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C O M P LY I N G W I T H

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION STANDARDS


BACKGROUND

COMPLYING WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION STANDARDS

Emissions standards in the US are established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Federal regulations serve as a minimum requirement for the nation, although individual

states

may

apply

for

stricter

regulations.

California’s EPA, however, has had to contend with severe pollution in Los Angeles, so it has received special permission from the government to create its own legislation. Other states may either choose to follow the federal or California standards. States that have elected to follow the California system include: Arizona, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington D.C. The first federal emissions standards for non-road diesel fuel engines over 37 kW (50hp) began in 1994 and were set to be phased in between 1996-2000. Other requirements released over the next decade focused on advanced engine design as a method of greenhouse gas emissions reduction. In 2004 another regulation determined the level of acceptable particulate matter (PM) and mono-nitrogen oxide (NOx)

Heavy-duty vehicles are the fastest growing

emissions and mandated lower sulfur levels in non-road, locomotive, and marine diesel fuels.

contributors to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions within the transportation industry. Research has shown

that

reductions

in

greenhouse

gas

In May 2010, President Obama requested that the EPA and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) coordinate a system of regulations to produce a cleaner

emissions will increase energy security, reduce

generation of vehicles. Since the announcement, the two

time spent refueling, improve human and wildlife

agencies have worked together to establish a program that

health (especially in poorer communities across the globe) and possibly decrease driving accidents, traffic congestion, and noise pollution. New emissions regulations are being passed in increasing numbers in cities and states across America.

These

far-reaching

legislative

consequences

movements for

rental

have and

construction equipment in terms of transportation and equipment. These standards are being established to both reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as to reduce domestic use and dependence on oil. This will affect the transportation of rental equipment, which may have future impact on equipment rental coverage.

would reduce GHG emissions and improve fuel economy for first commercial trucks and then passenger vehicles.


COMPLIANCE

CERTIFICATION: Manufacturers must submit a Pre Model Year (PMY) Report to be considered for certification. The report must go to both the EPA and the NHTSA. The contents of the report will include subconfiguration target and fleet standards, test group and fleet certification results, production volumes, joint approvals for innovative technology, certification statements for the EPA and NHTSA, and credit plans. The main purpose for the PMY Report is to provide these agencies with evidence that manufacturers are

By 2018, combination tractors (big rigs/semi trucks)

able to comply with the new regulations.

will need to reduce gallons of fuel consumed and emissions per ton-mile by 20%. This will save approximately 4 gallons of fuel for every 100 miles travelled. Heavy-duty trucks and vans will have to reduce grams of CO2 emissions per mile and gallons of fuel consumed per mile by 15%, saving about 1 gallon of fuel per 100 miles travelled. Vocational vehicles (buses, delivery trucks, garbage trucks, etc.) will have to reduce gallons of fuel consumed and emissions per ton-mile by 10%, saving roughly 1 gallon of fuel per 100 miles travelled. Ton-mile figures are calculated by dividing gallons of fuel consumed and grams of CO2 emissions per mile by tons of freight hauled. More precise targets exist within every category depending on the type of vehicle.

TARGET VEHICLES: Heavy duty vehicles, starting in model year 2014

EXEMPT VEHICLES: Medium-duty passenger vehicles

Analytically derived CO2 (ADC) emission rates calculated from baseline date may be used instead of measured emission rates. Baseline vehicles must comply with all the emissions standards required for

Vehicles produced before the 2014 model year

its model year. They also must include all official

Vehicles subject to light-duty greenhouse gas standards

tests for base engine, transmission class, engine code, transmission code, engine horsepower,

Qualified Small Business Association manufacturers

dynamometer drive wheels, and compression ratio.

REGULATED EMISSIONS: Carbon dioxide (CO2) Nitrous oxide (N2O) Methane (CH4) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC)

EMISSIONS STANDARD (G/MILE): CH4: 0.5

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION.

N2O: 0.5 HFC: A/C refrigerant leakage may not exceed 1.5% per year *CO2 credits may be used to offset CH4 and N2O requirements.

UNC

ISSU

Complying with Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards  

Emissions standards in the US are established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Federal regulations serve as a minimum requireme...

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