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STUDENT DESIGN PORTFLIO ALEXANDER KENDLE AlexKendle@gmail.com (303) 829-1653


ALEXANDER KENDLE LEED AP BD+C

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May 2017

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE CANDIDATE University of Oregon

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Spring 2017

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN University of Colorado Boulder

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Spring 2015


DIRECTORY CONTOUR VINES WINERY Graduate Design: Fall 2016

HYBRID DOMAINS Timber in the City Design Competition: Spring 2016

STADIUM CANOPY FOR QATAR WORLD CUP Graduate Design: Winter 2016

NEW ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BUILDING Undergraduate Design: Spring 2014

LANE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET Graduate Design: Fall 2015

POETICS IN SPACE URBAN RETREAT Undergraduate Design: Fall 2012

VISUAL RESOURCE CENTER RETROFIT Undergraduate Design: Fall 2013

01 13 27 35 39 43 47


01


CONTOUR VINES WINERY PROFESSOR: DON CORNER ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN FALL 2016 Location: Forest Grove, Oregon The client for this design is Shafer Vineyard Cellars, located in Forest Grove, Oregon. The existing site is located on a hillside with pleasant views overlooking grape vines and tree-covered hillsides in the background. The existing building on the site is extremely outdated and does not provide adequate space for the building to be a desirable destination for visitors. Additionally, there is a Christmas shop that is associated within the existing program, which allows the business to be successful through the winter months. This design project had a strong emphasis on materials and the construction methods that would be used. While selecting the materials for the Contour Vines Winery, some of the choices have been pre-determined by the client. The production room and barrel storage need to be made of concrete in order to eliminate the possibilities of bacteria living in the building material. The building has a strong emphasis of being heavy on the bottom, and light on the top; production spaces are heavy and made of concrete, and hospitality spaces are light and made of wood and steel. The roof plane of the new building is designed to mimic the contours of the existing topography, additionally providing a new name for the winery. The materials of the hospitality level of the building can be directly related to the process of growing grapes; the most pivotal step in the winemaking process. The fence posts, traditionally made of either wood or concrete depending on the location, represent the main structure of the building. These posts remain rooted into the ground, and provide the most stability for the grapes to grow. In the building, the stability will be provided by columns made of engineered wood. The metal wire that connects the posts together provides a pivotal backbone for the vines to grow, while also acting as a medium to connect the vines to the structural posts. Within the building structure, the metal wire represents the steel connections that tie the main structure to the beauty of the building that exists on the roof, walls, and ground planes. To combine concrete to engineered wood, steel connections are required, and are designed in unique ways to provide structural elegance. The grape vines (vitis) that sprout from the structure are the life that makes vinification process possible. Off of the structural fence, the grapes can grow in a controlled manner and provide fantastic organic contours. Within the building, the material that spreads from the structure will be made of wood in a delicate manner and is expressed in the roof form.

south west exterior of building

con our vines

hospitality

production


03

site plan


CONTOUR VINES WINERY

physical site model: se view

sw view

nw view


05 north elevation

west elevation

south elevation

dry goods storage

addl. storage up

east elevation

mep

case storage

bottling

production

outdoor support

up

barrel cellar

private reserve

outdoor processing

production level plan

up

lab


CONTOUR VINES WINERY

wedding

entry

dn

bath office

christmas storage

bath

sitting

christmas shop

dn prep dn

hosting

hospitality level plan

tasting

deck


07 roof

purlins

beams

columns

retaining wall

floor slab

concrete base

main structure exploded axon


CONTOUR VINES WINERY typical column connection

steel purlin connection

9” x 18” glulam purlin

6” x 12” glulam beam

12” x 24” glulam beam

steel connection

12” x 12” glulam column

bolts

cable x-bracing

fin for x-bracing

steel base connection

concrete footing


09 typical frame connection

roof membrane

batt insulation

6” x 12” glulam beam

12” x 24” glulam beam

glass

12” x 12” glulam column

ring bracing

cable x-bracing

wood to steel connection

window mullion

concrete floor slab


CONTOUR VINES WINERY

tasting room overlooking production space


11


CONTOUR VINES WINERY

entrance of building

physical section model


13


HYBRID DOMAINS SECOND PLACE: ACSA TIMBER IN THE CITY COMPETITION PROFESSORS: J. SHEINE, M. DONOFRIO & M. GERSHFELD ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN SPRING 2016 Location: New York, New York Collaboration with Ben Wright, Greg Stacy & Michael Meer One of the most iconic cities of the modern world, New York, is a collage of urban fabric, cultures, and infrastructure. The city is not beautiful because of its various individual pieces, but because of their intersections that combine into unique Hybrid Domains. There is no greater example of this hybridization than the Lower East Side. Rich with cultural history, architectural palimpsest, and layers of development, this neighborhood is fighting the pressures of a fast growing city. Therefore, it is in need of a solution that allows for both growth and a celebration of its character. Hybrid Domains does both of these by embracing new and innovative architectural design, while celebrating the neighborhood’s rich collage of history. Hybrid Domains responds to the surrounding context with its complex program and its revival of heavy timber construction through hybridization. Located at the crossing of Essex St. and Delancey St., the site is an opportunity to respond to existing infrastructure, such as the Essex St. Market as well as future projects, such as the Lowline. Sitting on the divide of historical tenement style architecture and more recent co-op housing projects, the site calls for an intervention to fuse the divide. The positioning and design of the market, museum, and housing programs enhances their surroundings. The project becomes a buffer between the nearby building forms and allows the elements of the surrounding environment to blend into hybrid experiences. The essence of Hybrid Domains, like New York, is its various singular pieces, which are special in their own right but, when merged into one, they become something truly beautiful. Whether it is through artist loft spaces, a fusing of museum and housing, or a public gallery and art market, emerging from a market and museum intersection, these hybrid programs create one-of-a-kind experiences. In the formation of these hybrid programs, Hybrid Domains finds opportunity for advanced wood structures to intersect and merge, enhancing the beauty of the hybrid spaces.

site overview and entrance

Just as the singular program elements have their own identity, each of their structural systems is unique, catering to each program’s spatial and construction needs. The housing buildings use a combination of glulam post and beam and CLT shear wall construction to support dwelling spaces. The museum explores the use of a two story, floor-toceiling truss that suspends the ground floor over the auditorium, allowing for larger spaces and flexibility within. The market uses a prefabricated system of LVL panels that connect as a series of three-pinned moment frames, allowing for mid-distance spans. Hybrid Domains takes these structural systems a step farther by interweaving them at program overlaps. As housing emerges above the museum, posts protrude downward into the museum spaces below. When housing is placed above the market, CLT shear walls from above extend downward merging with the LVL frames below, supporting both structures simultaneously. Hybrid Domains looks to exemplify the possibilities of taking various structural systems and engineered wood products to create a collage that resonates throughout the site and beyond.


15 SITE

site plan with program diagram

plaza

lowline

transit


HYBRID DOMAINS essex st. market

PROGRAM

d

c

b.2

b.1

a

market

museum

STRUCTURE

post•beam

truss

modular

progress massing within existing context


17 truss structure

museum section

post•beam housing building d 84’ 224’

56’

CLT floors

truss connection (2) 6” x 24” top chords

glulam framing

1/4” steel plate

12” x 12” struts glulam trusses 12” x 18” verticals

double skin façade

CLT cores

housing and museum structural collage

site plan


HYBRID DOMAINS andy warhol museum


19 market structure 9” LVL panels

post•beam housing building a

5 ply CLT mezzanine CLT shear walls

glulam beam

glass & CLT roof

1/4” steel plate connection concrete footing glulam framing

LVL panel system merge of market and housing grid

three pinned frame

curtain wall system

CLT & GluLam mezzanine

CLT cores

housing and market structural collage

site plan


HYBRID DOMAINS

interior of the essex street market


21 apartments and artist lofts building c

typical floor to wall detail bldg c cedar rain screen

micro unit

one bdrm

moisture barrier

2” concrete 3.5” rigid foam

densglass

5 ply CLT

wood stud wall 8” x 12” glulam beam

wood panel cladding wood stud wall with insulation

1/4” steel connection

artist loft

flashing 12” x 12” glulam column

typical frame connection building c

cedar shading device

connection variations

loft beam 8” x 12” glulam beam

1/4” steel plate connection

12” x 12” glulam column

housing

loft corner site plan


HYBRID DOMAINS interior of site showing convergence of all program


23

1

1. typical micro module: (two units per module) b.1: 56 units b.2: 72 units

typical artist loft: 16 units (ground floor of c building)

b buildings typ. housing plan: 128 units total

4

c building typical housing plan: 56 units total 4. typical housing module: 20 micro units, 20 one bedroom units

5

6

5. typ. one bedroom: 12 units

6. typical three bedroom: 18 units

d building typical housing plan: 30 units total


HYBRID DOMAINS 3

2

2. typical two bedroom: 30 units

3. typ. one bedroom: 70 units

a building typical housing plan: 100 units total

rendering of building illuminated at night


25


HYBRID DOMAINS

section through entrance of site looking south down suffolk street


27


STADIUM CANOPY FOR QATAR WORLD CUP PROFESSOR: DAVID POSADA ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN WINTER 2016 Location: Doha, Qatar Problem: Open-air stadiums provide minimal protection from natural elements (wind, sun, rain, snow), which hinder the viewer experience of spectators, as well as the possibility of diminishing the play on the field. Because of this problem, thermal comfort issues are of the highest importance to provide relief for players and spectators. Adding a shading device can reduce the temperature inside the stadium enclosure, which reduces the threat of heat exhaustion.

Solution: In order to solve this problem, a canopy system that spans the length of an open-air stadium that provides spectators and participants protection from seasonal elements has been designed. The canopy will be made from light materials that allows for light diffusion to create a warm light effect above, similar to the lighting qualities that come from cloud cover. The canopy has been designed for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, and the overall design of the canopy can be implemented on any stadium.

Program: Tensile structure that provides shading while using a semi-translucent material to allow light diffusion and reduce hard shadow lines on the playing surface. The canopy will provide minimal acoustic enhancement to the stadium experience due to the material choice. The general design of the canopy will be applicable to any open-air stadium around the world, with minimal changes in the design needed to be made in order to fit the stadium.

Site Information: Qatar Sports Club Location: Doha, Qatar Seating Capacity: 20,000 Completion: 1985 Annual Precipitation: 2.29 inches Cooling Degree Days: 6349 base 65 F Cooling Dry Bulb (0.4%): 110.6 F

Precedent: Pickathon, Happy Valley, Oregon Designed by GuildWorks, based out of Portland, OR. Features the world’s largest temporary shade structure of its kind. Tension structure provides a shading device for a concert venue. Installation requires over 175,00 square feet of architectural fabric.


29 process diagrams

parti diagram

four sided panel exploration

panel shape explorations

six sided panel exploration

base shape

in tension

small cluster

structure

base shape

in tension

small cluster

structure

base shape

in tension

small cluster

structure

eight sided panel exploration

triple layer exploration


STADIUM CANOPY FOR QATAR WORLD CUP physical model illuminated

light diffusion diagram

interior process rendering

physical model

aerial rendering


b

31

a

b

a

site plan

section cut aa


STADIUM CANOPY FOR QATAR WORLD CUP canopy layering

layer one: ornamentation

layer two: performance

layer three: ornamentation

section cut bb


33 performance panel connection detail


STADIUM CANOPY FOR QATAR WORLD CUP a

b

a. cable to panel connection detail

c

structural detail

b. strut detail

c. cable anchor connection


35


NEW ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BUILDING PROFESSOR: MARCUS FARR ADVANCED DESIGN LAB 2 SPRING 2014 Location: Boulder, Colorado Collaboration with Maggie Linton The Environmental Design (ENVD) building on the campus is an outdated building and a complete eyesore. The building was originally used as an on-campus laundry facility and has been repurposed as the ENVD building. The building was not suited towards young designers in a manner that encouraged cutting edge designs. The project objective was to design a new building with students in mind that was a much better fit for the ENVD program. Every other building on the campus is designed with the same, iconic native flagstone style, and one of the prerequisites for this project was that flagstone could not be included in the design. The exterior of the building was designed with a fixed louver system that regulated the amount of sun that entered each space. The main staircase doubles as the central circulation throughout each floor and an impromptu lecture space. The building was designed in a way that every space serves more than one purpose, therefore maximizing productivity and efficiency.

physical model northeast view within existing campus context

north facade


37 COMPUTER LAB

STUDIO TUDIO 1+2

CLASSROOM LASER/CNC LAB LI LIB BRA RARY RY RY

STUDIO TUDIO 3+4

ENTRY RY RY

GALLERY R CRIT RY

MAIN OFFICE SP PA ACE

L LTY LABS FAFSPAPAPCULTY CE

STORAGE GE

AUDITORIUM ORIUM program diagram

circulation diagram

physical model

studio space


NEW ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BUILDING

north elevation

east elevation

south elevation

west elevation

rendering of building illuminated at night


39


LANE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET PROFESSOR: MARK DONOFRIO GRADUATE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN FALL 2015 Location: Eugene, Oregon The intent of this design is to create a canopy structure to house the Lane County Farmers’ Market while also providing office space, a cafe, a restaurant, and an outdoor plaza space to be used by the community throughout the year. The canopy was designed to have a minimal disturbance on the ground level circulation while still providing adequate protection from seasonal weather. The two glulam structures are used as way finding points, but also marks where patrons can pass through the market from east to west. These two structures are replicated at the south side of the site, acting as an entrance into the market hall. Circulation from the Park Blocks to the Hult Center is emphasized by the main avenue, which is covered with a wood decking, that draws people underneath the canopy. In plan, the fountain is the same object as the glulam structure, superimposed on the ground. The remaining structures are made of rolled steel and are designed in a way to represent cards falling. The building has been designed to use daylight to reduce energy loads, incorporate pervious surfaces to mitigate storm water runoff, as well as the use of local materials.

southeast exterior perspective

southeast exterior perspective without roof


41 form process

start with a blank site

office #3

conf. room

conf. room

office #4

office #2

lobby

establish main structural elements office #5

office #1

cafe

rotate structural elements to create falling effect

covered outdoor seating

restaurant

change material to establish hierarchy

splay central elements to emphasize wayfinding

ground floor plan

first floor plan


LANE COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET program diagram

view down market lane without roof

office cafe main avenue market stalls restaurant plaza parking view down market lane


43 vegetation screen

wmns

vegetation screen

mens

courtyard

warm pool dreamspace

caf

storage deck

cold pool up

dreamspace

reception

dn

up

dreamspace

vegetation screen

conference

office

office

ground floor plan

meditation room #1

#2 deck

#3

dn deck

yoga studio

second level floor plan

dn bath

up

ca


POETICS IN SPACE URBAN RETREAT PROFESSOR: MARIANNE BELLINO HOLBERT ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO FALL 2012

roof garden

deck

Location: Denver, Colorado

fe kitchen dn kitchen bath

afe seating gathering space

deck

The urban retreat is a fantastic place to escape from the outside world. The site has been separated into three different buildings, each with a different program assigned to it. With the separation, this creates a buffer from not only each building, but from the outside context of the site. The main intent of the urban retreat is to give you an area to escape and clear your head. Throughout this design process, I kept three main ideas in the back of my mind: reduce demand, increase efficiency, and replace with renewables. After improving the building envelope, reducing loads, and adding top of the line solar and sustainable features, my urban retreat has gone off the grid and become Net-Zero. Granted, this is a very expensive process with the high cost of PV panels, ground source heat pumps, and solar thermal. However, I believe this investment will be worth it and eventually pay for itself in the near future. “A climate responsive design will respond to its climate.�

first level floor plan

roof plan

begin with a linear building forrm

separate into three buildings

create various building shapes

connect buildings with water

flip shapes while stacking to create outdoor spaces

offset to allow for planters along the building edge


45

section perspective

Pool

Relaxation

Nature

Community

Pool

Professional concept plan

southeast view

Yoga/Mediatation Cafe Dream Spaces

Gathering Space

Hot Bath

Offices

Pool sectional concept design

southwest view


POETICS IN SPACE URBAN RETREAT GSHP

GREEN ROOFS

PERVIOUS SURFACE

Uses the mass of the earth to improve the performance of a vapor compression refrigeration cycle, which can heat a building in the winter and cool it in the summer. Ground temperature fluctuates less than air temperature.

Used to provide for rainwater detention or retention, to increase the thermal resistance and capacitance of a building roof, to reduce the urban heat island effect, and to provide green space for what would otherwise be a hard-surfaced area.

Ground covers that allow rainwater to infiltrate and reach subsurface layers. Used as a means of mitigating urban stormwater runoff and reducing the flow of pollutants from a site. Pervious surfaces are amenable to use in most climates.

LOUVERS

PV PANELS

SOLAR THERMAL

A method used to reduce building heat gains from solar radiation while maintaining opportunities for daylighting and views.

Systems that produce electricity through the direct conversion of incident solar radiation. A photovoltaic cell provides direct current output. Reduces demand on the electrical grid and increases the use of renewable energy resources.

Utilizes energy from the sun for domestic water heating, pool heating, preheating of ventilation air, and/or space heating. The most common application for active solar thermal energy systems is heating water for domestic use.


47

birds nest, north east corner

birds nest, north west corner

birds nest roof design

section perspective cut a


VISUAL RESOURCE CENTER RETROFIT photography studio

portfolio binding

student employees

a

PROFESSOR: KATHLEEN KAMBIC ADVANCED DESIGN LAB 1 FALL 2013 Location: Boulder, Colorado The Visual Resource Center is located inside the Environmental Design building on the CU Boulder Campus. The VRC is a place where students can rent equipment to help with their class projects. The space is poorly laid out and the space is underutilized. The project was to propose a Retrofit for the space to improve faculty and student use.

student gallery

up print room front desk check out window

storage

computer lab

office

vrc retrofit floor plan - main floor

breakout room dn

breakout room

a

breakout room

vrc retrofit floor plan - birds nest

axonometric view main floor


THANK YOU ALEXANDER KENDLE AlexKendle@gmail.com (303) 829-1653

Alexander Kendle Design Portfolio  

Series of work from graduate and undergraduate design school

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