEVEMENTS Reaching Our Mission

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Social Media Growth

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Web Traffic Data

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Accomplishments of Valued Partners

28

Bronco Recreation & Intramural Complex

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ORGANIZATION Preparing for the Future

41

ASI Student Government

46

ASI Full-Time Staff

48

ASI Department Structure

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FINANCIALS Independent Auditor's Report

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Audited Financial Statements

55

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Awards 59 Credits 60


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A S I A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 1 4 -2 0 1 5


MIS SION Associated Students Incorporated (ASI), Cal Poly Pomona is a California State University recognized auxiliary organization and a nonprofit corporation that seeks to: Foster student advocacy, representation, engagement and academic success. Establish opportunities for learning, leadership and development for students and its staff. Create an environment that promotes collaborative partnerships, cultural diversity and campus pride. Provide high-quality facilities, programs and services to students, administrators, faculty, staff, alumni and the off-campus community.

V ISION “Enhancing the student experience”

VA L UE S Integrity, Honor, Dedication, Loyalty & Respect The values of ASI, Cal Poly Pomona are the ideals that we embrace and strive to achieve. These values serve as the cornerstone of ASI’s philosophy, which upholds the motto of the organization, “students serving students,” and its mission to promote the development of all its members.

MO T T O “Students Serving Students” The motto of ASI reflects the pivotal role that student leadership plays in serving the student body.

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ASI EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S LETTER The 2014-2015 fiscal year was an extraordinary year and a period of significant growth for Associated Students Inc. (ASI). Student leadership and advocacy were dominant throughout the year as our ASI students assumed leadership roles at the system-wide level in the California State Student Association (CSSA), participated in lobby efforts at the local and state levels and took action on policy initiatives and financial matters for our organization. ASI and Cal Poly Pomona (CPP) made history as we became the 14th campus in the California State University (CSU) system to open a recreation center facility. The Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC) opened in September 2014, as scheduled, and has created a dynamic and exciting venue for student engagement, employment and internship opportunities. The 165,000 square foot complex showcases sustainability in building features and facility operations. Through the BRIC, ASI is able to provide a diverse range of recreation and wellness programs for students and the campus community, contribute to student retention and attract prospective students to the campus. At the close of the fiscal year, 70 percent of enrolled students have registered to use the BRIC. In line with ASI’s continuing efforts to provide quality facilities to serve our students, several enhancements were also implemented in the Bronco Student Center (BSC). The former Bronco Fitness Center space was converted into Solaris Lounge, which opened concurrently with the BRIC. The Solaris Lounge is a multi-purpose area for students to study, meet, eat and have convenient access to charging stations for their devices. In partnership with the University Information Technology (IT) Division, WI-FI access was significantly enhanced in and around the BSC, cable signal was upgraded to HD quality and computer workstations were upgraded. The former study lounge was converted to what is now the Perseus meeting room with improved lighting and furnishings. Enhancements were made to the seating in Center Court, audio-visual resources in the Ursa Minor meeting room and equipment in the BSC TV Lounge.

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As a student-based organization that is committed to student success, ASI provided additional student internships in the areas of campus programs, human resources, marketing and public relations, assessment of learning outcomes for students and mobile applications for tracking event participation. Opportunities for certifications were made available through in-house resources and external partners. Collaborations with CPP faculty enabled students to have internal audit hands-on learning for designated operational areas within ASI: internships for Management in Human Resources students, and service learning projects relating to assessment of customer satisfaction and recommendations for improvements. ASI committed itself to several partnerships and collaborations during the year in order to realize many of the accomplishments highlighted in this annual report. It literally “took a village� to complete the BRIC project on time and within budget, and we acknowledge the ASI students and staff, construction team, university and Chancellor’s Office co lleagues, co nsultants, ag ency re presentatives an d se rvice pr oviders fo r a su ccessful outcome and lasting contribution to the campus. ASI continued to engage students through a diverse line-up of programs and partnered with the campus on large-scale events such as BroncoFusion and Homecoming. Through the service offerings of our valued business partners in the BSC and BRIC, ASI has extended its ability to meet the program, service and convenience needs of our students and campus community. The proud accomplishments outlined in our annual report represent the true dedication, hard work and unwavering commitment of the ASI students and team of staff members to the mission of ASI as a recognized auxiliary organization that supports the educational mission of the university. We thank our campus administrators, CPP, CSU colleagues and our off-campus partners for their incredible support to ASI on a successful and memorable year! Sincerely,

Cora M. Culla ASI Executive Director

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ASI PRESIDENT’S LETTER As the 2014-2015 year comes to an end, I look back on all of the accomplishments of Associated Students Incorporated (ASI). This amazing organization has continued to shine and serve as a resource for students, staff and faculty of Cal Poly Pomona (CPP). Without the hard work and dedication of our professional staff, student staff and student leaders, this organization would not flourish. I am deeply honored to have witnessed our growth and accomplishments throughout my two years serving in Student Government. This year proved to be an exciting time for ASI. The campus witnessed the grand opening of the Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC). As we registered most of the student body for its use, ASI also focused on training staff members and the implementation of new policies and programs. Student Government leaders were able to participate in registering students for the BRIC and encouraging our constituents to get out to the new facility. We are extremely excited to see what the BRIC has in store for the future of our campus. The ASI Senate and Cabinet were very productive this year and helped coordinate many initiatives that would benefit the students and the greater campus community. We were able to establish a code for the Sustainability Committee and finalize guidelines for the Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) reserve that was successfully created last year. The goal of the fund is to support sustainability related projects and student groups on campus. This year, our secretary of education reactivated the Educational Enhancement Board and was able to put together a program geared towards teaching students about all the resources we have to offer here in ASI and on campus. The event was geared toward first year students and was supported by the Graduation Initiative Steering Committee (GISC). It proved to be a great success and an event we would like to see happen again in later years.

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This year marked an exciting time in advocacy; our secretary of external affairs along with our Lobby Corps traveled to Sacramento to lobby on behalf of the California State University (CSU) for additional funding. Not only did we have the chance to lobby at the local and state level, this year we were able to take our lobbying efforts to the United States Capitol by participating in Hill Day. We were able to meet with our representatives and let them know the importance of funding higher education. Student leaders also made a diligent effort to make sure that students were included in the process of the calendar conversion. Student leaders served on the Semester Conversion Steering Committee as well as sub committees to ensure that students’ concerns were heard. We worked closely with university administrators and staff to make sure that the students’ best interest was kept at the forefront of all conversations regarding the conversion. Student Government leaders worked closely with councils and clubs and maintained strong relationships with the various groups on campus. We served as advocates for our students, provided feedback on codes and by-laws and supported their events and programs. Through Inter-Council meetings, we allowed student groups to collaborate with ASI. We also provided resources through the ASI Finance Committee. We encouraged students to get involved and had a very successful elections season. It has been a very productive year for ASI, the student leaders and me. I am excited for what the future will bring and wish every member of the CPP family the best of luck in their future endeavors. Sincerely,

James Cox ASI President 2014-2015

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ACHIEVEMENTS

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REACHING OUR MISSION

OUR ACHIEVEMENTS ARE CATEGORIZED ACCORDING TO OUR MISSION

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FOSTER STUDENT ADVOCACY, REPRESENTATION, ENGAGEMENT AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS • Attended Hill Day in Washington, D.C. with Cal Poly Pomona President Dr. Soraya Coley to visit legislators “on the hill” to advocate for higher education at the federal level

• Fostered student advocacy as ASI student leaders served in the following leadership roles and committees at the CSU system-wide level:

• James Cox, Admission Advisory Council Committee, California State Student Association (CSSA)

• Michael Adams, General Education Advisory Committee, California State Student Association (CSSA)

• Devon Graves, President and Chair of the Board of Directors, California State Student Association (CSSA)

• Devon Graves, Commissioner, California Student Aid Commission (CSAC)

• Devon Graves, Non Federal Negotiator, United States Department of Education

• Attended the California Higher Education Student Summit (CHESS) that empowers students to become change agents in advocating for an accessible, affordable and quality system of public higher education for all Californians

• Attended the CSUnity Conference at Sonoma State, a CSSA event, to bring the 23 CSU campuses and their student leaders together to focus on advocacy issues and training

• Created and funded The Green Initiative Fund (TGIF) • Participated in 60 university-wide committees and 15 internal committees, which included 107 students serving on universitywide committees and 46 students serving on internal committees

• Participated in the Fireside Chat with Dr. Soraya Coley that was viewed on the CPP website as part of her outreach to the campus

• Provided the supporting letter and base information to the Phase II application process of the Active Minds – Healthy Campus Award Application

• Hosted the Annual InterCouncil Banquet that brings the outgoing and incoming administrations of Student Government and the students from the 12 ASI councils together

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FOSTER STUDENT ADVOCACY, REPRESENTATION, ENGAGEMENT AND ACADEMIC SUCCESS (CONTINUED)

• Worked with the Secretary of Sustainability to invite the Councils to sponsor Children Center families and provide gift baskets for 12 families

• Averaged more than 2,000 students in the Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC) daily (Monday-Thursday) and almost 10,000 visits weekly since its opening in fall 2014

• Achieved record numbers of student participants for Intramural Sports (IM) leagues (4,275 participants and 466 teams) • Engaged 1,145 BRIC members in Bronco Peak’s climbing wall orientation and belay class • Participated in the university’s student job fair and spring career fair to promote student employment • Favorable action by the ASI Senate on the following policies with the endorsements of either the Rules and Policies Committee, Facilities and Operations Committee or the Finance Committee:

• Approval of Policies:

• Programs Involving Minor Children

• Anti-Harassment Policy

• ASI Non-Discrimination Policy

• ASI Social Media Policy

• ASI Corporate Brand Identity Policy

• ASI Reserves Policy

• Volunteer Policy

• General Rules of Conduct Policy

• Implementation of Policies:

• California’s New Sick Leave Policy (AB1522)

• New CSU Background Check Policy

• Employment Classifications

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• Amendments to Policies:

• BRIC Facility Use Manual

• BSC Facility Use Manual

• ASI Facility Posting & Advertising Policy


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ESTABLISH OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING, LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT FOR STUDENTS AND ITS STAFF • Onboarded and trained almost 200 new student staff to support the operations of the BRIC and Campus Recreation programs and services

• Increased the number of successful recruitments by 61 percent for a total of 323 positions filled (15 professional staff and 308 student staff)

• Continued the Human Resources Internship Program by hiring two MHR interns this fiscal year, where both students obtained full-time employment in their field of study upon completion of the program

• Provided five graphic design internships in the Marketing, Design and Public Relations department with the support of the art department

• Hired two graduate assistants to help develop learning outcomes, based assessments and research mobile applications for event participant tracking

• Created a new student-staff position, Student Activities Assistant, in which the student assisted with planning Weekend Events and unique BSC programs

• Coordinated trips to SeaWorld and an interview with PETA to help Student Government make an informed decision about the sale of SeaWorld tickets in the Games Room Etc.

• Coordinated off-campus certification opportunities in which four student staff received their Single Pitch Instructor Certification at Joshua Tree National Park and three students received their Spin Instructor certification with Madd Dogg Athletics

• Supported an extramural basketball team to Southwest Showdown Regional Basketball Tournament at the University of Arizona, where they advanced to the quarter finals, making them the most successful team in the recent history of ASI Campus Recreation

• Elevated level of training and emergency response for 21 student supervisors and assistant supervisors, and one non-student supervisor in Operations and Intramural Sports with Title 22 certification

• Transitioned six graduating seniors to graduate assistantships or professional positions in the field of university recreation

• Redesigned and relaunched the ASI and Campus Crop websites, and introduced the brand new Campus Recreation website

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• Hosted the reception for the Provost’s Kellogg Distinguished Speaker Series, featuring guest speaker, Adventurer Ranulph Fiennes

• Created ASI’s Snapchat account, which accumulated 563 new followers in its first year of activation • Increased Campus Recreation Facebook followers by 162 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased ASI Instagram followers by 143 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased Campus Recreation Twitter followers by 101 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC) Twitter followers by 99 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year

• Increased Campus Recreation Instagram followers by 75 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased Bronco Student Center (BSC) Twitter followers by 63 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased Bronco Student Center (BSC) Facebook followers by 40 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased ASI Twitter followers by 38 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Increased ASI Facebook followers by 19 percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year • Published 279 stories for the ASI website by the students and staff of Marketing, Design and Public Relations • Completed 535 Creative Work Order Requests in Marketing, Design and Public Relations department • Photographed, edited and archived 7,324 photos • Provided in-house opportunities for students to achieve or prepare for certifications, including the following:

• American Red Cross CPR/AED certification

• Personal training prep courses

• Group fitness instructor training and certification

• Lifeguard certification

• Wilderness first aid training

• American Mountain Guide Association (AMGA) Climbing Wall Instructor certification

• PADI SCUBA Advanced/Deep/Open Water training

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SOCIAL MEDIA GROWTH

FOLLOWER COUNT 2013-14

2014-15

ASI

3,555

4,227

BSC

1,155

1,617

CAMPUS REC

384

1,007

ASI

1,467

2,036

BSC

435

710

BRIC

365

727

CAMPUS REC

259

521

ASI

560

1,363

CAMPUS REC

641

1,122

900 +144%*

800

follower increase

700 600

+19%*

+162%* +39%*

500

+40%

+75%*

400

+99%

300

+63%*

+101%*

200 100 0

*Rounded to the nearest percentage.

ASI

BSC

BRIC CAMPUS REC

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WEB TRAFFIC DATA FOR ASI.CPP.EDU MOST POPULAR PAGE VISITS FOR 2014-15 FISCAL YEAR About the BRIC 17,443 BEAT Volunteer Form 20,329 BRIC Hours 27,230

The Campus Crop 357,486

Employment Opportunities 37,048

Campus Recreation 46,586

ASI Homepage 121,716

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TOTAL PAGE VISITS: 704,596


PAGE VISIT BREAKDOWN 1.

The Campus Crop 357,486

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Games Room Etc. 9,148

2.

ASI Homepage 121,716

12.

Contact 8,508

3.

Campus Recreation 46,586

13.

Financial Services 7,501

4.

Employment Opportunities 37,048

14.

Children’s Center 5,939

5.

BRIC Hours 27,230

15.

Intramural Sports 2,380

6.

BEAT Volunteer Form 20,329

16.

BRIC Membership Rates & Eligibility 2,070

7.

About the BRIC 17,443

17.

BRIC Guest & Day Passes 1,829

8.

Group Fitness 15,484

9.

Bronco Student Center 12,810

10. Box Office 11,089

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ESTABLISH OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING, LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT FOR STUDENTS AND ITS STAFF (CONTINUED) • Offered the following opportunities for training and development to employees:

• Workplace Violence in Academic Environments: Active Shooter

• Title IX Training

• Making Sense of Medicare

• Mobile Devices for Emergency Planning

• Effective Workplace Communications

• Employee Assistance Program: Uses, Benefits, FAQs

• Social and Emotional Health

• Financial Wellness

• Dealing with Difficult People

• Healthy Eating and Meal Planning

• Ergonomics

• Insights Discovery

• Hosted the following wellness-promoting activities for employees:

• Massage Monday

• Tennis Shoe Tuesdays

• Water Bar Wednesdays

• Tame Stress Thursday

• Free Fruit Friday

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CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT THAT PROMOTES COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS, CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND CAMPUS PRIDE Engaged in and implemented multiple partnerships with the university, our business partners and external organizations with:

• The BroncoFusion Committee and Interfraternity Council to host an after party for the BroncoFusion concert at the BRIC attended by 750 students

• The Office of Student Life and Cultural Centers (OSLCC) and University Risk Management to implement

the Sport Clubs Program, in which nine clubs and 120 participants engaged in the trial

• The university in an awareness opportunity about cultural diversity issues on campus by sending the Children’s Center Director to the “Cross Cultural, Are We There Yet?” retreat hosted by Cal Poly Pomona

• The Kinesiology and Health Promotion department to fund five student staff to attend the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA): Leaders in Collegiate Recreation Conference in Grapevine, Texas

• The Kinesiology and Health Promotion department to fund the registration costs for 12 students to participate in Campus Recreation’s group fitness instructor training

• Judicial Affairs and Student Health and Counseling Services to adopt a substance-free environment statement for the Intramural Sports program

• Student Health and Counseling Services to host a substance-free Super Bowl Sunday event at the BRIC pool

• The Veterans Center, University Housingand the Office of Student Life and Cultural Centers (OSLCC) to establish programs and services for the benefit of these campus departments

• The Office of Student Life and Cultural Centers (OSLCC) to provide diversity awareness training to 100 new Campus Recreation staff

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Engaged in and implemented multiple partnerships with the university, our business partners and external organizations with (continued):

• The Music and Entertainment Industry Club (MEIC) that engaged more than 100 students to attend the Splash Into Spring pool party

• Student musicians and Taiko drummers to perform at the Grand Opening Celebration for the BRIC where more than 400 on and off-campus colleagues attended

• The University Police Department to finalize and execute emergency response training for the BRIC and Campus Recreation programs

• The Children’s Center to create a mural by Cal Poly Pomona alumnus • The College of Business Accounting Department to provide students hands-on audit experience to assess internal controls, financial reporting and risk assessments

• The College of Business’ Management and Human Resources (MHR) Department faculty (MHR 441 and 442) to provide internship opportunities to MHR students

• The College of Business’ Management and Human Resources (MHR) Department faculty (MHR 301) to provide students with hands-on learning opportunities to work on meaningful HR projects

• The university’s Public Health Response Team in providing ASI representation • “Clean Source” merchant cleaning contractors and “See Clear Pool” to provide support for the BRIC • Facilities Management, the BSC and the BRIC operations team in the management of the BRIC • The College of Business Management (CBA) and Human Resources (MHR) students on the completion of two service learning projects, where students experienced hands-on learning by assessing customer satisfaction and developing improvement recommendations

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CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT THAT PROMOTES COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS, CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND CAMPUS PRIDE (CONTINUED) Engaged in and implemented multiple partnerships with the university, our business partners and external organizations with (continued):

• Cal Poly Pomona Athletics, the Registrar’s Office, Staff Council and the University Library on several events and programs to enhance student engagement

• The University to begin reviewing the necessary steps to convert to semesters and the impact it would have on the programs and operations

• The Children’s Center and the College of Education and Integrative Studies (CEIS) on the addition of the Early Childhood Studies undergraduate degree program, to begin fall 2016, with Children’s Center as the Lab School

• The Children’s Center and Dr. Peggy Kelly, Dean of the CEIS, to establish a Children’s Center Building Fund

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STUDENTS SERVING STUDENTS

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PROVIDE HIGH-QUALITY FACILITIES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO STUDENTS, ADMINISTRATORS, FACULTY, STAFF, ALUMNI AND THE OFF-CAMPUS COMMUNITY • Opened the BRIC on schedule and within budget on September 26, 2014 • Registered 70 percent of fee paying students (14,782 at the end of the spring quarter) for their membership to the BRIC • Provided 898 complimentary hours of facility reservations in the BRIC for various student clubs and organizations • Offered 41-52 group fitness classes per week with more than 12,000 participant check-ins recorded • Debuted cutting-edge programs including bubble soccer, underwater rugby, underwater hockey and water slackline • Launched three new comprehensive program areas including Sport Clubs, Aquatics and Adventures while enhancing and expanding Fitness and Intramural Sports programs

• Retained provision of complimentary membership to the BRIC for employees • Upgraded the wireless internet throughout the BSC last summer in partnership with University IT due to the Student Success Fee funding, making the BSC one of the best places to connect wirelessly on campus

• Converted the former Bronco Fitness Center into Solaris Lounge and Lyra meeting room • Hosted a series of events to welcome students to the new lounge space in the BSC, now known as Solaris Lounge • Hosted a total of 24,800 hours of events this year, 30 percent of which were scheduled by student clubs, 29.6 percent by campus departments and partners like the Foundation and 3.3 percent were scheduled by off-campus conference groups

• Converted the former study lounge into the Perseus meeting room and upgraded lighting • Approved by the ASI Senate the repurposing of Centaurus from a meeting room to house the Bronco Events and Activities Team (BEAT) and the Student Activities and Programs office

• Hosted 67 programs and events that accumulated a combined attendance of more than 38,000 people • Hosted the Alumni Association’s Alumni Homecoming Mixer and Exclusive ASI Alumni Reception events that welcomed back more than 200 alumni and their families to the campus and the BRIC

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• Hosted a polling precinct in the Bronco Student Center which yielded 206 registered voters who casted their vote in the General Election

• Created a quarterly series of events, Late Night at the BSC, to provide stress-relief activities as well as extended hours for study space for students during week 10 and finals week

• Upgraded the BSC’s cable TV signal to HD to improve quality of picture in the Games Room Etc. and Center Court • Added three more digital bulletin boards to Solaris Lounge, which increases the visibility of marketing for ASI and the clients who also pay to use the digital bulletin boards in the BSC

• Purchased new artwork from the graduating senior art exhibit for the ASI Art Collection, which includes paintings, mixed-media and sculptures

• Added new television monitors that facilitate the BSC and BRIC programs and events • Upgraded the projector in Ursa Minor and purchased new portable stage risers to replace the 20-year-old risers • Reconfigured Center Court seating in June to provide individual seating against the windows adding 60 more seats total • Redistributed furniture to provide new tables for the Games Room Etc. • Purchased and installed a new TV in the lounge in the Games Room Etc. • Increased the number of Lost and Found auctions to once a month providing more opportunities to raise money for the scholarship fund • Transitioned from analog to digital radios to provide better student and staff communication • Deployed and purchased new computers and computer upgrades to solid-state drives • Installed more than 50 touchless hand soap dispensers within facilities • Purchased 46 safety vests with appropriate ASI logos to identify departments • Upgraded facility access to keyless access cards • Purchased four efficient and ecofriendly chariot ride-on carpet extractor, vacuum cleaner and scrubber

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PROVIDE HIGH-QUALITY FACILITIES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES TO STUDENTS, ADMINISTRATORS, FACULTY, STAFF, ALUMNI AND THE OFF-CAMPUS COMMUNITY (CONTINUED) • Consolidated facilities department into one centralized location • Designed and manufactured a water line system for the BRIC pool, a student staff led initiative with the support of Professor Dixon Davis from the Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Department

• Completed the remodeling of the restrooms in all children’s classrooms and offices at the Children’s Center • Upgraded financial software, Microsoft Dynamics Great Plains • Implemented the following ADP functionalities: Payroll, Time and Attendance, ADP Homepage (Announcements, Spotlights, Quick Links), Policy Acknowledgements and Employee Self Service, resulting in improved communication, improved access to resources, better efficient processes and a reduction in carbon footprint

• Negotiated ADP implementation cost reductions for ACA implementation, new benefits carrier connection established, and background check implementation

• Appointed HRIS Project Manager to ensure ADP implementation yields maximum functionality, and optimal customer service is provided to assist employees during the transition

• Expanded employee benefits package to include an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) at no additional cost to the organization • Presented “To Be or Not to Be… A Doctor” by Barnaby Peake at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference in La Verne

• Presented “Assessment to Guide Event Planning” by Barnaby Peake at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference in La Verne

• Presented “Celebrating Campus Anniversaries” by Barnaby Peake at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference in La Verne

• Presented “Glitter, Sparkle, Glow” by Cathee Hill and Maria-Lisa Flemington at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference

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• Presented “Making Your Event Sparkle” by Cathee Hill at the National Association of Campus Activities West Conference • Presented “Building on Assessment - Our New Rec Center” by Barnaby Peake at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference in La Verne

• Presented “The BRIC - Our Journey from Inception through Opening” by Cora Culla, Lisa Dye, Barnaby Peake, and Krista Smith at the Auxiliary Organizations Association (AOA) Annual Conference in Pasadena

• Presented “Trends in Member Management Software” by Scott MacLeod at the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA): Leaders in Collegiate Recreation Conference in Grapevine, Texas

• Presented “Inheriting Student Staff - Staff Management” by A’Naja Bass at the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA): Leaders in Collegiate Recreation Conference in Grapevine, Texas

• Presented “Inheriting Student Staff - Staff Management” by A’Naja Bass at the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA): Leaders in Collegiate Recreation Conference in Portland, Oregon

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ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF VALUED PARTNERS BANK OF AMERICA

• Hosted one of two ATMs on campus, the Credit Union now offers its members free ATM services

BRONCO COPY ‘N MAIL

• Scheduled constant student employee coverage to accommodate continuous customer walk-ins • Hired an additional graphic design student assistant to accommodate influx of new design projects • Purchased new wide-format printer for Bronco Copy ’N Mail facility to provide immediate poster printing • Created the BCM Collection of custom designed planners, journals, notecards, all manufactured by CPP student assistants

• Unveiled new product line of retractable signage, all printed and assembled at CPP • Produced CPP Student Business Cards and custom designed personal business cards for students

CAL POLY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

• Funded more than $4.4 million in loans for the fiscal year of 2014-2015 • Provided students with access to $330,000 in Sallie Mae student loans • Spoke to more than 6,500 freshmen and transfer students through summer orientation and hosted more than 10 workshops to numerous student groups and organizations

• Supported numerous student organizations through donations and scholarships, including but not limited to Matt’s Run, Bronco Athletics, LFSSA, MASA House and memorial funds

• Offered financial services to the community of CPP, 57 percent of which were students, 25 percent staff, six percent faculty, 11 percent alumni and one percent other groups

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ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF VALUED PARTNERS CAL POLY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION (CONTINUED)

• Hired a student for IT support and managed two paid interns over the 2014 summer quarter • Partnered with the Bronco Bookstore for several technology loan specials, which provided students, faculty, staff and alumni with access to special pricing and convenient financing

• Enhanced Spending Account features, which now includes free money orders as well as a Bronco-inspired debit card that delivers the convenience of banking through numerous technological channels

• Continued to deliver the convenience of 24/7 access to financial services through debit cards, ATMs, home banking, mobile banking, text banking, telephone banking, e-alerts, secured messaging, A2A, e-statements and bill pay services

• Conducted credit and money management workshops throughout the university • Offered debit and credit card products that support University images and awareness • Collaborated with the Marketing, Design and Public Relations department to produce all marketing

CAL POLY POMONA FOUNDATION DINING SERVICES

• Opened Jamba Juice in conjunction with the opening of the BRIC • Replaced Kikka Sushi with the Foundation-run Bronco Bowl in the fall, which was then turned over in March 2015 to Panda Restaurant Group, who has remodeled the space as a Hibachi San restaurant, launching a nation-wide rebranding for the chain

• Opened the Foundation Dining Services catering office in the BSC to better support the catering clients of the Center Court dining operations

• Installed new indoor and outdoor furniture for Round Table Pizza

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BRONCO RECREATION & INTRAMURAL COMPLEX In partnership with the University, ASI became one of 14 California State

The BRIC showcases five fitness studios, an enclosed multi-activity court,

University (CSU) campuses with a recreation center, the first of its kind at Cal

two racquetball courts, a beautiful 10-lane lap and leisure pool with a

Poly Pomona (CPP). The project was approved by the CSU Board of Trustees

spacious pool deck, Jamba Juice bar, three basketball courts, cardio and

in 2010 and officially named the Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex

strength equipment, locker rooms, an indoor track and climbing wall.

(BRIC) in spring 2012. To prepare for facility and program operation, ASI’s Human Resources, in partnership with Campus Recreation and numerous ASI and University volunteers, facilitated a three-day student job fair where 737 CPP students applied and 1,545 interviews were conducted for positions with Campus Recreation. At the end of the job fair, 308 student employees were hired and onboarded to work at the new facility. In March 2014, ASI launched phase one of a three-phase campaign, known as the “Recharge” campaign, which was used to provide awareness about the opening of the facility on campus, recruit students for employment opportunities and encourage early student registration prior to the opening of the BRIC. The 165,000-square-foot complex opened its doors to students on September 26, 2014 with the student grand opening event “Break in the BRIC at BroncoFusion.” On that day, 448 members checked into the facility between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The response to the opening of the BRIC was overwhelmingly positive, reflected by 70 percent of the student body registering for their membership in the first year of operation. On average, the BRIC welcomes more than 2,000 students daily (Monday through Thursday), and over 10,000 visits weekly.

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Designed to serve a diverse student body, ASI Campus Recreation offers a variety of programs in the BRIC including indoor rock climbing, swimming, water polo, group fitness classes, non-credit instructional clinics, certification courses, personal training, competitions, intramural sports leagues, and so much more. During the BRIC’s second year of operation, ASI Campus Recreation will continue to focus on increasing student engagement and campus community participation through quality programs and services that inspire and cultivate healthy lifestyles, continuous personal growth, and a sense of community in an inclusive environment.


33


34


35


36


37


BRIC 2014-2015 USAGE STATISTICS

70% 10,000 15 OF TOTAL STUDENT BODY REGISTERED FOR THE BRIC

AVERAGE WEEKLY VISITS TO THE BRIC

PROFESSIONAL STAFF HIRED

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

INTRAMURAL SPORTS

737

4,275

1,545

466

308

19

SPORTS CLUBS

BRONCO PEAK

9

1,145

Student employment applications

Interviews

Student positions filled

Clubs

120

Participants

38

Participants

Teams

Sports

Members completed climbing wall orientation and belay class


39


ORGANIZATION

40


PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE OUR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR THE STRATEGIC PLAN 2014-2019

1

E NH A NCE OP P OR T UNI T IE S F OR S T UDEN T ENG A GEMEN T A ND A S I’ S COMMI T MEN T T O A C A DEMIC E XCE L L E NCE / P ROGRE S S T O GR A DU AT ION Increase the number of high-quality programs with an emphasis on all areas of personal wellness Create new opportunities for incoming students in campus involvement, leadership development and volunteerism Enhance year-round training programs for ASI students (leaders, staff and interns) to develop work and life skills through their experience with the organization Increase opportunities for internships and graduate assistantships in ASI Assess learning outcomes for ASI student leaders and staff to evaluate their academic progress towards graduation and preparation for their future careers Identify and implement additional outreach strategies to inform students about the opportunities for engagement with ASI

41


2

RE SP OND T O T HE CH A NGING NE E DS OF S T UDEN T S A ND T HE C A MP US COMMUNI T Y T HROUGH T HE P RO V IS ION A ND ONG OING A S S E S S MEN T OF HIGH-QU A L I T Y FA CIL I T IE S , P ROGR A MS A ND S E R V ICE S Evaluate programs, facilities and services through measurement of overall customer satisfaction and on a Universal Access standard Identify student needs and expectations for the future of the Bronco Student Center, utilizing the 2013 architectural review of the BSC, Energy Use Assessment and input from students and campus community Evaluate, identify and implement best practices for sustainability Assess the child care needs of the student population and availability of grants and external funding support

42


3

F OR T IF Y A S I ’ S INF R A S T RUC T URE T O S UP P OR T T HE GROW T H OF T HE ORG A NI Z AT ION , W HIL E P RO V IDING RE S IL IE NCE A ND F L E X IBIL I T Y Increase ASI’s web presence, social media outreach and mobile capabilities to better serve ASI, the students and the campus Provide additional local opportunities for professional growth and development for professional staff Evaluate the structure of the maintenance and custodial departments based on leading industry standards Evaluate and identify changes in workflow and processes in preparation for semester conversion Identify resources and training needs in order to implement accessible technology solutions Maintain a competitive and equitable compensation structure within available resources Research possible funding sources and partnerships and evaluate availability of internal and external resources to support development work

43


4

S T RE NG T HEN PA R T NE R S HIP S A ND C OL L A BOR AT IONS W I T H A S I A L UMNI, T HE C A MP US , C A L IF ORNI A S TAT E UNI V E R S I T Y (C S U ) S Y S T EM A ND E X T ERN A L ORG A NI Z AT IONS Define risk management practices and responsibilities for campus partnerships Implement plan for administrative oversight and risk management for Sports Clubs Increase advocacy to support students through independent efforts and partnerships Establish an ASI alumni network Develop new partnerships to create programs and activities for students that fosters sustainability, diversity and campus pride

44


45


ASI STUDENT GOVERNMENT E X E CU T I V E B O A RD

C A BINE T

James Cox ASI President

Kaleab Habtemariam ASI Secretary of External Affairs

Louis Harfouche ASI Vice President

Jasmine Andino ASI Secretary of Internal Affairs

Fayz Ashker ASI Treasurer

Andrew Campa ASI Secretary of Education

Andrea Cendejas ASI Attorney General

Christine Zheng ASI Secretary of Sustainability

Taylor Young ASI Senator Pro-Tempore

Marisol Aguayo ASI Secretary of Programs & Services

46


S E N AT E

B E AT C H A IRS

Kimberly Rotunno ASI Agriculture Senator

Chonlawan Khaothiemsang ASI Science Senator

Melanie Young ASI Business Senator

Katarina Kushin ASI Environmental Design Senator

Taylor Young ASI Collins College of Hospitality Management Senator

Benjamin Murdock ASI Senator-At-Large, Student Interest Council

Jai Oni Sly ASI College of Education and Integrative Studies Senator

Jared Tolbert ASI Senator-At-Large, Greek Council

Aivan Chung Outreach Chair

Jake Ly ASI Senator-At-Large, Inter-hall Council

Isolde Alfaro Programming Chair

Deena Wahba ASI Senator-At-Large, Multi-Cultural Council

Xyrine Dapal Programming Chair

Jasmine Moore ASI College of Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences Senator Colin Danahy ASI Engineering Senator

Jeffrey Cuevas ASI Assistant Secretary of Programs & Services Hana Kim Music Chair Andrew Densmore Music Chair

Iram Khajawall Programming Chair Sydney Martinez Programming Chair

47


A S I F UL L-TIME STAFF

A S O F 6/3 0/15

Saad Abbas Interim Associate Director of Business Services Richard Barron Custodian A’Naja Bass Fitness Coordinator Sarah Bauer Associate Director of Programs Theresa Bell Director of Business Services Ivonne Cabezas Accounting Analyst Leslie Corcoran Office & Enrollment Coordinator Michelle Crowder Teacher Cora M. Culla Executive Director Kimberly Deitrick Project Assistant Lisa Dye Human Resources Manager Jonathan Fitzhugh Interim Director of Financial Services

48

Maria-Lisa Flemington Program Coordinator

Sherrie Kerber Teacher

Kenneth Flores Interactive Content Producer

Rocio Kessler Assistant Teacher

Manuel Gaeta Maintenance Coordinator

Louisa Keyes Accounts Receivable/Vault Cashier

Melvin Galang Accounting Technician

Shelbi Long Associate Director of Recreation

Joseph Gallegos Custodial Coordinator

Claudia Lopez Food Services Assistant

Andrea Garcia Interim Interactive Content Producer

Victor Macias Facilities Assistant

Amanda Gelsinger Assistant Teacher

Scott Macleod Member Services Coordinator

Teresa Gonzalez Project Assistant

Michael Marshall Assistant Teacher

Jackelyn Hernandez Assistant Teacher

Jessica Martinez Accounts Payable Fund Specialist

Cathee Hill Program Assistant

Sandra Mihiar Commercial Services Coordinator

Vicki Jackson Student Government Coordinator

Hea Moon Assistant Teacher

Rashonda Johnson Administrative Assistant

Gidgitte Moore Custodian


Michael Moynihan Adventure Education Coordinator

Danielle Sanders Human Resources Assistant Manager

Melissa Terrazas Education Coordinator

Ian Navarro Adventure Education Coordinator

Lorena Segarra Employment, Training and Development Coordinator

Veronica Tirado Assistant Teacher

Cathy Neale Marketing and PR Manager Yolanda Palomarez HRIS Project Manager Barnaby Peake Director of Bronco Student Center Brandy Perez Assistant Teacher Sylvia Peterson Assistant Teacher David Quezada Associate Director of Facilities and Operations Jose Saavedra Custodian Celeste Salinas Associate Director of Children’s Center Lusero Sanchez-Lara Employment, Training and Development Assistant

Craig Shibley Audio Visual Coordinator Krista Smith Director of Recreation Willie Stewart Administrative Assistant Kimberly Sumida Communications and Social Media Coordinator Aracelle Tan Teacher

Eliane Townsend Accounts Payable Fund Specialist Lorena Valadez Custodian Powell Velasco Director of Facilities Management Susan Wise Reservations Coordinator Jonathan Wong Creative Design Coordinator Haley Youngblood Payroll Accountant

Kaycee Tanioka Intramural Sports Coordinator Leah Tarin Executive Assistant Jennifer Taylor Administrative Assistant Ginny Templeton Operations Manager

49


asi.cpp.edu

50


ASI DEPARTMENT STRUCTURE VP OF STUDENT AFFAIRS STUDENT GOVERNMENT

CHILDREN’S CENTER

BSC ADMINISTRATION

FINANCIAL SERVICES

ASI ADMINISTRATION

HUMAN RESOURCES

MARKETING, DESIGN & PUBLIC RELATIONS

VP OF ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS/CHIEF FINANICAL OFFICER

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

CAMPUS RECREATION

BSC OPERATIONS

AQUATICS

STUDENT ACTIVITIES & PROGRAMS

INTRAMURAL SPORTS

CONFERENCE & EVENTS

ADVENTURE EDUCATION

COMMERCIAL SERVICES

Direct Report

FITNESS

Indirect Report

51


FINANCIALS

52


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT Board of Directors Associated Students Inc. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Pomona, California Report on the Financial Statements We have audited the accompanying basic financial statements of the Associated Students Inc., California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (ASI) (a nonprofit organization), which comprise the statement of financial position as of June 30, 2015, and the related statements of activities and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes to the financial statements. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the ASI’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the ASI’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

53


INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of ASI as of June 30, 2015, and the changes in net assets and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Report on Summarized Comparative Information We have previously audited ASI’s 2014 financial statements, and our report dated September 10, 2014, expressed an unmodified opinion on those audited financial statements. In our opinion, the summarized comparative information presented herein as of and for the year ended June 30, 2014, is consistent, in all material respects, with the audited financial statements from which it has been derived. Report on Supplementary Information Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming an opinion on the ASI’s financial statements as a whole. The supplementary schedules are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not a required part of the basic financial statements. The supplementary section is the responsibility of management and was derived from and relates directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the financial statements and certain additional procedures, including comparing and reconciling such information directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements or to the basic financial statements themselves, and other additional procedures in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the information is fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements as a whole.

VICENTI, LLOYD & STUTZMAN LLP Glendora, CA September 9, 2015

54

A S I A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 1 4 -2 0 1 5

(CONTINUED)


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION June 30, 2015 With Comparative Totals for 2014

ASSETS

BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

GENERAL

TOTAL 2015

IRA

AGENCY

TOTAL 2014

Cash and cash equivalents On hand and in bank

$

80,102

$

Savings accounts

338,899

$

74,322

$

212,567

$

1,125

705,890

$

378,245

1,125

1,125

10,084,788

7,401,785

Investments in money funds

4,300,686

5,170,894

613,208

TOTAL CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

4,380,788

5,510,918

687,530

212,567

10,791,803

7,781,155

252,923

41,458

447

17,029

311,857

382,049

21,609

84,902

447

17,029

333,466

466,951

Receivables Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $5,982 (General) and $10,564 (Bronco Student Center) Due from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

21,609

TOTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

252,923

63,067

Prepaid expesnes and other assets

9,565

107,781

117,346

104,653

Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization

2,892

196,691

199,583

102,278

$4,646,168

$5,878,457

$11,442,198

$8,455,037

GENERAL

BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES Accounts Payable Due to California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Accrued liabilities

$

120,151

$

371,395

15,007

354,686

105,806

249,165

Funds held for others Due to (from) interfund activities

282,565

(286,274)

$229,596

$687,977

AGENCY

$

4,921

4,632

377 15,952

Postretirement benefit payable

1,936,500

2,507,120

$2,460,029

$3,196,092

$

501,099

TOTAL 2014 $

249,015

370,070

109,585

370,923

404,451

664,302

223,680

887,982

727,234

2,425

1,284

-

-

-

25,258

Unearned revenue TOTAL LIABILITIES

TOTAL 2015

IRA

$

$687,977

$229,596

4,443,620

3,274,641

$6,573,694

$4,790,184

A S I A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 1 4 -2 0 1 5 5 5


STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION (CONTINUED) NET ASSETS

BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

GENERAL

AGENCY

IRA

TOTAL 2015

TOTAL 2014

Unresticted net assets Designated

$

395,344

$

$

$

Undesignated

1,790,795

2,682,365

TOTAL NET ASSETS

2,186,139

2,682,365

-

$4,646,168

$5,878,457

$687,977

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

$

REVENUES Student activity fees

GENERAL $

2,529,623

TOTAL 2015 $

$

2,529,623

4,868,504

3,664,853

$229,596

$11,442,198

$8,455,037

2,142,369

Student center fees Bronco Student Center

3,081,390

3,081,390

3,587,000

Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC)

4.819,610

4,819,610

-

24,305

22,662

Programs Academic programs

24,305

Cultural affairs

27,452

54,437

81,889

227

Student services

20,665

217,552

238,217

546,211

-

51,079

3,300

-

Recreation intramurals Student government

3,300

Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC)

216,686

216,686

-

Rental income

314,988

314,988

272,064

Interest income Administrative fees

11,272

Other income, net TOTAL REVENUES

56

17,084

140,000 2,756,617

372,763

-

TOTAL 2014 $

$

3,292,090

Statement of Activities For the Year Ended June 30, 2015 (With Comparative Totals for 2014) BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

395,344 4,473,160

28,356

14,871

140,000

140,000

30,428

30,428

31,037

8,752,175

11,508,792

6,807,520


STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2015 (WITH COMPARATIVE TOTALS FROM 2014) EXPENSES Programs

BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

GENERAL $

$

Academic programs

TOTAL 2015 $

462,191

TOTAL 2014 $

462,191

401,546

Cultural affairs

212,506

265,980

478,486

521,442

Student services

351,540

1,102,166

1,453,706

1,343,389

45,579

332,802

Intercollegiate athletics

45,579

Recreation intramurals Student government

206,475

Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC) Rental expenses

-

156,976

36,078

242,553

202,768

1,666,877

1,666,877

-

331,902

331,902

308,424

733,675

689,372

1,530,410

1,530,410

3,002,874

General and administrative General

733,675

Bronco Student Center

2,393,717

2,393,717

-

2,011,966

7,327,130

9,339,096

6,959,593

GENERAL

BRONCO STUDENT CENTER

Bronco Recreation and Intramural Complex (BRIC) TOTAL EXPENSES

Change in net assets before other changes Other changes - Postretirement-related changes other than net periodic benefit cost CHANGE IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS NET ASSETS - BEGINNING OF YEAR NET ASSETS - END OF YEAR

$

744,651

$

1,425,045

TOTAL 2015 $

2,169,696

TOTAL 2014 $

(152,073)

(376,758)

(589,287)

(966,045)

46,209

367,893

835,758

1,203,651

(105,864)

1,818,246

1,846,607

3,664,853

3,770,717

$2,186,139

$2,682,365

$4,868,504

$3,664,853

57


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

58


AWARDS • Recognition of the BRIC as the Division of Student Affairs Vice President’s Team of the Year for spring 2015 • Recognition of Celeste Salinas for Vice President’s Leadership Award by the Division of Student Affairs • Recognition of Krista Smith as Diversity Champion by the Pride Alliance • Recognition of A’Naja Bass as the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Scholarship Recipient • Recognition of Ginny Templeton as the Instructor Trainer Educator Council by the American Red Cross • Recognition of Joe Gallegos for Star of the Year Award by ASI • Recognition of Sean Winter as first place winner in the Best Flyer/Poster category for the submission titled “Fall Comedy Kick Off” at the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) West 2014 Regional Conference

• Recognition of Tim Neumann as first place winner in the “Steal This Idea” Contest, Banners/Large Scale Media category for the submission titled “Humans vs. Zombies” at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference

• Recognition of Jon Wong as third place winner in the “Steal This Idea” Contest, Banners/Large Scale Media category for the submission titled “EAT. MEET. STUDY. PLAY.” at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference

• Recognition of Chris Arellano as third place winner in the “Steal This Idea” Contest, Multipage Document category for the submission titled “2012-2013 Annual Report” at the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Region 1 Conference

59


CREDITS Dedication

WRITERS/EDITORS

ASI recognizes students, past and present, who will always

Andrew Gin Patricia Guevarra

remain an important part of ASI and Cal Poly Pomona. We

Jessica Wang

thank the ASI team of students and full-time staff for their valuable contributions and support to ASI.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kelly Rice

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Neil Johnson Gilbert Sanchez

SENIOR EDITOR

Kimberly Sumida

MANAGING EDITOR

Cathy Neale

CREATIVE DIRECTION

Andrea Garcia

SPECIAL THANKS

Cora M. Culla ASI Marketing, Design & Public Relations ASI Staff

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A S I A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 1 4 -2 0 1 5 6 1

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