Page 1

Bolehills Management Plan (1st DRAFT). 2015 – 2020. Landscape Architect: Amy Lee. Written for Sheffield City Council. LSC6006 / 140100514.


Contents. List of tables and figures .................................................................................................. 3 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4 1.1. INTRODUCTION TO THE PARK ....................................................................................................... 4 1.2. WHO IS THIS PLAN FOR? ............................................................................................................... 4 1.3. PURPOSE OF THIS MANAGEMENT PLAN ...................................................................................... 4

2. Vision ................................................................................................................................................ 4 2.1. VISION STATEMENT ....................................................................................................................... 4

3. Park Resources & Management Issues .................................................................. 7 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4. 3.5. 3.6. 3.7. 3.8. 3.9.

3.10.

3.11. 3.12. 3.13. 3.14. 3.15.

THE LOCATION & CONTEXT............................................................................................................ 7 A BRIEF HISTORY............................................................................................................................ 7 THE LANDSCAPE CHARACTER........................................................................................................ 7 THE POLICY CONTEXT.................................................................................................................... 7 THE PARK LABOUR FORCE............................................................................................................. 7 THE PARK USERS............................................................................................................................ 8 THE PARK USES.............................................................................................................................. 8 3.7.1. EXISITNG EVENTS & USES .......................................................................................... 8 3.7.2. POTENTIAL EVENTS & USES........................................................................................ 8 EXISITNG & POTENTIAL STAKEHOLDERS........................................................................................ 8 3.8.1. CURRENT PARTNERSHIPS........................................................................................... 8 3.8.2. POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIPS......................................................................................... 8 THE BUILT INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES.................................................................................... 9 3.9.1. THE BOWLING GREEN & BUILDING............................................................................ 9 3.9.2. THE BMX TRACK.......................................................................................................... 9 3.9.3. THE PLAYGROUND...................................................................................................... 9 3.9.4. THE SPORTS COURT.................................................................................................... 9 THE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE...................................................................................................... 9 3.10.1. SEMI-NATURAL WOODLAND & WOODLAND EDGES................................................. 9 3.10.2. HEATHLAND............................................................................................................... 10 3.10.3. CONSERVATION AREA................................................................................................ 10 3.10.4. TALL GRASSLANDS..................................................................................................... 10 3.10.5. AMENITY GRASSLAND PLAYING FIELDS..................................................................... 10 3.10.6. PERENNIAL PLANTING BEDS & SHRUBS.................................................................... 10 THE OTHER STRUCTURES.............................................................................................................. 10 3.11.1. BENCHES.................................................................................................................... 10 3.11.2. LITTER & DOG BINS.................................................................................................... 10 ENTRANCES & BOUNDARIES......................................................................................................... 11 CIRCULATION & PATHS.................................................................................................................. 11 TRANSPORT LINKS & CAR PARKING.............................................................................................. 11 BRANDING & MARKETING............................................................................................................ 11

4. Aims.................................................................................................................................................... 12 4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4. 4.5.

TO CREATE A WELCOMING PLACE................................................................................................. THE ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABILITY.......................................................... TO MARKET THE PARK TO INCREASE AWARENESS AND USAGE.................................................... TO ENSURE A HEALTHY, SAFE AND WELL MAINTAINED PARK FOR PEOPLE................................... TO MAXIMISE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF THE PARK......................

12 12 12 12 12

5. Management Recommendations................................................................................ 12 6. Plan Implementation............................................................................................................. 26 6.1. 6.2. 6.3. 6.4. 6.5.

PHASE 1 (YEAR 1)........................................................................................................................... 26 PHASE 2 (YEAR 2)........................................................................................................................... 26 PHASE 3 (YEARS 3-4)...................................................................................................................... 26 PHASE 4 (YEARS 5+)....................................................................................................................... 27 MONITORING AND REVIEWING THE MANAGEMENT PLAN........................................................... 27

7. Bibliography & References................................................................................................ 28 8. Appendices.................................................................................................................................... 29


List of tables & figures. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5.

Existing Bolehills plan ...................................................................................................5 Proposed Planetarium plan ......................................................................................... 6 Bolehills woodland zones plan .................................................................................... 21 Bolehills grassland zones plan ..................................................................................... 22 Bolehills planting zones plan ....................................................................................... 23

Table 1.

Management recommendations...................................................................................13 - 25

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1.

Introduction.

1.1. INTRODUCTION TO THE PARK. SITE NAME: ADDRESS: OWNERSHIP: DESIGNATION: SIZE OF SITE:

Bolehills Recreation Ground. Longfield Road, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 1QW. Sheffield City Council. District Park. 17ha hectares (42 acres).

1.2. WHO IS THIS PLAN FOR? • • • • • • •

The Local Sheffield community. Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Service. Interested third parties, and potential investors and partners. Landscape designers and contractors. Contractors and event organisers. Staff and volunteers. Park visitors.

1.3. PURPOSES OF THIS MANAGEMENT PLAN. This Management Plan has been developed by Sheffield City Council as a feasibility study into the potential for Sheffield’s first planetarium to be developed on Bolehills Recreation Grounds. The study will test whether the park holds the carrying capacity to host this development and to engage the Sheffield community and stakeholders with this project to promote interest and discussion as well as to identify all potential conflicts and issues from the outset. This dynamic document is designed to act as a tool during consultations to aid the process of exchanging and developing ideas in partnership by jointly identifying clearly the vision for the project, aims and management recommendations. It will also identify areas of management requirements and responsibilities to programme and schedule work aiding in the efficient and effective management of the park. The resulting Plan will ultimately act as a future framework for decision making and set benchmarks against which delivery and performance can be measured. It will also act as a perquisite to costing of works, bidding for funds and accessing grants for the development.

2.

Vision.

2.1. VISION STATEMENT. The Moon on the Hills Planetarium will transform Bolehills into one of the city’s best greenspace experiences; offering visitors a vantage point to Sheffield’s starscape. It will provide high quality facilities that meet the cultural, recreation, leisure, educational, and environmental needs of the Sheffield community, whilst at the same time protecting the historical and natural landscape character of the park using the most current sustainability thinking. The park will become a new benchmark providing a unique opportunity to change the way we as a community view and engage with our landscapes.

4


F i g ur e1:


F i g ur e2:


3.

Park resources & key management issues.

3.1. THE LOCATION & CONTEXT. Bolehills Recreation Ground is located in the North-West of Sheffield. The park is surrounded by mostly residential parts of Crookes, Walkley and Walkley Bank as well as being in close proximity to Rivelin Valley Park helping to form a green network connecting the Peak District to the City Centre. It is located on top of a steep hill overlooking the Rivelin Valley and because of this variation in topography access to, in and around the park is difficult.

3.2. A BRIEF HISTORY. The history of Bolehills is rich in industry; previously the site was quarried for sandstone dating back to 1855 before ceasing operation in 1914. The area was also used as a place for the recuperation of sick workers during the industrial revolution. The site was purchased by the City Council in 1899 and was used as a park from the 1960’s onwards becoming a popular recreational facility hosting pitches for football, field hockey and cricket. Some of the remnants of this past remain at the park today, such as the exposed sandstone geology and stone walls boundaries situated within the woodlands which are included in local history walks.

3.3. THE LANDSCAPE CHARACTER. Today the landscape character of the park differentiates between four main sections. The Eastern section has more features typical of a City Council owned District Park with regularly maintained expansive amenity grasslands and outdoor play and sport facilities. The Southern section holds exposed sandstone geology from its industrial history amongst rough grassland and expansive open views across the valley with clear horizon lines. The Western section encompasses dense broadleaved woodland and steep rocky paths winding amongst its heathland, and finally the Northern section hosts a community made BMX track and amenity grasslands forming a unique combination of many characters within one park. There are many long distance views from most of the park helping to give the area a distinct character, and likewise many of the green spaces within the park can be seen from afar, meaning that their impact is more than just on the immediate surroundings.

3.4. THE POLICY CONTEXT. The park is a part of Sheffield’s Green & Open Space Strategy 2010-2030 which ensures that every area of the city has green and open spaces of exceptional quality for all current and future generations to use and enjoy.

3.5. THE PARK LABOUR FORCE. The park is managed and maintained primarily by Sheffield City Council’s Park & Countryside Service in partnership with three major stakeholder groups comprising of Friends of Bolehills, Bolehills Conservation Group, and The Sheffield Dirt Society. The council is responsible for the maintenance of the grass areas and playing fields, sports court, children’s playground, and bowling greens as well as the footpaths, walls, fences, signage, and litter and dog bin collections. The Friends of Bolehills community group is responsible for maintaining the boundaries of the park and green waste and litter pickup, more frequently working alongside The Sheffield Dirt Society. In previous years the Bolehills Conservation Group were the most active group but due to labour and funding deficiencies has ceased operation. This existing management/maintenance structure is unsustainable if the park is to be developed into a flagship attraction which comes with more demanding hours and more complex tasks. A proposed staffing structure is outlined in (Appendix 8.3.). 7


3.6. THE PARK USERS. From user surveys carried out at the greenspace strategy phase it is estimated that the park currently hosts around 35,000 visitors per annum. The user type combinations and compatibilities vary drastically throughout the year but it can be concluded that numbers during winter months are much fewer than in summer months. From the user survey data there are noticeable differentiations between user numbers as well as types in the upper and lower parks. The most frequent users of the upper park are dog walkers, young families and schoolchildren, students, and recreational sports facilities users. The lower part hosts mostly dog and leisure walkers, cyclists and recreational sports facilities users reflecting landscape character differences (Appendix 8.4.). It is estimated from similar park surveys that visitor numbers could increase to around 80,000 and the Planetarium will receive around 250,000 visitors per annum. The physical impact of more visitors to the park will increases stresses to the existing physical and green infrastructure of the park such as footpaths and woodland and increase the duration of these stresses to later in the evening potentially affecting local wildlife behaviours and trampling of fragile local ecology. There may also arise tension between different interest groups and local residents with the increased visitor numbers causing resistance to future developments. User compatibility at different times of the day will also need to be taken into consideration.

3.7. THE PARK USES. 3.7.2. POTENTIAL EVENTS & USES.

3.7.1. EXISITNG EVENTS & USES.

Planetarium showings. Exhibitions. Lunchtime/evening lectures & talks. Research. Workshops & seminars. Training courses. Discovery days/family weekends activities. School trips. Star nights / Stargazing Live. Health walks & events. Local sports competitions. Community Bioblitz events. Community planting events.

Leisure and dog walking. Walking thoroughfare. Cycling. Picnics and BBQ’s. Casual sports matches and local competitions. Health and history walks. Informal and formal play. Nature watching.

3.8. EXISITNG & POTENTIAL STAKEHOLDERS. 3.8.2. POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIPS.

3.8.1. CURRENT PARTNERSHIPS.

Sheffield Astronomical Society. Science and Technology Facilities Council. University of Sheffield Physics & Astronomy Group. Sheffield Hallam University. Museums Sheffield. Sheffield Landscape Trust. Sheffield Wildlife Trust. Rivelin Valley Conservation Group. Natural England. Prince’s Trust. Groundwork. Sheffield Woodland Environmental Enhancement Project (SWEEP). Welcome to Yorkshire. Welcome to Sheffield. VisitEngland. Play England.

Friends of Bolehills. Bolehills Bowling Club. The Sheffield Dirt Society.

8


3.9. THE BUILT INFRASTRUCTURE & FACILITIES. 3.9.1. THE BOWLING GREEN & BUILDING. The bowling greens and building are owned by the Council and fenced off to the general public. They are jointly managed and maintained with the Bolehills Bowling Club who have a strong presence at the park. The bowling lawn is mown weekly as well as trimming of the large trees and shrubs, and the Club helps to maintain the planting beds together with the Friends of Bolehills community group and volunteers. In the new plan the building and lawn are proposed as a café/restaurant and outdoor area due to its short distance to the playground and for its vantage point for dramatic views across the park and Rivelin Valley. It is recognised that this will cause issues regarding the relocation of the bowling green and finding a suitable alternative place to carry out club activities. If the club is not relocated however tension will arise from increased and prolonged noise levels.

3.9.2. THE BMX TRACK. The popular BMX track at Bolehills was constructed in the 1990’s by The Sheffield Dirt Society and under its continual improvement. The Society often organises Dig Days to get its members and volunteers together to maintain the track as funds not provided by the Council. There is the probability of tension between higher visitor numbers and the society’s activities. Potential user conflicts and safety concerns over society members going through the upper park to access the track. 3.9.3. THE PLAYGROUND. The condition of the playground assessed during the park’s quality audit (Appendix 8.5.) indicates that it is not sufficient for the needs of the high population of local young schoolchildren. The playground is well used before and after school and so the condition of the play equipment requires further attention. The existing playground needs investment and improvement. There is also a lack of more advanced play equipment incorporating the ideas of adventure/natural play to cater for a wider age-range. 3.9.4. THE SPORTS COURT. The sports court is a multi-use games area and owned and well-maintained by the Council. It sees most usage in summer amongst families and students and should continue to cater for a wider range of users as the park sees more usage. A generally small number of users in colder months and the lacking of a facility to rent sports equipment on site.

3.10. THE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE. 3.10.1. SEMI-NATURAL WOODLAND & WOODLAND EDGES. The lower half of the park has a large area of broadleaf woodland and is managed to maintenance standards set by the Council Parks & Countryside Service which cover all parks in Sheffield in a broad-brush manner (Appendix 8.6.). Species prevalent in this area include: Acer psuedoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Betula spp., Cotoneaster lacteus, Fagus sylvatica, Ligustrum ovalifolium, Malus spp., Quercus robur, and Rubus fruticosa. Some parts of the woodland have become dense with dominant species with some overhanging paths. There is currently no long term woodland management plan in place. 3.10.2. HEATHLAND. The heathland present at Bolehills is a rare habitat identified for protection in Sheffield’s Heathland Habitat Action Plan and must therefore be managed according to those guidelines and focus on halting its progression into woodland. Species of note in this area include: Aster amellus, Betula spp., Calluna spp., Chamerion angustifolium, and Malus spp.. 9


A lack of general public knowledge to the wildlife benefits of this habitat could mean that its management is seen as low priority. 3.10.3. CONSERVATION AREA. The conservation area is a tall grassland meadow which acts as a buffer zone for the heathland against the heavy usage traffic of the BMX track. It is maintained by the Council and mown in late August/early September with clippings removed from site to maximise the meadows ecological value in the spring and summer months. The meadow contributes to the diversity and network of park habitats but is not necessarily seen as attractive by some park users, especially in the winter months when the grass has been cut back. 3.10.4. TALL GRASSLANDS. Tall grassland is present throughout the park at woodland edges and mowed monthly by the Council. They break up areas of amenity grassland providing to the diversity and network of habitats for wildlife. May be seen as unkempt by the general public so their wildlife benefits need to be highlighted. 3.10.5. AMENITY GRASSLAND PLAYING FIELDS. The playing fields are classed as standard grass areas and mown fortnightly by the Council. The clippings are not collected and remain in-situ. The football pitches are marked throughout the winter season according to fixtures. Under the new proposal the lower park will remain at this management level whereas the upper park will be reclassed as high standard grass areas and need to be mown weekly with the clippings collected. The concentration of future match activities on one area may cause increased erosion to the grassland. 3.10.6. PERENNIAL PLANTING BEDS & SHRUBS. The plant beds running from the entrance are maintained jointly by the Council and Friends of Bolehills. They are lightly cultivated between October and November and treated with approved herbicide to keep the beds weed free with pruning carried out at times of year appropriate to the species. Shrubs are trimmed by the Council and trained volunteers of the community groups once or twice a year. Many of the shrubs around the bowling greens are managed to be below chest height to allow views out into the valley. Monoculture privet hedges grow around the sports court and could be slowly replaced by more species variety for visual interest. The proposal will require for more perennial planting beds will require more staff and volunteers to maintain and more specialist horticultural knowledge.

3.11. THE OTHER STRUCTURES. 3.11.1. BENCHES. The quality audit shows a varying degree of quality between the benches within the park. Older wooden benches show heavy signs of degradation whilst donated metal benches are in better condition. The benches will all need to be to a high standard under the proposal and so older benches will be removed and/or replaced if necessary. Severally degraded benches along main viewing platform and a disorganised assortment or lack of benches around the park. 3.11.2. LITTER & DOG BINS. The bins are emptied on a daily basis by Veolia as agreed with the park managers and Council to meet demand. There are no recycling bins available in or around the park. Increased visitor numbers would mean more litter generated on site. 10


3.12. ENTRANCES & BOUNDARIES. The quality audit suggests that the entrances throughout the whole site are not obvious or well sign posted. Entrances at the upper park of the site from Longfield Road, Northfield Road, Northfield Avenue, Moorsyde Avenue and Bolehill Lane are more obvious that the entrances from the lower park from Tinker Lane and several access points from Bole Hill Road. The stone wall boundaries however are in decent condition and contribute positively to the local character. Lack of attractive entrances means that the park is overlooked.

3.13. CIRCULATION & PATHS. The quality audit of the park suggested that the primary circulation routes are in good condition and accessible to all. However the secondary routes may not be equally accessible given that they are located on steep and narrow banks. There are a number of desire lines present suggesting locations of new paths may be desired to comply with user needs. Footpaths are sprayed with herbicide to prevents weeds and grass encroachment. Steep topography poses a challenge for access to certain areas of the park and designing for DDA regulations poses a challenge.

3.14. TRANSPORT LINKS & CAR PARKING. There are many bus links and cyclist routes to the park and the closest tram link is at Malin Bridge. The park is accessible by car but there is a distinct lack of car parking provision nearby and previously the conservation area was used informally for The Sheffield Dirt Society events and maintenance vehicles. A suitable alternative has not been found but measures to divert cars away from the conservation area are present through bollards. Lack of car parking provision for existing users will pose a great problem for future increased visitor numbers.

3.15. BRANDING & MARKETING. Very little marketing and branding exists for the site. Facilities and events are promoted primarily through the government and society websites and forums. A lack of funding for events and marketing in the public domain, only seem to be accessible through exclusive groups.

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4.

Aims.

4.1. TO CREATE A WELCOMING PLACE. Aim 1: To provide a well designed and well managed park. Aim 2: To provide a high quality visitor experience.

4.2. THE ENVIRONMENT CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABILITY. Aim 3: To conserve and enhance the historic, natural, and built character of the park. Aim 4: To provide interpretational and educational information and services.

4.3. TO MARKET THE PARK TO INCREASE AWARENESS AND USAGE. Aim 5: To ensure that the park becomes a flagship visitor attraction for Sheffield. Aim 6: To promote the park for health and recreation.

4.4. TO ENSURE A HEALTHY, SAFE AND WELL MAINTAINED PARK FOR PEOPLE. Aim 7: To provide a healthy, safe and well maintained environment for visitors and staff.

4.5. TO MAXIMISE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF THE PARK. Aim 8: To engage the community in the management of the park.

5.

Management recommendations.

The management recommendations follow on from the vision and aims identified for the park as well as responding directly to management issues identified at the site survey stage. The programme provides suggestions on what is to be achieved, where it is to be achieved, who is responsible for achieving them, what extra resources and partnerships are required, and where appropriate when they are to be achieved by. The programme will be reviewed annually and progress monitored against indicators/outputs. This will then feed into a renewed programme for the following year.

12


Entrances.

All.

N/A.

All. All. N/A. All.

To increase signage and provide park maps 1,2,4 incorporated into notice boards at entrances.

To produce educational signage around the 2,4,8 park.

2,5

1,2,7 1,2,8 2,3 3,5

1,3,7 1,3

1,3, 5,7

To produce appropriate signage to guide visitors from main activity hubs and transport stops to the park.

Identify areas of the park which would benefit from seating. Remove/replace degradated benches as appropriate. To dim street lights around the park to minimise light pollution. To turn off all lighting in the evening except for the planetarium exterior to save energy and costs.

To improve existing pathways.

To create new paths to the improved facilities and around the perimeter of the playground.

To install glow-in-the-dark stones in pathways to avoid light pollution from above and act as guides in the evening.

LIGHTING.

PATHWAYS.

BENCHES.

SIGNAGE.

Entrances.

2,7,8

To create new planting around main entrances from Moorsyde Ave, Longfield Road and Northfield Avenue.

Upper park.

Upper park.

All.

Entrances.

2,7

To ensure all entrances are litter free.

ENTRANCES.

ZONES.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

ISSUES.

1.8km²

1.2km²

5.4km²

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

PM.

PM.

PM.

VS.

PM.

PM.

PM.

ME.

PM. EC. CM.

PM. ME.

EC.

VS.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES. Continuous.

TIMEFRAME.

Council. officer. Council. officer. Council. officer.

Landscape architect. Contractor.

City Council. Area officer. City Council. Landscape architect. Area officer.

City Area City Area City Area

Travel South Yorkshire.

Ecology Unit. Rangers. Universities. Local schools.

City Council. Area officer.

By winter 2016. By winter 2016. By summer 2019. By summer 2019.

By summer 2016.

By summer 2018.

Final masterplan from landscape architect.

By spring 2017.

By spring 2017. Contractors. Final By spring masterplan from 2017. landscape architect.

Contractors.

Public donations.

Public donations.

Business sponsorships.

Grants/funding.

Masterplans from By summer council/ landscape 2016. architect.

Community groups. Funding/ donations By summer Volunteers. for plants. 2015.

Community groups.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

quality well paths. quality well paths.

High quality well used paths.

High used High used

A more inclusive park. A more inclusive park. Reduced light pollution. An increased awareness of the iconic planetarium.

An increased awareness and usage of the park.

An increased awareness of local ecology and sustainable environmental practices.

A well used and easy to orientate park.

Attractive entrances. Attractive and welcoming entrances.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


LITTER.

All. All.

2,7

To ensure that the park is litter free.

To ensure that dog owners clean up after 2,7 their pets and that the park is kept free of dog foul.

1,2,3, N/A. 7

All.

N/A.

1,3

8

N/A.

1,7

To carry out regular assessment of buildings. To carry out energy efficiency survey of buildings. To carry out regular assessment of built structures (benches, steps, handrails, fencing, walls, gates) to comply with health & safety standards.

To increase the frequency of collection to twice a day during peak times.

1,2,4, Upper park. 5

To develop the bowling greens and building into a café/restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating areas.

All.

N/A.

1,2,4, Upper park. 5

To provide a planetarium visitor centre with information desk, shop, gallery spaces, research roooms, lectures rooms and visitor toilets.

To increase the amount of waste recycled 7 from litter bins by providing recycling bins around the BMX track, playground/sports court interjunction and main entrances.

N/A.

1,2,5, Upper park. 7

To comply with DDA regulations to allow access for all to visitor facilities.

VISITOR FACILITIES.

N/A.

2,5

To ensure that drivers use the new onsite car parks at Northfield Avenue and Bole Hilld Road and not residential street parking spaces.

All.

All.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

3.6km²

6.2km²

N/A.

4km²

1.4km²

Upper park.

AREA SIZE.

To ensure that cyclists use the park in a 2,6,7 safe manner by providing cycle lanes.

ZONES.

ACCESSIBILITY.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

ISSUES.

VS.

VS.

CM.

CM.

HS.

HS.

HS.

PM.

PM.

VS.

VS. PM.

PM.

Community groups.

Veolia. City Council. Area officer.

Veolia. City Council. Area officer.

City Council. Landscape architect. Area officer.

City Council. Landscape architect. Area officer.

Landscape architect.

City Council.

Area officer.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Continuous.

By summer 2018.

By summer 2019.

TIMEFRAME.

Continuous.

Continuous.

By summer 2018.

By summer 2015.

Monthly.

Annually.

Annually.

Contractors. Final By summer plans from 2019. architect.

Contractors. Final By summer plans from 2019. architect.

Contractors.

Contractor.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

A clean and sanitary park for visitors.

A decrease of litter in the park.

A decrease of litter in the park.

An increase in the percentage of litter recycled.

Completed building efficiency audit. Completed energy efficiency audit. Completed park structure audits.

High quality visitor facilities provided.

High quality visitor facilities provided.

Improved access for all.

Revenue generated from car parking spaces.

High quality well used paths.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


EDUCATION.

HERITAGE.

SAFETY.

ISSUES.

4,6,8

4,8

To improve skills of the local community through training courses hosted at the park.

All.

3,7

To establish links with local schools to use park as an educational resource and for events.

All.

2,7

To carry out annual site risk assessments. To ensure that historical remnants are structurally sound and free from graffiti.

N/A.

All.

All.

2,7

To provide emergency information in the park for the public.

Upper park.

7

N/A.

All.

2,7

To remove all graffiti as soon as possible. CCTV monitoring to minimise anti-social behaviour and property theft. 2,7

N/A.

7

To liason regularly with the police and local groups.

To provide a first aider, first aid room and kit in the planetarium and cafĂŠ during opening hours.

All.

To carry out a daily check of paths, play 7 equipment and structures to assess for health and safety risks.

ZONES. All.

AIMS.

To discourage fly-tipping particularly in 7 the woodland area through fine enforcements.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

All.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

All.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

EC. ME.

EC. ME.

PM. HS. HS. CM.

HS. VS.

HS.

VS.

CM.

PM. VS.

PM. HS.

VS.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

Training Rentable lecture providers. Local rooms. community. Environmental charities.

Ranger team. External partners. Local schools.

Area officer.

Area officer.

First aid trained staff.

Sheffield Police. Local residents.

City Council.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Police presence at the site.

A safe park for visitors.

A decrease of flytipping in the park.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.

By summer 2015.

By summer 2016.

Weekly.

Annually.

By summer 2017.

Continous by summer 2019.

Renting of rooms for training courses. Higher employment rates of local community.

An increase in local school presence at park.

Decreased hazards and risks in park. Well maintained heritage features.

Signs with emergency information around site.

A clean park for visitors. Continuous by A safe and secure summer 2019. park for visitors.

As required.

Quarterly.

Daily.

Continuous.

TIMEFRAME.


2,6

2,6

1,2,5, Upper park. 6

1,2,5, Upper park. 6

To ensure the sports court is maintained to agreed standards.

To hire out sports equipment from the visitor helpdesk/building.

To provide new themed adventure play equipment to cater for children of a wider age range.

To provide new exercise equipment for a wider age range.

All.

To carry out regular ecological surveys by qualfied ecologists and students from the universities.

3,4,8

All.

To undertake nature conservation and site 3 maintenance in line with best practice guidelines.

All.

N/A.

Upper park.

N/A.

4,8

To invite and host lectures by the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Astronomical Society.

ZONES.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

CONSERVATION To contribute effectively to the network 3,5 of Sheffield wide and local green spaces. & SUSTAINABILITY.

RECREATION.

ISSUES.

All.

All.

All.

1km²

3km²

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

EC. CM.

PM. CM.

PM. ME. CM.

PM. VS.

PM. VS.

VS.

CM. PM.

ME. PM.

Ecology Unit. Universities. Local schools. Local community.

Area officer. Ecology Unit.

Area officer. Ecology Unit.

City Council. Activity Sheffield. Contractors.

City Council. Activity Sheffield. PlayEngland. Contractors.

City Council. Activity Sheffield.

Parks & Countryside Service.

University of Sheffield. Sheffield Astronomical Society.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Sheffield's Green and Open Space Strategy.

Funding. Final masterplan from landscape architect.

Funding. Masterplan from landscape architect.

Funds for sports equipment.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

Annually by Summer 2015.

By spring 2016.

By spring 2016.

By summer 2018.

By summer 2018.

By summer 2016.

Continuous.

By 2020.

TIMEFRAME.

Completed ecological surveys.

Increase in target species numbers and associated habitat quality.

Increased environmental benefits and biodiversity recorded during ecological surveys.

Increased health benefits to users of the park.

Increased usage of park by families.

Revenue generated from amenity and sports spaces.

Increased renting/use of sports court.

Public interest and revenue generated by ticket sales.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


N/A.

All.

All.

3

3,7

All.

All.

To review use of pesticide use.

To apply for relevant grant funding from private agencies and National Government inititives/schemes if/when opportunities arise.

To carry out asset valuations to evidence All. for and justify revenue funding to the park. All.

To reuse material generated from within the park where possible.

To periodically review running costs and identify potential savings.

To carry out community & visitor surveys to inform the revision of the management and maintenance plans.

FINANCE.

MARKETING.

FUNDING.

3

To ensure that repairs and maintenance are carried out using appropriate materials.

N/A.

N/A.

To create and continually update the park 2,4,5, N/A. and planetarium website for events and 6,8 activities and provide pre-visit information.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

All.

All.

All.

AREA SIZE.

All.

All.

All.

All.

All.

3

To identify management and maintenance practices to promote biodiversity.

ZONES.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

ISSUES.

ME.

EC. VS.

F.

F.

F.

CM. HS.

CM.

CM.

PM. CM.

Welcome to Sheffield.

External agencies.

Ecology Unit. Universities.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Inhouse web designer /developer.

Contractors.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

By summer 2016.

Annually.

By 2020.

By 2020.

By 2017 onwards.

By spring 2015.

Continuous.

Continuous.

Annually by Summer 2015.

TIMEFRAME.

A high volume of traffic to the website and positive feedback from users.

A good overall representation of user information collected.

Completion of an annual report.

Completion of an asset valuation report.

Grants approved.

A decrease in pesticide use and finding suitable alternatives.

Improved public image and more sustainable site.

A park in keeping with the landscape character.

Increase in target species numbers and associated habitat quality.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


EVENTS.

PARTNERSHIPS.

ISSUES.

AIMS. 5

5,8

5,8

5,8

5,8

5,6,8

8

8

8

5,6,8

RECOMMENDATIONS.

To utilise tourist websites to promote the park, planetarium and events.

To produce promotional leaflets to be distributed at other Yorkshire attractions and tourist centres.

To ensure that promotional material is available in a range of languages and formats to reflect the diversity of visitors.

To update all notice boards for local promotions within the park on a weekly basis.

To enter the park in appropriate awards.

To actively seek and develop parnerships to develop a range of activities and events.

To support exisitng community group and society activities.

To become Sheffield Astronomical Society's main headquarters/meeting building.

To promote a become a friend/ membership scheme with benefits such as cafĂŠ and shop discounts.

To establish a site specific events programme for the park with approved partners.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

ZONES.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

EC. ME.

VS. ME.

PM.

EC. PM.

EC. ME. PM.

ME. EC.

EC. ME.

ME.

ME.

ME.

Community groups. External partners.

Sheffield Astronomical Society

Community groups.

External partners. Area officer.

Area officer.

Community groups.

UK Association for Accessible Formats.

Welcome to Sheffield.

Welcomet to Yorkshire. Welcome to Sheffield. VisitEngland.

TEAMS. PARTNERS. By summer 2016.

TIMEFRAME.

Landscape architect.

Translator.

Annually by 2016.

By 2020.

By 2020.

Continuous.

Continuous.

By summer 2020.

By spring 2015.

By summer 2019.

Inhouse designer. By summer Printing costs. 2019.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

An agreed events programme (subject to agreed late inclusions).

Increased membership at the park and revenue.

Regular society meetings and events at the park.

Maintained existing community involvement with the park.

A variety of appropraite to the park activities & events for a range of people.

Winning or being short-listed for awards.

An increase in awareness and visitor numbers.

An increase in awareness and visitor numbers.

An increase in awareness and visitor numbers.

An increase in awareness and visitor numbers.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


N/A.

N/A.

To ensure attendance at community group 5,8 meetings to develop activities programme. 5,8

5,8

To develop a number of projects for community groups to carry out.

To develop a list of ranger activities within the park.

N/A.

N/A.

To give priority consideration to those 8 in local community groups when employing staff who possess the best working knowledge of the park and represent local aspirations and needs.

To employ staff and recruit volunteers in 1,2,8 accordance with the proposed staffing structure to effectively carry out future park management.

N/A.

N/A.

8

To grom local and staff skills through Investors in People.

7

N/A.

To carry out community biolitz with local 3,4,8 schools, community groups and individuals.

N/A.

N/A.

5,8

To investigate a range of appropriate revenue generating activities.

ZONES.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

STAFF TRAINING. To train staff in First Aid.

EMPLOYMENT.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT.

ISSUES.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

N/A.

All.

All.

All.

N/A.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

VS.

PM.

PM.

PM. EC.

EC. CM.

PM. EC. CM.

EC. CM. PM.

EC. PM.

F. ME.

Training providers.

Area officer.

Area officer.

City Council.

Ecology Unit. Local schools. Local community.

Rangers.

Community groups.

Community groups.

External partners. Area officer.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

An increase in group members and volunteers.

An increase in group members and volunteers.

An agreed activites programme.

Increased revenue for the park.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.

Continous by summer 2019.

As required.

As required.

Continous by summer 2019.

A high quality visitor experience and skilled workforce.

Increase in local employment opportunities and efficient management of the park.

Increase in local employment opportunities.

A high quality visitor experience and skilled workforce.

Annually from An increase in summer 2015. group members and volunteers. Increase in local skills and environmental awareness.

Semiannually.

Semiannually.

Semiannually.

Continuous.

TIMEFRAME.


3

All.

All.

Create and implement a long term (50-100 year) management plan for the woodland and heathland.

To ensure original maintenance plan is followed and amended in agreement as required.

To ensure that the City Council's public complaints and feedback procedure is adhered to.

GROUNDS MAINTENANCE.

COMPLAINTS.

N/A.

N/A.

W1,W2,W3, G1,G2,G3

N/A.

MANAGEMENT PLAN.

All.

N/A.

To review the management plan and amend on an annual basis in collaboration with representatives from all stakeholder groups.

7

To train staff in risk assessment techniques.

ZONES.

N/A.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

To develop staff skills and competencies All. through appropriate training courses e.g. LANTRA courses.

ISSUES.

N/A.

All.

8ha

All.

N/A.

N/A.

AREA SIZE.

VS.

CM. PM. HS.

CM. PM.

All.

VS.

VS.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

Continous by summer 2019.

Continous by summer 2019.

TIMEFRAME.

City Council.

Forms available.

As required.

Area officer. Visitor and Quarterly. Community groups. community surveys.

Guidance documents By summer from the Forestry 2016. Commission.

Meeting scheduler. Annually. Area Visitor and community surveys.

Ecology Unit. Sheffield Landscape Trust. Sheffield Wildlife Trust. Landscape architect. Area officer.

Landscape architect. officer.

Training providers. Rangers.

Training providers.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Complaints dealt with in line with SCC policies.

Revised maintenance plan.

A long term management plan for the woodland and heathland.

Revised and agreed changes recorded in the Annual Report.

A high quality visitor experience and skilled workforce.

A high quality visitor experience and skilled workforce.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


F i g ur e3:


F i g ur e4:


F i g ur e5:


W1

W1

W1

Selectively thin dominant species such as 3,7 Fraxinus excelsior and dense areas of C.lacteus and L.ovalifolium to increase light.

Incorporating standing and lying deadwood 3 where appropriate for rich diversity of habitats niches.

Maintain clear sightlines from major paths through woodland by coppicing shrubs which encroach onto paths.

WOODLAND EDGE. W3

W3

2

Removal of excessively large trees from the upper park/trees deemed to obscure the nightscape in key viewing areas.

Allow rough grassland transition zones to 3 develop around the woodland edges to promote biodiversity,

W3

W2

3,8

3,7,8

Promoting and planting suitable trees, shrubs and grasses, emphasis on incorporating flowering and fruiting species.

types.

WOODLAND AND Following Forestry Commission guidelines to plant a stretch of woodland inkeeping TREE PLANTING. with local landscape character/species

W1

Encourage and plant suitable colourful woodland wildflowers.

3,8

W1

Cut & strim edges of path three times per 3,7 year during May, July and September.

3,7,8

W1

3,8

Coppice and identify suitable tree species for planting to maintain diverse canopy structure,

SEMI-NATURAL WOODLAND.

ZONES.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

ISSUES.

1.3ha

1.3ha

1.3ha

56km²

4.6ha

4.6ha

4.6ha

4.6ha

4.6ha

4.6ha

AREA SIZE.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM.

CM. PM.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

TIMEFRAME.

Continuous.

By summer 2015.

By summer 2015.

By winter 2015.

Ecological surveys By autumn by Ecology Unit. 2017. Consultation with local residents and property owners.

Rangers.

Rangers. Contractors.

Tree Preservation Orders.

By summer 2015.

By winter 2019.

Rangers. Ecological surveys By autumn Community groups. by Ecology Unit. 2016.

Forestry Commission. Rangers. Community groups. Local schools.

Rangers. Ecological surveys By autumn Community groups. by Ecology Unit. 2016.

Rangers. Community groups.

Rangers.

Rangers.

Ecology Unit. Ecological surveys By autumn Community groups. by Ecology Unit. 2016.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

An increase in habitats for wildlife.

A clearer view to the nightscape.

An increase in habitats for wildlife.

Screening for local residents from increased noise levels and car traffic volumes.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and attractive park.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and safe park.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and safe park.

An increase in habitats for wildlife.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and attractive park.

An increase in habitats for wildlife.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


P2

P2

3,4

Maximise winter habitat by cutting in spring - importance of attractive structural seedheads and signs.

Maintaining high standards of maintenance 3,8 through regular weeding of beds.

P1

P2

3

Replace intensive cutting with less regular pruning.

SHRUB PLANTING.

P1

3,8

3

Replace monospecies privet hedges with a variety of shrub planting to extand visual interest through the year through flowering species.

HEDGES.

G5

G4

Planting species with year long seasonal interest and structural diversity, emphasis on plants that are benefitial for pollinators, avoiding plants which need protection from slugs.

3

Closed off areas for sowing of grass seeds in early spring or autumn to replenish grassland as required for summer/winter fixtures and events.

PERENNIAL PLANTING.

3

Mow fortnightly.

G4

P1

3

Marking out of the football pitches on playing field throughout the year.

AMENITY GRASSLAND.

ZONES.

Ensure that shrubs are kept pruned to 3,7 below chest height to allow for views out into the valley.

AIMS.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

ISSUES.

1.5km²

1.5km²

1.5km²

600m²

600m²

600m²

3ha

3ha

3ha

AREA SIZE.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM. PM.

CM.

CM.

CM. PM.

Landscape architect planting plan.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES.

Continuous.

Continuous.

TIMEFRAME.

Landscape By spring architect planting 2015. plan.

Landscape By summer architect planting 2015. plan.

Community groups.

By summer 2016.

By spring 2016.

Community groups. Landscape By summer architect planting 2016. plan.

Rangers.

Rangers.

Community groups. Landscape By spring architect planting 2016. plan.

Council.

Council.

Council.

TEAMS. PARTNERS.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and attractive park.

A more sustainability conscience park.

Improved public image of a sustainability conscience and attractive park.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and attractive park.

A more sustainability conscience park.

Improved public image of a wellmaintained and attractive park. Increased biodiversity.

Maintain public image of a wellmaintained park.

Maintain public image of a wellmaintained park.

Use of playing fields throughout the year.

INDICATORS / OUTPUTS.


6.

Plan implementation.

6.1. PHASE 1 (YEAR 1): The first year of the management plan focuses on low cost and easily achievable recommendations to improve public awareness and public image of the existing park; such as by improving main entranceways with new planting and including maps within the notice boards to help users navigate the park. Notice boards should also be updated on a weekly basis to promote events within and around the park, such as the annual Bioblitz events. The training of existing and new community group members is key and beneficial to the long term management and maintenance of the park to help to grow local skills and identify sustainable practices to promote biodiversity in line with best practice guidelines. There is extensive community involvement through consultation/group meetings held with local groups and residents to jointly develop the management plan using local expertise. There is also a focus on preliminary site investigations, ecological and user surveys in order to feed into a revised draft of this management plan to form a solid foundation for moving forward to the next phase.

6.2. PHASE 2 (YEAR 2): The second year of the management plan starts to focus on more costly but more effective recommendations to improve the accessibility and popularity of the park to the wider Sheffield audience; such as the creation of a park website to promote itself and its activities to a wider audience, providing signage within and around the park to guide existing and potential users around and to the park from the nearby activity hubs, and the renting out of sports equipment from the Bowling Club building to raise revenue. Consultations will begin to test and develop ideas regarding the planetarium development through focus groups with stakeholders consisting of community groups, local residents, representatives from the local authority, and potential investors and partners. Information about the developing project is to be periodically released online and through city newspapers and newsletters to surrounding residents which encourages everyone to become involved and to be able to voice ideas and identify potential issues/conflicts early to make them easier to resolve. More detailed surveys such as Landscape Impact Assessments and Ecological Impact Assessments will be carried out at this stage to understand the potential conflicts created by the proposals and the increased visitor numbers. More in depth planning, funding and costing advice will be sought to feed into an application for planning permission under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990. With the above information acquired a long term woodland management strategy and plan can also be produced in partnership with Sheffield’s Landscape and Wildlife Trusts to inform its next 50-100 years. There is also scope for a much needed car park at the Bole Hill Road entrance for users of the BMX track and playing fields for sports events. There may be conflict over the removal of an area of woodland. This could be resolved through biodiversity offsetting by planting more woodland through Forestry Commission woodland grant in other areas of the park.

6.3. PHASE 3 (YEARS 3-4): Grants and funding applications will be made to EU initiatives, central government, local authority, BIG lottery grants, third party organisations/potential partners for sponsorships such as Museums Sheffield and Science and Technology Facilities Council, and any other potential funding sources identified in the previous phase. If and when funds become available there will be further consultations through a project steering group from all interested parties into development of design ideas, proposals and solutions in conjunction with a jointly selected design firm to create the revised masterplan for the park and for visitor facilities designs.

26


The suggestion to relocate the bowling club for the creation of a café with outdoor seating area and nursery playground will face resistance even when an alternative local for activities can be found since the club is seen as an integral part of the heritage of the park. It may be possible however to relocate the café within the planetarium if no agreements can be made. Potential revenue funding streams for continued maintenance of the park will need to be identified at this phase, such as through visitor charges to use facilities and renting equipment and spaces, selling of shop merchandise, ‘Friends of the Park’ Scheme, sponsorships for promotion of events, charges for attendance of: lectures, workshops, training, activity days and potentially research grants. If only little grant/funding is achieved (depending on the grant) then smaller but still equally beneficial park projects can be implemented such as the improvement/expansion of the play area and provision of more play equipment for wider audiences. The planting of more woodland to benefit wildlife using Forestry Commission grants, or community tree and bulb planting events with local schools.

6.4. PHASE 4 (YEAR 5+): If substantial funds and planning permission are achieved then the construction of visitor facilities can start and may take a couple of years to be completed. Employment of staff can commence with priority consideration given to those in the local area and community groups. Training of staff and volunteers to manage the park as outlined by this plan will take place following the standards set by the Investors in People government initiative. Several documents will be produced at this phase; a grounds maintenance plan, a Green Flag application management plan to be developed further in future years when the park is more established, and an asset valuation to evidence for and justify revenue funding to the park. Running costs of the visitor facilities and park will be periodically reviewed and potential savings identified.

6.5. MONITORING AND REVIEWING THE MANAGEMENT PLAN. This Management Plan is a ‘living’ document and so it must be regularly updated to reflect new information. The management team will be responsible for holding quarterly meetings to oversee its delivery. The Plan will be reviewed annually by the landscape architect in partnership with representatives from all stakeholder groups including council officers, managers, team leaders and community group leaders with agreed changes recorded in an annual report as well as the Management Plan itself. The following will be reviewed subject to feedback: • • • • •

Consultation with staff, services, visitors and local communities on the contents of the Plan; Consultation with staff, services, visitors and local communities on the realities of the Plan ‘on the ground’; Updating target outputs, responsibilities, and resource and training implications. Analysis of performance indicators/outputs towards identified aims; Reviewing the key priorities for management and responsibilities in relation to available funding and current relevant policies and government strategies.

27


7. Bibliography & references. ONLINE PDF. CABEspace. A guide to producing parks and green space management plans. (2004). [pdf] London: CABEspace. Available at: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110118095356/http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/parks-and-green-spacemanagement-plans.pdf [Accessed 19 Dec. 2014]. CABE Space. The Green Flag Award Guidance Manual. (2006). [pdf] Liverpool: CABE Space. Available at: http://www.greenflagaward.org/media/45083/raising_the_standard_2009.pdf [Accessed 19 Dec. 2014]. Hitchmough, J.D (2006). Making contracts work for wildlife; how to encourage biodiversity in urban parks.[pdf] London: CABE Space. Available at: http://www.lbp.org.uk/downloads/Publications/Management/making-contracts-work-for-wildlife.pdf [Accessed 5 Jan. 2015]. Sheffield City Council. Sheffield’s Great Outdoors Green and Open Space Strategy 2010 - 2030. (2010). [pdf] Sheffield: Sheffield City Council. Available at: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/green-and-openspace-strategy.html [Accessed 18 Dec. 2014]. Sheffield Local Biodiversity Action Partnership. Heathland Habitat Action Plan. (2012). [pdf] Sheffield: Sheffield Local Biodiversity Action Partnership. Available at: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/ecologyunit/biodiversity-conservation-in-sheffield/sheffield-local-biodiversity-action-plan.html [Accessed 5 Jan. 2015].

WEBSITES. Biglotteryfund.org.uk, (2014). Funding finder: Funding - Big Lottery Fund. [online] Available at: http://www.biglotteryfund. org.uk/funding/funding-finder [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Bolehills.com, (2015). Bolehills Forever. [online] Available at: http://bolehills.com/ [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Brown, C. (2013). Sheffield Bioblitz : Museums Sheffield. [online] Museums-sheffield.org.uk. Available at: http://www. museums-sheffield.org.uk/blog/2013/5/sheffield-bioblitz [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Digimap.edina.ac.uk, (2015). Digimap Resource Centre. [online] Available at: http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/webhelp/resources/ [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Forestry.gov.uk, (2014). English Woodland Grant Scheme (England). [online] Available at: http://www.forestry.gov.uk/ewgs [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Google.co.uk, (2015). Google Earth. [online] Available at: http://www.google.co.uk/intl/en_uk/earth/ [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Playengland.org.uk, (n.d.). Our work. [online] Available at: http://www.playengland.org.uk/our-work.aspx [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Sheffield Astronomical Society, (2015). Home - Sheffield Astronomical Society. [online] Available at: http://www.sheffieldastro.org.uk/ [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Sheffield.gov.uk, (2014). Sheffield City Council - Leisure and tourism. [online] Available at: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/ out--about.html [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Sheffield City Council (2014). Sheffield City Council - Parks and open spaces maintenance standards. [online] Available at: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/parks/parks-maintenance/standards.html [Accessed 7 Jan. 2015]. Sheffieldforum.co.uk, (2005). Does anyone know the history of the Bole Hills?. [online] Available at: http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=59460 [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. Stfc.ac.uk, (n.d.). Funding. [online] Available at: https://www.stfc.ac.uk/1776.aspx [Accessed 12 Jan. 2015]. 28


CASE STUDIES. Glasgow City Council. Queen’s Park Management Plan 2011 - 2016. (2011). [pdf] Glasgow: Glasgow City Council. Available at: http://www.glasgowconsult.co.uk/KMS/dmart.aspx?strTab=PublicDMartCompleted&PageContext=PublicDMart&Pag eType=item&DMartId=638&breadcrumb_pc=PublicDMartCompleted&breadcrumb_pg=search&breadcrumb_pn=dmart. aspx&filter_Status=2 [Accessed 27 Dec. 2014]. Sheffield City Council. Weston Park Management Plan 2014. (2014). [pdf] Sheffield: Sheffield City Council. Available at: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/parks-woodlands--countryside/parks/city-district-local-parks/weston-park.html [Accessed 27 Dec. 2014]. Tower Hamlets Council. Weavers Fields Management Plan. (2008). 6th ed. [pdf] London: Tower Hamlets Council. Available at: http://www.towerhamlets.gov.uk/lgsl/451-500/466_park_management_plans.aspx [Accessed 28 Dec. 2014].

8.

8.1. 8.2. 8.3. 8.4. 8.5. 8.6. 8.7.

Appendices.

WHY IS A MANAGEMENT PLAN NEEDED? BOLEHILLS SITE SURVEY & GREENSPACE STRATEGY. USER HOTSPOTS. BOLEHILLS QUALITY AUDIT. PROPOSED STAFFING STRUCTURE. SHEFFIELD PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE SERVICE MAINTENANCE STANDARDS. SITE PHOTOS.

LEGAL COMPLIANCES. Statutory Instrument 2004 No.118 Prescribed Descriptions (England). Order 2004 (established statutory crime and disorder strategies). Local Government Acts 1972, 1999 (established Best Value Authorities) and 2000 (established promotion of economic, social or environmental well-being). Local Government and Rating Act 1997. Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996. Environmental Protection Act 1990. Litter Act 1983. Parish Councils and Burials Authorities (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1970. Public Health Acts 1848 to 1875. Smallholdings and Allotments Act 1908. Open Spaces Act 1906. Enclosure Act 1845. Best Value legislation. Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA). Planning Policy Guidance (PPG) 17. Local Agenda 21. Recreational Space Standards.

29


Bol e hi l l s Us e rhot s pot ss ur v e y

SATURDAY1 0: 00-1 2 : 00

WEDNESDAY1 0: 00-1 6: 1 5


GREEN SPACE QUALITY AUDIT SHEET Categorise each space as one of the following: Play space, allotments, playground, local green space, kickabout area, park, playing fields, adventure playground, small natural green space, large natural green space. If you feel that a certain category isn’t relevant to that particular space (i.e. if you would give it a 0) then put ‘N/A’ and don’t count that category towards the final score of the site. Name of Site: BOLEHILLS RECREATION GROUNDS. Type: DISTRICT PARK. Surveyor: AMY LEE. Date: 26/11/2014.

Criteria ACCESS Are entrances well located and accessible?

Score

Are entrances welcoming? Is the infrastructure suitable for disabled access?

5 5

Does signage communicate effectively? LANDSCAPE QUALITY

3

Is the space a rich and stimulating environment? Is there a variety of scales of space? Are the spaces boundaries attractive?

6

Is the spaces structure understandable with a clear focus and orientating features? FACILITES

4

5

7 5

Criteria MANAGEMENT Is the level of management appropriate to the size and nature of the space? Are staff based on site? Is there information on how to contact management services? Is there information on events and activities? Is there evidence of community involvement? SECURITY & SAFETY

Score

What is the sense of personal security in the space? What are the levels of vandalism? (Low score = high levels of vandalism) Is there evidence of anti social behaviour? (Low score = high anti social behaviour) To what extent is there self surveillance from surrounding areas or

6

7

N/A 6

7 8

6

6

6


Is the furniture well designed and located? Are the facilities appropriate to the spaces size and location? Are buildings well designed and located?

5

Are there special features that give the space local distinctiveness? MAINTENANCE Is the space clean and free from litter and dog fouling?

7

Are the fabric, furniture and buildings well maintained? Is the planting well maintained? Are grass areas well maintained? Are areas managed for wildlife habitat values appropriately maintained?

5

5 6

6

pedestrian traffic? NATURAL HERITAGE To what extent are areas managed as natural habitats? Are nature conservation objectives communicated effectively? Is there evidence of sustainable management practices? TOTAL SCORE: DIVIDED BY 29 (Minus the amount of N/A’s. i.e. if 4 categories are N/A then divide by 25): Score out of 100 (Multiply the above by 10):

6 7 5

Any further comments, strengths, weaknesses or recommendations:

5 3

4

156 5.57

56


LocalCommuni t y

Mar ket i ng& Event sTeam

Conser vat i on& Mai nt enenace Team

Educat i on& Communi t yTeam

Fi nance Team

Fi nance Manager

Ext er nalSt akehol der s

Mar ket i ng& Event sManager

Conser vat i on& Mai nt enenace Manager

Par kManager

HR&Heal t h &Saf et yTeam

HR&Heal t h &Saf et yManager

Communi t yTr ee Of f i cer

Tr eeManager

Di st r i ct sPar k Of f i cer

Ar eaOf f i cer

Tr ees&Woodl ands Manager

Par k&Count r ysi de Manager

Educat i on& Communi t yManager

Ser vi ceDel i ver y Manager

Pr oper t y&Faci l i t y Management

Local

PROPOS E DS T AF F I NGS T RUCT URE .

Vi si t orSer vi ces &Secur i t yTeam

Vi si t orSer vi ces &Secur i t yManager

Ranger

RangerTeam Leader

Ci t yWi de


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