Engage Magazine, Volume 1, Issue 3, Amnesty International India

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ENGAGE FOR THE MEMBERS OF AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL INDIA October/November 2015 VOLUME 1, ISSUE 03

HOW DOES AMNESTY USE YOUR MONEY?

READ ABOUT AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL INDIA’S AFFIRMATIVE ACTION POLICY

HOW IS AMNESTY’S HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION PROGRAMME SUPPORTING SCHOOLS IN INDIA?


INSIDE AGENDA Amnesty stories from India and around the world

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KOYLA SATYAGRAHA Satyendra Kumar, Campaigner for the human rights defenders programme, writes about how on 2 October, over 5,000 people from coal mining affected communities in the district of Raigarh, Chhattisgarh led a protest march to claim their rights over the coal under their lands

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CHILDREN CAN BE THE REAL CHANGE MAKERS Our programme officer, Somya Dimri talks to us about what inspires her to work for our human rights education programme

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EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY, THE CORE VALUES OF AMNESTY Aakar Patel, Executive Director at Amnesty International India writes about how affirmative action helps bring equality and diversity to the workplace

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INSPIRATIONAL AMNESTY MEMBERS A page dedicated to the members of Amnesty International - to recognize their passion and dedication to human rights and our work

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ENGAGE is Amnesty International India’s magazine, published six times a year to inform, empower and inspire people in India and around the world to take injustice personally.

GET IN TOUCH Email: membersupport@amnesty.org.in Whatsapp: +91 90360 02621 Telephone: +91 888288 4442

JOIN THE CONVERSATION Facebook: /AIIndia Twitter: /AIIndia Cover photograph credit: Tamnar Subrata Biswas Amnesty International’s vision is of a world in which every person enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments. In pursuit of this vision, Amnesty International’s mission is to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of these rights.

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVITY CENTER Learn human rights jargons and help your child understand human rights through an interactive puzzle

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TAKE ACTION NOW We need your support to defend individuals who are at immediate risk 10 HOW AMNESTY UTILIZES YOUR MONEY We show how your donations are being used in our campaigns to defend the rights of vulnerable people and communities across India

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AGENDA

AMNESTY STORIES FROM INDIA AND AROUND THE WORLD

STUDENTS TAKE HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION TO THEIR COMMUNITY Mount Litera Zee School, Alwar (one of the 100 schools associated with Amnesty International India) organized a rally and a street play with the help of student representatives for the people of Alwar, Rajasthan. This community engagement initiative was aimed at creating awareness on the prevalence of the dowry system in Rajasthan. Using the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti, the initiative spread the message of equality for women in a unique way.

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL INDIA ON THE 31ST ANNIVERSARY OF THE 1984 SIKH MASSACRE ‘LAWLESS LAWS’ MUST BE SCRAPPED IN INDIA Amnesty International India published an interactive online map showing how several states continue to retain laws to detain people on executive orders without charge or trial. Data from the National Crime Records Bureau released in September 2015 indicate that over 3,200 people were being held in administrative detention in Indian jails as of December 2014. To lock up persons without charge or trial violates the rights of both suspects and victims of human rights abuses. Amnesty India urges the central and state governments to repeal all administrative detention laws. Detained persons must be charged with recognizably criminal offences and promptly prosecuted in fair trials, or else released.

TRANSFORM YOURSELF INTO AN AGENT OF CHANGE: REGISTRATIONS OPEN Amnesty International collaborated with Edx and piloted its first ever Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on the freedom of expression. Through the programme, individuals and groups can gain the knowledge to protect human rights, and defend the rights of others. The online course runs from 17 November 2015 to 8 December 2015. The MOOC covers freedom of expression, and also focusses on freedom of association and assembly as closely related rights. It is a free course and lasts only three weeks.

8TH OCTOBER 2015

12TH OCTOBER 2015

ARRESTS NOT ENOUGH TO TACKLE RELIGIOUS INTOLERANCE AND VIOLENCE On 28 September, Mohammed Akhlaq, a 50-year-old Muslim man in Dadri, Uttar Pradesh was lynched by a mob allegedly after rumours that his family had eaten beef. Amnesty International India called on the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav to show that his government was serious about making the state safe for people from all religions. Amnesty International India said that arrests would not to be enough to ease communal tensions, and the state government must address cases of incitement to violence, and ensure that self-appointed cow protection organizations do not act as vigilante groups. To read our press release, visit - http://bit.ly/1RYgySr

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To listen to the podcast, visit - http://bit.ly/1Pxv2em

To find out administrative detention laws in your state, visit - http://bit.ly/1lqSjSC

20TH OCTOBER 2015

21ST OCTOBER 2015

Persecuted Rohingya refugees suffer horrific abuses at sea A new Amnesty International report revealed how Rohingya people from Myanmar attempting to flee persecution in the country by boat earlier this year were killed or severely beaten by human traffickers, if their families failed to pay ransoms.

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Amnesty India also released a podcast on Harman Radio that featured prominent human rights lawyer H.S. Phoolka talking to Amnesty about the 1984 Sikh massacre. Over 5,00,000 people have already taken action in Amnesty International India’s “Demand Justice for 1984” campaign.

To watch a video about the Massive Open Online Course, visit - http://bit.ly/1QBejTW

To know more, visit - http://bit.ly/20WnKEI

2ND OCTOBER 2015

To commemorate the 31st anniversary of the 1984 Sikh massacre, Amnesty International India launched a song titled “Akhey Maye, Mei Hune Iya, Eh Keh Ke,Murd, Na Iya H”. The song is a conversation between a bereaved mother and her son symbolizing the grief faced by the families of the Sikh massacre. The song is being broadcast on Chardikla Time TV (a Punjabi news channel).

The UN estimates that at least 370 people lost their lives between January and June 2015. Amnesty International is urging regional governments to urgently step up their response to the crisis.

31ST OCTOBER 2015

18TH NOVEMBER 2015

Amnesty International India launches the “Demand justice for Nepali women” campaign Two Nepali women employed as domestic workers were repeatedly raped and assaulted, allegedly by a Saudi Arabian diplomat and others, in Gurgaon near New Delhi. Amnesty International India has launched a campaign calling on authorities in India and Saudi Arabia to work together to secure justice for the survivors. To watch an exclusive Amnesty dispatch on this incident, visit - http://bit.ly/1X0nzJ3

To watch an Amnesty animated video on Myanmar, visit - http://bit.ly/1K6ARqy

The daily physical abuse faced by Rohingya is almost too horrific to put into words. They had escaped Myanmar, but had only traded one nightmare for another. Even children were not spared these abuses

- Anna Shea Refugee Researcher at Amnesty International

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Koyla Satyagraha RAISING BAPU’S ‘COAL’IN CHHATTISGARH

It wasn’t just the people from Gare who took part in the satyagraha, but also villagers from adjoining coal blocks. Tripathi said that the communities from different villages together discussed issues related to displacement, forced evictions, and the condition of women and children. “Their discussion was also focused on community control over resources, and how to empower and strengthen the role of Gram Sabhas or village assemblies,” said Tripathi.

defender from Gare village, where the Koyla Satyagraha was organized. If the Mahatma were alive today, he would likely have been proud of his continuing legacy – and of the satyagraha by the people of Gare for their rights over their resources.

“Phool nahi Chingari Hai, Hum Chhattisgarh ki Nari Hai” (We are fire, not flower. We are the women of Chhattisgarh) was the goosebump-inducing slogan of the women who travelled long distances to participate in the Koyla Satyagraha. In many patriarchal societies, women rarely get a chance to raise their voices, but the women of Gare turned up in large numbers and were at the forefront of the protest. “My land is my mother, coal companies destroyed our land and lives”, said Janki Bai, a woman human rights defender from Sarasmal village in Raigarh district. Men, women and children from across several coal blocks came together for the Koyla Satyagraha. “The idea of the entire Koyla Satyagraha is to make the community strong and promote sustainable mining,” said Dr. Harihar Patel, a human rights

Credit- Tamnar Subrata Biswas

Learn more about one of the HRD’s we work with >> http://bit.ly/1Op8YPX

Human Rights Defenders Credit- Tamnar Subrata Biswas

SATYENDRA KUMAR Satyendra Kumar works for the Human Rights Defenders programme at Amnesty International India. He holds a journalism degree and has worked as a National Co-ordinator for Mines, Minerals & People. Hailing from the small coal mining town of Dhanbad, Jharkhand, Satyendra has witnessed several cases of forced displacement. Satyagraha is a Sanskrit word, which has two parts: satya, “truth”, and agraha, “insistence”. It is a philosophy that was at the centre of Mahatma Gandhi’s non-violent movement against British colonial rule. In 1930, Mahatma Gandhi began a salt satyagraha, also known as the Dandi March, against the salt tax in colonial India. Thousands of people marched hundreds of kilometres from Sabarmati in Gujarat to the coastal village of Dandi to make salt, in defiance against the British salt monopoly.

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On 2nd October this year, Mahatma Gandhi’s birth anniversary, over 5,000 people from coal mining affected communities in the district of Raigarh, Chhattisgarh, shared their stories and walked from the village of Gare to the banks of the Kelo River to similarly claim their rights over the coal under their lands. For the last four years, people of Gare village have been organising the ‘Koyla (coal) Satyagraha’. A similar movement is also taking place in Jharkhand. “First of all, we don’t want to do mining and give our land for mining. We are happy with forest produce and agriculture. But if the government insists that for the development of the country, mining is more important than the community, we will extract the coal from our land and are willing to pay the royalties to the government. We don’t have a fight against any government, we are fighting for our rights over coal”, said Rajesh Tripathi, a human rights defender from Jan Chetna, a non profit based in Raigarh town.

We don’t have a fight against any government, we are fighting for our rights over coal

SAVITA RATH

DEGREE PRASAD CHOUHAN

BHAWATI BHAGAT

SHIVPAL BHAGAT

Savita is a woman human rights defender in the Raigarh district of Chattisgarh, and works with a local organisation called Jan Chetna. She is involved in grassroots level training, mobilisation and awareness building programs in different areas of the district on the issues of coal mining and human rights, the right to food and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA).

Degree is a Dalit school teacher-turned-human rights defender who closely works with Dalit and Adivasi communities on issues of land acquisition, displacement, human trafficking and coal mining. He is involved in training, mobilisation and fact finding on these issues, and is associated with the Chhattisgarh Bachao Andolan and the People’s Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL).

Bhawati is an Adivasi human rights defender actively involved in agitations and protests against human rights violations in the region. She is involved in mobilising and organizing groups, especially women.

Shivpal is a young Adivasi human rights defender, and the sarpanch of Sarasmal village in Raigarh. He has been involved in agitations, mobilisation, leading protests and demonstrations on human rights violations in coal mining areas.

*These are four among the 40 Human Rights Defenders whom Amnesty International India supports.

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2. What does your role involve?

“CHILDREN CAN BE THE REAL CHANGE MAKERS”

Somya Dimri

Somya Dimri is a programme officer at Amnesty International India. She holds a Master’s degree in social work from the University of Delhi. Her previous work with several national and international organizations, including Child Fund India and Sesame Street, has strengthened her belief that children can be change makers if they are empowered. She works directly with students, teachers, schools and NGO partners across the country as part of the Human Rights Education programme.

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My role involves working with educational institutions, students, teachers and various other stakeholders both in government and private schools to build awareness and understand the relevance of human rights in their daily lives. I work on integrating the principles and values of human rights through engaging and thought-provoking projects and collaborations.

3. How is the Human Rights Education programme helping children around the country? We facilitate lots of exciting projects and campaigns that motivate students & the youth to become part of the global movement. We help students understand global issues on human rights and how they are contextually relevant in their daily lives. Simultaneously, we also provide a platform for students to ask questions, take action and voice their opinions. Our flagship campaign #BullyNoMore is one such campaign that is gaining momentum and students across the country are joining this movement. Over 250 students from 13 states in India participated in the #BullyNoMore contest by sharing their opinions and experiences to prevent bullying in schools.

1. What inspired you to work for Amnesty International India’s Human Rights Education programme?

4. Your work requires you to interact with teachers, students and parents. Can you share a memorable experience while working for the Human Rights Education programme?

I have always been interested in working with organizations that have the vision to make a meaningful change to the lives of people. Working with Amnesty International India’s Human Rights Education (HRE) programme gives me that opportunity. The programme informs, builds aw areness and empowers students to voice their opinions, to listen and to respect others’ views and work together as equals. This is the spirit of Human Rights Education and this inspires me.

One of my most memorable experiences was working with kindergarten children on the issue of good touch and bad touch as part of our work on integrating human rights friendly practices in schools. I was pleased to see how easily children were able to pick up the messages we advocated and were able to speak about it with so much confidence. I think we underestimate how much children can comprehend. I find that if the content is presented in an engaging and safe environment, children can learn more than we think they can.

I was pleased to see how easily children were able to pick up the messages we advocated and were able to speak about it with so much confidence

5. 10th December is Human Rights Day, How has Human Rights Education programme planned to celebrate this month? How can members participate? The HRE team has put together a Human Rights Celebration toolkit on addressing the issue of bullying in schools. This toolkit lists out activities that schools can facilitate on the occasion of Human Rights Day. The kit consists of a wide range of engaging activities for different age groups s o that all students from the pre –primary section to high schools can be involved in the celebration. The activities comprise of assembly plans, classroom activities, skits, pledges and rhymes on ‘No Tolerance to Bullying’. Members of Amnesty International India can also participate in these celebrations by visiting our website http://www.bullynomore. in/ and support the #BullyNoMore campaign by shouting out against bullying. They can upload their pictures and share it on social media.

Key Facts HRE is involved WITH

134 SCHOOLS

HRE covers OVER

107200

students

4480

teachers hre is spread across Rajasthan, Bihar, Karnataka, Delhi, Maharashtra, Punjab, Haryana, Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Goa,Telangana, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal FIND OUT MORE >> Read the latest updates on the Human Rights Education programme >> http://bit.ly/1QFabps

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EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY, THE CORE VALUES OF AMNESTY

INSPIRATIONAL AMNESTY MEMBERS

AAKAR PATEL Amnesty International India’s executive director, Aakar Patel writes about the importance of creating opportunities for the underprivileged at the work place.

Aakar Patel is best known as a writer, columnist and broadcaster. His non-fiction work includes: ‘India: Low Trust Society’ (2015) and ‘Rights and Wrongs’, a co-authored report on the 2002 Gujarat riots. As a journalist, Aakar served as Deputy Editor of the Deccan Chronicle, as Editor in Chief of Gujarati daily Divya Bhaskar, and as Editor-in-Chief of Mid Day Multimedia Ltd. There is a remarkable lack of diversity in India’s workplaces. At first this might seem like a strange thing to say. For is it not true that one can walk into an office in north India and find south Indians? And there cannot be that many restaurants in south Indian metros where staff from the northeast have never worked. Bengalis dot the corporate world across India and it is not unusual to find the Sikh turban in an office in any part of the country. So is this not diversity? Yes, it is, and it is a fine thing to have. But in a huge and complex society, this is not what constitutes inclusion, which is the purpose of assessing and increasing diversity. Those of us who are fortunate enough to be born into the middle class may be reassured on the matter of inclusion if we view diversity through the linguistic lens. But the fact is that there is a sameness to the people who work in corporations even if they speak different mother tongues at home. They are, almost to a man, anglicised, middle class folks. As one goes up the management chain other things become noticeable. The most significant one is that women are fewer. Inspect the names and we are likely to find that these senior managers are preponderantly upper caste. The words ‘upper

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caste’ and ‘middle class’ are synonyms for privilege but we often use another word for them: merit. Those who were not as fortunate as us are then seen as being less deserving than us, not less privileged. If there is a sweeping manner to the way I have framed the issue, it is because it is reflective of the reality of India. A small group of us has cornered most opportunity and has been seduced into believing that this is entirely because of our talents. Well, not entirely. We have thrived because we have not had to face the problems - including generations if not millennia of poverty and illiteracy that has been the lot of most Indian families. There is only one way to correct this discrimination and it is to welcome the underprivileged and to make space for them at our workplace. Corporations stress uniformity, but they need to be more invested in diversity. Inclusion of women, Dalits, Adivasis and Muslims, and persons with disabilities is incumbent on us. At Amnesty International India, we are proud to have begun this process in our recruitments and I am eager to report to you soonest on the results of this initiative. My best wishes to you for the new year.

There is only one way to correct this discrimination and it is to welcome the underprivileged and to make space for them at our workplace

Work with Amnesty International India >> http://bit.ly/1Lg5P6P

A significant proportion of our income comes from individual members and supporters. We are inspired by the dedication and goodwill of our supporters and we dedicate this page to the members of Amnesty International India whose support ensures that we are able to work towards making a difference. In this edition, two members of our Telemarketing team Suresh Kumar and Triveni Chinnaraju, recounts the stories that have inspired them and sustained their passion and enthusiasm for human rights. SURESH KUMAR Mr. Sambandhamoorthy works as a farmer in Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu. He is known in his region for his writing and public-speaking skills. He understood the issues in Sri Lanka very well. When I spoke about Amnesty International and our work, he replied that he already knew about us, having seen an Amnesty spokesperson in a television interview. We had a long refreshing conversation about the Sri Lanka issue, and I was finally able to convince him to donate to Amnesty. He asked me to call him again later that evening to confirm the donation amount. I expected him to donate around 2000 or 3000 INR. But when I called him, he said he would give us 25,000 INR. I was shocked and asked him if I had heard him correctly. When he confirmed the amount, I was thrilled. He said he wanted to donate because he appreciated our honesty and had a lot of faith in Amnesty’s work.

TRIVENI CHINNARAJU In April 2013, I spoke to Mr. Masilamani, who was a supporter of Amnesty International India from Ponneri near Chennai, Tamil Nadu. I explained to him how Amnesty International functions, our principles and the Justice in Sri Lanka campaign. He was keen to become a member of Amnesty International India. Being an auto driver by profession, he explained that he would not be able to support us financially. He instead offered to speak about Amnesty to his passengers. After a week, when I called Mr. Masilamani, he did not answer, and I assumed that he had lost interest. But a few days later, he called to say that he had taken the initiative to keep a small box in his auto and speak about Amnesty to his passengers. He was slowly able to collect small amounts of money as contributions to Amnesty. He had collected 5400 INR by talking about us to the people he’d met!

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HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVITY CENTRE A BEGINNERS GUIDE TO HUMAN RIGHTS LANGUAGE Here is a short glossary of some commonly used words and phrases

WHEN THE WHOLE WORLD IS SILENT, EVEN ONE VOICE BECOMES POWERFUL

- MALALA YOUSAFZAI

Discrimination

The state or condition of being a slave; a civil relationship whereby one person has absolute power over another and controls his/her life, liberty, and fortune.

Torture Intentionally inflicting severe physical or mental pain or suffering on someone for a specific purpose, by or with the consent of state officials.

T N S E C U R I T Y F P I F

C R T A L V V J Z O Y S R A

E X W E A T Y G R U C X K I

P E G U R R O C J R O U U R

S M V D E F E Z I L M P Z T

E I I V C D E M M A M Y Q R

R R A T L O I R O B U S V I

C L U A Z N O E E O T J W A

S V R T A T A Y J U E Y V L

O U G T R V Q T N R R Q E S

F N I V W O I M P U N I T Y

U O A C J H T L I V O Z O Y

N R O E P S O U V Z M L J Z

5. SLAVERY

Slavery

Y T R E B I L D S O E W F D

6. TORTURE

When people who have committed crimes avoid punishment.

Can you identify the human rights jargons?

2. FAIRTRIAL

Impunity

Santosh Yadav

Word Puzzle

3. COMMUTE

When a person cannot enjoy her rights because he/she is treated differently based on his/her caste, disability, ethnicity, gender, political or other opinion, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or other status.

1. DISCRIMINATION

GET TALKING ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS

TAKE ACTION NOW

JOUNALIST DETAINED ON FABRICATED CHARGES “Santosh Yadav is one of the few journalists who reported on police brutality on Adivasis in the region. He has also been the contact person for national and international journalists and was crucial in getting media attention to the plight of Adivasis in the conflict-torn region. He has also been instrumental in helping Adivasis get legal aid” – Lawyer of Santosh Yadav Santosh Yadav is a freelance journalist. He was arrested on 29 September by the Chhattisgarh police for allegedly being involved in rioting, criminal conspiracy, murder, and being part of the banned Communist Party of India (Maoist) armed group, among other offences. He is being held under the Chhattisgarh Special Public Security Act and the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act – both of which violate international human rights standards – and other laws. It is believed that he is being targeted for his work among the Adivasi Indigenous communities in Bastar district, Chhattisgarh, and that the allegations against him are fabricated. According to his lawyer, Santosh Yadav has previously faced harassment by the authorities and was also stripped and beaten by the state police in June.

NO IMPUNITY FOR SEXUAL VIOLENCE- DEMAND JUSTICE FOR NEPALI WOMEN “A lot has happened to both of us. Only God knows how we have suffered. We felt we were dead then, and we will remain that way until justice is delivered.” On 9 September, the Haryana police raided a luxury apartment of a Saudi Arabian diplomat in Gurgaon, near New Delhi, after a tip-off from an NGO. They found two Nepali women, employed as domestic workers, who told the police that they had been forcibly confined, starved and repeatedly raped by the diplomat and other men over several months. A medical examination confirmed that the women had been anally and vaginally raped and brutally beaten. The Haryana police filed a criminal case against unnamed people, and say they are still investigating the case. The Saudi Arabian embassy in New Delhi denies the allegations, and complained that the ‘intrusion’ into the diplomat’s home breached diplomatic conventions. On September 16, the diplomat left India for Saudi Arabia. The Indian Ministry of External Affairs said that the diplomat was protected by the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Diplomatic immunity must not lead to impunity. And anyone suspected of serious abuses should not be allowed to hide behind the shield of diplomatic status.

TAKE ACTION Please write immediately calling on authorities in Chhattisgarh:

Please write immediately:

4. IMPUNITY

ANSWERS

Commute

• To immediately and unconditionally release Santosh Yadav;

• To demand justice for the two Nepali women and to live with dignity.

To replace a punishment, usually a death sentence with a less severe one.

• To ensure that pending his release, Santosh is protected from torture and other ill-treatment, and given regular access to his lawyer and family;

• To demand that authorities in India investigate the allegations, charge those suspected, and if required, seek their extradition from Saudi Arabia for prosecution.

• To urge the state and central government to ensure that journalists in Bastar can carry out their work without intimidation or harassment, and take prompt action against those who violate their rights.

• To demand that Saudi Arabian authorities co-operate with the investigation, and if required, revoke diplomatic status and extradite suspects to India for prosecution.

Fair TrIAl When the processes of a justice system are fair and certain, and respects people’s rights.

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WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTEST IN THE NAME OF UNIVERSAL FREEDOM

- NELSON MANDELA 1918-2013

PLEASE SEND APPEALS TO:

Chief Minister, Raman Singh Civil Line, Raipur Chhattisgarh – 492 001, India Email: mail@cmo.cg.gov.in Salutation: Dear Sir

Please Sign the Petition >> http://bit.ly/1O25lRx Please let us know if you took action so that we can track our impact. Send us a short email to membersupport@amnesty.org.in or Whatsapp us at +91 9036002621. Please visit our take action site, https://www.amnesty.org.in/action/


Human Rights Education

HOW AMNESTY UTILIZES YOUR MONEY

18%

HOW DONATIONS ARE BEING USED TO DEFEND THE RIGHTS OF VULNERABLE PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES ACROSS INDIA

We reach out to schools, children and parents across the country to integrate human rights into every aspect of school life.

Amnesty International India does not accept funding from governments or political organisations for our campaigning work. We are transparent with how we spend your money. Your financial support goes towards the following programmes.

Corporate Accountability

2%

2

%

CORPORATE ACCOUNTABILITY

We work to ensure that governments protect and corporates respect human rights across business operations especially in the coal mining sector in India.

18% HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION

Human Rights Defenders

7%

7

%

14%

HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS

MEDIA AND ADVOCACY

Media and Advocacy

2%

14%

We work to enable, empower and defend HRDs so that they can carry out their work in an effective and efficient manner. A human rights defender is a person who individually or with others takes an act to promote or protect human rights.

RAPID RESPONSE

We lobby governments and other powerful groups such as companies to respect human rights and we reach out to the media and expose investigations and facts on human rights.

3%

2%

ACCESS TO JUSTICE IN JAMMU & KASHMIR

6

%

Access to Justice in Jammu & Kashmir

3%

Rapid Response

RIGHTS OF MIGRANT WORKERS

We work to ensure that victims of human rights violations by state security forces are able to access justice.

8% WOMEN'S RIGHTS

5% UNDERTRIALS

Women’s Rights

8%

We work to ensure that women who choose to report sexual violence, can do it safely with dignity and without facing prejudice.

We provide effective and rapid responses to urgent situations whose human rights are at risk. Also involves short term projects like the justice for the victims of the 1984 Sikh massacre which mobilized over 500,000 people on the campaign.

Rights of Migrant Workers

6%

We work to defend migrant workers from exploitation and abuse in the pre-departure phase of migration to foreign countries.

35% CAMPAIGNING AND MOBILIZATION

Undertrials

Campaigning and Mobilization

35% ENGAGE 11

We tell our supporters about the powerful stories of the people we work with, and mobilize thousands of supporters around the world to campaign for change and to stand in defence of people who are at risk.

5%

We work with governments to reduce the number of undertrials eligible for release, especially those languishing beyond the term of what their conviction would have been.

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BOOK POST

JOIN AMNESTY TODAY TO DEFEND HUMAN RIGHTS AND PROTECT LIVES AROUND THE WORLD DONATE

Your donation will help fight injustice and oppression for everyone. By supporting us regularly, you are giving us a greater ability to respond to emergencies and take high profile actions.

TAKE ACTION

Sign a petition or write a letter on the human rights issues facing our communities in India and around the world.

VOLUNTEER AT AMNESTY

Work as a volunteer to inform and engage people about human rights issues.

FOLLOW CAMPAIGNS

Are you passionate about a certain issue? Support our campaigns online and spread the message to more people.

PARTICIPATE IN AMNESTY EVENTS

Events are a great way to educate yourself and others about human rights and meet other like-minded people in your community who want to take action together.

Amnesty International India 1074 B-1, 11th Main, HAL 2nd Stage, Bangalore – 560 008 Ph: 91 888288 4442


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