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SEGMENT II PORTFOLIO ANDREAS FRESE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE 01.02.2011


Andreas Frese

23 Conway St #2, Roslindale, MA 02131 andreas.frese@the-bac.edu 603.479.4074 http://www.linkedin.com/in/andreasfrese

Winner 1st Place and OBJECTIVE People’s Choice Seeking professional experience toto supplement mymy academic knowledge and skills in in architecture through a position in an To obtain professional experience supplement academic knowledge and skills architecture through full or part time position in an architecture related field. related fiaeld. EDUCATION Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA Candidate for Master of Architecture / Master Certificate of Sustainable Design Participated in an intensive first year program, GPA 3.5 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Troy, NY Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering Graduated Magna Cum Laude, GPA 3.75 (Overall)/GPA 4.00 (Major) SKILLS

Sept. 2009 - Present

Sept. 1988 - Dec. 1992

Design • Computer programs: Revit, AutoCAD, SketchUp, Rhino, InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, ArchiCAD • Drawing: freehand, sketching, drafting, perspective, axonometric • Model building: chipboard, foam core, basswood, laser cutter • Architectural research: history, design, analysis Engineering • Prior use of many CAD/Solid Modeling packages (AutoDesk, SolidWorks, SolidEdge, Aries) • Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with many different packages (ANSYS, NASTRAN, COSMOS, ABAQUS) • Software development on Windows, Unix, and Web in multiple languages Professional • Highly organized, reliable, and responsible • Developed and managed software projects from concept to production • Employee supervision (project assignment, project management, mentoring, reviewing, estimating) • Customer support and interaction (installations, fielding complaints, resolving problems) • Take initiative to learn the big picture and work collaboratively with others

EXPERIENCE NESEA Student Design Competition 2011 Nov. 2010 - Mar. 2011 Team Leader Lead a team of students to prepare a complete design package for a small residential community using modular housing and sustainable energy practices including the calculation of heating loads and cost of construction. Our team took home both the first place prize and the people’s choice prize at Building Energy 2011 conference. Green Courthouse Gateway Project Sept. 2010 - Nov. 2010 Team Leader Lead a team of select students chosen to work on the design of a new Net-Zero Energy courthouse in Lowell, MA in collaboration with Finegold, Alexander, and Associates, Arup, and DCAM. Result presented at Academy for Architecture for Justice Conference as part of Build Boston 2010. Nuance / Dictaphone, Hampton, NH Principal Software Engineer Developed web and PC based software for medical transcription market.

Feb. 2000 - Jul. 2006

Octave Communications, Salem, NH Senior Software Engineer Developed a web based user interface to a telephone conferencing system.

Sept. 1999 - Feb. 2000

MacNeal-Schwendler Corporation (MSC) / Aries Technology, Lowell, MA Oct. 1993 - Sept. 1999 Senior Software Engineer Developed software program and components for pre and post preprocessing to Finite Element Analysis. ADDITIONAL SKILLS AND INTERESTS Member of BSA, NESEA Studied French, German, Spanish, Arabic Hiking (Completed the AMC White Mountain 4000 footers), bicycling, tennis, skiing, snowshoeing, kayaking


Studio

Table of Contents

C1

<Spring 2011 - Peter Martin>

Spritual Urban Infill

p02

Practice Practice Essay NESEA Student Design Competition Roxbury Community Arts Center

p19 p20 p36


Spiritual Urban Infill

3

Studio:

C1 Studio

Semester:

Spring 2011

Project:

Spiritual Urban Infill: A Buddhist Center in Harvard Square

Duration:

Sixteen weeks

Instructor:

Peter Martin

Summary:

To design a new Buddhist Center for a Humanistic Buddhist group based in Cambridge. The building is located near Harvard Square and is to reflect the urban context while providing an environment that allows for the cultivation of inner tranquility, but presents a welcoming, accessible and open countenance to the general public.


Spiritual Urban Infill

The site is located near Harvard Square in Cambridge. It is bordered by streets on three sides. The north and south sides face Harvard dormitories. It faces a church to the east and a restaurant to the west. The site is on the end of an island of buildings not affiliated with Harvard that inserts itself into the Harvard own property. These buildings are unique from their surroundings in their materials and low height.

Site Location

Site Context


C1 Studio Andreas Frese The aspects of the site most affected my design were • The need to have a distinctness from the Harvard buildings to maintain the identity and integrity of the non-Harvard community of Cambridge • The high volume of pedestrian traffic coming primarily along on the eastern edge calls for a visual presence at the north-east and south east corners. • Other buildings on the “island” have their front face on the south side and there is more traffic there than to the north, so it is wise to maintain this side as the front. Harvard Non-Harvard Mixed Ownership

Site Analysis

5


Spiritual Urban Infill

In looking at precedents the buddhist temple of Lhasa, Tibet stood out to me. Like the Cambridge site they were in an urban context, with a tight footprint, and made of masonry, ancient yet having aspects of modern architecture. One common characteristic was either having sloped walls or sloped piers at their corners.

Buddhist Temples of Lhasa, Tibet

Another precedent was the Ningbo Museum in China. It consists of walls at different angles made of local masonry with inset windows in vary shapes and sizes.

Ningbo Historic Museum, Wang Shu, Amateur Architecture Studio


C1 Studio Andreas Frese

7

A varied program includes not only the Buddha Hall and related spaces, but also residences for monastics, a restaurant, plus rental spaces for student apartments and an NGO office. These spaces have to coexist but have separation from each other. The restaurant is the most public space and should be at street level. The Buddha Hall is the most important space in the building. It needs to be large enough to hold about one hundred people. It is given a double height. Its size and importance, combined with the vertical elements and the tight foot print place it on the second floor off center.

Buddha Hall and Stairs

Vertical Circulation

All Vertical Elements

Beginning with a box large enough to encompass the program, I tilt the three sides bordering streets inward. Then to give the corners presence they are cut off. Then areas of symmetry are found centered on the location of the Buddha Hall and the structure needed to support it. Then the wedge of symmetry is tilted to the vertical.

Block Mass

Slope North and South Walls

Sloped East Wall

Cut Off Corners

Symmetry

Verticalize


Spiritual Urban Infill

From this I derived the final form of my building.

For materials I chose to use composite granite panels of two different varieties. The Rosa Vanga granite relates to the color of the brick of Harvard buildings, yet separates from it by its materiality. The Sardo Gray granite further this separation.

Stonelite Granite Panels

Rosa Vanga Granite

Sardo Gray Granite


C1 Studio Andreas Frese

9

The corners being cutoff and forming the large triangular glazed areas are intended to give a visual presence as seen by approaching pedestrians from the surrounding streets.

Corner from Bow St

Corner from Dewolfe St

The most public space of the restaurant dining is on the ground floor with views to and from streets on three sides. The entrance is on south west corner and enters into a lobby that serves as a mixing spaces for the different inhabitants. Diners go to the right to the restaurant, those for the services, go up the stairs to the left, tenants take the elevator or stairs at the back. These separate paths are separated so access can restricted after hours between to various spaces. Stairs from the lobby with a Chinese influenced railing design start the transition from a public space to the spiritual space of the second floor which contains the Buddha Hall and meditation rooms. There is also space set aside for storage of shoes which are removed before entering the Buddha Hall. The third floor contains monastic and lay offices, a flower prep room, and a balcony that looks down into the double height space of the Buddha Hall. The fourth floor contains the monastic quarters and two seminar rooms. The monastic quarters are in a suite isolated from the seminar rooms. The fifth floor has an NGO office suite and two seminar rooms. The sixth floor has three student apartments. One two bedroom and two one bedroom apartment. Each apartment has access to an enclosed outdoor space. The apartment on the north side also has a sawtooth clerestory window to provide southern light. In the basement, besides mechanical space and storage, is another seminar room, laundry, a youth rec room and a music room. The youth rec room features a light well.


C

Mechanical 408 SF

5 4 2

E.1

1.1 00 - Basement 3/32" = 1'-0"

0

5

Laundry 235 SF

Elevator 61 SF Elevator 61 SF

Elevator 61 SF 6

Youth Rec 700 SF

Mechanical 292 SF

20' 13' - 7 13/32" 0 1/8 "

Kitchen 728 SF

A102

M Reception 99 SF

Monastic Office 205 SF

A.1

Open To Below

Monastic Office 219 SF Lobby 373 SF

7

Seminar Room 560 SF

6 Mechanical 408 SF

6

Dining 1129 SF

6

5

UP

5

6

7

C C

Lay Office 168 SF

6

54'

5

7

C

Stu 5

7

-5

7

A.1 A.1

Lay Office 168 SF

7/1 6"

Music Room 521 SF

Storage 652 SF

4

4

3

2 1.1 0

2

2

E.1

E.1 E.1

1.1 1.1

00 - Basement 3/32" = 1'-0"

03 - Mezzanine with Offices 3/32" = 1'-0" 01 - Entry/Mt Auburn St 1 3/32" = 1'-0"

3

Monastic and Lay Offices, Balcony Overlooking Buddha Hall

Laundry 235 SF 5

Elevator 61 SF

6

20' 13' - 7 13/32" 0 1/8 "

Kitchen 728 SF

A102

Lobby 373 SF

7

6

Dining 1129 SF

6

5

6

4

5

-5

-5

4 32

1

7

6

7

C

6 C

2

1.1

2 00 - Basement 3/32" = 1'-0" 02 - Buddha Hall 2 3/32" = 1'-0"

0

E.1

Monastic Of 205 SF

A.1

B

D

Monastic Apt 455 SF

4

2

C

Mechanical 408 SFMeditation 180 SF

5

4

1.1

A.1

Meditation 180 SF

7

Monastic Apt 330 SF

7/1 6"

C

Seminar Room 516 SF

A.1

6

UP

5

Music Room 521 SF

Buddha Hall 1175 SF

Seminar Room Monastic Apt 560 SF 372 SF

7

7

7

Seminar Room 398 SF

Monastic Common 639 SF Storage 652 SF Shoe Storage 182 SF

Reception 99 SF

A.1

Youth Rec 700 SF

Elevator 61 SF

Mechanical 292 SF

13/3 2"

Elevator 61 SFElevator 61 SF

7/3 2"

34'

A102 90' -1

54'

E.1 1.1

E.1

E.1

1.1

Buddha Hall and Meditation 4

01 - Entry/Mt Auburn St 3/32" = 1'-0"

04 - Monastic & Seminar 3/32" = 1'-0"

5 A102 90' -1 7/3 2"

Elevator 61 SF Elevator 61 SF

6 A102

20' 13' - 7 13/32" 0 1/8 "

Kitchen 728 SF Seminar Room 399 SF

M

Reception 99 SF

A.1

Shoe Storage 182 SF

7

7 B

6

C 5

Meditation 180 SF

D

4 3

02 - Buddha Hall 3/32" = 1'-0"

6

A.1

6

UP

6

C 5

A.1 7

Dining 1129 SF

7

5 4

4 2

2 1.1

2

NGO Office Suite 1778 SF

Lobby 373 SF

-5

Meditation 180 SF

Buddha Hall 1175 SF

Seminar Room 502 SF

7/1 6"

Elevator 61 SF

54'

Spiritual Urban Infill

A102 90' -1 7/3 2"

Flower Prep 117 SF

2 1.1

E.1

E.1

1.1

E.1

Entrance, Lobby, Dining, Kitchen 01 - Entry/Mt Auburn St 1 3/32" = 1'-0" 05 - NGO & Seminar 5 3/32" = 1'-0"

C


C 5 3

4

2 E.1

1.1

2 1.7

03 - Mezzanine with Offices 3 3/32" = 1'-0"

E.1

1.1

06 - Student Apartments 6 3/32" = 1'-0"

C1 Studio Andreas Frese

5/8 "

34'

Elevator 61 SF Seminar Room Laundry 398 SF 89 SF Elevator 61 SF

Monastic Common 639 SF

Sawtooth Skylights Above

Seminar Room 516 SF

A.1

A.1

A.1

e

-5

13/3 2"

80' -0

Monastic Apt 372 SF Student Apt 565 SF

7

Student Apt 771 SF

7

Monastic Apt 330 SF

6

6

7

7/1 6"

C

A.7

A.1

4' 5

6

C

C

Student AptMonastic Apt 455 SF 568 SF

5

5

4

4

C

5

3

2

4

1

1.7 4

1.7

E.1

1.1

2

1.1

06&- Seminar Student Apartments 04 - Monastic 6 3/32" = 1'-0"3/32" = 1'-0"

E.1 7

Student Apartments

80' -0

A.1

A.1

Seminar Room 502 SF

7

7

A.1 Student Apt 771 SF

6

C

6 C

5

5

4

5

7

C

Lay Office 168 SF

A.1

Student Apt 565 SF

A.7

6

Sawtooth Skylights Above

Elevator 61 SF

A.1

Lay Office 168 SF

Open To Below

Monastic Office 219 SF

7

Student Apt 568 SF

6

C

C 5

4

3

2

4

2 3

2

1.1

1.71.1

E.1 5

E.1

E.7

E.1

2 1.7

05 - NGO & Seminar 03 - Mezzanine with Offices 3/32" =3 1'-0" 3/32" = 1'-0"

6

1.1

06 - Student Apartments 3/32" = 1'-0"

E.1

NGO Office and Seminar Rooms 07 - Roof 3/32" = 1'-0"

7

5/8 "

-5

13/3 2"

80' -0

34'

Elevator 61 SF

Seminar Room 398 SF

1/8 "

Seminar Room 516 SF

Monastic Common 639 SF

A.1

A.1

A.1

Monastic Apt 372 SF

7

A.7 7

Monastic Apt 330 SF

6

6 7/1 6"

C

C

Monastic Apt 455 SF

5

-5

C

C 5 4

4

54'

0' 0

Laundry 89 SF

NGO Office Suite 1778 SF

Monastic Office 205 SF

A.1

07 - Roof 3/32" = 1'-0"

5/8 "

Seminar Room 399 SF

34'

-5

13/3 2"

Flower Prep 117 SF Elevator 61 SF Elevator 61 SF

E.7

2

3

2 1.1

E.1

4

04 - Monastic & Seminar 3/32" = 1'-0"

1.7

E.1

Monastic Quarters and Seminar Rooms

E.7

2

7

07 - Roof 3/32" = 1'-0"

11


Spiritual Urban Infill

The large scale geometric forms I used began to remind myself and others of the work of Louis Kahn. I found this especially in comparison with the National Assembly of Bangladesh and the Indian Institute of Management.

Indian Institute of Management, Louis Kahn

National Assembly of Bangladesh, Dhaka, Louis Kahn


C1 Studio Andreas Frese

Mt Auburn and DeWolfe View

Mt Auburn View West

South West Birds Eye View

Mt Auburn View East

The large circular window on the south side provides light to the two stories of the Buddha Hall as well as the monastic apartments and the NGO office suite. Horizontal louvers provide shade in the summer to prevent overheating while allowing full sun in the winter. The student apartments have their own sun room which acts like a double skin facade to provide heat in the winter and cooling in the summer through shading and ventilation.

Student Apartment Sun Room

13


Spiritual Urban Infill

The north side, appropriately, has much less glazing. This side also has a lower amount of foot and vehicular traffic. It is the back side of the other buildings on the block. Seminar rooms, one student apartment, and circulation space around the Buddha Hall are on this side of the building. patios for outdoor dining are located at the north west and south west corners

North West Patio

Lobby Looking Toward Entrance

North Side

North East Birds Eye View

The Buddha Hall is the most important and scared space in the building. It is accessed from a wide U-shaped staircase from the lobby. The Buddha Hall has walls that isolate it in the building, and provide a circumambulation space around the outside. Stained glass windows featuring Buddhist motifs allow light in without taking focus away from the internal space.

Above is an octagonal opening that is surrounded by a custom railing featuring Buddhist symbology and columns with bracketing inspired by asian designs. Light from the circular window on the south side spills in from above into the Buddha Hall. A octagonal coffered ceiling creates shadow and reflections from this light and aids in acoustics. The balcony above serves as an observation point for the monastics and lay person in their offices, but can also be used for overflow crowds as they receive on the Chinese New Year.


C1 Studio Andreas Frese

15


Spiritual Urban Infill


C1 Studio Andreas Frese

17


Practice Essay

19


The 2nd Annual NESEA Student Design Competition

HIGH PERFORMANCE

MODULAR BUILDING

In a world that is changing rapidly, it is essential for our buildings to conserve energy and materials, provide a comfortable and healthy indoor environment, and to be durable, affordable, and desirable. While the majority of current building construction is performed on-site, this competition will focus on the alternative; modular building technology. For information please visit: www.neseastudentdesigncompetition.com

Competition Hosted and Sponsored By:


NESEA Competition

21

Project:

Student Design Competition for the New England Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA)

Project Type:

High Performance Modular Housing

Program size:

20 units of 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments

Location:

West Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts

Team:

Four students

Role:

My role was as project leader and major contributor. Four students were involved but the majority of the work was done by myself and one other student. Everyone contributed ideas but it was mine that became the overarching concepts behind the design.

Summary:

Submittal consisted of two 24”x36” boards and an essay. The entries were judged by a panel and the results presented at the Building Energy 2011 conference in March. Additionally conference attendees voted for a people’s choice awards. My team’s entry took home both the first place and the people’s choice prizes.


NESEA Competition

This competition is sponsored by the New England Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) and focuses on modular building technology. The aim is to conserve energy and materials in order to create a healthy, durable, affordable, and desirable residential community. Teams were to submit a complete design package that includes a site plan, community center, and housing units for 20 families. Heating loads as well as estimated construction costs were to be calculated and presented with the package. The site is a 4 acre vacant lot in West Roxbury on the edge of Boston city limits


Practice Andreas Frese

23

Modular HAUSing: A PASSIV Community a PASSIV community modular HAUSing:

Winner 1st Place and Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice NESEA Student Design Competition 2011

Andreas Frese Jeff Estes Neil Dumont Ken Schroeder Existing Conditions The site for the design competition was formerly part of the mobile home park which it now abuts to the west. To the east is the VFW Parkway; a busy high speed road with a guardrail and chain link fence down its center line. To the south is a car dealership and an extended commercial area beyond that. To the north is an apartment building, gas station, and more commercial businesses.

Existing Conditions

Residential

Residential

The design site has an access road to the mobile home park, which has been made redundant by a new access road to the north, however it still gets use. Running parallel to the Parkway along the

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Besides the remaining portion of the mobile home park and the apartment building north of it there are some nearby residential areas. Across the VFW Parkway is a condominium development as well as some single family homes to its north along the Parkway. However the Parkway median isolates it from our site. Further residential homes lie further to the east but are even more isolated by an absence of access from the west.

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length of the site are two berms. The access road splits the berms and drops from the level of the Parkway to the level of the flat portion of the site. The berms proved to be useful as a visual and aural The for theThisdesign competition was formerly part of the mobile home park which it now barrier to the site sight and sound of the Parkway. site is clear and has excellent southern exposure. Design Site Design abuts to the west. To the east is the VFW Parkway; a busy high speed road with a guardrail Due to their benefits and to save on costs the berms were kept. With a lack of views or available connections to the outside it was decided to create a community of our own and turn views inward to a common green space. Adjusting to the southern exposure and south west winds of summer a staggered block design was developed. This provides every one with southern exposure and collects sumand chain link fence down its center line. To the south is a car dealership and an extended mer winds to provide cooling breezes. To maintain a community space in the center roads and parking were kept to the periphery. The buildings form mimics the shape of the berm and blends in with the site. commercial area beyond that. To the north is an apartment building, gas station, and Commercial more Inspired by the Passivhaus movement utilization of super insulation and triple pane glazing was investigated. commercial businesses. r

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Besides the remaining portion of the mobile home park and the apartment building north of it there are some nearby residential areas. Across the VFW Parkway is a condominium development as well as some single family homes to its north along the Parkway. However the Parkway median isolates it from our site. Further residential homes lie further to the east but are even more isolated by an absence of access from the west. Berms and Flat Ground Views Turned Inward Adjust to Sun and Wind Vehicular Access Berms Providing Sound Attenuation

Stop The design site has an access road to the mobileBushome park, which has been made redundant Berm Berm by a new access road to the north, however it still gets use. Running parallel to the Parkway Road - connects to along the length of the site are two berms. The access road splits the berms and drops from mobile home park

648,349 BTU/hr

Payback Period To keep energy and construction costs low apartment sizes were kept small but functional. Circulation was placed to minimize lost space. Bathrooms are stacked and backed to reduce construction and roof penetrations. Including basements there is a total of 29,268 sq ft for the three buildings.

Community Center

12.2 years

South Apartment Building

Design Site

Room Legend

Energy Production

South Facing Roof: 6502 sq ft Solar System Size: 65 kWh Energy Production: 6760 kWh/month or 276,809,978 BTU/yr* *based on a average solar radiance of 4.27 kWh/sq m/day

1 Bedroom ADA 2 Bedroom

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Glazing was made most prominent on the south side of the apartment buildings ranging from 18 to 20% of the wall. On the north and east sides it was from 11-13%. On the west side is was 6-7%. These percentages are designed to provide light and heat without excessive solar heat gain in the winter.

1 Bedroom

Road - connects to mobile home park

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Construction is simplified by being made of 21 full length modules and 12 half size modules capable of being carried on 27 truck beds.

22.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

$41,451 of oil/yr

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VS

Residential

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6.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

$11,681 of oil/yr

Common Greenspace

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182,708 BTU/hr

North Apartment Building

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Total Heating Cost

Residential

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Total Heating Loads

Retention Pond and Bioswale

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the level of the Parkway to the level of the flat portion of Buildings as Berms the site. The berms proved Cost and Energy to be useful as costs a more visual andcosts but there are savings in heating costs Using superinsulation and triple pane windows initially in construction that will payback the investment. Through calculation of costs and energy usage for both the superinsulated design and one with the basic amount of insulation and double pane windows it was found that the superinsulated design would payback the aural barrier to the sight and initial investment in a reasonable 12.2 years. Additionally government incentives may reduce this even further. With southern exposure solar photovoltaics could be This mounted to offset the energy needed from outside sound ofand pitched theroofsParkway. sources. Cost and Energy Calculations site is clear and has excellent Proposed Design with Super Insulation Basic Insulation southern exposure. Total Structure Cost $944,986 $19.92/sq ft $32.29/sq ft $583,018

Commercial

2 Bedroom ADA 3 Bedroom

Room Legend Room Legend 3 Bedroom ADA 11 Bedroom Bedroom 1 Bedroom Basement

11 Bedroom Bedroom ADA ADA 1 Bedroom ADA Bathroom 22 Bedroom Bedroom 2 Bedroom Circulation

22 Bedroom ADA Bedroom 2 Bedroom ADA ADA Community Room 33 Bedroom Bedroom 3 Bedroom Compost and Recycling 33 Bedroom ADA Bedroom 3 Bedroom ADA ADA Kitchen


NESEA Competition

Design Due to their benefits and to save on costs the berms were kept. With a lack of views or available connections to the outside it was decided to create a community of our own and turn views inward to a common green space. Adjusting to the southern exposure and south west winds of summer a staggered block design was developed. This provides every one with southern exposure and collects summer winds to provide cooling breezes. To maintain a community space in the center roads and parking were kept to the periphery. The buildings form mimics the shape of the berm and blends in with the site. Inspired by the Passivhaus movement utilization of super insulation and triple pane glazing was investigated.

Berms Providing Sound Attenuation

Berm

Berm

Buildings as Berms


. Further residential homes lie further to the east but are even more isolated by an ie r

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Design Site

Practice Andreas Frese

25

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e outside it was decided to create a community of our own and turn views inward to a gn was developed. This provides every one with southern exposure and collects sumo the periphery. The buildings form mimics the shape of the berm and blends in with

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Views Turned Inward

Views Turned Inward

Adjust to Sun and Wind

Vehicular Access

Adjust to Sun and Wind

Vehicular Access

Bus Stop

Road - connects to mobile home park

Retention Pond and Bioswale

North Apartment Building

Common Greenspace

Community Center South Apartment Building Road - connects to mobile home park

Room Legend 1 Bedroom 1 Bedroom ADA 2 Bedroom 2 Bedroom ADA 3 Bedroom

Room Legend Room Legend 3 Bedroom ADA

11 Bedroom Bedroom 1 Bedroom Basement 11 Bedroom ADA Bedroom 1 Bedroom ADA ADA Bathroom 22 Bedroom Bedroom 2 Bedroom Circulation


648,349 BTU/hr

F la

6.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

al Heating Cost

$41,451 of oil/yr

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$11,681 of oil/yr

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12.2 years

South Apartment Building

rm Be

back Period

Room Le

Energy Production

eep energy and construction costs low apartment sizes kept small but functional. Circulation was placed to mize lost space. Bathrooms are stacked and backed to ce construction and roof penetrations. Including bases there is a total of 29,268 sq ft for the three buildings.

South Facing Roof: 6502 sq ft Solar System Size: 65 kWh Energy Production: 6760 kWh/month or 276,809,978 BTU/yr* *based on a average solar radiance of 4.27 kWh/sq m/day

struction is simplified by being made of 21 full length Berms ules and 12 half size modules capable of being carried 7nuation truck beds.

and Flat Ground

Views Turned Inward

1 Bedroo

Road - connects to mobile home park

1 Bedroo

Adjust to Sun and Wind

2 Bedroo

Vehicular Access

2 Bedroo

ing was made most prominent on the south side of the apartment buildings ranging from 18 to 20% of the wall. On the Busare Stop h and east sides it was from 11-13%. On the west side is was 6-7%. These percentages designed to provide light and without excessive Berm solar heat gain in the winter.

3 Bedroo

Room Leg Le Room Le 3 Bedroo

11 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 1 Bedroo Baseme

s

NESEA Competition

Road - connects to mobile home park

Retention Pond and Bioswale

construction costs but there are savings in heating costs ergy usage for both the superinsulated design and one ound that the superinsulated design would payback the incentives may reduce this even further.

e mounted to offset the energy needed from outside

alculations

North Apartment Building

Common Greenspace

Basic Insulation

VS

$583,018

$19.92/sq ft

648,349 BTU/hr

22.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

Community Center 1

$41,451 of oil/yr

2.2 years

South Apartment Building

Room Legend

Energy Production

acing Roof: 6502 sq ft ystem Size: 65 kWh Production: 6760 kWh/month or 276,809,978 BTU/yr*

1 Bedroom

Road - connects to mobile home park

1 Bedroom ADA

on a average solar radiance of 4.27 kWh/sq m/day

11 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 1 Bedroo Bathroom 22 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 2 Bedroo Circulati 22 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 2 Bedroo Commun 33 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 3 Bedroo Compos 33 Bedroo Bedro Bedroo 3 Bedroo Kitchen Baseme Baseme Baseme Laundry Bathroom Bathroo Bathroom Bathroom Mechan Circulatio Circulati Office GroundCirculati Floor ADA Commun Commu Commun Commun Storage Compos Compos Compos Kitchen Kitchen Kitchen One Bedroom Apartm 1/32" = 1'-0" Laundry Laundry Laundry Mechani Mechan Mechan Office Office Office Storage Storage Storage

2 Bedroom

Assembly of Modules

2 Bedroom ADA

buildings ranging from 18 to 20% of the wall. On the %. These percentages are designed to provide light and

3 Bedroom

R

Room Room Legend Legend

R

1

One Bedroom Apartment - A23 1/16" = 1'-0"

R

R

1

3 Bedroom ADA 11 Bedroom Bedroom 1 Bedroom Basement 11 Bedroom Bedroom ADA ADA 1 Bedroom ADA Bathroom 22 Bedroom Bedroom 2 Bedroom Circulation 22 Bedroom Bedroom ADA ADA 2 Bedroom ADA Community Room 33 Bedroom Bedroom 3 Bedroom Compost and Recycling 33 Bedroom ADA Bedroom 3 Bedroom ADA ADA Kitchen Basement Basement Basement Laundry Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom Mechanical Circulation Circulation Office GroundCirculation Floor ADA Apartment Community Room Community Room Community Room Storage Compost and Compost and and Recycling Recycling Compost Recycling Kitchen Kitchen Kitchen One Bedroom Apartment - A23 1/32" = 1'-0" Laundry Laundry Laundry Mechanical Mechanical Mechanical Office Office Office Storage Storage Storage

1

Two Bedroom Apartment - A22 1/16" = 1'-0"

One Bedroom Bedroom Apartment Apartment --- A23 A23 11 One One Bedroom Apartment A23 = 1'-0" 1 1/32" 1/32" 1/32" = = 1'-0" 1'-0"

1

Three Bedroom Apartment - B21 1/16" = 1'-0"

One Bedroom Bedroom Apartm Apartm 11 One One Bedroom Apartm = 1'-0" 1 1/32" 1/32" 1/32" = = 1'-0" 1'-0"


Practice Andreas Frese

27

Modular HAUSing: A PASSIV Community a PASSIV community modular HAUSing:

Winner 1st Place and Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice NESEA Student Design Competition 2011

Andreas Frese Jeff Estes Neil Dumont Ken Schroeder View From Deck

C12 99 SF 1

Community Center

Circulation

R

Compost and Recycling

C15

C18

113 SF

56 SF

Bathroom C19

Three Bedroom Apartment - B21 1/16" = 1'-0"

Passageway to Common Greenspace

58 SF

Mechanical C13

Compost and Recycling

53 SF

C12

DW

D

R

WD

Circulation

WD

C18 56 SF

Office C16

59 SF

C19

W

DW

D

WD

Laundry

Two Bedroom Apartment - A22 1/16" = 1'-0"

C17

Bathroom 58 SF

C13 53 SF

104 SF

Storage

Bathroom

C15 113 SF

Mechanical

C14

R

W

99 SF

Laundry

1

Three Bedroom Apartment

Bathroom

Kitchen

Storage C17

WD

C21

59 SF

C14

Kitchen

104 SF

C21

Office

240 SF

240 SF

C16

R

Community Room C20

R

Community Room 444 SF

R

144 SF

R

144 SF

C20 One Bedroom Apartment - A23 1/16" = 1'-0"

1

Community Center 444 1/16" =SF 1'-0"

R

1

Passageway to Common Greenspace Community Center 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

Community Center Entrance

Community Center Entrance

View From Common Greenspace

View From Deck


NESEA Competition View From Berm


Practice Andreas Frese

29


NESEA Competition

Cost and Energy Using superinsulation and triple pane windows costs more initially in construction costs but there are savings in heating costs that will payback the investment. Through calculation of costs and energy usage for both the superinsulated design and one with the basic amount of insulation and double pane windows it was found that the superinsulated design would payback the initial investment in a reasonable 12.2 years. Additionally government incentives may reduce this even further. With southern exposure and pitched roofs solar photovoltaics could be mounted to offset the energy needed from outside sources.

Assembly of Modules


Cost and Energy Using superinsulation and triple pane windows costs more initially in construction costs but there are savings in heating costs that will payback the investment. Through calculation of costs and energy usage for both the superinsulated design and one Practice 31 with the basic amount of insulation and double pane windows it was found that the superinsulated design would payback the initial investment in a reasonable 12.2 years. Additionally government incentives may reduce this Andreas even further. Frese With southern exposure and pitched roofs solar photovoltaics could be mounted to offset the energy needed from outside sources.

Cost and Energy Calculations

Proposed Design with Super Insulation $944,986

$32.29/sq ft

Total Heating Loads

182,708 BTU/hr

6.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

VS

$583,018

$19.92/sq ft

648,349 BTU/hr

22.2 BTU/hr/sq ft

$11,681 of oil/yr

To keep energy and construction costs low apartment sizes were kept small but functional. Circulation was placed to minimize lost space. Bathrooms are stacked and backed to reduce construction and roof penetrations. Including basements there is a total of 29,268 sq ft for the three buildings. Construction is simplified by being made of 21 full length modules and 12 half size modules capable of being carried on 27 truck beds.

Co

$41,451 of oil/yr

12.2 years

Payback Period

Com

Basic Insulation

Total Structure Cost Total Heating Cost

North Ap

South Ap

Energy Production

South Facing Roof: 6502 sq ft Solar System Size: 65 kWh Energy Production: 6760 kWh/month or 276,809,978 BTU/yr* *based on a average solar radiance of 4.27 kWh/sq m/day

Glazing was made most prominent on the south side of the apartment buildings ranging from 18 to 20% of the wall. On the north and east sides it was from 11-13%. On the west side is was 6-7%. These percentages are designed to provide light and heat without excessive solar heat gain in the winter.

View From Common Greenspace

R m


NESEA Competition

Essay

Ground Floor ADA Apartment

Our team saw a great potential for architectural design and learning opportunities in the challenges that came with this competition. How do we fit twenty families on to a four acre lot, with parking, and green space while abiding by local zoning and being sustainable? What is the right balance between initial construction cost and future energy savings? How do you turn a series of modular units into a work of architecture? We made it our mission to tackle all these issues. Our first step upon entering this competition was to understand the modular units that would control our design. From our tour of the Preferred Building Systems plant we learned how these units are constructed and assembled, the various options available, and the limitations involved, as well as their future possibilities. The next step was the first of several site visits. We found the site to have a lot of detractors to becoming a residential community. It is bordered by a busy high speed road, a car dealership, and a mobile home park. A small number of other residential buildings exist close by, but barriers prevent a real community from being formed. These site detractors, in combination with construction parameters set challenges we needed to over come, leading us on a path toward one ideal design. The site has a large flat expanse and two earthen berms bisected by an access road. These berms varied in height from about nine feet to fifteen feet above the flat part of the site acting as a barrier to the sounds and sites of the busy road. The site is open and clear to the south allowing for great southern exposure. Our first challenge was to come up with a building form. A single building would be the most energy efficient and least expensive but not very desirable. Single family homes might be desirable but expensive and not energy efficient. Townhouses, row houses, and various numbers of buildings were considered. We wanted to create a community green space to bring people together and we found that having two residential buildings with the space in between would work best. With a lack of pleasant views outside of our site we would use this


Practice Andreas Frese

33

Access to Parking from Common Greenspace

common green space as the focal point and turn the views inward. By having the buildings at the edges of the common green space, we create a safe and visible space for community members of all ages to interact. The flip up pitched roofs of the modular units also proved challenging to incorporate. Many initial designs that worked with a flat roof didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work when we tried to incorporate these roofs. We found it necessary to really think about the roofs from the start of design and not as an after thought. Flat roofs were introduced into the competition too late in our process to be reconsidered. We wanted to adopt passive strategies to reduce the need for energy consumption. We wanted to give every unit southern exposure. This led to a long façade on the south side and a narrow depth of the building. We also wanted to provide access to the southwest summer winds which could be put to use for ventilation and cooling. By staggering the form, winds would be captured at the corners and allow them to be used to their most potential. Based on the estimated area required for twenty units, we determined that we needed to go with three stories. To limit the amount of units on the third floor, avoid a block-like appearance, and play off the shape of the berms we staggered the form from one story on


NESEA Competition

the outside up to three stories in the middle. The slopes of the roof were also varied so that from the side there is a change of slope that along with the other aspects of the form help to make the building appear to rise out of the ground. To provide easy access to the common green space, the community center, and the other residential building a passageway was created on the ground level of each building connecting to the side with the parking and main entrances. To maintain a focus on the common green space, parking was moved to the outside. Historically, the site was a part of the mobile home park, and despite the neighborhood getting a new entrance, the old one is still commonly used. We believe this is an easier, safer route for the residents, so as a friendly gesture to our neighbors, we propose two connections to the mobile home park. Rather than running the road directly across the site, it would connect to the neighborhood at two corners of the site, off the new parking. The mobile home park residents would keep their access, and in the event that a fire truck is needed, the connection to their existing roads would function as a turn around.

Three Bedroom Apartment


Practice Andreas Frese

35

Apartments were kept small but functional to reduce the overall volume, which would also reduce construction and heating costs. Also circulation was designed to make efficient use of space. Every unit is provided with a deck with access to and views of the common green space. Inspired by the Passivhaus method from Germany we investigated using extensive insulation and triple pane glass. The amount of fenestration on the different sides of the buildings was chosen to provide light and heat but without excessive solar heat gain. Additionally the southern facing roofs provide an ideal location for the mounting of photovoltaic panels. To evaluate our choices, we compared the costs and energy of a basic level of insulation and found that the added expense of construction would be paid back in a reasonable 12.2 years, making it a worthy investment. With the various government incentives currently in place we imagine that it would payback even quicker. The project was driven by three main factors/opportunities: modularity, energy saving, and community, and our project title reflects this. This is â&#x20AC;&#x153;modular HAUSing: a PASSIV communityâ&#x20AC;?.

Community Center


Andreas Frese - Segment II Portfolio (in process)  

The start of my Segment II portfolio showing the latest work as part of my Master of Architecture studies at Boston Architectural College.

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