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The Future is Now

A N N U A L

09

R E P O R T


Despite the challenging economy, we had our most successful year ever in river protection and river restoration, and dramatically expanded our work securing adequate clean water for communities.

Oxbow Bend, Snake River, WY

Photo by David F. Putnam


Securing Healthy Rivers

T

hanks to the commitment

Scenic Rivers by the 40th Anniversa-

influential reports — Hidden Reser-

of American Rivers’

ry of the original act. In March 2009,

voir and Natural Security — and

supporters and the power

President Obama signed a bill add-

securing almost $1.2 billion dollars

of our vision, 2009 was a

ing 86 new Wild and Scenic Rivers,

in stimulus funding for “green”

year of remarkable success. Despite

the second largest expansion of the

infrastructure, we began to shift

the difficult economy, we had our most

system in history!

our nation onto a sustainable path.

successful year ever in river protection

✦ For the past nine years we have

Despite this remarkable success, much

and river restoration, and dramatically

been part of complex negotiations to

work remains to be done. Guided by our

expanded our work securing clean

remove four dams along the Klam-

vision and sustained by your commit-

water for communities.

ath River in Oregon and California,

ment, we look forward to a 2010 marked

While the economic crisis did present

and in September we signed a final

by even more progress securing healthy

challenges, our funders, both large and

agreement to take down the dams!

rivers for all communities.

small, civic leaders, and government

This will be the largest dam removal

officials embraced our bold goal that

project the world has ever seen.

healthy rivers will provide resilience to

✦ We are changing the way this nation

every human and natural community

thinks about water infrastructure —

so that we can thrive in the face of

moving national policy from the 19th

climate change.

to the 21st century. With a focus on

And we made significant progress toward that goal: ✦ Three years ago we set the goal of designating 40 additional Wild and

Thank you for your continued support.

Edward B. Whitney Chairman of the Board Chairma

failing water infrastructure in our 2009 America’s Most Endangered RiversTM report, expansion of our

Rebecca R. Wodder

work in the Southeast and the

President

Midwest, the publication of two

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Historic Advances in River Protection

T

hree years ago, American

and bringing new levels of pro-

Rivers set the audacious

tection for 350,000 acres of land

goal of winning the

along the rivers. The same Act also

designation of 40 new Wild and

contained new Wilderness desig-

Scenic Rivers to mark the 40th

nation for more than two million

Anniversary of the Wild and Scenic

acres of public lands.

Rivers Act. At the time, the “40 x 40” goal seemed almost too ambitious — with the nation at war, the economy beginning to soften, and the political system gridlocked by a presidential election, how could we hope to expand the national Wild and Scenic Rivers System?

A M E R I C A N

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ters in Wyoming to the desert Southwest’s Fossil Creek, to the trout streams of the Rockies and the popular fishing and paddling streams of the Pacific Northwest, to the East Coast’s beautiful Musconetcong, this tremendous victory was possible because of

Yet, on March 30, 2009, President

American Rivers’ unique ability to

Barack Obama signed into law the

bring together diverse interests

second largest Wild and Scenic

with the common goal of protect-

Rivers package in history, desig-

ing rivers. American Rivers brought

nating 86 new Wild and Scenic

ranchers and hunters together with

Rivers, totaling more than 1,100

anglers, rafters, and bird watchers,

miles of newly protected rivers,

Republicans together with Demo-

Mystery Canyon, UT

2

From the Snake River headwa-

Photo by Tanya Milligan


crats, Easterners together with West-

report focused primarily on the threats

erners, all united to take us far beyond

to rivers and communities caused by

our most ambitious goals.

our failing water infrastructure — the

Flathead River, MO

Photo courtesy of Montana Public Image Library

✦ Spend money wisely by investing in

systems that handle drinking water,

“green” solutions that are cheaper

For the first time, we were able to ex-

wastewater, and stormwater. As grow-

and provide more benefits; and

pand the protective nature of Wild and

ing communities rely on 19th cen-

Scenic River designation by bringing

tury infrastructure, polluted streams,

protection to the river’s watershed it-

increased flooding, and water short-

self. The 350,000 acres along the rivers

ages are becoming more common.

and the two million acres of Wilderness

And climate change will only increase

Across the nation, American Rivers’

protect entire watersheds, ensuring

the problem, bringing more floods,

activists and civic leaders responded,

that these Wild and Scenic rivers are

droughts and waterborne disease.

and we’ve begun to turn the tide on

not only protected from threats like dams, but are sustained for the longer term as the centerpiece of a healthy ecosystem.

Through the release of America’s Most Endangered Rivers™, we spotlighted threats to rivers from outdated flood control methods, flawed dam and res-

At the same time we were securing

ervoir proposals, and increased water

permanent protection for these riv-

withdrawals. We highlighted the three

ers, American Rivers was also battling

principles of our 21st century solutions:

threats across the country through our

✦ Nature works best and we should

✦ Adopt “green” solutions that are flexible and enhance the communities where they are implemented.

the threats facing this year’s Most Endangered Rivers. Federal policymakers also heard from American Rivers, and thanks to our work with the Congress and the Administration, designated funds in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for states to pursue green infrastructure projects. These funds will help communities

signature program, America’s Most

restore natural systems whenever

build 21st century infrastructure that

Endangered Rivers™. This year’s

possible;

protects their rivers and their citizens.

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River Restoration:

Today, all over the country, outmoded and Klamath River, CA Photo by Ben Davidson, courtesy of O.A.R.S.

dangerous dams are coming down and rivers are being restored, thanks to American Rivers.

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Big Rivers, Big Successes

I

Keno Dam, Klamath River, CA

Photo by Thomas B. Dunklin

t’s been more than 100

to remove all four dams in what will be

achieving highly complex river resto-

years since the waters of

the biggest dam removal project the

ration goals through negotiation and

the Klamath River have

world has ever seen. Earlier, in Novem-

consensus building. American Rivers

flowed freely from their source at

ber 2008, American Rivers and 24

has worked on the Klamath for more

Upper Klamath Lake in Oregon,

other stakeholders signed the Klamath

than nine years, since the dam owners

through 15,000 square miles of once-

Basin Restoration Agreement, which

first applied for a 50-year extension of

productive salmon and steelhead

balanced the water needs of agricul-

the federal license to operate the four

habitat in Oregon and California until

ture, national wildlife refuges along

hydropower dams. Realizing that this

they empty into the Pacific Ocean.

the river, the rebuilding fish popula-

was a once-in-a-generation opportuni-

Four dams, built between 1908 and

tions and the economic needs of

ty, American Rivers began the pains-

1962 have cut off the river, devastating

local communities. Once that thorny

taking process of creating a vision for

the salmon population and the

set of issues was resolved, the way was

what might be possible in the Klamath,

communities that depend on them.

cleared for the final agreement on dam

and then convening the stakeholders in

removal, which the parties signed in

a focused and respectful process.

But after one of the most complicated, and at times contentious, river restora-

September 2009.

Today, the rebirth of the Klamath is in

tion efforts ever undertaken, in Sep-

While the Klamath dam removals will

sight. And our sense of what is possi-

tember 2009 American Rivers and 25

be the largest in the world, the Klam-

ble has dramatically increased. Across

other partners finalized an agreement

ath is also important as a model for

the country, American Rivers received

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Iron Gate Dam, Klamath River, CA Photo by James Norman Flight by Lighthawk

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$4 million in ARRA funds to remove

restoration of the Chesapeake Bay by

two outdated dams on the Patapsco

supporting a freshwater mussel that

River, the largest dam removal project

filters and purifies the water.

in Maryland history, and a source of

Not long ago, river advocates thought

jobs for the rebounding economy. An

dam removal was an impossible dream.

important tributary of the Chesapeake

But in 1999, with the removal of the

Bay, the Patapsco is blocked by four

Edwards Dam on the Kennebec River

dams, which cut off migratory fish

in Maine, American Rivers proved that

from more than 370 miles of historic

dam removal was not only possible,

spawning grounds. The restoration

but that it made sense for the river and

project on the Patapsco will remove

the communities that depend on the

unsafe and outmoded dams that are a

river. Today, all over the country, out-

threat to public safety, open up recre-

moded and dangerous dams are com-

ational opportunities along this hidden

ing down and rivers are being restored,

gem of a river, and contribute to the

thanks to American Rivers.

National River Cleanup ProgramTM Each year, millions of tons of trash end up in our nation’s rivers. However, through our National River Cleanup Program™, American Rivers is committed to keeping our nation’s rivers clean. Last year, hundreds of thousands of volunteers participated in the National River Cleanup Program™ and picked up more than 1.2 million pounds of trash from 76,000 miles of rivers. In 2009, we began providing organizers with National River Cleanup Kits that contained sponsor-branded trash bags, T-shirts and snacks. We also conducted more media outreach than ever before, resulting in increased local media coverage, increased participation in cleanups and additional visibility for our work.

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A M E R I C A N

R I V E R S

Patapsco River, MD

Photo by American Rivers


Water Supply: Tapping the Hidden Reservoir

A A

cross the country, com-

eral communities running out of water,

ments. With its detailed set of water

munities are facing short-

proposals emerged for building new

efficiency policies and success stories

ages of water caused by

dams and reservoirs, and for lawsuits

from other communities, the report

expanding development and increas-

against neighboring states over water

was welcomed by many civic leaders

ingly frequent drought. And across

supplies — 21st century “water wars!”

eager to find a quicker and less costly

the country, American Rivers is there, working with local community leaders to implement 21st century solutions, and to oppose short-sighted, expensive, ineffective projects that will do more harm than good.

As elected officials scrambled to

solution to their problems.

address the crisis, American Rivers published a widely heralded report entitled Hidden Reservoir, which makes the case that water efficiency is the best source of affordable water

Over the past several years, American

and must be the backbone of water

Rivers has strengthened its presence

supply planning. Hidden Reservoir

in the Southeast, precisely as that

illustrated the cost of dam building

region was facing some of the most

to civic leaders and elected officials,

serious droughts in the nation. With

pointing out that on a per-gallon

the region facing water use restric-

basis, dams cost up to 8,500 times

tions and the very real threat of sev-

more than water efficiency invest-

Creek in Hartselle, AL

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Photo by Lana Dotson

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Clean Water: Wa Protecting our Health

P P

rotecting our drinking water,

terways, demonstrate the effectiveness

solutions to civic leaders, and to lever-

and our ability to safely

of sustainable solutions for rivers and

age federal funding for local commu-

enjoy river recreation, means

communities, and contribute to the

nities to implement those solutions.

larger Great Lakes restoration efforts.

Through our work on Capitol Hill, the

stopping pollution and increasing the amount of natural infrastructure to filter and absorb water from storms.

working with an army of volunteers

Act contained a provision that set

who are revitalizing an economically

aside $1.2 billion for states to use for

cerned about the problem and looked

distressed community around Darby

green infrastructure and water efficien-

to “green” their infrastructure, our

Creek. American Rivers, the Commu-

cy projects, the largest single invest-

work in this area expanded this year.

nity Action Agency of Delaware

ment in green infrastructure funding

Building on our very successful work

County, and the Delaware County

in history. The Obama Administration

in Toledo, Ohio, American Rivers, the

Planning Department are mobilizing

and the Congress have continued this

Joyce Foundation and the Milwau-

more than 200 volunteers who will

trend, setting aside an additional

kee Metropolitan Sewerage District

install rain barrels to catch rainwater

$700 million in green infrastructure

have developed a unique partnership

and decrease stormwater pollution.

funding block grants to states.

411 square miles around Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Through this partnership we

A M E R I C A N

American Recovery and Reinvestment

As more communities became con-

extending over 28 communities and

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In Pennsylvania, American Rivers is

A clean and protected Darby Creek will be the centerpiece of this community’s rebirth.

Through on-the-ground work in local communities and skillful advocacy in Washington, we’re protecting drinking

will implement innovative solutions to

At American Rivers, our approach is to

water and the health of the communi-

improve the health of community wa-

both bring cost-effective and reliable

ties who depend on their rivers.

R I V E R S


As more communities became concerned about the problem and looked to “green� their infrastructure,

West River, CT

Photo by Frank Slack

our work in this area expanded this year. 2 0 0 9

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American Rivers has begun to foster

Ecoroof in Portland, OR Photo courtesy of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services

a more integrated and successful approach to water infrastructure issues. 10

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Natural Security – Working With Nature, Not Against It

A A

ll over the nation, antiquated

tainable approach for communities.

a result of climate change. By sup-

water infrastructure under-

The report offers eight case studies

porting the report through extensive

mines our security and

of communities that are employing

media outreach, an online video, and

economic competitiveness, our envi-

integrated sustainable approaches,

a Capitol Hill briefing, American Rivers

ronment and our quality of life. Climate

and how they are both saving money

has begun to foster a more integrated

change will further stress the already

and better equipping themselves to

and successful approach to water in-

crumbling systems that supply clean

deal with the increasing number and

frastructure issues at the federal, state,

drinking water, control stormwater and

severity of droughts and floods as

and local levels.

flooding, and treat sewage. More frequent and more intense droughts and

Ecoroof in Portland, OR

Photo courtesy of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services

floods are already becoming a reality in parts of the country. We brought together our work on the full range of river and water policy issues in Natural Security: How Sustainable Water Strategies Are Preparing Communities for Climate Change, which illustrates the interrelated nature of all water issues and outlines a sus-

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2009 Governance American Rivers Board of Directors

Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee

Southeast Advisory Council

FISCAL YEAR 2009 (JULY 1, 2008 — JUNE 30, 2009)

Edward B. Whitney; New York, NY (Chairman of the Board) David Hayes; Washington, DC (Vice Chair) Anne H. Shields; Chevy Chase, MD (Acting Vice Chair) Thomas Hughes; Seattle, WA (Secretary) Dorothy Ballantyne; Bozeman, MT (Treasurer) Russell Daggatt; Seattle, WA Swep Davis; Bozeman, MT Dr. Sylvia A. Earle; Oakland, CA Ray Gardner; Raymond, WA Nora Hohenlohe; Washington, DC Rick Holton; St. Louis, MO Landon Jones; Princeton, NJ Laurie Kracum; Chicago, IL Dee Leggett; Great Falls, VA Richard Legon; Fairfax, VA Lisel Loy; Washington, DC Robert F. McDermott, Jr.; Alexandria, VA Dr. Jeffrey Mount; Davis, CA Jay Mills; Chattanooga, TN Z. Cartter Patten, III; Chattanooga, TN Gordon W. Philpott; St. Louis, MO Tom Skerritt; Seattle, WA C. Austin Stephens; Atlanta, GA Alex Taylor; Palm Beach, FL

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Dr. Jeffrey Mount, Chair University of California — Davis Davis, CA Dr. Jim Boyd Resources for the Future Washington, DC Dr. Norman L. Christensen Duke University Durham, NC Dr. Robert Glennon University of Arizona Tucson, AZ Dr. David D. Hart Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Environmental and Watershed Research Orono, ME Dr. Gene Helfman, University of Georgia Emeritus Lopez Island, WA Mr. Jim MacBroom, P.E. Milone and MacBroom, Inc. Cheshire, CT Mr. David Marcus Energy Economist Berkeley, CA Dr. Judy L. Meyer University of Georgia Emeritus Lopez Island, WA

Dr. David R. Montgomery University of Washington Seattle, WA Dr. Michael R. Moore University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI Dr. Margaret A. Palmer University of Maryland College Park, MD Dr. Duncan Patten Montana State University Bozeman, MT Dr. N. LeRoy Poff Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Ms. Sandra Postel Center for the Environment Mount Holyoke College South Hadley, MA

Jay Mills, Chair Chattanooga, TN Dana Beach Charleston, SC Fitz Coker Key West, FL Rev. Mark Johnston Nauvoo, AL J. Paul Oxer Smyrna, GA Z. Cartter Patten, III Chattanooga, TN Victoria (Vicki) Taylor Troutman, NC

Northwest Advisory Council (ALL OF SEATTLE, WA)

Brad Axel David Groff

Dr. Joan Rose Michigan State University East Lansing, MI Dr. Jack Schmidt Utah State University Logan, UT Dr. Richard Sparks National Great Rivers Research and Education Center Godfrey, IL

Thomas Hughes Brad Hanson Matt Kellogg Nan McKay Jeff Nielsen John Schuitemaker Julie Tokashiki Skerritt


River Guardian Society Champions $25,000 and above

Anonymous (2) Barbara Brunckhorst, The Brunckhorst Foundation Fitz Coker Mary Lee Dayton, W.M. Foundation Steve Leuthold Family Foundation Susan McDowell David and Katherine Moore Gilman and Marge Ordway Gordon and Susan Philpott C. Austin Stephens George B. Storer Foundation Alex Taylor Margaretta Taylor Douglas Walker Edward B. Whitney and Martha Howell

Rick and Lotsie Holton Laurie and Rich Kracum Richard and Fran Legon The George and Miriam Martin Foundation Lee and Carol Mather Robert F. and Judith L. McDermott Jennifer and Jay Mills Z. Cartter Patten, III and Lee Patten Anne H. Shields Margot Snowdon Peter J. Solomon Family Foundation Jennifer and Edmund A. Stanley, Jr. Joanna Sturm Ted Williams Rebecca R. Wodder

Stewards $5,000 to $9,999

Protectors $10,000 to $24,999

Anonymous (4) The Evenor Armington Fund Ambassador Victor Ashe Dorothy Ballantyne Wolf Creek Charitable Foundation Bertram and Barbara Cohn Carson Cox and Debbie Haase, Cox Family Fund Sally Davidson Barbara Dubois, Rowe Foundation John L. Ernst Caroline D. Gabel Eugene and Emily Grant Dr. Joseph and Susan Gray

Anonymous (2) Donald and Anne Ayer Stanley and Kristine Baty Otto Frenzel and Eleanor Bookwalter Judith M. Buechner Russell and Gemma Daggatt Swep and Brenda Davis Edward and Sherry Ann Dayton Lynn and Edward Dolnick Michael and Cleo Gewirz Boyce and Anne Greer David and Nan Grusin Frank Hagel David and Elizabeth Hayes William and Lannie Hoglund Ruth Holmberg Landon and Sarah Jones

Sandra Lerner Wallace and Anne McDowell William and Sandy Neukom Jeffrey Nielsen George and Manci Ohrstrom Wally Pereyra Molly Reinhart John and Barbara Robinson Anne Larsen Simonson, Larsen Fund Janet Tanner John and Carson Taylor

Friends $1,000 to $4,999

Anonymous (6) Paul and Maryann Allison Bradford and Angela Axel Robert and Anne Bass Carolyn Bausch John C. Bierwirth Dr. Philip and Faith Bobrow Katherine S. Borgen Martha Brand Dr. Peter Bross Martin S. Brown Family Charlie Bucket Fund Lillis J. Bunce Johannes Burlin and D.D. Danforth Burlin Suzanne Burton Daniel and Susan Carlson Ann and Doug Christensen Max and Laura Clough James E. Coleman, Jr. Joel and Melissa Coleman Patricia R. Conkie Beverly Crawford Thomas Crawford John S. Cromlish

Margaretta Taylor Family Gift American Rivers has received the largest single gift in its history, a $4 million capacity-building grant from the Margaretta Taylor family. This four-year grant will support American Rivers’ vision that healthy rivers equip every human and natural community to thrive in the face of climate change. “American Rivers is an organization whose impact is orders of magnitude greater than its size would suggest,” said Alex Taylor, American Rivers Board Member. “With this gift our family is helping American Rivers grow into its own footprint, and by doing so, further increase its ability to protect and restore rivers for the benefit of communities nationwide.”

Kelly Curtis and Carolyn Favale Polly Dement and John Mayer Michael P. Dowling, The Dowling Foundation Leo and Kay Drey Cathy Duley and Meredith Elkins Dr. Sylvia A. Earle Dr. Stan G. Eilers Mark B. Elhilow Melissa L. Epple Evergreen Hill Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Willem Faber and Rena Pine Andrew Fahlund and Jill Corr Robert and Cynthia Feldman Robert Fina Charlotte Forsythe Fund of Headwaters Foundation for Justice Randall and Ellen Frank Jane Freeman Christian Fulghum

Marianne Gabel Chuck and Lisa Gerardi Thomas and Sarah Gleason Dr. David Glickerman David Groff Jennifer Hamilton Jack and Lorraine Hannon Bradley Hanson Elizabeth and Whitney Hatch Agnes Hayden Chuck Hendricks Sidney and Margaret Herman Sean Heyniger Dr. Jane Hon Lynne and Joe Horning Stephen Irish Greg and Carol James Anna S. Jeffrey Judith Lee Jones Edward Juda Matthew and Sara Kellogg Steve G. King Martha Kongsgaard 2 0 0 9

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Sam and Casey Lambert Juliet Lamont and Phil Price Murray E. Lapides Robert and Dee Leggett Carl and Sandra Lehner Daniel and Deanna Lentz Lester and Connie LeRoss Jennifer Levine James and Vicky Linville Ann Lorimer Lisel Loy and Martin Moe Dr. Jeffrey Mount Elaine Ludwig Ralph A. Luken Elizabeth and Whitney MacMillan Robbin Marks and Daniel Zabronsky Verneda Mason George Matelich Charles and Sandra McIntosh Nancy McKay Helen Meloa Drs. Judy L. Meyer and Gene Helfman Dr. Kevin J. Miller Maryam Mohit and Erik Blachford Debra Montanino William and Linda Musser J. Paul Oxer Rodman and Christine Patton Nicholas and Carol Paumgarten Nicholas and Linda Penniman Edward W. Pettigrew Rafe and Lenore Pomerance John P. McBride Family, ABC Foundation Fred Randall Nathaniel Reed John Reilly and Lise Woodard

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Lisa Renstrom Philip Rever Matthew Rice Esther H. Rivinus F. Leland Russell Sandpiper Fund Elizabeth L. Sarles George and Laurie Schuchart Charles Schulze and Lucy Holland Beth and Gary Schwarzman Kimberly and Jeffrey Seely Robert Seith Tom Skerritt and Julie Tokashiki Skerritt Michael Bredt Stanley Frances W. Stevenson William Michael Summers Sutherland Foundation Brett Swift Swimmer Family Foundation Charles E. Taylor James L. Terrill Robert H. Tharpe, Jr., The Tharpe Foundation Brad Thompson Lawrence Thompson Joseph and Lora Vansickle Christopher W. Walker Kendall W. Wilson Nancy Hamill Winter Dr. Ellen Wohl Don Wolfe John (LJ) Wolken W.O.O.D. Foundation Gay Wray Charles J. Wyly, Jr. Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas Helen R. Yeisley Anne Zetterberg Matt and Audrey Zimmermann

River Legacy Society The River Legacy Society recognizes individuals who have provided for the future of American Rivers through bequests and other planned gifts. Lynne AlďŹ eri Bob Anderson Rosemary Baab Vera and Nancy Bagwell Joseph Bania Bob and Donna Benner Larry G. and Constance C. Blackwood Clark Bullard Inis Carpenter Estate Delores Cerro Estate Betsy Case Patricia Case in memory of Al Staats Cynthia Chevins Estate Dan Cinowalt Bruce C. Cornish John S. Cromlish Estate of Jane Daganhardt Jack Daggitt and Anne Stellwagen Estate of Carolyn Dejanikus Joseph Dluglach Estate Patricia Echevarria John Graham John and Mariam Graham Stephen Gruber Dave Grusin and Nan Newton, the Trustees of the Grusin/ Newton Charitable Trust Melva C. Hackney Robert Heacox Gale B. Hill Perry Hopkins Kristin Howland Sally Hubbard Leonara Hurst in memory of Kerney J. Hurst

Stephen Johnson Paul Jones Charlotte Lackey and Donald Barnett George Lane Martin Laufe Ken and Carrie Lavine Kirk Lawton Robert and Dee Leggett Estate of Mildred Lewis Diane Loand Larry Lundberg John J. McGough Donald McNabb Barbara McPherson Judy Meyer Margaret D. Meyer Howard W. Mielke Estate of Frances W. Miller Debra Montanino Estate of Daniel Morrill Mary W. Namey Wilke Nelson Scott Olsen David Payer and Angela Matz Theresa Perenich Estate of Jane Perry Bob Pierpont Rebecca Post Estate of Elizabeth Prather Margaret Purves Jim Rahtz Julie Roller Michael Ryan and Linda Joyce Joan Samara Anne H. Shields Trudy Sivick Farwell Smith Lauren Smith Philip M. Smith Betsy Soifer Patricia Sorenson Elsie Sorgenfrei Howard Steffens Whitney and Kate Sunderland Evelyn B. Teerlinck

Cleobelle and Sidney Heiple-Tice Walter Tingle and Thea Holmes John Train Richard Voss Wendy Watson James and Janet Wenninger Tim Wernette Laura Whitehall Estate Steve White Edward B. Whitney and Martha Howell Rebecca R. Wodder Don and Trish Wolfe Donald Wolfe Roger and Betty Wrigley

Foundation Grants Bella Vista Foundation The Betterment Fund Margaret T. Biddle Foundation Brico Fund Brunswick Public Foundation, Inc. The Bullitt Foundation The Burning Foundation The Butler Fund for the Environment The Keith Campbell Foundation for the Environment Margaret A. Cargill Foundation Claneil Foundation Clovis Foundation Charles W. and Elizabeth H. Coker Foundation Colcom Foundation The Cole Foundation Davis Conservation Fund Sarah K. deCoizart Article TENTH Perpetual Charitable Trust


Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation The Charles Engelhard Foundation Fanwood Foundation Firedoll Foundation French Foundation Friends of Deer Creek Garden Homes Fund Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund JW and HM Goodman Foundation The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Horizons Foundation The Joyce Foundation Jubitz Family Foundation Kendeda Fund Kongsgaard Goldman Foundation Laird Norton Foundation The Forrest and Frances Lattner Foundation Laurel Foundation Thomas H. Maren Foundation Markmakers Foundation Mars Foundation Martin Foundation, Inc. Oscar G. and Elsa S. Mayer Family Foundation The McKnight Foundation Richard King Mellon Foundation Charles Stewart Mott Foundation National Wildlife Federation The New-Land Foundation, Inc. Orchard Foundation Park Foundation William Penn Foundation Penney Family Fund Pew Charitable Trusts The Philanthropic Collaborative

Resources Legacy Fund Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation The Jim and Patty Rouse Charitable Foundation, Inc. Save Our Wild Salmon Elmina B. Sewall Foundation Shared Earth Foundation The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation Milton Shoong Foundation The Smart Family Foundation The Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation Tides Foundation Town Creek Foundation, Inc. United Way of Rhode Island Wallace Genetic Foundation, Inc. Weeden Foundation Wilburforce Foundation

Government Grants Massachusetts Environmental Trust National Fish and Wildlife Foundation National Park Service Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Growing Greener Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission Richland County, SC, Conservation Commission U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Corporate and Organizational Donations Major Sponsors

In-Kind Donations

Boulder Canyon Natural Foods Conservation Alliance Green Mountain Coffee Roasters The Orvis Company Repreve by Unifi Subaru of America, Inc. Tom’s of Maine Working Assets

Professional Services

Supporters Allay Home Care, LLC ARTA River Trips Canoe Cruiser Association Carolina Canoe Club City of Tacoma, Washington Clark Skamania Flyfishers CP Lab Safety Croakies Filson Float Fisherman of Virginia Green Hotels Association Inter-Fluve, Inc. Island Press JustGive NetworkForGood.org New York Times Company Foundation Northwest River Supplies O.A.R.S. Companies, Inc. Paddling.net Inc. Patagonia, Inc. Re/Max of Georgia Remodelers Advantage Spokane Canoe and Kayak Club Tallac Ventures, Inc. Theatrical Outfit Tisbest Philanthropy

Adler & Colvin Larry Blackwood Coppersmith, Schermer & Brockelman Carter Gowl Holland & Knight Jean Howell Jones Day Klamp & Associates Ronald Kreisman Levine & Associates, Inc.

Product Donations Adventure Carolina AGB Agua Verde Alpine Adventures Aquatic Safari The Avid Angler Ben Bridge Jewelers Jeff Bright Design Brightwater House Bed and Breakfast Carmel Gallery Clyde’s Restaurant Group Columbia Hospitality Congaree National Park Conway Kayak Company Conway Marina — City of Conway Dry Soda, Inc. ECHO River Trips Mary Edwards Photography Emerald Water Anglers Filson Fish Brewing Company Food Lion Store 1384 Dave Groff

Thomas Hughes Jones Day Kaufmann’s Streamborn Matt Kellogg Dawnula Koukol Latham & Watkins Elliot Levin Kevin Lewis JD Love NW Fly Fishing Adventures Outdoor Odysseys Outdoor Research Patagonia, Inc. John Schuitemaker Seattle Raft and Kayak Tom Skerritt and Julie Tokashiki Skerritt Stumptown Coffee Sam and Lindsay Tucker Waterbrook Wine

Kresge Foundation Grant American Rivers was honored to receive a twoyear, $800,000 grant from the Kresge Foundation to support our work helping communities prepare for climate change. The Kresge Foundation is a leader in environmental grant making, particularly in the area of climate change adaptation.

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FY 2009 Statement of Activities JUNE 30, 2 009

Unrestricted

Temporarily Restricted

Permanently Restricted

Total FY 2009

Membership Contributions Planned Giving Corporate Donations Foundation Grants Government Grants Interest Other Realized Gain (Loss)

832,428 1,592,051 362,457 293,976 749,484 820,670 75,063 332,530 16,014

— 56,680 — 16,000 3,994,966 — 131,340 — —

— 50,175 — — — — 348 — —

832,428 1,698,906 362,457 309,976 4,744,450 820,670 206,751 332,530 16,014

Support and Revenue

5,074,673

4,198,986

50,523

9,324,182

Net Assets Released From Restriction

3,580,832

(3,580,832)

Total Support And Revenue

8,655,505

618,154

50,523

9,324,182

Unrestricted

Temporarily Restricted

Permanently Restricted

Total FY 2009

6,963,235

6,963,235

Fundraising

1,258,762

1,258,762

General and Administrative

1,055,259

1,055,259

Total Expenses

9,277,256

9,277,256

(18,916)

(457,999)

(476,915)

Transfer Of Net Assets For Deficiency In Endowment Funds

(226,092)

226,092

Increase (Decrease) In Net Assets Net Assets At Beginning Of Year

(866,759) 750,914

386,247 4,771,004

50,523 1,669,250

(429,989) 7,191,168

(115,845)

5,157,251

1,719,773

6,761,179

SUPPORT AND REVENUE

EXPENSES Program Services River Restoration Clean Water Water Supply River Protection Total Program Services

Change In Market Value Of Investments

Net Assets At End Of Year 16

A M E R I C A N

R I V E R S

4,842,076 714,560 544,774 861,825


Statement of Financial Position

J UN E 3 0, 2 0 09

ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents Investments Grants Receivable Accounts Receivable Other Assets — Principally Prepaid Expenses Fixed Assets — net of accumulated depreciation of $270,576 Total Assets

UNRESTRICTED SUPPORT & REVENUE: 1,718,805 2,330,556 3,205,069 26,845 172,462 367,558

7,821,295

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Membership Dues

16%

Contributions Above Dues 31% Planned Giving

7%

Corporations

6%

Foundation Grants

15%

Government Grants

16%

Other

9%

LIABILITIES Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses Accrued Salaries and Related Benefits Refundable Advances Charitable Gift Annuities Payable Deferred Rent Abatement Deposits Total Liabilities

374,560 218,032 190,187 93,594 183,143 600 1,060,116

EXPENSES:

■ ■ ■

Program Services

75%

Fundraising

14%

Administration

11%

NET ASSETS Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted

(115,845) 5,157,251 1,719,773

Total Net Assets

6,761,179

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

7,821,295

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009, the total net assets of American Rivers decreased by $429,989. This amount included a $386,247 increase in temporarily restricted net assets and a $50,523 increase in permanently restricted net assets. Unrestricted net assets decreased by $866,759. ® American Rivers, Inc. is a registered charitable corporation under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. American Rivers’ financial statements are audited by Gelman, Rosenberg and Freedman, Certified Public Accountants. For a complete copy of the audited financial statements, contact American Rivers.


1101 14th Street NW Suite 1400 Washington, DC 20005 Phone: 877-347-7550

REGIONAL OFFICES: California Great Lakes Mid-Atlantic

Northeast Northwest Southeast

About American Rivers: American Rivers is the leading conservation organization fighting for healthy rivers so communities can thrive. American Rivers protects and restores America’s rivers for the benefit of people, wildlife, and nature. Founded in 1973, American Rivers has more than 65,000 members and supporters, with offices in Washington, DC and nationwide.

www.AmericanRivers.org

Cert no. SCS-COC-00648

Printed on paper that contains 30% post-consumer recycled fiber. DESIGN: Levine & Associates, Inc. Washington, DC FRONT COVER PHOTO: Resurrection River, AK

www.levinedc.com Photo by Dan Logan


American Rivers 2009 Annual Report