Page 1

Alexander Wise

Undergraduate Portfolio (2009-2012) University at Buffalo | b.s. arch | 2013


Relevant Software Skills Beginner Grasshopper Ecotect

Intermediate Powerpoint Excel 3ds Max Photoshop

Well Versed Rhinoceros Auto CAD Illustrator InDesign Microsoft Word

Previous Design Studios

Arc 101 | Freshmen at University at Buffalo Fall 2009 | 6 Credits | Introductory Design Professors | Joseph Dahmen, Joyce Hwang, and Christopher Romano T.A | James Willems Ransom Arc 102 | Freshmen at University at Buffalo Spring 2010 | 6 Credits | Introductory Design Professors | Nicholas Bruscia, Shadi Nazarian, and Christopher Romano T.A | Silvia Lee

Alexander Wise

University at Buffalo | b.s. arch | 2013 m.arch applicant

Arc 201 | Sophomore at University at Buffalo Fall 2010 | 6 Credits | Introductory Design Professor | Kenny Cupers Arc 202 | Sophomore at University at Buffalo Spring 2011 | 6 Credits | Introductory Design Professor | Sergio Lopez Pineiro Arc 301 | Junior at University at Buffalo Fall 2011 | 6 Credits | Intermediate Design Professor | Curt Gambetta Arc 302 | Junior at University at Buffalo Spring 2012 | 6 Credits | Intermediate Design Professor | Brian Carter

8 Marshall Road Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 Phone: (845) 392-4791 email: amwise2@buffalo.edu

Arc 406 | Senior at University at Buffalo Summer 2012 | 6 Credits | Urban Design Professors | Martha Bohm, Chris Ellis, Tracee Johnson, Christopher Romano, and Sue Thering T.A | Brian Hadley Arc 403 | Senior at University at Buffalo Fall 2012 | 6 Credits | Comprehensive Studio Professor | Nerea Feliz

1 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise


Table of Contents

3 Comprehensive Inhabitation- “cooperative apARTments” 9 Sustainable Futures- “Monteverde Deportes” 15 Sustainable Futures- “Stone Wall” 17 Buffalo Botanical Gardens- “Branching Out” 21 Pattern Wall- “Wrapping Space” 27 Office/ Marketplace- “Wrapping Space” 31 Massing Shifts- “Half and Half” 33 Living Wall- “Acute House” 41 Construction Technology- “Technical Drawings”


“cooperative apARTments” Arc 403 | Fall 2012 Professor | Nerea Feliz

The comprehensive inhabitation project was a comprehensive studio that was based around the design for a building that had a public program as well as a designated number of apartments of different size.

Elementary School (PK-8) High Schools Specialty Schools Swing Schools

Pass Rate

cooperative apARTments is based around the idea of having many large work spaces that focus on different types of crafts. These work spaces then have apartments plug into them. The apartments house craftsman who work in the work spaces that their apartment plugs into. The area where the residential and the public work areas interact becomes a service core that serves as a buffer between the noise of the work spaces and the desired quiet and intimacy of the apartment homes.

Students in advanced classes

Below Standards

25 mi 50 mi 100 mi

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Elementary School (PK-8) High Schools Elementary School (PK-8) Specialty Schools High Schools Swing Schools Specialty Schools Swing Schools

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Art: “The use of skill and imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others *As defined by the Encyclopedia Britannica

Pass Rate

Report “Learning, Arts, and the Brain”

Pass Rate Below Standards Below Standards

-”Research concluded that the arts can train children’s attention, which in turn improves cognition”

Students in advanced classes Students in advanced classes

25 mi 25 mi50 mi 50 mi

100 mi 100 mi

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andards

Comprehensive Inhabitation

Art: “The use of skill and imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others Art: “The*Asuse of skill and imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others defined by the Encyclopedia Britannica *As defined by the Encyclopedia Britannica

Report “Learning, Arts, and the Brain” Report “Learning, Arts, and Brain” -”Research concluded that the the arts can train children’s attention, which in turn improves cognition” -”Research concluded that the arts can train children’s attention, which in turn improves cognition”

Elementary School (PK-8) High Schools Specialty Schools Swing Schools

Four crafts were chosen to take place in the work spaces based on statistics of vendors and craftsmen that come to an annual art festival that takes place in Buffalo (The Elmwood Arts Festival). These four crafts are metal sculpture, glass work, ceramics, and painting. These crafts seemed to be the most popular at the art festival, therefore giving them the best chance to prosper in Buffalo.

Painter’s Studio

Sculptor’s Studio

Ceramic and Glass Workers Studio

Pass Rate

Pass Rate

Students in advanced classes

Below Standards

25 mi 50 mi

Students in advanced classes

100 mi cooperative apARTments Mechanical Services

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

Unit Aggregation

The diagrams above show the public floor slabs that house the work spaces as well as the apartments that plug into them separated by a large buffer zone. Painter’s Studio

Sculptor’s Studio

Ceramic and Glass Workers Studio

Painter’s Studio

Sculptor’s Studio

Ceramic and Glass Workers Studio

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ts

Sculpture Area

Ceramics Area

Glass Area

Painter’s Area

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3 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise

25 mi 50 mi

100 mi


Comprehensive Inhabitation- “cooperative apARTments”

PARKING

ELMWOOD AVE.

Offices

Truck Delivery Food Prep Handicapped Parking

Main Gallery

Men’s Restroom Apartment Lobby

Women’s Restroom

1st residential floor

2nd residential floor

3rd residential floor

4th residential floor

5th residential floor

6th residential floor

7th residential floor

8th residential floor

Chase Storage

Storage

Storage

BRYANT ST.

The ground floor plan houses an art gallery where the workers that live in the complex can display there work. The other plans show all of the residential floors and how that apartment units interact with the work spaces. Below are plans and axonometrics of all the units. They also show how all of the units come together for a certain craft and how space is formed when two units collide. Every single unit different, but the general organization is the same cooperative apARTments

1’

5’

10’

20’

40’

N


All doors have proper clearance -18” on pull -12” on push Accessible parking spots and delivery area

-18” on pull -12” on push Accessible parking spots and delivery area

Notes

14 type “B” Units 2 type “A” Units All doors have proper clearance -18” on pull -12” on push Accessible parking spots and delivery area

Fall 2012

Key: 60” wheelchair turning radius Wheel Chair Refuge Area Accessible Elevator (10’ x 5’) Accessible Corridor Egress Stairs

Accessibility: In the complex there are 16 total units. Of the 16, two are type “A” accessible, which means ever room is accessible. The other 14 are type “B” accessible which means that the major necessities are accessible like a bathroom, the kitchen, and one bedroom.

Notes

Key: 60” wheelchair turning radius Wheel Chair Refuge Area Accessible Elevator (10’ x 5’) Accessible Corridor Egress Stairs

60” Wheelchair Turning Radius

1.5

2.5000

1.5

1.5

1.5

Basement Floor

1.5 1.5

1.5

1.0

2.25

Ground Floor Plan

14 type “B” Units 2 type “A” Units All doors have proper clearance -18” on pull -12” on push Accessible parking spots and delivery area

Typical Studio Apartment

1.5

Typical Studio Apartment 1.5

1.0

Concrete12.2500 Wall

3.0

Ground Floor Plan

Typical Studio Apartment

The structure mainly consists of a large concrete wall with holes punched in it to allow light into the interior. This wall serves as the major balancing point for all of the units which cantilever off of it. The units consist of a large truss structured wall that has beams extending all the way through the concrete wall in order to support these massive cantilevers.

1.5 1.5

1.0

Key: 60” wheelchair turning radius Wheel Chair Refuge Area Accessible Elevator (10’ x 5’) Accessible Corridor 1.5 1.5 Egress Stairs

1.0

Notes

1.5

1.0

1.5

5.0000

Key: 60” wheelchair turning radius Wheel Chair Refuge Area Accessible Elevator (10’ x 5’) 12.2500 Accessible Corridor Egress Stairs

3.75 12.2500

2.5

1.0

2.25 3.0

1.5

5.0000 1.5

Typical Two Bedroom Apartment 2.75 1.5

2.5

1.5 1.75

9.0000

3.75

1.5 1.75

9.0000

2.75

3.75

3.0

5.0000

2.5 1.5

1.75

9.0000

Typical Two Bedroom Apartment

Typical One Bedroom Apartment

2.75

Typical One Bedroom Apartment

1.5

Typical Studio Apartment 1.0

Wheelchair Refuge Area Key:

2.5000

12.2500

Typical One Bedroom Apartment

Shear Wall Columns Beams

1.5

Accessible Elevator (10’x5’)

1.5 3.751.75

3.0

2.5000

2.5

1.5

1.5

5.0000

2.5

1.5

1.5

9.0000

1.5 1.5 1.5

2.5000

1.5 1.5

Accessible Corridor

1.0

1.5 2.75

1.75

1.75

2.5

1.5 3.5

Typical One Bedroom Apartment

1.5

1.5

2.0 1.5

2.75

1.5

1.0 1.0

Egress Stairs

2.25

Ground Floor Plan

2.25

2.5000

Ground Floor Plan

3.5

Typical Three Bedroom Apartment

2.0

1.5

1.5 1.5

1.5

Second Floor Residential Plan

2.75

1.0 1.5 2.25

Ground Floor Plan

1’ 5’

cooperative apARTments Accessibility

Notes

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

The structure mainly consists of a large concrete wall with holes punched in it to allow light into the interior. This wall serves as the major balancing point for all of the units which cantilever off of it. The units consist of a large truss structured wall that has beams extending all the way through the concrete wall in order to support these massive cantilevers.

10’

Typical Two Bedroom Apartment

Basement Floor

20’ 40’ Typical Three BedroomNApartment Typical Two Bedroom Apartment

1.5

Structure: The structure of the complex is based off of a large concrete wall and many cantilevers. The large concreteARTwall also serves as the main buffer between workspace and private space. The concrete wall has large truss arms cantilevered out of it that form the apartments. The beams of the trusses extend back into the concrete wall to satisfy the cantilever. The truss arms that come out of the wall them support concrete slabs which are the Notes floorsTheof the apartments. structure mainly consists of a large concrete wall with holes punched Second Floor Residential Plan

cooperative ap Accessibility

Typical Two Bedroom Apartment

1’ 5’

ments

10’

20’

1.0

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

Ground Floor Plan

2.25

40’

First FloorN Residential

1.5

1.5

1.0

Key: Shear Wall Columns Concrete Wall Beams

1.0

Wall with truss arms

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.75

1.5

2.5

1.5

1.5

2.5

1.5

1.0

in it to allow light into the interior. This wall serves as the major balancing point for all of the units which cantilever off of it. The units consist of a large truss structured wall that has beams extending all the way through the concrete wall in order to support these massive cantilevers.

1.75

Typical Two Bedroom Apartment

1.5

1.5 1.5 1.5

1.5

1.75

2.5

3.5 1.5

3.5 2.0

1.5 1.5

Key: Shear Wall Columns Beams

2.0

2.75

1.5

1.5

1.0

2.75

Basement Floor 3.5

1.75 1.5 Typical Three Bedroom Apartment

1.5 2.5

Typical Three Bedroom Apartment

2.0 1.5

Concrete Wall

Second Floor Residential Plan

cooperative apARTments Accessibility

2.75 1.5

Second Floor Residential Plan

1.5

Typical Three Bedroom Apartment

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

cooperative apARTments

1’ 5’

1’ 5’

10’

20’

40’ N

2.0 1.5

Key: Shear Wall Columns Beams

40’

3.5

1’ 5’

10’

20’

2.75

40’ N

Accessibility

The structure mainly consists of a large concrete wall with holes punched in it to allow light into the interior. This wall serves as the major balancing point for all of the units which cantilever off of it. The units consist of a large truss structured wall that has beams extending all the way through the concrete wall in order to support these massive cantilevers.

20’

N

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

cooperative apARTments

Notes

10’

Accessibility

Second Floor Residential Plan

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012 Typical Three Bedroom Apartment

Second Floor Residential Plan 1’ 5’

cooperative apARTments

10’

20’

40’ N

Accessibility

Basement Floor

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

First Floor Residential

Concrete Wall

Concrete Wall

Concrete Wall with truss arms

Wall with truss arms and floor plates

Concrete Wall with truss arms and floor slabs

Wall with truss arms

Basement Floor

First Floor Residential

Wall with truss arms

cooperative apARTments Structural System

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

onsists of a large concrete wall with holes punched he interior. This wall serves as the major balancing which cantilever off of it. The units consist of a large at has beams extending all the way through the concrete t these massive cantilevers.

Concrete Wall

Columns Beams Concrete wall Basement Floor Wall with truss arms and floor plates

Basement plan Wall with truss arms

5 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise Wall with truss arms

1st residentialcooperative plan apARTments First Floor Residential

First Floor Residential

Structural System

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

2nd residential plan Second Floor Residential

1’ 5’ 10’

20’

40’

N

Wall with truss arms and floor plates

Second Floor Residential

Second Floor Residential


RTments

Key: Meter Rooms Elevator Mechanical Room Main Vertical Chase Boiler Room Pump Room AHU Chiller Radiators Wet Walls Cooling Tower Chimney

Mechanical Systems: all of the major mechanical systems are housed in the basement with the main service cores coming up through the teeth of the large concrete wall

Chiller

Boiler Pumps

Basement Plan Ground Water Wells

Comprehensive Inhabitation- “cooperative apARTments”

Roof Plan

Notes

Drop ceiling occurs in all residential units for mechanical supply. Wet walls all run in the main core concrete structural component

Key: Meter Rooms Elevator Mechanical Room Main Vertical Chase Boiler Room Pump Room AHU Chiller Radiators Wet Walls Cooling Tower Chimney

Notes

Distances between stairs are marked on drawings -none are less then the 1/3 rule Smoke Detectors: -1 in every bedroom -1 right outside every bedroom -1 in every living area The building is completely sprinkled

Cooling Tower

Cooling Tower

Radiators

Chiller

Radiators

Key: Fire Stairs Smoke proof Wheel Chair Refuge Area Public Egress Private Egress

Boiler Pumps

Basement Plan

Chiller

Boiler

Roof Plan Pumps

Basement Plan Ground Water Wells

Ground Water Wells

Typical Residential Floor Plan

Occupancy Group

Occupant Load

R-2 Multi-Family Residential

200 sqft

A-3 Assembly, Miscellaneous

5 sqft

Maximum Single Floor area (Scheme)

Number of Occupants

Number of Stair Width Egress Stairs

Smoke proof Sprinklers? Stairs? yes/no

Maximum Travel Distance

5700 sqft

29

2

36”

yes

yes

250’

4500 sqft

900

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

134

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

2

2

36”

yes

15

2

36”

yes

Typical Residential Floor Plan

cooperative apARTments Typical Section

Meter Room

Mechanical Services

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

Typical Section

Roof Plan

Boiler Room

A-2 15 sqft 2000 sqft Assembly, Food and Drink Establishments S-2 300 sqftapART 500ments sqft cooperative Storage, Low HazardMechanical Services

Pump Room

F-2 Factory, Low Hazard

Chiller

Typical Section

yes

400’

yes

400

Public Egress

Cooling Tower

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

Elevator Mechanical Room Main Vertical Chase

Life Safety: The major focus of life safety is the egress stairs, and there are two sets of scissors stairs in cooperative apARTments. The scissor stairs allow for the rooms housing large equipment to have separate means of egress from the main paths of those coming from the apartments.

3-hr Fire Rating

Notes

Distances between stairs are marked on drawings -none are less then the 1/3 rule Smoke Detectors: -1 in every bedroom -1 right outside every bedroom -1 in every living area The building is completely sprinkled

Air Handling Unit

1/2-hr Fire Rating

Ground Floor Plan

cooperative apARTments Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

Public Egress Notes

Distances between stairs are marked on drawings -none are less then the 1/3 rule Smoke Detectors: -1 in every bedroom -1 right outside every bedroom -1 in every living area The building is completely sprinkled

Private Egress

Wheelchair Refuge Area Maximum Single Floor area (Scheme)

Number of Occupants

Number of Stair Width Egress Stairs

Smoke proof Sprinklers? Stairs? yes/no

Maximum Travel Distance

L= 30’

Key: Fire Stairs Smoke proof Wheel Chair Refuge Area Public Egress Private Egress L= 72’

R-2 Multi-Family Residential

200 sqft

5700 sqft

29

2

36”

yes

yes

250’

A-3 Assembly, Miscellaneous

5 sqft

4500 sqft

900

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

A-2 Assembly, Food and Drink Establishments S-2 Storage, Low Hazard

15 sqft

2000 sqft

134

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

300 sqft

500 sqft

2

2

36”

yes

yes

400’

100 sqft

1500 sqft

15

2

36”

yes

yes

400

F-2 Factory, Low Hazard

Typical Section

Mechanical Services

Smoke Proof Area Occupant Load

Chimney

Typical Residential Floor Plan

Fire Stairs

Occupancy Group

1500 sqft

Wet Walls

Key: Fire Stairs Smoke proof Wheel Chair Refuge Area Public Egress Roof Plan Private Egress

1-hr Fire Rating

Radiators

100 sqft

Occupancy Group

Maximum Single Floor area (Scheme)

Number of Occupants

Smoke proof Sprinklers? Stairs? yes/no

Maximum Travel Distance

R-2 Multi-Family Residential

200 sqft

5700 sqft

29

2

36”

yes

yes

250’

A-3 Assembly, Miscellaneous

Occupant Load

5 sqft

4500 sqft

900

Number of Stair Width Egress Stairs

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

A-2 Assembly, Food and Drink Establishments S-2 Storage, Low Hazard

15 sqft

2000 sqft

134

2

44”

yes

yes

250’

300 sqft

500 sqft

2

2

36”

yes

yes

400’

F-2 Factory, Low Hazard

100 sqft

1500 sqft

15

2

36”

yes

yes

400

Public Egress

L= 65’

Private Egress

Public Egress

Ground Floor Plan

Key: 3-hr Fire Rating 2-hr Fire Rating 1- hr Fire Rating 1/2- hr Fire Rating

Typical Residential Floor Plan L= 30’

L= 72’

L= 65’

Private Egress

cooperative apARTments

Typical Section

Typical Section

Mechanical Services

Ground Floor Plan

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012 L= 30’

L= 72’

L= 65’

Private Egress 20’ Typical Residential Plan Typical Residential Plan

Typical Residential Plan Ground Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

Life Safety

Alexander Wise- Fall 2012

1’ 5’ 10’

20’

40’

N

Combined Egress

Combined Egress cooperative apARTments

cooperative apARTments

10’

20’

40’

N


Fall 2012

Large Structural Wall

Roof Construction Metal Decking Poured Concrete Concrete Topping Insulation Gravel Concrete tiles

Floor Supports

20” Deep Beams 10” Deep Cross Beams

Return Air Duct

Public Floor Construction Metal Decking Poured Concrete Concrete Topping

Supply Air Duct

Gas Pipes Painter’s Apartment Wall Construction Interior Finish Metal Studs Insulation Facade Framing System Off-white Plaster Exterior Finish Colored Rain Screen

Water Pipes

Electric Pipes

Ceramic Workers Apartment Wall Construction Interior Finish Metal Studs Insulation Facade Framing System Colored Plaster Exterior Finish Black Rain Screen

Glass Workers Apartment Wall Construction Interior Finish Recessed Mullions Frosted Glass Facade Framing System Colored Rain Screen

Concrete Foundation

Sculpture Apartment Wall Construction Interior Finish Metal Studs Insulation Facade Framing System Metal Cladding Black Rain Screen

7 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise

The integrated axon and section show how all of the systems of the building come together. From the building systems that were studied more in-depth on the previous page to the facade system.


Comprehensive Inhabitation- “cooperative apARTments�


Sustainable Futures “Monteverde Deportes�

Arc 406 | Summer 2012 Professors | Martha Bohm, Chris Ellis, Tracee Johnson, Christopher Romano, and Sue Thering Team members | Jon Eng, Matthew Geiger, Ryu Kim, Alex Neubauer, Ariel Resnick, Christa Trautman, and Alexander Wise

The 2012 Sustainable Futures program, based in Monteverde, Costa Rica, was tasked with research and design into a new sports and recreation center in the town. The students met with two separate groups associated with the town. A sports committee that had the job of expressing their needs and desire for a sports center in the town. The second committee was a local municipality who talked about the available money and other issues associated with building this center. Research consisted of athletics associated with the area, the National Games which could become a major funding source for the complex if Monteverde won a bid to host, as well as health statistics of the area. All of this research went into trying to convince the town and its leaders a sports complex is necessary. All of the Final research and design proposal was presented at a large gathering consisting of many members of the town and higher ups, such as architects coming all the way from the capital city of San Jose. This presentation took place at the end of a 10 week period with the first 4 weeks being allotted to research and the rest of the time to design. This is one of the most rewarding work and study experiences anyone could ever do, especially because of how close the students and town people were. 9 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise

There had to be a lot of analysis done on the site that was given by the sports committee and municipality. The site was originally 3 hectares (30,000 sq. m). But upon much analysis it was proposed to be extended to a 4.5 hectare site.


Sustainable Futures- “Monteverde Deportes� The major analysis of the site consisted of its contours and the flow of water as well as a fault line that required a 50 meter buffer on either side where there could be no permanent structure. The main requirement of the sports committee was a soccer field with a track around it. With international regulations restricting the orientation of the field it was proposed that it would be best to purchase a larger site. The process of positioning the soccer field and extending the site are illustrated to the left.

Drawings by Alex Neubauer

N

Drawing by Ryu Kim

Drawing by Ryu Kim


Summer 2012

Drawing by Ryu Kim and Alexander Wise

Laguna Lake

Drawing by Ryu Kim and Alexander Wise

Drawings by Alexander Wise

Natural Graderia Seating Informal

Dormitorio Dormitories

Ruta de Servicio

Service Road

Pista Track CanchaField de Soccer Futbol

Piscina Pool Leyenda

Circulaci贸n Primario

Circulaci贸n Secondario

Parqueo Parking Gymnasium Gimnasio

Leyenda

Ejes Primario

Ejes Secondario

Parada de Bus

Bus Drop-off Diagrams by Jon Eng, Ryu Kim, Alexander Wise

11 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise

Drawing by Alexander Wise

Through many iterations and sketches a final master plan was made. The diagrams to the left of the master plan explain the main types of circulation through the site and the attractions. A major aspect to circulation on the site was the separation of Athlete and Spectator. The two sectional sketches above show how the slope of the site creates an interesting possibility for the arrangement of spectator options that would separate the athlete and spectator with the exception of a visual connection when observing the events.


Sustainable Futures- “Monteverde Deportes� The diagrams to the left best show the separation of athlete and spectator which was a major driving principle of the design. The section below also illustrates the separation with the athletes down on the soccer field and all the spectators inhabiting the area above with no access to the playing field. This idea came from the sketch of the seating seen on the previous page.

Leyenda

Diagrams by Matthew Geiger Nivel del Espectador

Novel del atleta

Drawing by Ariel Resnick and Christa Trautman Leyenda gimnasio

patio

vestuario

dormitorio

piscina

Drawing by Ryu Kim

road S

Drawing by Ryu Kim

lawn seating

Drawing by Ariel Resnick and Christa Trautman

bleachers

culverts

bleachers

lawn seating 10 20

40

80 Meters

N


Summer 2012

Drawing by Ariel Resnick and Alexander Wise

Drawing by Ariel Resnick

With this new facility being located in Costa Rica it was important to make it environmentally friendly. This is because Costa Rica is aiming to become the first carbon neutral country by 2021.

Leyenda

Fluho de Aguas Negras y Grises

Flujo de Agua Limpio para Irrigacion

The environmental aspects of this design are mainly illustrated by the use and reuse of water on the site. There are many small treatment ponds located throughout the site to catch the water as it flows down the sloping site. The roof that wraps the major structures is also sloped to direct rain water to specific points where they are caught in basins.

Instalaciones para Tratamiento de Aguas de Escorrentia

Bosque Natural

Leyenda

Drenaje Sobre Suelo

Drenaje Subterranea

Drenaje Pluvial

There are also culverts placed under the soccer field to slow the flow of water through the sloping site. These will prevent erosion and make the site last longer and produce more reusable water.

Leyenda DRENAJE SOBRE SUELO

DRENAJE SUBTERRANEA

DRENAJE PLUVIAL

Leyenda

Bosque Existente

Reforestaci贸n

Deforestaci贸n

Leyenda

Bosque Natural

Espacio Activo

Espacio Pasivo

Drawing by Jon Eng

Diagrams by Jon Eng, Ryu Kim, Alexander Wise

13 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise

Drawing by Jon Eng and Alexander Wise


Drawing by Ryu Kim

Drawing by Ryu Kim and Alex Neubauer


Sustainable Futures “Stone Wall Build�

Arc 406 | Summer 2012 Professors | Martha Bohm, Chris Ellis, Tracee Johnson, Christopher Romano, and Sue Thering Team Members | Grant Black, Brittany Cohen, Thomas DeGraff, Jennifer Dow, Jon Eng, Matthew Geiger, Ryu Kim, Mira Lee, Alex Neubauer, Nicole Nguyen, Ariel Resnick, Maya Shermer, Christa Trautman, and Alexander Wise

Also part of the Sustainable Futures experience in Monteverde, Costa Rica was being part of a design and build project of a stone wall for the Institute. The Monteverde Institute is the home to many domestic and study abroad programs including the Sustainable Futures program. The SF 2012 group was tasked with a design build of a stone wall and walkway system that would lead up to an outdoor classroom that was recently constructed. There was time spent laying out string for the paths of walkways or the routes the terracing walls may take. SF 2012 was also part of the site work that went into building the wall. A lot of digging and reworking of the earth had to be done before a single stone could even be placed to make the wall. Upon completion the wall consisted of four levels of terracing walls, a large patio are with seating in front of the outdoor classroom, and two paths connecting the main Institute building and the new outdoor classroom.

15 | Undergraduate Portfolio- A.Wise


Sustainable Futures- “Stone Wall”


Buffalo Botanical Gardens “Branching Out”

Arc 302 | Spring 2012 Professor | Brian Carter

The Botanical Gardens project was presented as an expansion to the already existing Buffalo Botanical Gardens located in Frederick Law Olmsted’s South Park. About half of the existing building is listed as a historical building. The committee from the Botanical Gardens, who were treated as clients, made it clear they did not want to tinker with the main entrance facade and its historical value to them. Therefore most of the designing took place in back of the existing building. “Branching Out” is proposed as a project that is meant to connect the Buffalo Botanical Gardens with the surrounding gardens of South Park. As it stands right now, the Botanical Gardens building is placed in no mans land. It has almost no contact with the gardens of The following are sketches that drove the major design process. The first being a leaf from a plant that South Park. This means that visitors to either is displayed in the existing building. Its long stems drove the idea of making a connection between the destination have almost no idea the other one building and south park. The second is a sectional sketch that became the main idea of the design. exists. By proposing a design that bridges the gap between the two historical areas, both could increase revenue and popularity.

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Botanical Gardens- “Branching Out” Sketch Models S3

S1

S2

S2

Elevation 1: 1/16”=1’

Plan 1: 1/16”=1’ S1

Section 2: 1/16”=1’ P1

P2

Long Section

S3

Main Plan


Spring 2012

Short Section


The roof of the building is going to contain a green roof with grass, flowers, and small trees. The green roof would be a walk able path that would connect the existing building to the rest of South Park. The model to the right was a detail of the sloping green roof that is being proposed for the roof of the expansion building. The drawing below is a detail section that mainly shows the layers that would have to go into building a walk able green roof.

Botanical Gardens- “Branching Out�


Pattern Wall

“Wrapping Space”

Arc 301 | Fall 2011 Professor | Curt Gambetta

The pattern wall is a design based off of two patterns. One is a man made pattern and the second is a pattern found in nature. The two patterns are shown below with the man made pattern being a weaving fabric and the natural one being the bark of a tree.

The patterns then had to inspire a common design trait that would lead to the creation of a double envelope facade. The project “Wrapping Space” uses the idea of weaving and overlapping that is found in both images. When the weaving and overlapping is explored in a 3-dimensional frame there are interesting tunneling effects found that may help support the building with some passive systems.

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The project started with the production of sketch models. All took into account the idea of overlapping and creating a 3-dimensional view of something that started as a 2-dimensional print in the case of the fabric swatch and image of a natural pattern.


The diagram below shows the module that is created with the ideas of weaving and overlapping. These modules began to get combined to create an entire system that would serve as a double envelope for a building. The model seen to the right is the most successful iteration of the combined modules and drove the developments of the rest of the project.

Pattern Wall- “Project Name�


Fall 2011 This iteration is the first time the project is actually seen as a wall covering and how it functions as an envelope. The colors chosen here were the result of a lot of testing of combinations of different colors of transparent and translucent materials. The blue transparency and the blue-green translucency were chosen because they have the best relationship to the natural setting at which the envelope is being placed.


The final model was to be built to cover two sides of a building. The final wall covering had to provide a complete enclosure and still perform well as a double envelope.

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Fall 2011

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Office/Marketplace “Wrapping Space�

Arc 301 | Fall 2011 Professor | Curt Gambetta

The office/Marketplace was related to the Pattern Wall project in that the facade created in the Pattern Wall had to derive the design for a building that would house offices as well as a marketplace. The facade from the first project became the building itself with the modules created from the idea of overlapping becoming inhabitable. The modules divided up the building into sections of public and private as well as creating certain coves and niches that helped the office/marketplace type function nicely.

PROGRAM

The site for the project was a small plot of land just outside of downtown Pittsburgh. Upon completion of the project students were invited back to Pittsburgh to display projects at an art gallery that had opened up right next to the site being used.

PROGRAM

These diagram explain the project best. In the first diagram the blue represents that private office spaces and the red shows what modules becomes the public marketplace. The second diagram shows the diagonal elevators in blue. Finally, the third diagram shows the means of egress and escape in red. PROGRAM

CIRCULATION/ EGRESS ELEVATOR FIRE STAIRS

CIRCULATION/ EGRESS

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ELEVATOR FIRE STAIRS


Office/ Marketplace- “Project Name”

First Floor Plan

Long Section

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan


Fall 2011

LONG VEHICLE

Short Section Undergraduate

LONG VEHICLE

Portfolio- A.Wise


Office/ Marketplace- “Project Name�

This is a connection detail of how the facade plates attach to the floor plates and the main building structure.


Massing Shifts “Half and Half”

Arc 102 | Spring 2010 Professors | Nicholas Bruscia, Shadi Nazarian, and Christopher Romano

Massing Shifts is a project that started with two cubes. One cube was 8’ x 8’ x 8’ and the other was 12’ x 12’ x 12’. Each cube was then assigned either a living program or a work program. Each mass went through a series of cuts and shifts until a volume was established that accomplished the goal of creating a living space, and a work space. Each cube could only house one task and they had to be differentiable from each other. “Half and Half” was unique because each cube only went through one cut and shift in order to create a desired volume. The large mass houses the work program of wood working. This is why extra height is given. It allows for more ceiling height and also creates openings for ventilation. The small cube houses the living area. Once again the cut in half and shift upward creates different levels that can be programed to be sleeping coves or counters for daily household duties.

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Styrofoam Sketch Models

Planar Model

Structural Model


The final model was made completely of basswood, both sticks and sheets.

Assignment Name- “Project Name�


The Living Wall “Acute House”

Arc 102 | Spring 2010 Professors | Nicholas Bruscia, Shadi Nazarian, and Christopher Romano Team Members | Timothy Boll, Michael Floryan, Cassidy Huls, Robert Miller, Lauren Walker, and Alexander Wise

The Living Wall project began with a 6’ x 6’ x 8’ mass. Shifts were made to this mass with cuts and any kind of movements. The shifts were limited to two cuts and two moves. The final design could not have a footprint larger than the original 6’ x 6’ x 8’. The shifts were made to create three sleeping areas, an entrance, and circulation space. The semester started with all 100 students making their own individual proposals. As the semester went on groups were formed around certain projects until only 14 remained. The 14 remaining projects then collaborated to create certain relationships between each other that formed the LIVING WALL. The final projects were built at full scale and displayed in a nearby sculpture park. As part of the final review students spent 24 living in the living wall. The final project name “Acute House” was developed with the idea of creating sleeping spaces that catered to the form people create when they curl up to go to sleep. This project began as a massing scheme developed by me and made it all the way through to the final 14 to be built at full scale

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Drawings and Models by Alexander Wise


One of the major parts of the project was breaking up the original massing design into modules that could be packaged into a volume similar to that of the original 6’ x 6’ x 8’ volume that started the project. This would make the project easier to transport from the school where they were being built, to the park, about 45 minutes away, where the projects would be assembled for display. Acute house was broken down using layers that would be stacked on top of each other. There were three layers, and each layer had two modules that would be stacked on top of the layer below it. Once all of the specifics were figured out at a smaller scale level using models and hand drawings, full scale construction began in the studio. The project was built completely in the studio and later disassembled by modules for transport and reassembly at the park.

Drawing by Alexander Wise

Drawings by Cassidy Huls, Lauren Walker, and Alexander Wise

Model by Alexander Wise


Spring 2010 The major focus of “Acute House” became two columns in the front. In the design the columns are like a vanishing point coming to a very acute angle. If the column did not look good, then the entire project would look strange. In order to make the columns look great a lot of jigs were created and long 4” x 4” timber was used instead of laminating pieces together. The columns came out great with a knife like edge to highlight the project.

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In order to make the columns attach back to the main structure a difficult process of embedding bolts had to take place. The column was split into two pieces with the piece closest to the main structure having a bolt inserted through it. The second piece of the column was then glued onto the first piece burying the head of the bolt well inside the column, and only exposing the threaded part of the part that would attach back to the main structure and then be hidden by ply-wood wall panels

Drawing by Michael Floryan


Spring 2010

The modulated package was wrapped up and loaded onto a flat bed for transport out to the park. Once out at the park it was set down, unwrapped, and prepped for reassembly. The project was reassembled and placed on railroad ties as to allow water to run beneath the projects and not build up below them creating water damage. The sequence on the following page is “Acute House� being assembled by its modules on the site and placed in its designated spot within the LIVING WALL.

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Living Wall- “Acute House”


Spring 2010 The final installment was placed in Griffis Sculpture park just outside of Buffalo. This was the first time the University at Buffalo Architecture program did a project of this magnitude. The 14 dwellings stood in Griffis sculpture park for about 8 months before they were taken to down to make room for a second installment of the LIVING WALL.


OR TO ROOF exterior Construction Technology 16” o.c“Technical vertical Drawings” Arc | Spring 2012 ores grout442 solid Professor | Annette Lecuyer

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minimum e slab on grade 9

Construction Technology was a class to learn about the different systems in a building and all the major construction techniques.

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6 1.) EXTERIOR WALL FOUNDATION 24” wide x 12” thick continuous site cast concrete strip footing with 3 #5 reinforcement bars

2.) EXTERIOR WALL, GROUND FLOOR TO FIRST FLOOR 8x16x12 cmu wall, painted exterior horizontal reinforcement 16” o.c vertical vertical reinforcement, cores grout solid all other cores insulated

Assignments in this class included reproducing drawings for two different buildings. The first was the Reid House, which is mainly concrete construction. The second building was the Conibear Shell house in Washington which is mainly of steel construction.

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3.) EXTERIOR WALLS, FIRST FLOOR TO ROOF 8x16x8 cmu wall, painted exterior horizontal reinforcement 16” o.c vertical vertical reinforcement, cores grout solid

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4.) GROUND FLOOR compacted sand fill, 4” minimum 4” thick site cast concrete slab on grade vapor barrier

5.) FIRST FLOOR 2x10 framing, spaced 16” o.c 2x6 t&g decking typical

6.) ROOF/CEILING rafters 2x6 at 16” o.c Joists 2x6 at 16” o.c. celing joists are to be suspended from roof rafters3/8” mdd plywood nailed to joists batt insulation between joists 5/8” roof sheathing w/ plywood clips 16” o.c fiberglass roof shingles w/ underlayment & w/ continuous metal flashing

g joists are to be ers3/8” mdd plywood nailed to joists oists ywood clips 16” o.c underlayment & w/ continuous metal flashing

5 7.) WINDOW AT GROUND FLOOR cast in place concrete sill wood window, painted lintel, 12” lintel block w/ 2 #5 bars bond beam, continuous 12” lintel block w/ 2 #5 bars

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8.) WINDOW AT FIRST FLOOR cast in place concrete sill steel frame & sash window painted w/ 5/8” insulated glass 2 course 8” cmu lintel block w/ 2 #5 bars grout solid

9.) CLERESTORY metal sash block-cut 1/8” glass set in sealant in sash block

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OR

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#5 bars

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Reid House

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Alexander Wise

Undergraduate Portfolio (2009-2012) University at Buffalo- b.s. arch- 2013

Undergraduate Portfolio  

Portfolio of my major projects completed while working on my Bachelor of Architecture.