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BREAKFAST BASICS 2018 UPDATE A Comprehensive Look at School Breakfast Participation in Allegheny County


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report, produced by Allies for Children and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, summarizes school breakfast participation rates in Allegheny County school districts and charter schools as reported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Percentages throughout the report are rounded. This report was produced by:

Mara Kelosky

Allies for Children serves as a bold voice for policy and practice changes that improve the wellbeing of all children and youth in Allegheny County, especially those with the greatest need.

Chris West Child Nutrition Outreach Coordinator Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank

Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank a member of Feeding America, is a nonprofit organization founded in 1980 that distributes more than 33 million meals annually throughout a network of nearly 400 member agencies across 11 counties in southwestern Pennsylvania.

Research and Operations Manager Allies for Children

A very special thanks to the Henry L. Hillman Foundation for financial support with school breakfast intervention in five school districts. Also, thank you to the many administrators, food service staff, teachers, custodial staff, and students at those five districts (Gateway, North Hills, South Allegheny, Sto-Rox, and West Mifflin Area School Districts) for sharing their cafeterias and classrooms with us. Design by SHIFT COLLABORATIVE


TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction

1

School Breakfast in Allegheny County

2

School Breakfast in Pennsylvania

3

Case Study: Gateway High School

5

Case Study: North Hills Middle School

6

Case Study: Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School 7 Conclusion

8

Allegheny County School Breakfast Participation Data Overview

9


Introduction Research shows that breakfast positively affects children’s learning in terms of behavior, cognition, and school performance.1 Studies indicate children ages four through ten have a metabolism that works twice as fast as adults’ metabolism. Additionally, due to higher sleep demands during childhood and adolescence compared with adults, children have a longer overnight fasting period. Therefore, a supply of energy through food in the morning is vital to a child.2 When a child skips breakfast, their mood and overall energy level can drop by midmorning, causing their focus to shift from academics to their rumbling stomachs.3 To improve students’ access to breakfast, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) was established in 1966 as a two-year pilot project specifically for schools located within low-income areas. With much success, the pilot was extended multiple times until 1975, when Congress fully authorized the program, making it available to all schools. Today, the program continues to provide higher reimbursement to schools in severe need.4 In 1966, the first year of operation, the SBP served approximately 80,000 children.5 More recently, in 2016, the SBP served school breakfast to an average of 14.6 million students each day.6 Over the past decade, states throughout the nation, including Pennsylvania in 2010, have begun utilizing the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP).7 According to the USDA, CEP is defined as “a non-pricing meal service option for schools and school districts in low-income areas. CEP allows the nation’s highest poverty schools and districts to serve breakfast and lunch at no cost to all enrolled students without collecting household applications. Instead, schools that adopt CEP are reimbursed using a formula based on the percentage of students categorically eligible for free meals based on their participation in other specific means-tested programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).”8 Since 2016, Allies for Children and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank have published an annual school breakfast report, Breakfast Basics: A Comprehensive Look at School Breakfast Participation in Allegheny County. The report highlights how school policy changes can help combat childhood hunger and increase the number of breakfasts schools serve. To help increase student consumption, Allies for Children and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank offer hands-on, technical assistance and support to schools, including sharing best practices, providing materials, and connecting schools to funding opportunities. With substantial support from the Henry L. Hillman Foundation, in the 2017-2018 school year Allies for Children and Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank were able to offer various resources to schools interested in implementing an alternative school breakfast model. Resources included funding for equipment, informative workshops, and professional marketing materials, among other support. This report gives an overview of school breakfast participation in schools throughout Allegheny County, and gives an in-depth look at how several schools implemented alternative breakfast models to make breakfast an easier option for more of their students.

Adolphus, Katie, et al. “The Effects of Breakfast on Behavior and Academic Performance in Children and Adolescents.” Frontiers Media, 8 Aug. 2013, www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00425/full. Accessed 4 Jan. 2018.

1

Adolphus, Katie, et al. “The Effects of Breakfast on Behavior and Academic Performance in Children and Adolescents.” Frontiers Media, 8 Aug. 2013, www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00425/full. Accessed 4 Jan. 2018.

2

1

3

“Breakfast Basics.” KidsHealth, The Nemours Foundation, kidshealth.org/en/parents/breakfast.html. Accessed 12 Dec. 2017

4

“School Breakfast Program (SBP).” United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 26 July 2013, www.fns.usda.gov/sbp/program-history. Accessed 20 Jan. 2018.

5

“School Breakfast Program (SBP).” United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 26 July 2013, www.fns.usda.gov/sbp/program-history. Accessed 20 Jan. 2018.


School Breakfast in Allegheny County Since the 2017 report, more schools served more meals to students. In October 2015, four school districts and charter schools in Allegheny County served breakfast to at least 50 percent of students. In October 2016, six districts and charters in the county served breakfast to more than half of the student populations. In October 2017, seven districts and charters served breakfast to at least half of students -- Duquesne City (84 percent), Sto-Rox (67 percent), Cornell (65 percent), Wilkinsburg Borough (59 percent), East Allegheny (54 percent), Woodland Hills (54 percent), and Pittsburgh Public (50 percent).

EXHIBIT 1 This chart reflects the average breakfasts served in October 2017 at 43 school districts and three charter schools in Allegheny County, as a percentage of the total student population. The figures measure the percentage of all enrolled students eating breakfast at school. Data used is from the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

PERCENT OF TOTAL STUDENTS EATING SCHOOL BREAKFAST IN OCTOBER 2017

Wilkinsburg experienced one of the largest percentage changes in students eating school breakfast from October 2016 to October 2017.

TOP 10 DISTRICTS WITH THE LARGEST PERCENTAGE CHANGE IN TOTAL STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN SCHOOL BREAKFAST FROM OCTOBER 2016 TO OCTOBER 2017

EXHIBIT 2 This chart documents the top ten school districts with the greatest increase in percentage change of total student population eating breakfast at school.

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 included the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) as a new option to allow individual schools, a group of schools, or an entire school district to provide breakfast and lunch for free to all students. Federal reimbursement for meals served under CEP is based on a formula that determines a school’s percentage of “identified students.” An “identified student” is a student who is enrolled in a public assistance program, such as foster care, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), or Medicaid. To participate in CEP, at least 40 percent of the student population must be categorized as “identified students.”

“School Meal Trends & Stats.” School Nutrition Association, 2016, schoolnutrition.org/AboutSchoolMeals/SchoolMealTrendsStats/. Accessed 19 Jan. 2018. “Community Eligibility Provision.” Pennsylvania Department of Education,Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, www.education.pa.gov/ Teachers%20-%20Administrators/Food-Nutrition/Pages/Community-Eligibility-Provision.aspx. Accessed 8 Jan. 2018. 6

7

8 “School Meals;Community Eligibility Provision.” United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 8 Aug. 2017, www.fns.usda.gov/school-meals/community-eligibility-provision. Accessed 22 Dec. 2017.

Breakfast Basics | 2


EXHIBIT 3A & 3B These charts reflect the total daily average participation of free and reduced price eligible students eating school breakfast compared to school lunch in both Pennsylvania and Allegheny County. The percentage in each graph reflects the percent of free and reduced price eligible students eating school breakfast per 100 eating lunch. TOTAL DAILY AVERAGE FREE AND REDUCED PRICE SCHOOL MEALS SERVED IN ALLEGHENY COUNTY

TOTAL DAILY AVERAGE FREE AND REDUCED PRICE SCHOOL MEALS SERVED IN PENNSYLVANIA

EXHIBIT 4 In October 2017 in Allegheny County, of the 43 school districts and three charter schools reviewed, ten (22 percent) met the 2020 Blueprint target of 60 students eligible for free and reduced price meals eating breakfast for every 100 eating lunch. Fourteen (30 percent) served between 40 and 59 percent of eligible students breakfast for every 100 eligible students eating lunch; 15 (33 percent) served between 20 and 39 percent of eligible students; and seven (15 percent) served 18 percent or fewer.

School Breakfast in Pennsylvania Schools throughout the commonwealth are working to increase the number of students eating breakfast, particularly those students eligible for free and reduced price meals who are eating school lunch but skipping school breakfast. In September 2016, the Governor’s Food Security Partnership published a plan entitled Setting the Table: A Blueprint for a Hunger-free PA.9 One of the Blueprint’s goals is that “By 2020, 60 percent of students benefiting from the free and reduced price school meals will participate in school breakfast.”10 Throughout the commonwealth, this number has increased from 50 percent in 2016 to 53 percent in 2017. Currently, Allegheny County outperforms the state in school breakfast participation among students who qualify for free and reduced price meals. In Allegheny County, 57 students qualifying for free and reduced price meals eat breakfast for every 100 eating lunch, compared with a rate of 53 per 100 statewide. Although this percentage has increased since 2016, there are still over 550,000 students in Pennsylvania and 40,000 in Allegheny County eligible for free or reduced price school meals who continue to not eat school breakfast. These students may not be eating breakfast at all, or may start the day with unhealthy food choices. A real opportunity exists to reach more of these students, and for students to benefit from the health and academic benefits that come with eating breakfast at school. Of the 43 school districts and three charter schools reviewed, ten in Allegheny County have met or exceeded the 60 percent target for the state. Six school districts and one charter school fall drastically short of the goal, serving fewer than 20 percent of the free and reduced price eligible students breakfast, as compared to those eating lunch. Exhibit 5 ranks 43 Allegheny County school districts and three charter schools in meeting the statewide goal.

DISTRICTS SERVING STUDENTS ELIGIBLE FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS BREAKFAST AS A RATIO TO LUNCH IN OCTOBER 2017

3

9 “Setting the Table: A Blueprint for a Hunger-Free PA.” www.pa.gov, the Governor Tom Wolf Administration, July 2016, www.dhs.pa.gov/cs/groups/webcontent/documents/document/c_242851.pdf. Accessed 3 Feb. 2017.

“Setting the Table; A Blueprint for a hunger-free PA. Harrisburg, Governor Tom Wolf Administration, Sept. 2016, dhs. pa.gov/cs/groups/webcontent/documents/document/c_242851.pdf. Accessed 2 Feb. 2018.

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DISTRICTS’ STATUS IN MEETING 2020 GOAL OF 60 PERCENT BREAKFAST PARTICIPATION IN OCTOBER 2017

EXHIBIT 5 This chart reflects how each school district and three charter schools in Allegheny County performed in relation to the 2020 Blueprint goal, as of October 2017. As a reminder, the 2020 Blueprint aims to achieve 60 free and reduced eligible students eating school breakfast for every 100 eating lunch. An asterisk demonstrates participation in the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP).

Breakfast Basics | 4


Alternative Breakfast Models There are many reasons why students may not participate in school breakfast. Reasons can include: students might not be hungry in the early morning hours, they may not have enough time to eat once they arrive at school, they do not like the food choices, or there may be a stigma associated with eating breakfast in the cafeteria.11 With so many varying reasons for low breakfast participation, it is up to schools to make breakfast the norm for students as they begin their day. To increase student participation, school administrators are beginning to utilize alternative breakfast models in addition to, or in place of, the traditional breakfast in the cafeteria. Schools who are able to adopt CEP are not the only ones who can benefit from alternative breakfast models. Having an easy breakfast option is attractive to all students. The most common alternative breakfast models include “Grab and Go,” Second Chance Breakfast, and Breakfast in the Classroom. The first step is to determine which model is best for your school. Working with administrators, food service staff, teachers, custodians, and others to develop and implement an alternative breakfast model is a best practice. Troubleshooting in advance can position a model for success, and by incorporating all stakeholders early on, all voices are heard and each person is compelled to work through issues to ensure success. The second step is to market the breakfast program to students and families. Schools can ensure students are aware of the new program by making it part of morning announcements, hanging flyers or posters where students will notice, and incorporating teachers to help with the advertising. To notify families, a notice can be sent home so the entire household is aware of the brand new breakfast option. At the beginning of the launch of the alternative model, schools often find success in holding raffles for students who eat school breakfast. The prizes can be small gift cards or tickets to a school event such as a football game or dance. Lastly, it is important to personalize the program for students by serving options that excite the students. Student surveys can be a great way to create a popular menu. A successful program attracts students and is simple for schools to administer. The following three case studies describe the experience of three school districts that launched an alternative breakfast program in the 2017-18 school year.

Case Study: “Grab and Go” Breakfast Cart and Second Chance Breakfast, Gateway Senior High School Overall, Gateway School District excels in serving school breakfast to students by utilizing alternative breakfast models in its operations. Three of its elementary schools offer breakfast in the classroom, and Gateway Middle School provides a “Grab and Go” model. Gateway Senior High School, however, was a different story with different results. Approximately 140, or 13 percent, of students participated in the school breakfast program at the start of the 2017-18 school year. After promoting the launch of its new alternative breakfast models by distributing flyers and displaying banners and posters throughout the school, along with using a promotional video, Gateway Senior High School was ready to launch its hybrid “Grab and Go” breakfast cart and Second Chance Breakfast models in September 2017, while still keeping the “traditional” hot breakfast options available in the cafeteria. In only a short few months, Gateway Senior High School saw an increase in their breakfast participation, serving an additional 75 students breakfast each day on average, for an increase of over 50% in the building’s breakfast program. As part of the “Grab and Go” effort, each morning at the high school, Ms. Deb stocks a brand new charcoal gray breakfast cart with nearly a dozen whole-grain options for the students, in addition to milk, 100 percent juice, and whole fruit choices. She then wheels the large cart to a hallway near the main entrance. Ms. Deb always starts the day with a smile and often knows which students will end up stopping by. She sometimes even saves particular items for the pickier students. Ms. Deb has embraced her newly created position, and students clearly appreciate her positive attitude. To brighten students’ days, Ms. Deb has gone as far as dressing as Chewbacca for Halloween. She recently expanded her costume repertoire to include a milk carton that she wears from time to time to surprise students!

Hearst, Mary O. et al. “Barriers, Benefits and Behaviors Related to Breakfast Consumption among Rural Adolescents.” The Journal of school health, 2016, https://www.ncbi.nlm. nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4825869/. Accessed 5 Feb. 2018.

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5


After the homeroom bell, the “daily breakfast show” is far from over. Ms.Deb then wheels her cart back to the cafeteria where she transitions her items into the student store and prepares for second chance breakfast. The store is located in the cafeteria with a convenient window for students to place orders until midway through third period. By utilizing this area, students are able to order any remaining hot items from the “traditional” cafeteria breakfast in addition to several pre-packaged “Grab and Go” breakfast items. With Second Chance Breakfast, if a student misses breakfast, they can simply ask their teacher for a pass and head to the cafeteria. This option works especially easily for students who have a study hall conveniently located within the cafeteria during the early morning periods. To assist in making the transition to alternative models as smooth as possible, Gateway’s director of food service along with school administrators created a new part-time food service position for managing the alternative breakfast options. Ms. Deb was exactly what the district needed to ensure the alternative options were a success. This mixture of breakfast options has become quite popular at Gateway Senior High School and the program shows no signs of slowing down.

Gateway Senior High School

Case Study: “Grab and Go” Breakfast Cart, North Hills Middle School In the 2016-17 school year, school breakfast was extremely underutilized by students attending North Hills Middle School. With only two to five students eating breakfast in the middle school cafeteria, the food service director knew she had to do something to increase participation. In the fall of 2017, North Hills Middle School administrators and staff worked together to implement a “Grab and Go” alternative breakfast model near the main entrance to the school, in place of breakfast in the cafeteria. Space can be an issue at this particular location since all middle school students remain in the hallway until the bell rings signalling the start of homeroom period. It was important to be mindful of placing the cart in a high-traffic area to increase visibility, while being careful to not hinder safety.

Breakfast Basics | 6


To assist with traffic flow, banners were placed above the outside doors directing each grade through its own door, and any student wanting breakfast through a different door. The line for the cart is also delineated with red retractable cloth tape barriers to help reduce congestion around the cart. Students grab their breakfast and eat in the hallway while waiting to be dismissed. To reduce possible trash issues, additional trash cans were placed strategically throughout the area. Proudly, trash and congestion have not been problems. Students are excited to have this easy breakfast option, and enjoy fun giveaways that food service staff spontaneously offer at the cart. Participation has increased drastically, with an average of 50 students participating daily. To keep the momentum going with their new breakfast model, the school plans to continue offering fun incentives, and plans to survey the students to determine how the food offerings can continue to evolve.

North Hills Middle School

Case Study: “Grab and Go” Breakfast Cart, Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School Sto-Rox School District participates in the Community Eligibility Provision, meaning every student can eat breakfast and lunch at no cost, regardless of family income. During the 2016-17 school year, Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School served approximately 30 percent of students breakfast using the traditional school breakfast model of breakfast in the cafeteria. Even though students would sit in the cafeteria until they could go to their homeroom, the majority of students were still skipping breakfast. The district brainstormed to think of “outside of the box” approaches to make breakfast a more attractive option for the students. In the Fall of 2017, the district decided to pilot an alternative breakfast model using a “Grab and Go” cart. Food service staff packed bags complete with a full and convenient breakfast. On a September morning, Ms. Brandi wheeled the mobile food cart towards an area where students enter the building, and a new way of doing breakfast began. The cart is conveniently nestled in the hallway, where students pass on their way to the cafeteria to wait until the homeroom bell sounds. Since launching the “Grab and Go” model, Ms. Brandi has strived to perfect the bagged breakfast she serves from the cart, stocking the most popular items. Each bag contains a carton of 100 percent juice and a twograin item. Students can choose to add fresh fruit and a carton of milk to their bag. A white board on the cart lets the students know what the daily options are. To move students along quickly, Ms. Brandi created a color coding system for the bagged breakfast options. Each option is marked with a different color, so that she can quickly pick the option chosen by the student. A hot breakfast is also available in the cafeteria. To promote school breakfast at the “Grab and Go” cart, at certain points throughout the year participating students were entered into a raffle to win tickets to school events or various gift cards. In addition to the raffle, there were posters, flyers, and banners posted throughout the building. Since launching the “Grab and Go” model, Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School improved its performance by 13 percent compared to 2016, now serving 42 percent of the students breakfast compared to 29 percent. The Junior/ Senior High School food service department continues to see how they can keep increasing the number of students eating school breakfast.

7


Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School

Conclusion Allegheny County and the commonwealth are working towards Governor Wolf’s statewide goal of 60 students eligible for free and reduced meals eating school breakfast for every 100 of those students eating lunch, with hopes of exceeding that goal. Right now Allegheny County stands at 57 percent and Pennsylvania at 53 percent. With community partners and schools collaborating together, school breakfast is getting the makeover it needs, often in the form of alternative breakfast models that fit into the lives of more students. The School Breakfast Program has impacted both the education and health arenas, with food consumed at school now being shown to contribute as much as 50 percent of children’s daily caloric intake on school days.12 School Breakfast participation can decrease the risk of food insecurity, may protect against childhood obesity, and protects against other negative health outcomes such as mental health impacts, behavior problems, and visits to the school nurse. Skipping breakfast can impair children’s ability to learn and develop.13 Although school breakfast makes up a short amount of the school day, it can impact a student’s learning and mood throughout the day. “Providing nutritious school breakfast not only contributes to long-term health outcomes for children, it is also linked to improved academic performance. Since we started using the ‘Grab and Go’ model, we are able to see more students eating breakfast and beginning their day fueled up and ready to learn,” says Timothy Beck, Sto-Rox Junior/Senior High School Principal. Appendix I contains school breakfast participation data for Allegheny County schools between October 2016 and 2017. This provides a snapshot of how individual school programs performed in terms of overall school breakfast participation (see orange highlighted section). Appendix I also illustrates how individual school programs performed in terms of serving free and reduced price eligible students breakfast compared to lunch (see blue highlighted section). The green highlighted section shows if school programs met, exceeded, or missed meeting the 2020 Blueprint goal of 60 students eligible for free and reduced meals benefiting from school breakfast for every 100 benefiting from lunch. Pennsylvania Department of Education supplied all data used throughout this report and Appendix. To determine the feasibility of alternative breakfast models or the viability of CEP, contact Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Both technical support and connections to grant opportunities may be facilitated through Chris West, Child Nutrition Outreach Coordinator: cwest@pittsburghfoodbank.org or 412-460-3663 x307.

12

“Food in School.” Kaiser Permanente, share.kaiserpermanente.org/static/ weightofthenation/docs/topics/WOTNCommActTopic_School%20Food_F.pdf. Accessed 19 Dec. 2017.

13

“Breakfast for Health.” Food Research & Action Center, 2018, frac.org/research/ resource-library/breakfast-for-health. Accessed 13 Jan. 2018.

Breakfast Basics | 8


Appendix

School District/Sponsor

Site Name

CEP

ALLEGHENY VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT ALLEGHENY VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT ALLEGHENY VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT ALLEGHENY VALLEY SCHOOL TOTAL AVONWORTH SCHOOL DISTRICT AVONWORTH SCHOOL DISTRICT AVONWORTH SCHOOL DISTRICT AVONWORTH SCHOOL DISTRICT AVONWORTH SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT BALDWIN-WHITEHALL SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT BETHEL PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL BRENTWOOD BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT BRENTWOOD BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT BRENTWOOD BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT BRENTWOOD BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL CARLYNTON SCHOOL DISTRICT CARLYNTON SCHOOL DISTRICT CARLYNTON SCHOOL DISTRICT CARLYNTON SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL CITY CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL CITY CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL TOTAL CLAIRTON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT CLAIRTON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT CLAIRTON CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL CORNELL SCHOOL DISTRICT CORNELL SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL DEER LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT DEER LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT DEER LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT DEER LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT DEER LAKES SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL DUQUESNE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT DUQUESNE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL EAST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT EAST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT EAST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT ELIZABETH FORWARD SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT FOX CHAPEL AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT GATEWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT HAMPTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT

ACMETONIA PRIMARY SCH SPRINGDALE JSHS COLFAX UPPER EL SCH

N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y N N S N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y Y N N N N N S N N N N N N Y

9

Avonworth Primary Center AVONWORTH EL SCH AVONWORTH HS Avonworth MS PAYNTER EL SCH WHITEHALL EL SCH MCANNULTY EL SCH BALDWIN SHS HARRISON MS NEIL ARMSTRONG MS WILLIAM PENN EL SCH BENJAMIN FRANKLIN EL SCH ABRAHAM LINCOLN EL SCH BETHEL MEMORIAL EL SCH BETHEL PARK SHS GEORGE WASHINGTON EL SCH INDEPENDENCE MS ELROY AVENUE EL SCH MOORE SCH BRENTWOOD MS Carnegie Elementary School Carlynton JS/HS Crafton Elementary School CHARTIERS VALLEY INTRMD SCHOOL CHARTIERS VALLEY MS CHARTIERS VALLEY PRIMARY SCH CHARTIERS VALLEY HS City CHS CLAIRTON EL SCH Clairton MS/HS CORNELL SD CURTISVILLE PRI CTR EAST UNION INTRMD SCH DEER LAKES HS Deer Lakes Middle School DUQUESNE EL SCH LOGAN EL SCH EAST ALLEGHENY JSHS Elizabeth Learning Center MT VERNON EL SCH WILLIAM PENN EL SCH GREENOCK EL SCH ELIZABETH FORWARD MS ELIZABETH FORWARD SHS CENTRAL EL SCH KERR EL SCH HARTWOOD EL SCH DORSEYVILLE MS FOX CHAPEL AREA SHS OHARA EL SCH FAIRVIEW EL SCH Dr. Cleveland Steward Jr. El Sch EVERGREEN EL SCH MOSS SIDE MS GATEWAY MS UNIVERSITY PARK EL SCH GATEWAY SHS RAMSEY EL SCH WYLAND EL SCH CENTRAL EL SCH POFF EL SCH HAMPTON MS HAMPTON HS FAIRMOUNT PRIMARY CENTER

Change in % of % Students Total Students % Students Eating School Eating School Eating School Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily in October from October in October 2016 2017 2016 to October 2017

Current Status % of Free/Reduced Compared to 2020 Free/Reduce Free/Reduced Eligible Students Blueprint Goal to Have Students Eating Students Eating Eating School 60% of Free/Reduced School Brekfast School Lunch Breakfast Per 100 Eligible Students Eating Daily in October Daily in October Eating Lunch Daily School Breakfast Per 2017 2017 in October 2017 100 Eating Lunch in 2017

36% 27% 34% 34% 12% 8% 5% * 8% 17% 19% 17% 9% 9% 13% 16% 9% 9% 8% 5% 4% 4% 2% 7% 21% 17% 14% 16% 50% 20% 19% 29% 18% 2% 11% 9% 10% 10% 10% 40% 35% 38% 60% 60% 28% 24% 19% 12% 21% 81% 81% 64% 46% 56% 87% 22% 18% 17% 9% 8% 6% 13% 22% 7% 8% 7% 4% 1% 8% 80% 71% 37% 23% 16% 13% 18% 29% 9% 6% 4% 3% 2% 4% 90%

89 114 54 54 18 15 6 2 41 108 92 36 128 81 452 37 8 17 14 9 30 2 12 134 62 27 90 178 149 91 40 279 78 75 58 25 236 45 45 159 101 260 346 346 54 52 47 30 182 288 288 519 288 807 28 28 54 26 41 50 12 239 69 18 54 79 17 0 237 161 99 129 105 42 171 47 754 16 21 3 4 10 53 198

39% 29% 28% 28% 14% 6% 2% 2% 6% 16% 16% 14% 10% 9% 12% 15% 10% 9% 8% 6% 5% 5% 4% 8% 26% 17% 15% 18% 38% 18% 17% 24% 19% 14% 10% 3% 11% 9% 9% 37% 27% 32% 65% 65% 25% 20% 17% 10% 18% 84% 84% 65% 42% 54% 83% 19% 19% 19% 10% 9% 6% 13% 23% 12% 8% 8% 5% 0% 8% 78% 68% 28% 24% 19% 18% 18% 29% 8% 8% 5% 3% 2% 4% 85%

3% 2% -6% -6% 2% -2% -3% * -1% -1% -3% -2% 1% 0% -1% 0% 1% 0% -1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 1% 5% 0% 2% 2% -12% -2% -2% -5% 1% 12% 0% -5% 1% -1% -1% -4% -8% -5% 6% 6% -3% -4% -2% -2% -3% 2% 2% 1% -5% -1% -4% -3% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 5% 0% 0% 1% -1% 1% -2% -3% -9% 1% 2% 5% 0% 0% -1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% -5%

113 145 92 92 34 44 39 19 136 316 227 103 341 294 1281 93 17 35 38 33 122 17 73 428 121 73 267 461 256 195 103 554 157 166 167 192 682 264 264 314 302 616 443 443 96 102 111 89 398 309 309 676 520 1195 26 54 100 48 134 139 36 534 115 44 114 158 64 14 509 167 113 202 200 91 314 97 1184 44 35 13 49 59 200 187

79% 79% 59% 59% 54% 35% 15% 10% 30% 34% 41% 35% 38% 27% 35% 40% 49% 47% 37% 28% 24% 11% 17% 31% 51% 36% 34% 39% 58% 47% 39% 50% 50% 45% 35% 13% 35% 17% 17% 51% 33% 42% 78% 78% 56% 51% 42% 34% 46% 93% 93% 77% 55% 68% 107% 53% 55% 53% 31% 36% 32% 45% 60% 41% 48% 50% 27% 0% 47% 96% 87% 64% 53% 46% 54% 48% 64% 36% 60% 20% 9% 16% 26% 106%

19% 19% -1% -1% -6% -25% -45% -50% -30% -26% -19% -25% -22% -33% -25% -20% -11% -13% -23% -32% -36% -49% -43% -29% -9% -24% -26% -21% -2% -13% -21% -10% -10% -15% -25% -47% -25% -43% -43% -9% -27% -18% 18% 18% -4% -9% -18% -26% -14% 33% 33% 17% -5% 8% 47% -7% -5% -7% -29% -24% -28% -15% 0% -19% -12% -10% -33% -60% -13% 36% 27% 4% -7% -14% -6% -12% 4% -24% 0% -40% -51% -44% -34% 46%


Appendix

School District/Sponsor

Site Name

CEP

HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT HIGHLANDS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT KEYSTONE OAKS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL MANCHESTER ACADEMIC CS MANCHESTER ACADEMIC CS MANCHESTER ACADEMIC CS TOTAL MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEESPORT AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MOON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT MT LEBANON SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTH HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL NORTHGATE SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTHGATE SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTHGATE SCHOOL DISTRICT NORTHGATE SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL PENN HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT PENN HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT PENN HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT PENN HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT PINE-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

FAWN PRIMARY CENTER GRANDVIEW UPPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HIGHLANDS MS HIGHLANDS SHS

Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N Y Y Y

MYRTLE AVE SCH FRED L AIKEN EL SCH KEYSTONE OAKS MS DORMONT EL SCH KEYSTONE OAKS HS Manchester Academic CS @ Sarah Heinz House Manchester Academic CS Frances McClure Intermediate School Francis McClure Primary Twin Rivers Intermediate Twin Rivers Primary Twin Rivers El Sch Francis McClure El Sch McKeesport Area Alternative Education Founder's Hall Middle School MCKEESPORT AREA SHS MONTOUR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MONTOUR HS DAVID E WILLIAMS Richard J. Hyde El. Sch J. A. Allard Intermediate School JH Brooks School Mc Cormick Intermediate School MOON AREA LOWER MS MOON SHS BON MEADE EL SCH MOON AREA UPPER MS FOSTER EL SCH HOOVER EL SCH HOWE EL SCH JEFFERSON EL SCH LINCOLN EL SCH MARKHAM EL SCH WASHINGTON EL SCH MT LEBANON SHS MELLON MS JEFFERSON MS BRADFORD WOODS EL SCH FRANKLIN EL SCH HOSACK EL SCH INGOMAR EL SCH PEEBLES EL SCH CARSON MS North Allegheny HS North Allegheny Intermediate High School INGOMAR MS MARSHALL MS MCKNIGHT EL SCH MARSHALL EL SCH HIGHCLIFF EL SCH WEST VIEW EL SCH NORTH HILLS SHS MCINTYRE EL SCH ROSS EL SCH North Hills Middle School BELLEVUE EL SCH NORTHGATE JSHS AVALON EL SCH Penn Hills El Sch LINTON MS PENN HILLS SHS HANCE EL SCH RICHLAND EL SCH PINE-RICHLAND HS PINE-RICHLAND MS Eden Hall Upper Elementary School WEIL TECHNOLOGY INST GRANDVIEW EL SCH

Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N Y Y N N N N N N S N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y N N S N N N N N N Y Y

Change in % of % Students Total Students % Students Eating School Eating School Eating School Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily in October from October in October 2016 2017 2016 to October 2017

Current Status % of Free/Reduced Compared to 2020 Free/Reduce Free/Reduced Eligible Students Blueprint Goal to Have Students Eating Students Eating Eating School 60% of Free/Reduced School Brekfast School Lunch Breakfast Per 100 Eligible Students Eating Daily in October Daily in October Eating Lunch Daily School Breakfast Per 2017 2017 in October 2017 100 Eating Lunch in 2017

53% 81% 27% 37% 54% 24% 12% 12% 13% 7% 12% 67% 43% 48% 42% 55% 62% 55% * * 52% 37% 20% 40% * 12% 6% 9% * 9% 8% 2% 4% 4% 7% 4% 5% * * * * * * * 2% 2% 0% 1% * * * * * 0% 4% 2% 1% 1% 1% 0% 1% 15% 14% 8% 8% 9% 1% 9% 26% 13% 21% 19% 51% 44% 20% 38% 5% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 75% 71%

111 227 151 198 885 53 16 43 24 42 178 51 113 164 * * * * 494 418 25 255 255 1405 53 46 33 132 48 22 25 2 24 38 10 14 182 * * * * * * * 26 6 2 34 * * * * * 9 11 7 3 4 1 0 35 61 51 82 20 10 20 244 61 88 43 192 815 359 236 1410 2 1 15 2 2 23 198 243

47% 42% 32% 30% 41% 24% 13% 13% 10% 9% 13% 68% 42% 48% * * * * 62% 58% 46% 34% 23% 41% 6% 6% 4% 5% 37% 18% 10% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 7% * * * * * * * 4% 2% 1% 2% * * * * * 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 0% 2% 16% 13% 10% 8% 8% 5% 10% 23% 22% 17% 21% 68% 46% 23% 46% 6% 3% 2% 2% 1% 2% 90% 83%

-6% -39% 4% -7% -13% 1% 1% 1% -3% 2% 1% 1% -1% 0% * * * * * * -6% -3% 3% 1% * -6% -2% -4% * 9% 2% 3% 0% 0% -3% -1% 2% * * * * * * * 2% 0% 0% 1% * * * * * 3% -1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% -1% 2% 0% -2% 5% 1% -2% 9% -4% 2% 17% 2% 3% 8% 1% -1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 14% 12%

173 416 398 440 1614 101 33 136 92 128 490 64 226 290 * * * * 669 588 34 675 734 2700 205 150 182 536 77 60 72 14 103 162 62 76 626 17 13 28 7 26 6 28 126 48 39 347 14 4 19 10 25 59 54 52 19 24 63 13 355 135 151 211 99 75 130 802 163 193 118 474 932 523 432 1887 17 19 65 21 45 167 206 270

64% 55% 38% 45% 55% 52% 48% 32% 27% 32% 36% 80% 50% 57% * * * * 74% 71% 75% 38% 35% 52% 26% 31% 18% 25% 62% 36% 35% 11% 23% 23% 17% 19% 29% * * * * * * * 20% 13% 4% 10% * * * * * 15% 21% 14% 17% 15% 1% 0% 10% 46% 34% 39% 21% 13% 15% 30% 38% 45% 36% 40% 87% 69% 55% 75% 13% 6% 23% 10% 5% 14% 96% 90%

4% -5% -22% -15% -5% -8% -12% -28% -33% -28% -24% 20% -10% -3% * * * * 14% 11% 15% -22% -25% -8% -34% -29% -42% -35% 2% -24% -25% -49% -37% -37% -43% -41% -31% * * * * * * * -40% -47% -56% -50% * * * * * -45% -39% -46% -43% -45% -59% -60% -50% -14% -26% -21% -39% -47% -45% -30% -22% -15% -24% -20% 27% 9% -5% 15% -47% -54% -37% -50% -55% -46% 36% 30%

Breakfast Basics | 10


Appendix

School District/Sponsor

Site Name

CEP

PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PITTSBURGH SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PLUM BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD PROPEL CS-HOMESTEAD TOTAL QUAKER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT QUAKER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT QUAKER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT QUAKER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT QUAKER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL RIVERVIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RIVERVIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RIVERVIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT RIVERVIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL

CONROY ED CTR (Conroy TMR Ctr) Pittsburgh Miller k-8 PITTSBURGH FAISON K-5 PITTSBURGH CHILDREN'S MUSEUM ARSENAL PK-8 MANCHESTER EL SCH M L KING EL SCH (ALA) SCHILLER CLASSICAL ACADEMY SPRING GARDEN EARLY CHILDHOOD SCH PITTSBURGH LANGLEY K-8 CHARTIERS ECC SUNNYSIDE EL SCH CLAYTON ACADEMY (CEP) Pittsburgh Oliver CRESCENT EL SCH WOOLSLAIR EL SCH FULTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCE SPRING HILL EL SCH PITTSBURGH LINCOLN K-5 Carmalt Academy of Science and Technology Pittsburgh Westwood K-8 MINADEO EL SCH ARLINGTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL WHITTIER EL SCH SOUTH HILLS MS Pittsburgh Classical Academy (MS) ALLEGHENY TRADITIONAL MIDDLE ACADEMY ROOSEVELT EL SCH Pittsburgh Morrow K-8 CONCORD EL SCH PHILLIPS EL SCH DILWORTH TRADITIONAL ACADEMY BANKSVILLE EL SCH LIBERTY EL SCH BEECHWOOD EL SCH LINDEN EL SCH PITTSBURGH MILLIONES 6-12 Pittsburgh Brashear HS MIFFLIN EL SCH STERRETT CLASSICAL ACADEMY PITTSBURGH OBAMA 6-12 ACADEMY AT WESTINGHOUSE Student Achievement Center CARRICK HS South Brook Middle School West Liberty Elementary PITTSBURGH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY 6-12 PITTSBURGH HS CREAT & PER ARTS Pittsburgh Montessori K-5 BROOKLINE EL SCH Pittsburgh Perry HS GREENFIELD EL SCH ALLDERDICE HS COLFAX EL SCH

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N N N

11

REGENCY PARK EL SCH CENTER EL SCH Holiday Park El Sch PIVIK EL SCH OBLOCK JHS PLUM SHS PROPEL NORTHSIDE ELE Propel CS - Homestead PROPEL CS - PITCAIRN PROPEL BRADDOCK HILLS ELE Propel McKeesport Propel Montour Propel Montour MS/HS Propel CS - Hazelwood PROPEL BRADDOCK HILLS MIDDLE SCHOOL Propel East PROPEL ANDREW STREET HIGH SCHOOL PROPEL BRADDOCK HILLS HS OSBORNE EL SCH EDGEWORTH EL SCH QUAKER VALLEY MS QUAKER VALLEY HS VERNER EL SCH RIVERVIEW JSHS TENTH STREET EL SCH

Change in % of % Students Total Students % Students Eating School Eating School Eating School Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily in October from October in October 2016 2017 2016 to October 2017

Current Status % of Free/Reduced Compared to 2020 Free/Reduce Free/Reduced Eligible Students Blueprint Goal to Have Students Eating Students Eating Eating School 60% of Free/Reduced School Brekfast School Lunch Breakfast Per 100 Eligible Students Eating Daily in October Daily in October Eating Lunch Daily School Breakfast Per 2017 2017 in October 2017 100 Eating Lunch in 2017

81% 64% 74% 90% 74% 63% 64% 34% 79% 66% 84% 59% 44% 64% 82% 61% 62% 61% 60% 54% 65% 56% 59% 53% 57% 58% 53% 51% 50% 48% 40% 50% 64% 43% 45% 43% 54% 43% 44% 43% 47% 44% 26% 38% 50% 47% 32% 35% 33% 29% 34% 38% 29% 26% 49% 23% 13% 12% 8% 5% 4% 9% 55% 64% 52% 52% 54% 44% * 43% 37% 36% 23% 11% 44% 10% 5% 3% 0% 4% 42% 11% 8% 16%

199 205 392 26 390 158 326 123 61 401 102 176 48 60 150 144 228 114 148 348 176 195 232 133 272 186 458 183 334 257 150 251 165 199 188 154 185 570 147 139 434 299 80 281 163 88 194 301 110 159 145 118 363 188 11753 27 33 42 18 18 40 179 238 226 192 197 190 186 115 123 62 133 45 68 1775 21 19 4 1 45 73 41 17 131

81% 81% 79% 78% 76% 74% 72% 70% 68% 68% 67% 66% 66% 66% 65% 65% 65% 64% 64% 63% 62% 60% 60% 59% 58% 58% 57% 56% 52% 52% 51% 51% 50% 49% 49% 48% 46% 46% 45% 45% 43% 41% 39% 37% 37% 36% 35% 34% 33% 31% 31% 30% 24% 21% 50% 21% 14% 11% 7% 6% 4% 8% 60% 59% 53% 51% 48% 47% 45% 40% 37% 37% 23% 21% 45% 10% 10% 2% 0% 5% 42% 12% 9% 17%

1% 17% 6% -12% 2% 11% 9% 36% -11% 2% -17% 8% 23% 2% -17% 4% 3% 3% 4% 9% -4% 5% 1% 5% 1% 0% 5% 6% 2% 4% 12% 1% -13% 6% 4% 6% -8% 3% 1% 2% -4% -3% 13% -1% -13% -11% 3% -1% -1% 2% -3% -8% -5% -5% 1% -2% 1% -1% -1% 1% 0% 0% 5% -5% 1% -1% -7% 3% * -3% 1% 1% 1% 11% 1% 0% 4% -1% 0% 1% 0% 1% 2% 1%

200 227 442 27 442 185 395 144 62 511 100 231 52 63 157 177 315 158 218 408 216 253 319 171 428 377 709 251 543 427 222 363 204 286 304 247 288 755 261 242 671 514 132 574 348 156 364 563 169 391 312 283 777 470 17535 58 83 142 69 103 176 631 309 281 243 275 280 266 195 205 114 209 104 164 2645 67 48 62 51 228 116 101 51 268

100% 90% 89% 99% 88% 85% 82% 85% 99% 79% 101% 76% 92% 94% 95% 81% 72% 72% 68% 85% 81% 77% 73% 78% 63% 49% 65% 73% 62% 60% 68% 69% 81% 70% 62% 62% 64% 76% 56% 57% 65% 58% 61% 49% 47% 57% 53% 53% 65% 41% 47% 42% 47% 40% 67% 47% 40% 30% 26% 17% 23% 28% 77% 81% 79% 72% 68% 70% 59% 60% 54% 63% 43% 42% 67% 32% 40% 6% 2% 20% 63% 40% 33% 49%

40% 30% 29% 39% 28% 25% 22% 25% 39% 19% 41% 16% 32% 34% 35% 21% 12% 12% 8% 25% 21% 17% 13% 18% 3% -11% 5% 13% 2% 0% 8% 9% 21% 10% 2% 2% 4% 16% -4% -3% 5% -2% 1% -11% -13% -3% -7% -7% 5% -19% -13% -18% -13% -20% 7% -13% -20% -30% -34% -43% -37% -32% 17% 21% 19% 12% 8% 10% -1% 0% -6% 3% -17% -18% 7% -28% -20% -54% -58% -40% 3% -20% -27% -11%


Appendix

School District/Sponsor

Site Name

SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT RESERVE EL SCH SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT JEFFERY EL SCH SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MARZOLF EL SCH SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT ROGERS EL SCH SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT SHALER AREA MS SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT Shaler Area Elementary School SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT BURCHFIELD EL SCH SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT SHALER AREA HS SHALER AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL SOUTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT South Allegheny Early Childhood SOUTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT South Allegheny Elementary SOUTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT SOUTH ALLEGHENY JSHS SOUTH ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette Intermediate School SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT SOUTH FAYETTE TWP EL SCH SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT South Fayette Twp. Middle School SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL SOUTH PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT South Park Elem Center SOUTH PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT SOUTH PARK SHS SOUTH PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT SOUTH PARK MS SOUTH PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL STEEL VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT STEEL VALLEY SHS STEEL VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT BARRETT EL SCH STEEL VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT STEEL VALLEY MS STEEL VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT PARK EL SCH STEEL VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL STO-ROX SCHOOL DISTRICT STO-ROX PRIMARY CTR STO-ROX SCHOOL DISTRICT STO-ROX UPPER EL SCH STO-ROX SCHOOL DISTRICT STO-ROX JSHS STO-ROX SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT UPPER SAINT CLAIR HS UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT STREAMS EL SCH UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT BOYCE MS UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT EISENHOWER EL SCH UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT BAKER EL SCH UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT FORT COUCH MS UPPER SAINT CLAIR SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT MCKEE EL SCH WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT WILSON EL SCH WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT Donaldson Elementary School WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT WEST ALLEGHENY MS WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT WEST ALLEGHENY SHS WEST ALLEGHENY SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT GILL HALL EL SCH WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT JEFFERSON EL SCH WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT MCCLELLAN EL SCH WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT PLEASANT HILLS MS WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT THOMAS JEFFERSON HS WEST JEFFERSON HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT NEW EMERSON EL SCH WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT HOMEVILLE EL SCH WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT WEST MIFFLIN AREA MS WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT CLARA BARTON EL SCH WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT WEST MIFFLIN AREA HS WEST MIFFLIN AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL WILKINSBURG BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT TURNER EL SCH WILKINSBURG BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT KELLY EL SCH WILKINSBURG BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT EDGEWOOD ELEMENTARY WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT Woodland Hills Intermediate School WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT WILKINS ELEMENTARY WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT WOODLAND HILLS PROMISE PROGRAM WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT Woodland Hills Academy WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT WOODLAND HILLS JSHS WOODLAND HILLS SCHOOL DISTRICT TOTAL *Data was unavailable from the Pennsylvania Department of Education at time of Publication

CEP

N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y N S Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

Change in % of % Students Total Students % Students Eating School Eating School Eating School Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily Breakfast Daily in October from October in October 2016 2017 2016 to October 2017

Current Status % of Free/Reduced Compared to 2020 Free/Reduce Free/Reduced Eligible Students Blueprint Goal to Have Students Eating Students Eating Eating School 60% of Free/Reduced School Brekfast School Lunch Breakfast Per 100 Eligible Students Eating Daily in October Daily in October Eating Lunch Daily School Breakfast Per 2017 2017 in October 2017 100 Eating Lunch in 2017

22% 28% 20% 14% 7% 8% 4% 7% 10% 66% 36% 16% 32% * * 4% 1% 14% 10% 6% 10% 45% 42% 35% 26% 38% 87% 77% 29% 62% 7% 5% 2% 2% 1% 0% 4% 11% 15% 14% 4% 5% 9% * * * * * * 44% 42% 26% 36% 14% 26% 64% 39% 50% 66% 75% 67% 58% 47% 40% 53%

36 31 59 7 53 83 19 78 364 125 213 142 480 * * 13 13 41 30 23 93 236 100 129 85 550 368 241 203 812 13 5 5 2 1 2 28 33 51 27 36 35 182 * * * * * * 75 133 373 69 137 787 196 134 330 289 401 293 42 247 615 1887

30% 26% 23% 14% 13% 13% 11% 8% 13% 71% 48% 26% 41% * * 3% 1% 10% 9% 6% 8% 55% 46% 32% 32% 42% 85% 81% 42% 67% 7% 6% 1% 1% 1% 1% 4% 16% 15% 11% 8% 6% 10% * * * * * * 46% 46% 44% 35% 15% 33% 77% 43% 59% 78% 70% 69% 65% 44% 40% 54%

8% -2% 2% 0% 5% 4% 6% 1% 3% 4% 12% 10% 9% * * -1% 0% -3% -1% -1% -2% 10% 4% -2% 6% 5% -2% 4% 13% 5% 0% 0% 0% -1% 0% 0% 0% 6% -1% -3% 4% 1% 1% * * * * * * 2% 3% 18% 0% 1% 7% 13% 4% 9% 12% -5% 3% 7% -3% 1% 1%

74 54 119 23 163 282 90 263 1062 130 368 401 898 88 53 77 218 88 86 106 280 333 176 323 174 1006 365 266 385 1015 47 16 35 21 13 24 156 62 111 58 137 103 472 21 87 35 102 106 350 118 197 672 120 359 1466 235 278 512 287 481 360 41 362 1110 2641

49% 57% 49% 31% 33% 30% 21% 30% 34% 96% 58% 35% 53% * * 16% 6% 46% 34% 21% 33% 71% 57% 40% 49% 55% 101% 91% 53% 80% 28% 31% 14% 9% 9% 8% 18% 52% 46% 46% 26% 34% 39% * * * * * * 64% 67% 55% 58% 38% 54% 83% 48% 64% 101% 83% 81% 102% 68% 55% 71%

-11% -3% -11% -29% -27% -30% -39% -30% -26% 36% -2% -25% -7% * * -44% -54% -14% -26% -39% -27% 11% -3% -20% -11% -5% 41% 31% -7% 20% -32% -29% -46% -51% -51% -52% -42% -8% -14% -14% -34% -26% -21% * * * * * * 4% 7% -5% -2% -22% -6% 23% -12% 4% 41% 23% 21% 42% 8% -5% 11%

Breakfast Basics | 12


Breakfast Basics | CopyrightŠ 2018 Allies for Children

Profile for Allies for Children

Breakfast Basics 2018 Update  

This report looks at how schools in Allegheny County are doing in terms of students participating in school breakfast. The report takes an i...

Breakfast Basics 2018 Update  

This report looks at how schools in Allegheny County are doing in terms of students participating in school breakfast. The report takes an i...

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