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テア ANA PAULA MUテ前Z


ANA PAULA MUNOZ 915.490.2170 apmunozh@gmail.com

2121 James M. Wood Blvd. Apt. 321 Los Angeles, CA 90006

Education Expected 2014 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE (SCI-Arc) | Los Angeles, CA Master of Architecture 2007 - 2011

UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO (USF) | San Francisco, CA Bachelor of Art in Architecture Major: Architecture and Community Design Minors: Architectural Engineering and Fine Art

Dean’s Honor List: 2007, 2009 - 2011 | Cumulative GPA: 3.6 | Major GPA: 3.8 Spring 2010 Pazmany University | Budapest, Hungary Fall 2009 Victoria University of Wellington | Wellington, New Zealand

Work + Community Experience

July 2013 - Aug. 2013 ATELIER MANFERDINI | Design Intern| Los Angeles, CA Design and script artwork for current project. Develop booklet proposals for client. May 2013 - July 2013 FP MOD | Design Intern | Los Angeles, CA Designer for Taichung Convention Center competition. July 2012 - Jan. 2013 ZAGO ARCHITECTURE | Design Intern | Los Angeles, CA Fabricate intital phase of BOING! chair, design exploration through model- making and model restoration. Aug. 2013 SCI-Arc | Making + Meaning Teaching Assistant | Los Angeles, CA Assist in teaching an introductory architecture course to incoming M.Arch1 students. Mar. 2012 - Apr. 2012

PETER COOK “TOWARDS COMFO-VEG” EXHIBIT | Fabrication | Los Angeles, CA

Jan. 2012 ZAGO ARCHITECTURE “PROPERTY WITH PROPERTIES”|Model Maker | L.A.-N.Y. Engage in making physical model for ZAGO Architecture’s “Forclosed” installation exhibited at the New York MoMA in February 2012. Sept. 2011 - Oct. 2011

ODILE DECQ “ANSIOTROPY” WORKSHOP | Fabrication| Los Angeles, CA

Jan. 2011 - May 2011 FME ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN | Intern | San Francisco, CA Pick up redlines and make powerpoint presentations for Architecture department. Research new products, order samples and create proposal board layouts for Interior Design team. Update spreadsheets, websites and brochures for Marketing. Nov. 2010 - Jan. 2011 COMMISSION | Interior Designer | San Francisco, CA Develop schematic design of home office space in San Francisco for private client. On-site client consultation and product research. July 2010 - Dec. 2010 A. LOZANO ARQUITECTOS | Monterrey, Mexico and San Francisco, USA Owner’s Representative, Design Aid and Interpreter. Lead San Francisco design development. Undertake product research and decision making for building specifications. Serve as liaison between Mexican architect and American contractor.


• Rhinoceros

[Grasshopper]• • • • •

Skills Summary • Autodesk Maya [modeling, rendering and animation] • • • • • Autodesk Revit • • • • • • • • •

Vectorworks • • • ZBrush • • • Cinema4D [rendering and animation]• • Adobe Photoshop • • • • • Adobe InDesign • • • • Adobe Illustrator • • • • Adobe AfterEffects • •

• • • • • • • • •

Autodesk Ecotect • • • RealFlow • Model Making • • • • • Milling • • • • Lasercutting • • • • • 3D Print • • • • • Vaccuform • • • Hand Drafting • • • • • Art: Watercolor, Acrylic, Oil, Pastel, Graphite, Photography • • • •

Languages

Native Speaker: Spanish and English Conversational: French

Exhibitions + Competitions + Activities Spring 2012 - 2014

SCI-Arc SPRING SHOW | Southern California Institute of Architecture

Fall 2011 SCI-Arc WINTER SHOW | Southern California Institute of Architecture Spring 2011 “HAITIAN CLINIC” | Thacher Gallery: Gloria Osuna Award for Social Justice Selected by jury for Thacher Gallery Showcase at University of San Francisco. April 2011 “HAITIAN ORPHANAGE” | DeYoung Museum: Call of the Times | 2nd Place Awarded 2nd place for 2011 DeYoung Student Showcase juried by DeYoung museum curators. Fall 2010 - 2012 “PASEO DEL NORTE” | University of San Francisco | San Francisco, CA Painted 4’x 8’ abstract mural depicting life in the border of Juarez, Mexico and El Paso, TX. Displayed in Kalmanovitz Hall from 2011 to 2013 Spring 2009 “FOLDING LABYRINTH” | “PLASTIKI” Exhibition | San Francisco, CA Exhibited at the “Plastiki” Exhibition in Pier 45.

Honors + Memberships Fall

2012 - Spring 2014

CONTINUING STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP | SCI-Arc

Spring 2011 DAVIES SCHOLAR | University of San Francisco Nominated and admitted to Davis Forum, “Envisioning the Post-Carbon City.” Admission is competitive (1% admitted) and based on academic performance. Fall 2010 - Spring 2011 AIA SAN FRANCISCO STUDENT MEMBERS at USF | USF President (Elected) 2010 - 2011

ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN ARCHITECTS | San Francisco, CA

Sept. 2010

WEST COAST GREEN CONVENTION SCHOLARSHIP |San Francisco, CA

Fall 2008 - Spring 2009

AMERICAN INSTITUTE of ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS at USF | President Founded first architecture club at USF. Led recruitment of first round of officers and members. Structured bylaws. Led first round of community involvement efforts.

Fall 2007 - Spring 2011

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF COLLEGIATE SCHOLARS | Vice President


Contents

5

INTRODUCTION

7

DESIGN STUDIOS

8

Hyde Park Library

14

Rhythmic Dissonance

24

Messthetics

38

Teatro Tenebroso

46

Taiwan Museum and Library

56

SCI-Arc Addition

69

APPLIED STUDIES

70

Family Matters

76

Algae Research Center

80

Mega-Drawing

84

VISUAL STUDIES

86

Contoured Intersections

90

Inherent Geometry

94 98

Future Cities Tableau Vivant

102 Black Forest 106 Rude Form 117

THESIS STATEMENT


6


DESIGN STUDIO

7


Hyde Park Library Los Angeles, CA This library was developed from a grid composed of elongated octahedrons and regular tetrahedrons which were then morphed to create a series of modules that were infinite and continuous when mirrored and multiplied. Once I created a continuous pattern of modules, I chose one module from the strand of identical parts. This single module whose continuous geometry became the structural frame of the library embodies another continuous system from which the void were systematically developed to create spaces. The system consists of cutting an elongated octahedron from base to edge. Creating a shape that inverts unto itself. This same movement propagated throughout the entire structure created a composition that went into the interior at some points and protruded onto the exterior in others continuously inverting space. In order to enclose the space defined by the structure, a secondary system rooted at the octahedron cut line defines the edge of the void not only creating enclosure, but also in-between spaces; such as the louvered patio, which connects the project structurally but also programmatically joining the children’s area with the adults and teen area. Exhibition: NAAB Accreditation Exhibition Exhibition: SCI-Arc Winter 2011 Publication: OnRamp No. 4 “Another Fine Mess” 8

Design Studio


Mirror and Multiplication Transformation drawing [above left] and model [above right] Section drawing of three modules after the Tetrahedron and Octahedron Transformation [below left] and model [below right] 9

Design Studio


Module Axonometric Transformation Sequence [above] Tetrahedron and Octahedron Transformation Sequence [below] 10

Design Studio


Tetrahedron to Octahedron Connection Transformations [below]

11

Design Studio


Section and Plan Overlay

12

Design Studio


Architectural Section Model [above] Exploded Void Axonometric [below] 13

Design Studio


Ana Paula Munoz

Rhythmic Dissonance Los Angeles, CA This house was constructed through a rhythm that unfolds from the inside out. This internalization of rhythm generates an inside out understanding. The internal mass was generated through a series of rhythmic planes whose proximity creates a laminated thickness. This internal mass materializes the boundaries of the space and at its edge a secondary rhythm, is used to generate the skin of the house. This rhythm coordinates a gradient of perforations in the skin allowing for more or less privacy where it is needed. On the interior of the secondary rhythm is the tertiary rhythmic condition of a reflective metallic grid. This tertiary arrangement adds to the dissonance of the first two by generating a condition where outward views and inward reflections create an overlap in registration.

Exhibition: SCI-Arc Spring Show 2012

14

Design Studio


Diagram Defining Rhythm through Planes

15

Design Studio


Conceptual Diagram Sequence

16

Design Studio


Architectural Model depicting the Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Rhythmic Systems

17

Design Studio


Plan

18

Design Studio


Architectural Section Model: Interior Massing [Primary], Skin [Secondary], Interior Reflective Skin [Tertiary]

19

Design Studio


Longitudinal Section

20

Design Studio


Architectural Section Model

21

Design Studio


Model Aerial View with front and top skin removed to display interior [left] Model showing varied spatial conditions through rhythmic solids [right] 22

Design Studio


Model exhibiting spaces formed by rhythmic systems [left] Model displaying the three rhythmic conditions [right] 23

Design Studio


Messthetics Mendoza, Argentina Messthetics is a project that creates a world from digitally found objects which are scalable and deformable. It contains multiple layers of mapping: Grotesque [Primary: Spatial], Pop [Secondary: Object and Place], Hair [Tertiary: Connective tissue between skins]. Placed inside are the avatars of the sub-conscious of the digitally found world. They work for the building and operate it; they live and die here. When we bring this world into our ordinary physical environment, we perceive a slight shift. Avatars become more human, colors fade, and objects change in their spatial representation. Once an object is moved into a non-ideal reality the materials composing it mold its virtual form into a new physical representation. The object thereby becomes a new thing-in-itself.

Group Project: Ana Munoz and Ryan Manning

24

Design Studio


Landscape Model

25

Design Studio


Topographic Diagrams: Form to Division [left to right]

26


Topographic Model [Neon Yellow: Buildings, Green: Vinyard, White: Lake, Bronze: Patio Area, Grey: Seating]

27


Facade Studies

28

Design Studio


Site Model

29

Design Studio


Model showing peephole view [circle, upper left] and peephole drawer organization [square, upper right]

30


Model showing landscape. Peephole view [circle, middle right], peephole drawer organization [square, upper right] and landscape drawer.

31


Axonometric Rendering of buildings and surrounding landscape

32

Design Studio


33

Design Studio


Section Rendering of winery with each of the room views

34


35


Peephole Models

36

Design Studio


Section Model

37

Design Studio


Teatro Tenebroso Los Angeles, CA This theater project works with light and shadow to create a chiaroscuro painterly effect represented in the texture and geometry of our building. By mapping out shadows at specific times we carved the site and painted the facades to create ambiguity between light and darkness. A multiplicity of lines and the accumulated density of tone accentuates some edges while blurring others.

Group Project: Ana Munoz and Anushka Jhaveri Exhibition: SCI-Arc Spring Show 2013 38

Design Studio


39

Design Studio


Entrance Plan

40

Design Studio


Theater Section A

41

Design Studio


Theater Section B [above] Unrolled Panorama of Interior of Exterior Shell [below] 42

Design Studio


Relief [Exhibition: SCI-Arc Spring Show 2013] Model in Site 43

Design Studio


Unrolled Panorama of Exterior of Interior Shell

44

Design Studio


45

Design Studio


Taiwan Museum and Library Taichung, Taiwan This project is about two programs that can see each other but cannot touch, even though they share the same formal conditions. Programatic separation but formal similarity are achieved by: the void extrusion [the rooms], the poche [the walkways], and the connecting facades. Three diagrams were studied in elaborating this project: a typical Hotel de Ville, the Ascot House, and the Museum der Kulturen in Basel. I first studied the spatial organization of an Hotel de Ville where the rooms are packed into an externally defined boundary condition. Next I flipped my version of the plan so that it could be read in section, extruded the internal elements, and connected the differing external facades which cut off the extruded portions at some points. The extruded rooms were then divided perpendicularly to the extrusion direction and divided between the museum and the library. Once a visitor enters a program [library or museum], he or she can stay only within that one program; however, the two programs connect scopically through the extrusion glass divides. Circulation is resolved by allowing movement in plan in one axial direction and in section through slanted cores, each identified to a single program.

46

Design Studio


47

Design Studio


Extensive Diagram Research Map Typical Hotel de Ville diagram, Ascot House diagram, Museum der Kulturen Basel [below, left to right] 48


Program Differentiation Diagram - Library: Purple, Museum: Pink [below] 49


Site Plan Axonometic Diagrams: Library Program, Museum Program, combined Programs [below, left to right] 50

Design Studio


Model [1:500]

51

Design Studio


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Public Library

Fine Arts Museum

A. Reading Area: News B. Lounge C. Circulation D. Circulation E. Group Study Room F. Study Room G. Reading Area: Natural Science H. Self Study

1. Small Theater 2. Lobby 3. Art Workshop Auditorium 4. Art Classroom 5. Learning Resources Area 6. Museum Cafe 7. Public Rest Area 8. Staff Lounge 9. Staff Offices 10. Operation Room 11. Research Room 12. Archive

G 11

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12

Plan Plan Legend [below] 52

Design Studio


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Y N J Y J 1 W G S 27 X

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5 5 L O N P J 12 5 J G 11 G M L O G 4 9 10 L 8 5 6 7 8 4 H J G F 3 K K K E

A

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C

1 D

4

Public Library

Fine Arts Museum

A. Delivery B. Main Storage C. Preparation Room D. Nursing Area and First Aid E. Young Adults Reading Area F. Group Study Room G. Storage H. Lounge J. Circulation K. Reading Area L. Group Study Room M. Study Rooms N. Equipment Room O. Computer Labs P. Technical Support Q. Senior Reading Room R. News Room S. Preparation Room T. Classroom U. Equipment Room V. Archive W. Conference Hall X. Special Collection Y. Office Z. Office

1. Service Counter 2. Lobby 3. Information 4. Storage 5. Circulation 6. Special Exhibitoin Area: Gallery 1 7. Special Exhibition Area: Gallery 2 8. Special Exhibition:Storage and Preparation 9. Special Exhibition Area: Gallery 6 10. Special Exhibition: Circulation 11. Multi Access Preparation Room 12. Permanent Exhibition Area: Intro Gallery 13. Library Archive 14. Lounge 15. Permanent Exhibition Area: Gallery 3 16. Permanent Exhibition Area: Gallery 2 17. Permanent Exhibition Area: Gallery 4 18. Permanent Exhibition Storange and Preparation 19. Research and Operation Archive 20. Art Classroom 21. Small Theater 22. Equipment Room 23. Art Studio 24. Conference Room 25. Staff Offices 26. Cafe 27. Directors Office 28. Digital Operations: Print Room 29. Archive 30. Photo Room

Section Section Core Diagram and Legend [below] 53

Design Studio


Section Model Sequence [top, left to right] Diagram [below] 54

Design Studio


Diagram [below] 55

Design Studio


SCI-Arc Addition Los Angeles, CA This project concerns the acquisition of a historic building for the use of SCI-Arc and the surrounding arts district. The Pickleworks Factory is an historic building which dates from the infancy of the Los Angeles art scene. The subject is conservation and revitalization as much as expanding SCI-Arc. This project brings neighbors into the Pickleworks building and surrounds them with a scaled up facsimile of the original building now replicated in the form of a series of walls. The walls connect to the original Pickleworks through windows. The series of walls create a porous solid from which the proposed SCI-Arc addition is carved out, held, and attached. The walls are supported by the bridge which creates another entrance for the pedestrians on the bridge. These moments can only be read from inside the building [hence the project is “introverted�]. The neighborhood is brought in by leaving the ground floor of the Pickleworks as an open public space. The new ceiling is SCI-Arc, now embedded to a new version of the original.

56

Design Studio


57

Design Studio


ExistingPickleworks [inner] with replica [outer shell]

Existing Pickleworks shell [inner] with scaled up replica [outer]

Existing Pickleworks shell[within] with scaled up and duplicated replica[outer] Existing Pickleworks shell [within], carved out existing Pickleworks void, and scaled up and duplicated replica [outer]

Existing Pickleworks shell [within], carved out existing Pickleworks void, scaled and duplicated replica [outer] and lofted window connection

Existing Pickleworks shell [within], carved out existing Pickleworks void, scaled and duplicated replica [outer], lofted window connection, carved SCI-Arc addition program and circulation

Operation Diagrams

58

Design Studio


Exploded Axonometric Drawing of Elements: Existing Pickleworks Building, SCI-Arc Addition [porous solid and program voids]

59

Design Studio


Plan A

60

Design Studio


Plan B

61

Design Studio


Section A Elevation Model [below] 62


63


Section B

64

Design Studio


Section Model [ 1’ = 1/8” ]

65

Design Studio


Full Model [ 1’ = 1/16” ]

66


Wormseye View

67


Kulturforum Museum Berlin, Germany This project concerns the acquisition of a historic building for the use of SCI-Arc and the surrounding arts district. The Pickleworks Factory is an historic building which dates from the infancy of the Los Angeles art scene. The subject is conservation and revitalization as much as expanding SCI-Arc. This project brings neighbors into the Pickleworks building and surrounds them with a scaled up facsimile of the original building now replicated in the form of a series of walls. The walls connect to the original Pickleworks through windows. The series of walls create a porous solid from which the proposed SCI-Arc addition is carved out, held, and attached. The walls are supported by the bridge which creates another entrance for the pedestrians on the bridge. These moments can only be read from inside the building [hence the project is “introverted�]. The neighborhood is brought in by leaving the ground floor of the Pickleworks as an open public space. The new ceiling is SCI-Arc, now embedded to a new version of the original.

68

Design Studio


69

Design Studio


Berlin Diagram Research Map

70


71


MAIN GALLERY SPACE INTERSTITIAL SPACE | BRIDGING GALLERY SPACE | POCHE CIRCULATION TECH. OFFICES | DELIVERY RMS TICKETING | COAT CHECK

Machine Programatic Diagram Kulturforum Site [below] 72


SCULPTURE GALLERY

PAINTING GALLERY

BRIDGING

CIRCULATION CIRCULATION

SCULPTURE GALLERY

VOID

PAINTING GALLERY

Plan A Program Diagram [below] 73

CIRCULATION

SCULPTURE GALLERY


Model Close-Up Section Model [below] 74


Model Exterior Section Drawing [below] 75


76


APPLIED STUDIES

77


Family Matters This project pushes the envelope on the uses and capabilities of carbon fiber. We created a wall partition disintegrating into the softness of human forms that have been enveloped by this material. Using a projected pattern onto a milled surface and bodies as a solid, we followed the curves with carbon fiber tow and resin to create the shell that would become our partition. The lines thin out and thicken, thereby lending greater definition or blur to the figures. Once the tow had hardened and the solids removed, the wall partition is read grotesquely as a family that has been taken over by a patterned wall.

Group Project: Ana Munoz, Ryan Manning, Daniel Karas, Lili Nourmansouri, Johnathan Schnure and Daniel Massaro

78

Applied Studies: Advanced Building Materials


Image of preliminary Carbon-Fiber Model

79

Applied Studies: Advanced Building Materials


80


81


Fabrication Diagram [above] Front and Side Elevations [below] 82

Applied Studies: Advanced Structures


Carbon Fiber Model

83

Applied Studies: Advanced Structures


Algae Research Center Saint-Marc, Haiti Inspired by processes that generate skin color in the Elysia crispata sea slug, is an envelope that communicates to its surroundings the level of maturation of algae resulting in the production of biofuel. This project mimics the way in which this sea slug harnesses energy for its survival while communicating this process physically through varying coloration. The skin that envelops this facility consists of layers which contain a series of modules, each filled with a type of algae. Each algal species has a distinct maturation length and coloration, ranging from red to blue to green. Therefore, the building envelope provides visual information of its processes while creating interesting ambient effects. The dynamic condition of growth and harvest of the algae provides a parallel dynamic beautification of the structure that indexically communicates its level of productivity. A system of interlocking tubes brings water to specific bags/pods/sacs, which are layered depending on particular light exposure requirements. At any given time there can be as many as 6 different types of algae maturing to create biodiesel, each exhibiting a different color during the day and night. The structural system which locks all of the modules in place is mae up of transparent tubes filled with a bioluminescent species of algae, allowing for the spaces to be used at night through a different effect. The layers of multiple skins containing micro algae modules and a bioluminescent algae structure continuously create an array of ever changing coloration inside and outside the structure. The variation in color is produced not only by the different types of algae within the structure and the glow of day and night but also as the algae is inserted, as it matures and when it is expelled. Publication: “Architecture Follows Nature� by Ilaria Mazzoleni Publication: The Architects Newspaper at archpaper.com Group Project: Ana Munoz and Ryan Hopkins 84

Applied Studies: Biomimicry


Elysia crispata

85

Applied Studies: Biomimicry


Elysia crispata Biomimetric Skin: Day (above) Night (below) [Rendered with the help of Maya Alam] The building’s coloration is a main component in this design. By communicating the harnessing of energy through coloration the structure produces a unique presence along the coast of the island. 86

Applied Studies: Biomimicry


Skin Wall Section [left] Skin Details [right] 87

Applied Studies: Biomimicry


Mega Drawings Los Angeles, CA This project takes the Teatro Tenebroso project past Schematic Design into Design Development where it was reorganized to fit new structural conditions, egress, HVAC, and ADA requirements. This course proved that while practice often follows disiplinary inventions there is potential for invention to arise from practice itself. Our mega-drawing goes beyond the merely practical through the methods of representation of: peeling, slicing and coring the architecture to reveal its interior and infrastructure while resisting construction documents as we know them.

Group Project: Ana Munoz, Ryan Manning, Anushka Jhaveri, Vestalis Pizzarro, Mengwen Li Special Exhibition: Art Walk LA [Fall 2013] at Tom Gilmore’s Farmers and Merchants Bank Building 88

Design Studio


89

Design Studio


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20. COMPOSITE FLOOR SLAB 21. TIMBER JOIST 22. TIMBER FLOORING 23. STEEL COLUMN 24. COLUMN CLADDING 22 1,2

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1. DOUBLE GLAZING CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM 2. SEALANT 3. BOX CHANNEL 4. 'L' STEEL PLATE 5. PROFILE BEAM 6. METAL FLASHING 7. WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE 8. HARD INSULATION 9. GFRC PANELS 10. METAL CLIP CONNECTION 11. SECONDARY PIPE SYSTEM 12. 'U' CHANNEL 13. BOX FRAME 14. STEEL DECKING

14 16

15. PRIMARY STEEL BEAM SYSTEM 16. INTERIOR WALL CLADDING 17. FALSE CEILING 18. FALSE CEILING TIES 19. HVAC SYSTEM, DIFFUSER

1. COMPOSITE FLOOR SLAB 2. TIMBER JOIST 3. TIMBER FLOORING 4. STEEL COLUMN 5. COLUMN CLADDING 6. FIREPROOFING FOAM

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11. COMPOSITE FIBERGLASS AND FOAM SHELLS 11A.FIBERGLASS EXTERIOR CLADDING 11B.INTERIOR FOAM 12. METAL CLIP CONNECTION 13. SECONDARY PIPE SYSTEM 14. 'U' CHANNEL 15. BOX FRAME 16. WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE 17. HARD INSULATION 18. STEEL DECKING 19. PRIMARY STEEL SYSTEM

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7. INTERIOR WALL CLADDING 8. FALSE CEILING 9. FALSE CEILING TIES 10. HVAC SYSTEM, DIFFUSER 19

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Details

90

Design Studio


Mega-Drawing

91

Design Studio


92


VISUAL STUDIES

93


Contoured Intersections This project composed of an intersecting design within a six inch cube creates a variety of conditions through stacking. Two primary figures have a patterned system applied to them that responds to the local condition of the geometry. A secondary figure with no apertures is larger than the other figures while sharing sides with the bounding six inch cube. Contoured and painted for differentiation these digital figures become two-dimensional and then three-dimensional again through stacking.

94

Visual Studies


Contour Model

95

Visual Studies


Contour Model

96

Visual Studies


97

Visual Studies


From New Modes of Represention to New Forms Through a series of creative exercises, in this course we examined mechanics of representation of the past and current forms of representation. The final part of this course moved from a thorough study of these techniques and their systems to using these systems to create form. The final drawing explores the use of coreographed movement to create form through capturing acceleration and decceleration of the geometry at different points in time.

Exhibition: “fine black lines on white paper� SCI-Arc Drawing Symposium [Spring 2014] 98

Visual Studies


99

Visual Studies


C’ D’

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Past Forms of Representation

100

Visual Studies


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Current Forms of Representation

101

Visual Studies


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New Form

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Visual Studies


t33

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103

Visual Studies


New Form Diagrams: Constant Acceleration, Acceleration and Decceleration and a Moving Axis with Acceleration

104

Visual Studies


New Form through Acceleration and Decceleration along a shifting axis

105

Visual Studies


Inherent Geometry These drawings exercise the ability to extract the essential components in a violin. Through line weight, diverse orthographic projections and white space I described the components and composition of a violin.

106

Visual Studies


107

Visual Studies


Inherent Geometry of a Violin

108

Visual Studies


Violin

109

Visual Studies


Future Cities Essentially, this group project describes the design of a city composed of multiple components. The way in which it is laid out was imagined as a series of intersecting rings which describe a different architectural shift: Corbusier’s Infinite City, Super Studio and the point we are in now. The way in which the rings are laid out, challenge the nature in which we connect components within a cityscape. Some buildings some connect with each other creating a massive urban continuity at certain points. The idea of entrance is challenged as the XY plane changes along with the ring creating a condition where the entrance is from the top of the structure to the middle then back to top on the other side. There is no ground level, as the horizon shows the top of another ring; instead of a limited landscape with a ground and a sky, one will see the top (or entrance) of a building at one point while seeing another ring above and below them.

Group Project: Ana Munoz, Garret Chang, Julian Ma and Greg Polvi

110

Visual Studies


City Close Up

111

Visual Studies


112

Visual Studies


City Axonometric

113

Visual Studies


Black Forest This course mined the potential to develop Uncivilized space; a particular category of space where bearings are reset and traditional modes of optic and haptic occupation cease. The uncivilized depends—in critical ways—on conventions and default civil behavior while simultaneously engineering and consequently triggering uncivil-mood through numerable calibrated distinctions and select omissions.

Group Project: Ana Munoz and Aaron Olko

114

Visual Studies


Preliminary Sketches

115

Visual Studies


Tree Studies [under Eric Kahn]

116

Visual Studies


Forest Pattern Split Scan Drawing [under Matthew Au]

117

Visual Studies


Tableau Vivant: Imaginary Landscapes Using Tableau Vivant as a point of departure to question the ideologial and formal implications of various digital representational modes, our experiment in the relationship between geometrical relief, coloration, surface finish, and materials resulted in large scale Imaginary Landscapes that depart from analog aquisitions of natural objects. To produce our tableau, we created three-dimensional geometry between two real-world objects in order to create imaginary other-world landscapes. We used “fantastic� versions of these models with the aim of making them magical yet realistic enough to be a reality in another place. We then created a 2.5 dimensional landscape which we imagined as a window into a faraway world.

Group Project: Ana Munoz and Kamil Kos Audio-Visual Exhibition: SCI-Arc [Fall 2012] 118

Visual Studies


Landscape Close Up

119

Visual Studies


Imaginary Landscape

120

Visual Studies


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Visual Studies


Rude Form: Dolmen Table des Marchands a Locmariaquer The Dolmen is named a Table. Perhaps this is due to the form and the composition of its parts. One monumental, horizontally oriented stone rests on the other eight. It cantilevers from the vertical supports doubling the area below its surface. Producing an implied center, the vertical stones radiate at different angles from that of the horizontal stone, creating an elliptical space. This series of misregistrations in the size, position, and orientation of the support stones against the capstone, enables the upright stones to be understood as figures positioned against the ground of the horizontal surface of the very large cantilever. Thus, an interior space, or a room, is formed from the vertical stones. In exploring the interior, a series of elevations are constructed by remapping each individual stone to its grid’s origin and projecting those displaces drawings back onto the original figures. In developing the space of the room, the elevations are unfolded according to the orientation of their individual planes, then when fit back together, are folded again based upon new intersections of the now vertical planes. A new surface is created between the gap of the original, folded planes. In an effort to depict the interiors through an opposing approach, the four exterior surfaces of the model represent the interior through a conventional four-sided interior elevation drawing. This process results in an objectified space. Our interest in the room references Cohen’s discussion about interior as found in Log 28 where he describes the interior as opaque and façade-like, but without the qualities of an object. This was our translation of Robin Evan’s writing “The Developed Surface” Group Project: Ana Munoz, Scotty Carroll, Taryn Bone and Andrew Park Exhibition: SCI-Arc Winter Show 2013 122

Visual Studies


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Plan

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Visual Studies


90* Axonometric

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Visual Studies


Side Elevation

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Elevation Unfold of Interior - orthagonally and according to planes that define the interiority.

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Annotational Rendering

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THANK YOU. [thesis coming in September 2014]


Ana Paula Munoz