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The Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC) is a self-governing body dedicated to regulating the profession of architecture on behalf of the public. Our vision is to build public confidence and excellence in architectural practice.

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AIBC Operations

AIBC Council

Architectural Institute of British Columbia 100-440 Cambie Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 2N5 T: 604.683.8588 | F: 604.683.8568 info@aibc.ca

As set out in the Architects Act, a council governs the affairs of the institute. The council consists of 10 elected architects (Architects AIBC); persons (non-architects) appointed by the provincial government; and one appointee from the faculty of The University of British Columbia’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture.

Mark Vernon CPA CA CPA (IL) Chief Executive Officer mvernon@aibc.ca | ext. 304

Fabian Sherlock Administrative Assistant fsherlock@aibc.ca | ext. 300

Grace Battiston Director of Communications gbattiston@aibc.ca | ext. 308

Lainie Shore Staff Lawyer lshore@aibc.ca | ext. 327

Chloe Bouskill Professional Development Coordinator cbouskill@aibc.ca | ext. 328

Krista Sutherland Professional Development Coordinator ksutherland@aibc.ca | ext. 318

Jackie Buchan (On Leave) Illegal Practice, Professional Conduct and FOI Officer

Shohreh Tehrani Database Research Analyst stehrani@aibc.ca | ext. 322

Belinda Chao Admissions Coordinator bchao@aibc.ca | ext. 324

Lindsay Todd Communications Specialist ltodd@aibc.ca | ext. 311

Shawna Chilton CHRP Manager of Human Resources and Administration schilton@aibc.ca | ext. 305

Tracy Tough Executive Coordinator ttough@aibc.ca | ext. 335

Maura Gatensby Architect AIBC MRAIC CP

Practice Advisor mgatensby@aibc.ca | ext. 334 Joan Hendriks Architect AIBC MRAIC

Director of Registration and Licensing, and Registrar jhendriks@aibc.ca | ext. 323 Alexandra Kokol Manager of Professional Services akokol@aibc.ca | ext. 312 Christine Leclerc Communications Specialist cleclerc@aibc.ca | ext. 331 Thomas Lutes Deputy Chief Executive Officer, General Counsel, Director of Professional Conduct & Illegal Practice, and Acting FOI Officer tlutes@aibc.ca | ext. 321 Laura-Beth McDonald Events and Outreach Specialist lbmcdonald@aibc.ca | ext. 329 Karen Morris CPA CGA Manager of Finance and Facilities kmorris@aibc.ca | ext. 317 Gayle Roberts Professional Conduct Officer groberts@aibc.ca | ext. 310 Meagan Sands Paralegal msands@aibc.ca | ext. 367

Kim Underwood Licensing Coordinator kunderwood@aibc.ca | ext. 309 Yana Vassilenko (On Leave) Human Resources and Administration Coordinator Jaidin Wale Human Resources and Administration Coordinator jaidin@aibc.ca | ext. 314 Marguerite Wood Accounting Assistant mwood@aibc.ca | ext. 306 architectureBC 2016 Publisher: AIBC Editor: Grace Battiston Associate Editors: Lindsay Todd, Christine Leclerc Design & Production: FMS Creative Inc. Special thanks to Pauline SchipaniDeschryver Publication Agreement Number 40884028 architectureBC is the journal of the AIBC and the architectural community of British Columbia. It is mailed to approximately 4,000 architects, retired architects, honorary members, intern architects, architectural technologists, students and affiliates. architectureBC is also mailed to industry partners and stakeholders in government, related sectors, professional associations and selected media outlets.

Officers for 2016/2017: President: Darryl J. Condon Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC LEED AP

Vice President: Danica Djurkovic Architect AIBC LEED AP

Treasurer: Karl W. Gustavson Architect AIBC FRAIC LEED AP

Registrar (non-voting): Joan Hendriks Architect AIBC MRAIC

Elected Councilors: Darryl J. Condon Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC LEED AP

Danica Djurkovic Architect AIBC LEED AP David Dove Architect AIBC Sylvie Gagnon Architect AIBC Karl W. Gustavson Architect AIBC FRAIC LEED AP Mona Lovgreen Architect AIBC MArch MRAIC LEED AP bd+c

Ian R. McDonald Architect AIBC AAA LEED GA Catherine Nickerson Architect AIBC MRAIC LEED AP Sean Ruthen Architect AIBC MRAIC David N.M. Yustin Architect AIBC Lieutenant Governor Appointees: S. Ross Rettie, P.Eng., FEC Michelle Rupp University of British Columbia School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Appointee: John Bass Invited Guests to Council: By tradition, AIBC Council invites guests to assist in an advisory, non-voting capacity.

Immediate Past President: Scott Kemp Architect AIBC FRAIC RIBA LEED AP

Intern Architect Liaison: Sara Kasaei Intern Architect AIBC LEED AP M.Arch MLA

Architectural Technologist Liaison: Jordan van Dijk Architectural Technologist AIBC LEED AP

Ideas and contributions are welcomed; please contact the editor. Opinions expressed herein are not necessarily endorsed by the AIBC; authors are solely responsible for the information and opinions in their articles. Advertising Enquiries: communications@aibc.ca


5 President’s Message

AIBC Innovation Award Recipient

6 About the AIBC Architectural Awards

50 Surrey Operations Centre Taylor Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc. and Rounthwaite Dick & Hadley Architects Inc.

7 2016 AIBC Architectural Awards Lieutenant Governor Medal Award Recipients 10  Guildford Aquatic Centre Bing Thom Architects Inc. in association with Shape Architecture Inc. 14 TELUS Garden Commercial Henriquez Partners Architects Lieutenant Governor Merit Award Recipients 20 York House Senior School Action Ostry Architects Inc.

AIBC Emerging Firm Award Recipient 56 marianne amodio architecture studio AIBC Special Jury Award Recipients 62 2211 Cambie Arno Matis Architecture Inc. and Azurean Architecture Inc. 66 Shaughnessy House Measured Architecture Inc. 71 Other Submissions 91 2016 Recognition Program

24 Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre HCMA Architecture + Design 28 Jasper Place Library HCMA Architecture + Design in joint venture with DUB Architects 32 Centennial College Ashtonbee Campus Student Hub MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects Ltd. (MJMA) 36 Rough House Measured Architecture Inc. 40 MNP Tower Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership in association with Kohn Pederson Fox Associates 44 Fort McMurray International Airport office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers inc. (project commenced as predecessor firm mcfarlane | green | biggar architecture + design inc.)

92 2015 AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award Fred Hollingsworth Honorary Member of the AIBC FRAIC FAIA 93 2015 AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award Roger Hughes Architect AIBC FRAIC 95 2016 AIBC Scholarship & Bursary Program 96 Profiles Kate Busby Louis Conway Robyn Fenton Neil Prakash Gavin Schaefer Jordan van Dijk Graeme Bristol 114 2016 AIBC Induction & Retirement Ceremony 119 2  016 AIBC Architectural Awards Jury 120 C  hief Executive Officer’s Message


President’s Message

Choosing Our Legacy Darryl Condon Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC LEED® AP AIBC Council President

“We are called to be architects of the future, not its victims.”

— R. Buckminster Fuller

The 21st century continues to issue its call to view our work through the lens of global impact. Resilience was the theme of the AIBC’s 2016 Annual Conference and has become a major theme for practitioners in many disciplines around the world. A single project does not make or break resilience in the face of global phenomena, but the outcomes we build for alongside practitioners in diverse fields around the world will have a dramatic impact on lives lived in centuries to come. Does building for a resilient future come without change? Of course not. One of the big challenges we face as architects is shifting a long standing and mature profession to meet the needs of the future. Our systems and methods have developed over centuries, and our role is changing faster than our systems are designed to allow.

Resilience is a concept that applies to individuals, communities and ecosystems. As architects, we are positioned to impact all three, whether it is through the design of buildings that people can live well in, buildings that support community development or buildings that create a net zero, or close to it, impact on the surrounding environment. Moving forward, our skills at facilitating community discussions and in the process helping our communities reach consensus around challenging issues will become even more important. Indeed, engaging people locally is a hallmark of community resilience best practice. How can we join forces with the communities we design for to help build a legacy of resilience? I leave you with this question and look forward to continuing the conversation with you, my colleagues, this year, and in the years to come.

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About the AIBC Architectural Awards The Architectural Institute of British Columbia showcases the best in architecture from the AIBC community through its awards program. While honours are given out in a number of distinct award categories, there is one common element: excellence.

Program Goals • To honour excellence in completed architectural projects. • To celebrate the achievements of AIBC member architects and firms. • To recognize the role of AIBC members and associates in the built environment. • To encourage public interest in B.C. architects and architecture. • To promote AIBC members as architectural leaders provincially, nationally and internationally.

Award Categories Submissions are accepted in the following award categories: The Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Awards in Architecture (“The LGs”) – established to recognize excellence in completed architectural projects led or designed by AIBC members. Firms, clients and lead design architects associated with chosen projects are honoured for their achievements in one of two award levels: Medal or Merit. Each eligible project submission is judged individually on how it reflects excellence in architectural design and practice.

AIBC Innovation Award – recognizes achievements that are not strictly ‘architectural,’ but that have a direct bearing on the future of architecture in such areas as design, building technology, use of materials and sustainability. AIBC Emerging Firm Award – recognizes the development, success and contributions of emerging architectural firms. It is given to firms that have shown exemplary promise, clear vision and defined goals in the practice of architecture. It also celebrates and encourages newlyestablished firms that have embraced broader, modern types of practice reflecting the changing nature of the profession. AIBC Special Jury Award – In addition to the established categories, the awards jury may choose to grant an AIBC Special Jury Award, selected from all entries, that recognizes exceptional achievement. Any and all selections are decided by the annual awards jury. The number of awards in each category is not guaranteed.

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2016 AIBC Architectural Awards This year 13 projects by B.C. architects were recognized at the closing ceremony of the 2016 AIBC Annual Conference in May. The AIBC was privileged, on behalf of the Honourable Judith Guichon, to honour two projects with the highest distinction of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Medal, and seven more exceptional projects with the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Awards in Architecture – Merit Level.

Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Medal Level

Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit Level

•  Guildford Aquatic Centre by Bing Thom Architects in association with Shape Architecture

•  York House Senior School by Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

•  Telus Garden by Henriquez Partners Architects

•  Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre by HCMA Architecture + Design •  Jasper Place Library by HCMA Architecture + Design in joint venture with Dub Architects •  Centennial College Ashtonbee Campus Student Hub by MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects Ltd. •  Rough House by Measured Architecture Inc. •  MNP Tower by the Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership in association with Kohn Pederson Fox

AIBC Innovation Award • S  urrey Operations Centre by Taylor Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc. and Rounthwaite, Dick & Hadley Architects

AIBC Emerging Firm Award • m  arianne amodio architecture studio

AIBC Special Jury Award •  Special Jury Award for Contextual Innovation goes to 2211 Cambie by Arno Matis Architecture Inc. and Azurean Architecture • S  pecial Jury Award for Heritage Retention and Modernization awarded to Shaughnessy House by Measured Architecture Inc.

•  Fort McMurray Airport, International Airport Terminal by mcfarlane biggar architects + designers (project started at predecessor firm mcfarlane | green | bigger | architecture and design inc.)

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Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Medal

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Guildford Aquatic Centre Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Medal BING THOM ARCHITECTS INC. IN ASSOCIATION WITH SHAPE ARCHITECTURE INC.

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

The City of Surrey's Guildford Aquatic Centre is a 75,000 square foot expansion to the existing Guildford Recreation Centre. The new Aquatic Centre is a recreation and therapeutic aquatic destination, providing training opportunities for swimming, water polo, and other aquatic sports as well as the capacity to host competitive swimming events. The unique architectural and urban design features of the Aquatic Centre provide the community of Guildford with a world class facility and a landmark building.


“This project jumped off the page. It’s a gorgeous space. It is an instant icon. The BC Wood First program has spawned some often-predictable design responses around the Province. This is a new twist on the clear-finished glulam. It may not announce itself as wood but it does indeed make clever use of the material that BC Wood aims to promote.”

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

— JACK KOBAYASHI Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER


PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Firm: Bing Thom Architects Inc. in association with Shape Architecture Inc.

Loretta Kong Architect AIBC

Lead Design Architect: Bing Thom Architect AIBC

M.Arch

CM FRAIC AIA LLD

Completion Date: 2015-02 Location: Surrey, B.C., Canada Client: City of Surrey Architecture Team Members: Michael Heeney Architect AIBC FRAIC RI(BC) LEED AP

Nick Sully Architect AIBC AAA Alec Smith Architect AIBC Venelin Kokalov MEng Shinobu Homma Architect AIBC MRAIC

Marcos Hui M.Arch Lisa Potopsingh M.Arch Arthur Tseng Architect AIBC Amirali Javidan M.Arch LEED AP Huiran (Nicole) Hu Architectural Technologist AIBC LEED AP

Johnnie Kuo LEED AP BD+C Dwayne Smyth Architect AIBC

LEED AP

Nathaniel Funk David Guenter Architect AIBC Kathy Chang Certified Professional: Carlito Cabahug Civil Engineer: Core Group Electrical Engineer: Applied Engineering Solutions Mechanical Engineer: AME Consulting Group Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp General Contractor: Heatherbrae Builders Owner Representative: Scott Groves Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd. Landscape Consultant: PWL Partnership

Building Envelope Consultant: Morrison Hershfield Surveyor: Core Group Cost Consultant: LEC Group Acoustic Consultant: BKL Consultants Ltd. Audio Visual Consultant: MC Squared System Design Group Construction Management: Turnbull Construction Services Ltd. Wayfinding Consultant: Letterbox Design Traffic Consultant: Bunt & Associates Sierra Wall Design: EXP Services Inc. Elevator Consultant: Gunn Consultants Inc.

Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.

AAA MRAIC

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TELUS Garden Commercial Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Medal

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PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

The TELUS Garden Office Tower is part of a development transforming an entire city block of downtown Vancouver into a vibrant, sustainable and complete community.

PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

HENRIQUEZ PARTNERS ARCHITECTS


PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

“ The architect has created a very successful ground plane that makes an important contribution to the City’s public realm.” — NORM SHEARING Architect AIBC & Juror

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16 architectureBC PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE


PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

Firm: Henriquez Partners Architects Lead Design Architect: Peter Lawrence Wood Architect AIBC MRAIC

Completion Date: 2015-09 Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Client: Westbank Corp.

Architectural Team Members: Gregory Henriquez Architect AIBC OAA RCA AAA AIA FRAIC

Ben Rowe Erik Roth Architect AIBC Dragoslav Mitic Jaime Dejo MRAIC Rocio Huertas Garcia Nick James Juan Hurtado Luke Cho Norman Huth Architect AIBC MRAIC

Payam Ashjae Intern Architect

Electrical Engineer: Integral Group Mechanical Engineer: Integral Group Structural Engineer: Glotman Simpson General Contractor: ICON Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd. Sustainability Consultant: Integral Group

AIBC

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Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit

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York House Senior School Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit ACTON OSTRY ARCHITECTS INC.

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PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN

Founded in 1932, York House is a leading independent all-girls K-12 day school with a campus that occupies an entire block in the heart of the Shaughnessy residential neighbourhood of Vancouver. Drawing on the rich history of West Coast Modernism with a material palette of textured concrete, wood, glass and limestone, the York House Senior School’s contemporary architecture grants the surrounding campus a clear identity as a dynamic learning place within a unique community.


“ The architect uses some very raw and basic materials (concrete and wood) to create a high-end aesthetic within the building. They have also used one of the cheapest building components, painted metal lockers, to activate and invigorate the space. It’s very clever design work.” — JACK KOBAYASHI Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN

PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN

PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN


PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN

Firm: Acton Ostry Architects Inc. Lead Design Architects: Mark Ostry Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC

Russell Acton Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC

Completion Date: 2013-09 Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Client: York House Senior School Architectural Team Members: Michael Fugeta Architect AIBC Ryan McCuaig Architect AIBC MRAIC LEED AP

Susan Ockwell Architect AIBC LEED AP

Nathaniel Straathof Architect AIBC LEED AP

Certified Professional: Gage-Babcock & Associates Ltd.

Code Consultant: Gage-Babcock & Associates Ltd.

Electrical Engineer: Acumen Engineering

Building Envelope Consultant: Morrison Hershfield Ltd.

Mechanical Engineer: MCW Consultants Ltd. (formerly Perez Engineering)

Surveyor: Murray & Associates

Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp

Cost Consultant: BTY Group

General Contractor: Haebler Construction Ltd.

Interior Design Consultant: Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

Owner Representative: First Western Developments Ltd.

Acoustic Consultant: RWDI (formerly Daniel Lyzun & Associates Ltd.)

Geotechnical Consultant: Exp. Associates Inc. Landscape Consultant: PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc.

Sergei Vakhrameev Architect AIBC

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Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Located in South Surrey, Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre joins a neighbourhood with close links to nature and proximity to urban amenities. With growing densification came the need for recreational and community spaces that would promote wellness, learning, healthy living, and athletic excellence. The LEED-certified facility balances pro-athlete capabilities with the needs of recreational users.

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

HCMA ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN


“The complexity of the structure is amazing and beautifully executed. The wave form of the roof is a playful metaphor. It feels as if it is floating.”

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

— NORM SHEARING Architect AIBC & Juror

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26 architectureBC PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER


PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Firm: HCMA Architecture + Design Lead Design Architect: Darryl Condon Architect AIBC AAA SAA OAA FRAIC LEED AP

Completion Date: 2015-12 Location: Surrey, B.C., Canada Client: City of Surrey Architectural Team Members: Stuart Rothnie Architect AIBC SAA OAA MRAIC LEED AP

Melissa Higgs Architect AIBC MRAIC

Nicolas Worth Project Manager Dip Arch ARB UK

Aiden Callison Architect AIBC LEED AP

Craig Lane Architect AIBC MRAIC

Steve DiPasquale Intern Architect AIBC

Alexandra Kenyon Intern Architect AIBC

Michael Henderson Architect AIBC MRAIC

Civil Engineer: RF Binnie Electrical Engineer: Applied Engineering Solutions

Building Envelope Consultant: Morrison Hershfield Surveyor: Underhill Cost Consultant: BTY Group

Mechanical Engineer: AME Group

Acoustic Consultant: Daniel Lyzun & Associates Ltd.

Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp

Audio Visual Consultant: MC2

General Contractor: EllisDon

Sustainability Consultant: MMM

Owner Representative: Scott Groves

Wayfinding Consultant: Cygnus

Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd.

Snow: Snow Country

Landscape Consultant: PFS Studio

Traffic: Bunt

Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.

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Jasper Place Library Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit HCMA ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN IN JOINT VENTURE WITH DUB ARCHITECTS

Tasked with creating a library to serve as the civic heart of a suburban community, the design needed to respond to the reality that print materials could be made obsolete in an increasingly technological world. Whether or not books will completely disappear from libraries in the coming decades remains uncertain. However, designing a distinct and flexible space to respond to rapidly changing user needs became a crucial programming consideration.

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— JACK KOBAYASHI Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: HUBERT KANG

“This is a very small suburban, neighbourhood library operating in the shadow of West Edmonton Mall. Using clever roof undulations, the architect was able to create a grand public space within a very small footprint.”


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PHOTO CREDIT: HUBERT KANG

PHOTO CREDIT: HUBERT KANG

PHOTO CREDIT: HUBERT KANG


PHOTO CREDIT: HUBERT KANG

Firms: HCMA Architecture + Design in joint venture with Dub Architects Lead Design Architects: Darryl Condon Architect AIBC

Architectural Team Members: Stuart Maddocks Architect AIBC Steve DiPasquale Intern Architect AIBC

James Woodall

AAA SAA OAA FRAIC LEED AP

Vincent Siu Architect AIBC

Michael Dub AAA MRAIC

LEED AP

LEED AP

Ciaran Bonar Dipl. Architectural

Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp General Contractor: Stuart Olson Dominion Construction Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.

Technology

Completion Date: 2012-12 Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada Client: City of Edmonton / Edmonton Public Library

Civil Engineer: ISL Engineering and Land Services Inc. Electrical Engineer: Williams Engineering Canada Inc. Mechanical Engineer: Williams Engineering Canada Inc.

Building Envelope Consultant: RDH Surveyor: Navland Geomatics Cost Consultant: BTY Group Acoustic Consultant: Brown Strachan Associates

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Centennial College Ashtonbee Campus Student Hub Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit

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PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

Centennial College’s Ashtonbee Campus Student Hub – the largest transportation school in Canada – required renewal to accommodate a growing student population and to revitalize its 1970s site. The student hub for this transportation campus was conceived as a figurative and literal ‘bridge’ – creating a kaleidoscopic campus gateway engaging pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The project was designed to LEED Gold requirements and conforms to the Toronto Green Standards.

PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

MACLENNAN JAUNKALNS MILLER ARCHITECTS LTD. (MJMA)


PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

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“ This project is exemplary because it acknowledges an entrenched automotive culture while posturing the next generation of students for a multi-modal and pedestrian-oriented future.”

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PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

— JAMES BLIGH Intern Architect AIBC & Juror


PHOTO CREDIT: SHAI GIL

Firm: MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects Ltd. (MJMA) Lead Design Architects: Ted Watson Architect AIBC OAA AAA SAA MRAIC SCUP LEED AP

Robert Allen OAA MRAIC SCUP

Client: Centennial College Architectural Team Members: Viktors Jaunkalns Architect AIBC OAA AAA NSAA SAA FRAIC SCUP

LEED AP

Andrew Filarski

Chris Burbidge OAA

Architect AIBC OAA AAA NSAA MRAIC

Completion Date: 2014-08

David Miller Architect AIBC

Location: Scarborough, ON, Canada

Tarisha Dolyniuk OAA

OAA NSAA SAA FRAIC

Cathy McMahon OAA Andrew Ng Nicole Tiomasi Electrical Engineer: Smith + Andersen Mechanical Engineer: Smith + Andersen Structural Engineer: Blackwell

Leland Dadson OAA MRAIC NCIDQ ARIDO

General Contractor: EllisDon

Kyung Sun Hur Afsaneh Tafazolli

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Rough House Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit MEASURED ARCHITECTURE INC.

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Rough House has been referred to as a playground for the architects and those living in it; a spirit of experimentation pervades the project. By leveraging the skillsets of trusted artisans, the process and finished product became a showcase for the architectural team’s creative pillars: specificity of site and purpose, carefully chosen and recycled materials, green building processes, meticulous finishing and a relentless dialogue with collaborators to constantly refine the vision for the project’s final incarnation.


“There are many elevation changes that occur throughout and between the main house and the lane house. You don’t see that very often in such a small project.”

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

— FRANCES BULA Journalist, Blogger & Juror

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38 architectureBC PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER


PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Firm: Measured Architecture Inc. Lead Design Architects: Clinton Cuddington Architect AIBC MRAIC

Piers Cunnington Architect AIBC MRAIC

Completion Date: 2015-08 Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Client Name: Clinton Cuddington and Monica Berdin

Architectural Team Members: Tobi May Architect AIBC Ryan Arceneaux Intern Architect AIBC

Joanne Smith Intern Architect AIBC

James Papa Architectural Technologist AIBC

Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp General Contractor: Powers Construction Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd.

Landscape Consultant: Aloe Designs Surveyor: Matson Peck & Topliss Interior Design Consultant: Monica Berdin Audio Visual Consultant: Graytek Custom Tile: Dear Human Millwork: Nico Spacecraft

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MNP Tower Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit MUSSON CATTELL MACKEY PARTNERSHIP IN ASSOCIATION WITH KOHN PEDERSON FOX ASSOCIATES

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PHOTO CREDIT: TIM GRIFFITH

The MNP Tower is defined by its unique 450 foot form, which responds to Waterfront and North Shore views, and mid-block location between three important heritage buildings. Through efficient functional planning, material reduction, employment of triple glazed curtain wall, and use of new mechanical systems permitting control by individual floors the MNP Tower achieves LEED Gold certification.


PHOTO CREDIT: TIM GRIFFITH

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“ The historic Marine Building was a great crag that rose out of the ocean. The MNP Tower is a modern crag that (when viewed down Hastings) adds to the original vision and yet does not compete. It’s a very elegant backdrop.” —JAMES BLIGH

PHOTO CREDIT: TIM GRIFFITH

Intern Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: TIM GRIFFITH

Firms: Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership in association with Kohn Pederson Fox Associates Lead Design Architects: Josh Chaiken AIA

Certified Professional: William Reid Architect AIBC AAA MRAIC CP

Electrical Engineer: Schenke Bawol Engineering

AAA MRAIC (Assoc) AIA

Mechanical Engineer: Integral Group

Completion Date: 2015-08

Structural Engineer: Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd.

Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada

General Contractor: Ledcor Construction Ltd.

Client: Oxford Properties Group

Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd.

Architectural Team Members: Jonah Hansen AIA

Landscape Consultant: Durante Kreuk Ltd.

Mark Whitehead Architect AIBC

Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd. Building Envelope Consultant: BVDA Facade Engineering & Morrison Hershfield Surveyor: McElhanney Heritage Consultant: Robert Lemon Architect Sustainability Consultant: Integral Group Wayfinding Consultant: Entro Communications

Steve Nilan AIA LEED AP BD + C

Peter Odegaard Architect AIBC

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Fort McMurray International Airport Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia Award in Architecture – Merit OFFICE OF MCFARLANE BIGGAR ARCHITECTS + DESIGNERS INC. (PROJECT COMMENCED AS PREDECESSOR FIRM MCFARLANE | GREEN | BIGGAR ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN INC.)

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

The terminal was designed to create a meaningful portal for the northern reaches of Alberta. Several innovations challenge the status quo, including passive solar orientation, superinsulated building envelope assemblies, in-floor radiant heating, displacement ventilation, and sophisticated heat recovery systems. Low-emitting materials are used throughout to promote healthy interior environments for passengers and employees. More significantly, the building is also distinguished by its early adoption and creative application of a mass timber construction system that envelopes the principal public spaces.


“ The architects were able to create a very clear organization and layout as well as promote good wayfinding within a highly programmed and secure environment. It’s no easy task. It has a Scandinavian sensibility in that it’s a well-designed and thoughtful building for the public to enjoy.” — JACK KOBAYASHI Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATREILLE


PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Firm: office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers inc. (project commenced as predecessor firm mcfarlane | green | biggar architecture + design inc.)

Heather Maxwell Architect AIBC

Lead Design Architects: Steve McFarlane Architect AIBC

Intern Architect AIBC

Hozumi Nakai Kevin Kong MASLA B.Arch Michael Townshend B.Tech Lydia Robinson RIBA LEED AP Langjing Xu Jordan van Dijk Architectural

AAA FRAIC LEED AP

Technologist AIBC

Rob Grant Architect AIBC

Mingyuk Chen

Completion Date: 2014-06 Location: Fort McMurray, AB, Canada Client: Fort McMurray Airport Authority Architectural Team Members: Michelle Biggar BBE RID LEED CI

Beth Denny Architect AIBC Nicholas Standeven Architect AAA

Jenell Hagardt BADID - Int Design

Adam Jennings B.A. (Hons)

Justin Bennet Architect AIBC LEED AP

Seng Tsoi Architect AIBC MRAIC ASLA

Simon Clewes BArch Adrienne Gibbs Electrical Engineer: Integral Group Mechanical Engineer: Integral Group Structural Engineer: Equilibrium Consulting Inc. General Contractor: Ledcor Construction Ltd.

Landscape Consultant: PWL Partnership Code Consultant: GHL Consultants Cost Consultant: BTY Group Interior Design Consultant: office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers Inc. Acoustic Consultant: BKL Consultants Audio Visual Consultant: Faith Group LLC Wayfinding Consultant: The Design Office Vertical Transportation: JW Gunn Consultants Inc. Lighting: Total Lighting Solutions Specifications: Morris Specifications

Owner Representative: Stantec Consulting Ltd.

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AIBC Innovation Award

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Surrey Operations Centre The AIBC Innovation Award TAYLOR KURTZ ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN INC. AND ROUNTHWAITE DICK & HADLEY ARCHITECTS INC.

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Comprising a loose group of three structures that mediate between public and industrial urban spaces, this $53M, 157,000 square foot project completely reconfigures and densifies the City of Surrey’s existing Central Operations Centre and works yard site. It provides a safe, modern and flexible work environment, sets a new design benchmark for this often neglected building type, and celebrates the work of those who build and maintain our municipal infrastructure.


“I have worked in some of these industrial spaces myself and a lot of tasks could not be performed without natural light. We would often drive our vehicles outside to get a better look in the natural light. This building solves that problem.”

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

— GILBERT LAROCQUE P.Eng., LLB & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA EMA PETERPETER PHOTO CREDIT:

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER


PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Firm Names: Taylor Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc. and Rounthwaite, Dick & Hadley Architects Inc. Project Architect: Craig Taylor Architect AIBC

Certified Professional: Gage Babcock & Associates

Cost Consultant: James Bush & Associates Ltd.

Civil Engineer: RF Binnie & Associates

Interior Design Consultant: Taylor Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc.

MRAIC (TKA+D)

Electrical Engineer: Integral Group

Design Lead: Geoff Miller Architect OAA

Mechanical Engineer: Integral Group

MRAIC LEED AP (RDHA)

Completion Date: 2015-05 Location: Surrey, B.C., Canada Client Name: City of Surrey Architectural Team Members: Bob Goyeche Architect OAA (RDHA)

Patrick Murphy (TKA+D) Dan Herljevic (RDHA) Luc Johnston (RDHA) Benjamin Beckwith Intern Architect AIBC LEED AP (TKA+D)

Svetlana Svechkina Intern Architect AIBC LEED AP (TKA+D)

Kent Fawcett (TKA+D) Christina Fong NCIDQ (TKA+D)

Asar Aminpour NCIDQ (TKA+D)

Structural Engineer: WSP (formerly Halsall Associates Ltd.) General Contractor: Graham Construction and Engineering Owner Representative: Scott Groves Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd. Landscape Consultant: PFS Studio Code Consultant: Gage Babcock & Associates Building Envelope Consultant: WSP (formerly Halsall Associates Ltd.)

Acoustic Consultant: BKL Audio Visual Consultant: City of Surrey Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment: Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc., City of Surrey Construction Management: Graham Construction and Engineering Sustainability Consultant: Recollective Wayfinding Consultant: City of Surrey Traffic Engineering: WSP (formerly MMM Group) Environment Engineering: Dylan Consulting & Envirowest Public Artist: Alan Storey

Surveyor: Bulter Sundvick

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AIBC Emerging Firm Award

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AIBC Emerging Firm Award MARIANNE AMODIO ARCHITECTURE STUDIO

marianne amodio architecture studio was founded in 2010. Amodio launched her firm in June 2010, working out of her living room before opening up shop in Chinatown in 2013. This award-winning firm works to strike a balance between fanciful architecture and functional art. Last year, Amodio won Western Living’s Designers of the Year Arthur Erickson Memorial Award.

1. MADhouse  –  Multi-Adult Dwelling 2. APT  –  Multi-Unit Residential Amenity Floor & Exterior Renovation

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

PHOTO CREDIT: JANIS NICOLAY

3. W2  –  Kitsilano Multi-Unit Exterior Renovation


PHOTO CREDIT: JANIS NICOLAY

PHOTO CREDIT: JANIS NICOLAY PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

The MAD (house) is a multi-adult dwelling in Vancouver. Housing three sets of adults from the same family within a 2880 square foot volume, the home was designed to allow for wide open shared public spaces and private separated suites. A contrast of high volume spaces with small nooks allows for varied spatial experience in the contained footprint. The homeowners sense of whimsy and quirk allows the home its delightful eccentricities. The purposeful manipulation of natural light creates a sense of spaciousness in the home, while full height doors, soaring windows and wide open roof decks add to this sense of openness. The private spaces are purposefully intimate and smaller: the juxtaposition emphasizing a sense of respite and comfort. The home provides a practical solution to housing affordability and multi-generational living while embracing the homeowners’ artful and creative nature.

PHOTO CREDIT: JANIS NICOLAY

1. MAD(house)

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PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

“She has a design sensibility that is unusual within the architectural scene in Vancouver. Her work is whimsical. She is not afraid to have fun or challenge entrenched norms. She states her goals and accomplishes them.” — JAMES BLIGH

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

Intern Architect AIBC & Juror

PHOTO CREDIT: EMA PETER

2. APT

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A major renovation to 15,000 square feet of tenant amenity area in a 12-storey residential tower. The design of the amenity floors are intended to complement the size of the units; they include private TV and dining lounges that can be reserved by residents, art studios and workshops, communal gathering spaces for watching TV and lounging, a coffee bar and ping pong table in addition to a sauna and workout room. The intention that while residents own living units may be small, that their home comprises the lofty and spacious amenity floors. The project highlights how design and creative thinking can address issues of affordability and sustainability.


3. W2

PHOTO CREDIT: JANIS NICOLAY

A balcony and guardrail replacement that began as a technical exercise, led to a more playful approach to the renovation. Creating a more vibrant and happy face to the street, this project highlights how one simple move using standard building materials can create great impact and immediately refresh an aging but much needed market rental building.

Firm marianne amodio architecture studio Firm Principal Marianne Amodio Architect AIBC Projects Names: 1. MADhouse – Multi-Adult Dwelling 2. APT – Multi-Unit Residential Amenity Floor & Exterior Renovation 3. W2 – Kitsilano Multi-Unit Exterior Renovation

Architectural Team Members Stefan Levasseur B.EnDs. Alicia Medina Laddaga M.Arch. Nigel Dembicki B.EnDs. Brooke Dedrick M.Arch. Alejandro Sanguino Bueno B.Arch. Areas of Practice: Commercial, Interior Design, Office, Renovation, Residential Multiple, Residential Single, Retail Certificate of Practice issued: December 17, 2009

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AIBC Special Jury Awards

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2211 Cambie The AIBC Special Jury Award for Contextual Innovation ARNO MATIS ARCHITECTURE INC. AND AZUREAN ARCHITECTURE INC.

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PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN

Inspired by the stone quarry of nearby Queen Elizabeth Park and shaped by the energy of the site, 2211 Cambie is a transitoriented market rental building. Building forms bend and open to increase daylight in courtyards and public spaces. The development was shaped to maximize views from and through the site in anticipation of development to the south and west.


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PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL ELKAN


“This is a unique building form for Vancouver on a prominent and difficult site. The building makes me happy. It’s a pleasure. Every time I drive down Cambie I admire it.”

PHOTO CREDIT: ED WHITE

— FRANCES BULA Journalist, Blogger & Juror

Firms: Arno Matis Architecture Inc. and Azurean Architecture Inc. Lead Design Architect: Arno Matis Architect AIBC RAIC Completion Date: 2014-10 Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Client: Portliving - Tavia Cooper Architectural Team Members: Arno Matis Architect AIBC RAIC Nicholas Weissbluth Dominic Mahoney Graham Barron Architect AIBC

Electrical Engineer: Nemetz (S/A) & Associates Ltd. Mechanical Engineer: MMM Group Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp General Contractor: Kindred Construction Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Engineering Inc. Landscape Consultant: Considered Design Code Consultant: LMDG Building Code Consultants Ltd.

Building Envelope Consultant: Spratt Emanuel Engineering Ltd. Surveyor: Bennett Land Surveying Cost Consultant: Concosts Group Interior Design Consultant: Hungerford Interior Design Acoustic Consultant: Brown Strachan Associates Sustainability Consultant: One Earth Light Art: Lightspace by Tamar Frank

Alasdair Hamilton Architect AIBC

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Shaughnessy House The AIBC Special Jury Award for Heritage Retention and Modernization MEASURED ARCHITECTURE INC.

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PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

This project addresses the question of heritage and what it means in a context of innovation. The Measured Architecture team, led by Clinton Cuddington and Piers Cunnington, were tasked with preserving the Garden City suburb concept built into a 1910 grand Edwardian-era Foursquare house while introducing contemporary interventions to draw the building into the present.


“This is a very important and timely project in light of what is happening to the historic building fabric in Vancouver.” — NORM SHEARING Architect AIBC & Juror

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PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE


PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW LATRIELLE

Firm: Measured Architecture Inc. Lead Design Architects: Clinton Cuddington

Architectural Team Members Tobi May Architect AIBC

Surveyor: Matson Peck & Topliss

Technologist AIBC

Audio Visual Consultant: New Space Technologies

Structural Engineer: Fast + Epp

Heritage Consultant: Donald Luxton & Associates

General Contractor: Powers Construction

Millwork: Intempo Interiors

Geotechnical Consultant: GeoPacific Consultants Ltd.

Architectural Steel: Epic Metalworks

James Papa Architectural

Architect AIBC MRAIC

Piers Cunnington Architect AIBC MRAIC

Completion Date: 2015-06 Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada Client: Jennifer Wong

Landscape Consultant: Paul Sangha Landscape Architecture

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Other Submissions The following pages feature entries not selected for the 2016 AIBC Architectural Awards. All images courtesy of the submitting architectural firms; used with permission.

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The Lubavitch Centre of British Columbia Interior Renovation ABC Architecture Building Culture Inc.

The Stubbs Residence ABC Architecture Building Culture Inc.

999 Seymour Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

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Christ Worship Centre Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

Congregation Beth Israel Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

Hillel Student Centre Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

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Cactus Club English Bay Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

St. Augustine School Acton Ostry Architects Inc.

BlueShore Financial Head Office/Financial Spa Atelier Pacific Architecture Inc. and EHS Design Inc.

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Tall Trees Integrated Health Centre Cascadia Architects Inc.

AMS Student Nest The University of British Columbia DIALOG and B+H Associated Architects

Old Main Academic Building Addition Thompson Rivers University Diamond and Schmitt Architects Inc. in association with Stantec Architecture Ltd.

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Mountain Equipment Coop Head Office

Brock Commons Phase One

Grandview Heights Aquatic Centre

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Peter A. Allard School of Law The University of British Columbia Diamond and Schmitt Architects Inc. in joint venture with CEI Architecture Planning Interiors

Casa Luca Passive House DLP Architecture Inc.

Djavad Mowafaghian Child Care Centre DYS Architecture

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Boardwalk Building F M D’Ambrosio Architecture Inc.

Village Walk F M D’Ambrosio Architecture Inc.

Wesbrook Community Centre Francl Architecture in collaboration with WMW Public: Architecture + Communication Inc.

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Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre The University of British Columbia HCMA Architecture + Design in joint venture with KPMB Architects

Mill Woods Branch Library HCMA Architecture + Design in joint partnership with Dub Architects

Galadriel Iredale Group Architecture

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Outma Sqilx'w Cultural School Iredale Group Architecture

Dairy Research Center Housing The University of British Columbia Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture

Branksome Hall Athletics & Wellness Centre MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects Ltd. (MJMA)

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What’s possible? HCMA Architecture + Design challenges the traditional boundaries of architectural practice by asking one question. “How do we achieve the maximum positive impact through design?” Visit hcma.ca to join the conversation.

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Queen Mary Elementary School Restoration & Addition Mark Ehman, Architect Inc. and Randy Knill, Architect Ltd. dba DA Architects + Planners

École Mer-et-montagne McFarland Marceau Architects Ltd.

Fitness & Wellness Centre Okanagan Campus The University of British Columbia McFarland Marceau Architects Ltd.

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Cloister House + Laneway Measured Architecture Inc.

OAK Merrick Architecture  –  Borowski Sakumoto Fligg Mcintyre Ltd.

Interfor Metrotown MGA | Michael Green Architecture Inc.

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TED Elevate MGA | Michael Green Architecture Inc.

Whistler Rendezvous Renovation MGA | Michael Green Architecture Inc.

Halsa Float Spa Michel A. Laflamme Architect

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ARTlab Patkau Architects Inc. in joint venture with LM Architectural Group

Chinook Regional Hospital Perkins+Will Canada Architects Co. and Group2 Architecture Interior Design Inc.

Canada House Stantec Architecture Ltd.

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South Surrey Recreation & Arts Centre Addition Taylor Kurtz Architecture + Design Inc.

Engineering Student Centre The University of British Columbia Urban Arts Architecture

Main Street - Science World SkyTrain Station VIA Architecture Inc.

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Centennial Beach Park Pavillion WMW Public: Architecture + Communication Inc.

East 3rd House WMW Public: Architecture + Communication Inc.

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2016 Recognition Program The AIBC recognizes the invaluable contributions from volunteers who donate their time, energy and wisdom to a great variety of organizational activities. There are currently about 150 volunteers involved in a number of ways at the AIBC, including providing the governance of our council, reviewing and updating bylaws, reviewing qualifications and

experience of intern architects and architectural technologists, and so much more. In addition to AIBC volunteers, the institute also celebrates the success and extraordinary contributions of architects in British Columbia by encouraging recognition award nominations.

Do you know worthy candidates who should be recognized for their contributions to the profession, the community or the institute? Nominate dedicated volunteers and others who have made positive impacts on the profession of architecture and its public appreciation. Visit the AIBC website at www.aibc.ca for details and nomination forms.

AIBC Recognition Award Categories AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award This prestigious award recognizes current or former B.C. architects who have made exceptional, sustained and significant contributions to the profession of architecture and its public appreciation in the province through an outstanding, career-long body of work.

AIBC Special Certificate of Recognition

The Barbara Dalrymple Memorial Award for Community Service

This award honours AIBC architects, other individual registrants or architectural firms who have made positive contributions to the practice or profession of architecture through volunteer activities.

Established in honour of the late Barbara Dalrymple, a respected Vancouver architect with a strong commitment to her profession and the community, this award recognizes contributions made by AIBC architects, individual registrants or architectural firms, in the spirit of Barbara’s dedication to positive change and her legacy of professional and public service.

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2015 AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award:

Fred Hollingsworth Honorary

Member of the AIBC FRAIC FAIA (posthumously)

Plans drafted for his own house, built in 1946, in which his wife resides to this day, led to an offer of employment at the prestigious Sharp & Thompson, Berwick, Pratt architectural firm. Fred designed the iconic Sky Bungalow, introducing what would become common features of the West Coast modern home. Fred has since been regarded as one of the originators of West Coast Modernism. A growing desire to investigate a more suitable and practical form of architecture attracted Fred to the

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works of American architects, in particular Bernard Maybeck and Frank Lloyd Wright, who offered Fred a job. Fred declined, choosing instead to pursue his own philosophy of organic architecture, emphasizing a close relationship and sensitivity to nature and simple, local materials. Fred's 'Neoteric' design of simple post and beam houses for working class people met with immediate success. After a period in the 1950's in the office of William Birmingham, Fred obtained his architectural license and served as an Alderman for the District of North Vancouver where he was instrumental in setting up the Planning Board. In 1963, Fred partnered with Barry Downs. He served as AIBC president in 1971 and as President of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada in 1975. In 1976 he was awarded Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architect. In 1967 he began his own practice, which he ran until 2004. Fred continued drawing, making and painting until he passed away in April 2015.

PHOTO CREDIT: ALAN MAPLES

The AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award was established by the institute specifically to recognize current or former B.C. architects who have made exceptional, sustained and significant contributions to the profession of architecture and its public appreciation in the province through an outstanding, career-long body of work.

Born in Oldham, England on January 8, 1917, Fred immigrated to Canada in 1929 and settled in the Marpole area. An early interest in aircraft helped him obtain work as a sheet metal worker, which led to employment at Boeing Aircraft during WWII. A love of music led to the formation of the Fred Hollingsworth Orchestra with performances at the city's dance clubs, and to close associations with musicians, including Dal Richards with whom he attended high school.


PHOTO CREDIT: ALAN MAPLES

2015 AIBC Lifetime Achievement Award: Roger Hughes Architect AIBC FRAIC

Roger Hughes was educated at the University of British Columbia and went on to complete continuing studies at the Architectural Association in London. In 1971 he became a member of the RIBA and established Roger Hughes & Associates Architects completing a number of inner city housing projects. Roger returned to Vancouver in 1976 and formed Roger Hughes Architects, a firm that has evolved over four decades to become HCMA Architecture + Design. During his career, his work has adapted to changing contexts and needs, while consistently being recognized for its design excellence.

Roger has focused his 40-year career on leveraging the power of design to contribute to a strong, healthy and socially diverse society. He has led the design of innovative residential, civic, and urban design projects, focusing on each project's potential to impact society. Roger is a passionate and gifted designer with a sharp mind, and a rich and varied portfolio. Over the forty years of his practice, the firm and his work have been recognized with numerous national and international awards including six Governor General's Awards from the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

of the firm's design philosophies. As founding partner, his projects defined the direction for the firm. He has led the design of a number of firm firsts, building typologies that now shape the practice.

Early in his career, Roger focused on ground-breaking residential and social housing projects, with the core work being multi-family housing projects for inner city areas, and it was these projects that best expressed the evolving characteristics

Roger is a current and past member of the Vancouver Urban Design Panel, the Shaughnessy Design Panel and has been active as a guest critic at the UBC School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. He was made a fellow of the RAIC for his contribution to design excellence in 1995.

Roger cultivated a practice that encourages dialogue and problem solving. A supportive leader, he was never shy to give his staff opportunities to learn and grow and his open studio fostered thoughtful discussion and action. HCMA has been an incubator firm for many of today's young practices and Roger's influence can be seen in their philosophies.

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2016 AIBC Scholarship & Bursary Program Each year, the AIBC is pleased to fund scholarships to exemplary students in the University of British Columbia’s Master of Architecture Program as well as the British Columbia Institute of Technology’s Architectural and Building Technology and Architectural Science programs, recognizing academic standing and progress. Recipients for 2016 include:

The University of British Columbia School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

British Columbia Institute of Technology

Michael A. Ernest AIBC Intern Architect Bursary

2016

The AIBC is pleased to offer the Michael A. Ernest AIBC Intern Architect Bursary in recognition of Mike’s long standing contribution to the profession. Retired as AIBC’s Executive Director in December 2014, Michael A. Ernest Architect AIBC has been a dedicated member of the AIBC and the British Columbia architectural community since the 1970s.

AIBC Achievement Award: AIBC Medal - awarded to an outstanding student in the graduating class who has demonstrated excellence in academic work as well as in design and who holds the promise of making a contribution to the profession of architecture:

2016 Medal • Mr. Daichi Yamashita

Additional Scholarship Recipients: • Mr. Lorinc Vass • Mr. Roy Cloutier • Ms. Laura Gilmore

• Mr. Julio He Lu

AIBC Achievement Award in Architectural Science: • Mr. Jivan Khera

AIBC Achievement Award in Architecture: • Ms. Lanna FitzGerald

AIBC Award in Architecture: • Mr. Michael Dalby

The annual bursary is awarded to intern architects in good standing who are intending to become a registered architect.

AIBC Award in Architectural Science: • Mr. Abubaker Bajaman

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Profiles

Kate Busby Architect AIBC Kate Busby is a project architect with SHAPE Architecture, a Vancouver-based design firm known for high density, low energy, innovative projects. For over ten years, her work has focused on community buildings, with special expertise in sport and aquatic facilities. Before moving to B.C., Kate worked with offices in Paris, Dublin, Oslo and Edmonton. She is a member of the AIBC Advisory Design Panel Committee and previously served on the City of Vancouver Development Permit Board Advisory Panel. Kate lives in downtown Vancouver with her husband, Michael Thicke, and their son Odin.

How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work? As professionals, architects are ethically-bound to make decisions in the interest of the public, as well as represent the private interests of their clients. This is no small feat. Professional integrity and responsibility have definite benefits for society as a whole every day. An architect's work is always influenced by the sum of their experiences and training – so each architect has an innately unique view to share. It's important for architects to keep learning and staying inspired. We have a lot of influence on what gets built, therefore we should broaden our exposure as often as possible.

What is the highlight of your career so far? From 2008-10, I was working in France for an architecture/urbanism office. We mostly worked on sports projects, including France's successful bid for the EURO 2016. It was exciting to work on something with such a massive scale that would have an effect on so many people.

What lies at the heart of the value architects bring to bear on the projects they work on? Architects work with a lot of specialists with very focused areas of expertise. But as prime consultants, we have to be generalists. Our role on the project team is inherently holistic. This viewpoint is the most important skill we bring to the project. And we can draw well.

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How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? While the term resilience has been appropriated to mean design for natural disasters, it is a pretty good term for good design in general. Good work is durable yet adaptable to changes over time. Design for the built environment really can't afford to be flighty or trend-driven. It's easy to get caught up in the latest trends, but it's irresponsible to come up with designs that won't be loved over time.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? I learned a lot about good design from my former boss Barry Johns. He talked about responsible design, down to the details – even when making colour choices. He advised to avoid trendy colours, because they wouldn't last over time – and this may not only be a disservice to the project's clients, but could compromise the original design intent. Better to go with the classics – fire engine red!

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture? Built works need to withstand real world use and deterioration. In architecture, true resiliency lies in considered design, quality materials and execution. Strong ideas and well-built projects can withstand the elements and maintain their relevance over time.

Which innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? I'm a big fan of Building Information Modelling. I'm keen to see increased implementation in our day-to-day design and construction processes. I really believe that applying the right technology can help us design smarter and better.

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future? I'd say ‘you need to look to the past.’ It sounds really trite, but it's so true. In Canada we get this wrong all the time; we rarely look at time-tested precedents. We should be looking at cities and buildings that really work for people, but these are often in foreign countries. We write them off as too exotic or irrelevant, but I find them more relevant than ever as we are starting to increasingly value things like walkability and sense of community.

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years? I'm mostly eager to try lots of new things – as many as possible.

I like to think about optimism in design. You can't help but get excited about work if you're designing ‘optimistic’ buildings.

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Profiles

Louis Conway Architect AIBC photographer

Louis Conway studied psychology prior to entering architecture, and the concept of resilience resonates with him at both a personal and professional level as essential for coping with stressors and challenges. His professional practice has included rezoning, planning, design and construction. His focus on resilience strategies is an extension of his interest in sustainability as both LEED AP BD+C and ENVISION SP (Sustainability Professional – Infrastructure).

How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work? Architects are constantly engaging other disciplines in the course of their day-to-day work whether they are involved in community engagement, planning, design, construction or building conditions assessment. The design thinking involved in architectural practice can benefit society by helping to address complex problems such as adaptation to disruptive changes following a natural or man-made disaster. It involves the ability to think strategically about resilience and to generate multiple approaches at building, community, regional and ecosystem scales. A resilience strategy for Vancouver, for example, could integrate existing city initiatives such as earthquake preparedness with new approaches based on resources available through its membership in the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities global network of cities. Potential impacts of a resilience strategy for Vancouver on architectural practice could involve consideration

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of resilience performance objectives for inclusion in the Vancouver Building Bylaw. Specific strategies that could be implemented include LEED’s new pilot credits for resilient design: assessment and planning for resilience, and passive survivability and functionality during emergencies.

What is the highlight of your career so far? One career highlight has been my involvement since early 2014 with the AIBC Post-Disaster Response Committee. The committee's work in engaging a broad array of stakeholders has been key to its success. We met with members of the resilience community from various levels of government, APEGBC and academia; and participated in emergency management exercises. Discussions with stakeholders on emergency preparedness have included the City of Vancouver’s Office of Emergency Management and UBC’s Risk Management Services. We also collaborated with members of the AIA in providing post disaster response training focused on safety assessment.


What lies at the heart of the value architects bring to bear on the projects they work on? Architects often work with poorly defined problems with seemingly disconnected elements. Design thinking enables the architect to establish relationships that link these elements. It is a collaborative process that allows for disruption, the unpredictable and the emergence of new ideas, and is key to the development of resilience strategies.

How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? My work with the AIBC Post Disaster Response Committee as resilience advocate has involved engaging broadly with the resilience community. For the AIBC 2014 conference, I coordinated with New Zealand planner Darren Davis who presented on recovery in Christchurch, New Zealand following the 2011 earthquakes; while at Buildex 2015 I presented on risk and resilience. I have participated in the 2015 Annual National Roundtable on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) under Canada's Platform for DRR which represents Canada under the 2015–30 UNISDR Sendai Framework for DRR. Currently, I contribute to the development of a Resilience Knowledge Base (RKB) and the application of resilience planning principles to disaster scenarios with the Community Resilience Panel, a stakeholder engagement group under NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology – a US federal agency). I am also involved in developing ISO DTR 37121, a review of existing frameworks on sustainable development and resilience in cities, with TC 268 of the Standards Council of Canada.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? Thought leadership on resilience and environment has been provided by Johan Rockstrom of the Stockholm Resilience Centre who emphasizes the need to stay within planetary boundaries or life support systems to create a “safe operating space for humanity.” At the heart of resilience thinking is the idea that planetary boundaries must be respected and, if they are crossed, ecological or social systems can change from one state to another  – perhaps disruptively. Two of these boundaries, climate change and biodiversity loss, may have already been crossed. Judith Rodin’s work as president of the Rockefeller Foundation 200416 has provided thought leadership on resilience strategies that address disruptive change through programs such as 100 Resilient Cities. She is a thought leader not only for supporting the development of resilience strategies for cities but for linking resilience to humanitarian causes and emphasizing urgent implementation.

Framework and it implies not necessarily restoration of the status quo as in “bounce back” but recovery, regeneration and “bounce forward”. • Development of community plans will increasingly focus on risk-based land use. • Rating systems such as LEED and the infrastructure rating system ENVISION will increasingly incorporate resilience strategies. • Building codes will include resilience for multiple hazards as performance objectives. • Architecture will move toward design that is increasingly multifunctional.

What innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? Social innovation is a key aspect of resilience. It seeks to balance topdown and bottom-up approaches to improve the lives of the poor and the most vulnerable in society. IDEO is a social innovator in the area of human-centered design in which participants immerse themselves within a vulnerable community.

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years?

The architectural community has also been engaged through the foundation’s support for programs such as Rebuild by Design, and the National Disaster Resilience Competition which have attracted extensive US federal funding.

My focus will be on contributing to the development of resilience strategies.

Patrick Meier, co-founder of the Digital Humanitarian Network, has provided thought leadership on Big Crisis Data and mobilizing online to make sense of data from social media, SMS, and imagery from satellites and UAVs (drones).

" ... work with urgency, respond rapidly, and course correct if necessary."  – Judith Rodin, June 2016

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future?

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture? A focus on resilience encourages a philosophy of Build Back Better. This is a key theme of the Sendai

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Profiles

Robyn Fenton Architect AIBC Robyn Fenton is an architect, designer, instructor and facilitator. She grew up in Richmond, B.C. and after graduating high school, she travelled to Sydney, Australia to pursue her passion in architecture. She lived in Sydney for seven years and completed her B.A.Arch and B.Arch at the University of Technology, Sydney. While studying, she worked for six years with Yvonne Haber Architect. In 2007, Robyn returned to Vancouver. Working with Boni Maddison Architects from 2008 to 2013, she completed her internship and became a registered architect in 2011. In 2009, ReForma Studio was founded, completing small projects. In 2011 it transformed into ReForma Architecture, a registered practice with the AIBC.

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How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work?

What lies at the heart of the value architects bring to bear on the projects they work on?

Architects are problem solvers. We can help communities in a variety of ways. I’ve found this through my volunteer work as a facilitator in workshops and public charrettes.

Community engagement. I’m always thinking about who will be the ultimate end user, who will benefit from the project, and how we can help them have input on its design.

Including the public (introducing design thinking or human-centred design, for example) and making them feel part of the design process has the benefit of helping them differentiate between good design and bad design and think about how to improve it.

I’m always interested to hear about major projects that have gone through extensive community engagement and how successful they are. Dialog with the New UBC SUB building or Fowler Bauld and Mitchell with the new Halifax Central Library are good examples. Both went to great lengths to engage with the end users and the buildings are not only successful projects, but from what I understand, there is an immense sense of ownership and respect for these spaces in their respective communities.

What is the highlight of your career so far? It's been more than a single project or moment. I’ve had a great career, working with fantastic people, both colleagues and clients. I’ve followed my instincts, been a bit adventurous, which has sometimes led me in unexpected directions, but it’s always worked out! For a few years now, I’ve been doing presentations at conferences, which isn’t something I ever expected to do, but I enjoy and find it really rewarding.


How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? At the moment, I generally apply the concept through volunteer work and advocacy. My work with the AIBC's Post-Disaster Response Committee gives me the opportunity to talk about resiliency with colleagues, family, friends and people in my community. I try to advocate where I see opportunities for projects to bring resiliency into the mix. I’m looking forward to having resiliency become more integrated into my professional work.

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture? Resilience has been coming to the forefront more and more lately, and I only see that continuing. With climate change bringing more storms, drought, and extreme weather events, our designs will have to respond. There will be innovators and pioneers at the forefront, and we’re already seeing this in some prominent projects that emphasize resilience, like The Big U project in New York City. It's a seawall that will protect the city from storm surges, but also creates amazing new public spaces. Then coming in behind the pioneers, will be the more structured and universal measures, like those that come in through the building code.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? Which innovations do you Rachel Minnery has been a leading anticipate when it comes to voice in the AIA, particularly in postresilience? disaster context, but also in Resilient Design. The AIA has taken a clear leadership role for architects with their Resiliency Program and it is definitely something for us to aspire to here in Canada. One concept that informs my thinking, as resiliency relates to environmental sustainability, is durable, low maintenance material. Designing buildings that are going to last 50 to 100 years and are adaptable, repairable, and flexible is key to resilience.

I like to think of resilience as the next wave of thinking in buildings. I feel the last 10 to 15 years has been about energy efficiency and GHG emissions (with programs like LEED, Net Zero, Built Green) which have done a great job in bringing public awareness to sustainability and energy efficiency in the built environment. It would be great to see a standard develop to emphasize resiliency in design (there are some code-plus programs underway in the US, such as FORTIFIED). I know it’s not glamorous, but I see innovation in building codes and with insurers being key and influential. I’m a big believer in incentives. Insurers already provide incentives in places like Florida, where if you take measures to protect your house from hurricanes, you receive discounts on your premiums. This

isn’t a new concept, but resilient design is a new area where we can advocate for incentives. Imagine a discount on insurance premiums or even property taxes if you built your house to a post-disaster standard?

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years? My newly adopted home of Bowen Island is an exciting place to be at the moment. There are new neighborhoods and community buildings in the planning stages, to be built in years to come. I hope to advocate for them to be built with resiliency in mind. I also plan to continue my work with the AIBC's Post-Disaster Response Committee, where we are working to establish a national, cross-jurisdictional network of architects who can assist after disasters, much like the AIA’s Disaster Assistance Program.

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future? One of the most important aspects of resiliency is building a strong, connected community. There's a lot we can do with the built environment, but it's the people inhabiting those spaces and how they will support and assist each other over time, especially in a post-disaster context, that will most effectively provide for a resilient future.

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Profiles

Neil Prakash Architect AIBC Neil Prakash has worked for Nick Milkovich Architects since 2005. He is an active member of Vancouver’s design community in both architecture and jewelry design (hk+np studio). Currently, Neil volunteers as the Vice Chair for the AIBC’s Design Panel Committee. He has developed and taught curriculum for Athabasca Universities Centre for Architecture and has volunteered with the RAIC Syllabus program.

How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work? Architecture is unique in that it must unite many disparate viewpoints in order to be successful. Site conditions as well as the social and economic environment are also always unique, so our profession demands a certain level of adaptability, flexibility, and nimbleness in the design process. In dealing with issues that affect society at large, I think these characteristics are good ones for policy makers to utilize in generating consensus around an idea.

What is the highlight of your career so far? I’m not sure that I can point to any one project as a career highlight. My exposure to a wide range of program types and project scales has been both rewarding and invigorating because it challenges me on a number

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of different levels. I have also had the opportunity to work with many interesting individuals and I take pride in working with others to achieve a common goal.

What lies at the heart of the value architects bring to bear on the projects they work on? I think that open-mindedness is a crucial component to the value we bring to clients. Being adaptable and developing a willfulness to listen are also key characteristics in practicing architecture. Because of the nature of our work we are also exposed to a wide range of expertise and have the ability to see synergies between different disciplines. Often times this leads to uncovering solutions that solve multiple problems for our clients which they find extremely valuable.


How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? When working with communities it is important for us to develop an understanding of the value system that binds individuals to the group. Our aim is to then reinforce those shared values in a built form that celebrates and supports community activity. Two important keys to resilience in this regard are community involvement, and quality of design and construction. Community involvement fosters stewardship and care; quality of design and construction fosters longevity and adaptability.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? In a very general sense I gravitate towards thinkers that promote the idea of self-discovery as an intrinsic way towards understanding our world. To build a knowledge of what is individually true through direct experience and contemplation provides me with a good foundation to respond and react to different situations.

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture?

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years?

Architecture, when considered as the physical expression of the aspirations and values of a community, requires resilience to maintain relevance. Architectural resilience, however, has many different expressions – social, environmental, and economical being the broad expressions. Why are some expressions of architecture celebrated and why do some survive the tests of time, while others succumb to changing demographics? There is no simple answer to this question, but in my mind, if a work of architecture is to be resilient it must be adaptable to the changing expressions of culture, the environment, and economical currents. To me, this speaks to the fundamentals of architecture that deal with spatial proportion and natural light, mediated through a unified formal expression. When these three elements are skillfully dealt with in architecture, society usually seems to find new ways to express itself within it over time.

Over the next five years I hope to focus on projects that are community-based and look at holistic sustainability solutions. I would like to maintain the diversity of project types I am working on and hope to create new collaborations within B.C.’s design, development, and building community.

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future? In general my best advice would be to face the future with an open mind, an open heart and a sense of humour. In practice, I think this attitude also applies. Working on a diversity of project types and scales can also help smooth out any dips you might experience due to changes in the economy.

Which innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? The future is quite interesting in that I think we are heading in a direction where we will be able to do more with less. Greater spans with less material, generate more energy with less carbon footprint, and have more self-sufficiency with less reliance. New ideas about how to readapt aging infrastructure, new methods for moving goods, people, and services, and new ways to organize our communities will all be interesting topics for architects to grapple with in the future.

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Profiles

Gavin Schaefer Intern Architect AIBC Gavin is an Intern Architect AIBC at the Vancouver office of Perkins + Will, where he focuses on complex building typologies and advanced digital project delivery methods. He is vice chair of Cascadia Green Building Council Metro Vancouver, sits on the AIBC Intern Architect Committee, and is a member of the Urban Land Institute BC YLG Programming Committee. He graduated from Dalhousie University in 2014.

How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work? Architects have a unique role in society, as they accept the obligation to consider simultaneously the interests of the community, the client, and the profession. When you combine this obligation with the analytical skillset, communications skills, and tenacity that gets imbued through a rigorous architectural education, architects are powerful advocates for positive social change.

What is the highlight of your career so far? Working with international teams on complicated projects has been an incredible opportunity to be exposed to different cultures and ideas. I think it is one of the greatest aspects about the industry, and we are only going to see more of it. I am fortunate to get to work with intelligent people from different disciplines who each bring their own perspective to the table.

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What lies at the heart of the value intern architects bring to bear on the projects they work on? Architectural thinking is holistic and, by necessity, has a focus on the future. The new perspectives that emerging practitioners bring to the table allow for a critical reinterpretation of the urban landscape. The profession needs to have next generation thinking coming into the office constantly to refresh and challenge entrenched points of view in order to better serve the public. Skyscrapers and other major civic projects last for a long time, and they impact the welfare and success of generations of citizens, so it is important that the decisions we make now are the right ones. For example, Vancouver’s tower envelopes are just starting to come to the end of their lifecycles, so we are seeing a great opportunity to improve performance and rethink what a tower offers the city.


How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? Perkins + Will has internal design reviews that check projects against the Architecture 2030 Challenge, energy use/water reduction, and resiliency in the face of climate science projections for the particular region we are working in. For example, on a project I was recently working on in the Middle East we identified issues of rising temperatures, heat gain, water scarcity, occasional floods, population increases, and limited energy resources. Our design had to incorporate responses to these issues. We also do a lot of work in mass transit, which helps regions respond to changing demographics.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? Professional and advocacy bodies like the AIBC, AIA, and RAIC provide a lot of insight into current trends in resilient design. Internally at Perkins + Will, we have a Resiliency Task Force which provides a toolkit for staff, along with case studies. The Urban Land Institute in particular has done some useful studies, and has a great report called Returns on Resilience: The Business Case, which shows that resilient design is an intelligent investment. It is not an extra cost, as commonly perceived. Designers have a responsibility to inform clients, and so we also find ourselves in the role of teacher.

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture?

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years?

I would argue that so far resilience has not influenced architecture enough. Even just getting climate change to be accepted as a problem took decades, and there are still those out there who deny it. With that social environment, how do we get money for future threats that are ambiguous?

I am increasingly interested in the policy framework within which the building industry operates. Cascadia Green Building Council Metro Vancouver last year focused on the pathway towards Net Zero energy in the built environment, and it was wonderful to see the different perspectives that policymakers, designers, and building managers brought to the table.

Architects have a social responsibility to elevate this conversation. Thought leadership is important now more than ever, and it is great to see new forms of media being used to raise awareness of these issues.

Which innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? There are three groups of responses that I have seen so far to resilience: heavy infrastructure like the NYC BIG U which wraps the entire Manhattan peninsula; mobile architecture which responds to or mitigates threats; and, rapid response to deploy emergency services like Shigeru Ban’s post-earthquake shelters. Although it’s arguably not as much fun, I think the real power comes from the subtle responses that get embedded into planning policy and our codes. The City of North Vancouver is allowing higher construction heights in storm surge areas with the intent of having sacrificial lower storeys. Surrey is slowly raising the height of some of its roads in the flood plain whenever they get redone.

We are also witnessing a resurgence in prefabrication. The accessibility of 3D printing, BIM, advanced visualization, project management tools, and robotics represent a revolution in construction technologies. The role of the designer will likely change, and it is a huge opportunity for more responsible buildings.

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future? I see resilience as a logical next step in the continued trajectory towards tighter interdisciplinary cooperation in the construction industry. As resilience gets added to the architectural lexicon, we will find landscape architects, civil engineers, structural engineers, and planners need to be brought to the table earlier and with a greater say. Listen to everyone, and distill down the essence of their ideas into your work.

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Profiles

Jordan van Dijk Architectural Technologist AIBC Jordan van Dijk Architectural Technologist AIBC is an associate at Michael Green Architecture Inc., where he is a project lead and one of the firm’s senior advisors. Prior to MGA and the previous firm office of mcfarlane biggar architects & designers inc., Jordan worked on numerous civic and cultural buildings at Proscenium Architecture + Interiors. An instructor at the not-for-profit Design Build Research Institute, Jordan is also the Architectural Technologist liaison to AIBC Council.

How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? Our firm is a vocal supporter of the use of wood in construction, not only for the significant carbon sequestration but also the strength and resilience it provides. As a result of the 2011 Christchurch earthquake, well over half of the multi-storey concrete buildings failed and needed to be taken down. Wood buildings are ductile and can be designed to withstand an earthquake, leaving it serviceable post-disaster. Working with other experts such as the structural engineer Eric Karsh at Equilibrium, we have developed systems for tall wood construction that use a complete dry approach – no concrete above the foundations. We have proven that these buildings can be very safe in areas with high winds or seismic loads.

What is the highlight of your career so far? Traveling to Ottawa a couple years ago to celebrate the Governor General's Medal in Architecture for the North Vancouver City Hall building was naturally a huge honour. This particular building resonated with me as it was a technically challenging exercise in comprehensive adaptive reuse, and also a fun exploration with new ways of using mass wood to create large structures. We are fortunate to send team members again this year to attend the presentation of two medals, one for the Wood Innovation and Design Centre and one for Ronald McDonald House BC. Ronald McDonald House is probably most special to me because of how it so beautifully meets the needs of families staying at the house. It was planned to foster community and playful social interaction, while allowing for quiet contemplation and solitude. The building uses an innovative tilt-up mass wood structural system, is clad

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in brick, and is consistently detailed with materials chosen to meet the client's needs for a building with a 100-year life expectancy. The entire design, construction and client team constantly worked with passion and conviction to honour the vision of the client and families who live in the house in some of their most trying times.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? William McDonough and Michael Braungart have expanded their Cradle-to-Cradle philosophy into a more forward-thinking approach on designing products to generate positive impact for the environment throughout the product’s life and beyond. We should be looking at resilience with the same holistic vision. How are our buildings and their components contributing to society and the environment, and providing a safe, lasting legacy? What happens when a building reaches the end of its life? We must think more progressively and create philosophies of whole building resilience and adaptability, to create change in the way our industry addresses the huge impact buildings have on climate change.

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture? In recent decades, as models of sustainability have rapidly developed, the importance of durable and resilient buildings was not focused on as much as it should have been. I feel that in some ways,

the concept of resiliency actually went backwards. Of course there are notable exceptions, especially on the social and sustainability fronts, but there should be a larger drive to make resiliency a bigger priority. Recent natural disasters, increasingly urbanized populations, and climate change have rekindled the discussion recently, with resiliency returning as a noteworthy conversation.

Which innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? It's exciting to see developments in 3D printing and other automated manufacturing and fabrication processes. The technologies are continuously advancing and they will help create more durable and lasting building materials, especially when the processes become more efficient and use more sustainable, healthy materials. In the future, we hope to see 3D-printed wood fibre, as it will be very efficient, recyclable or reusable, and extremely strong.

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years? Each of our projects is a constant evolution and exploration based on the lessons of the past. I am excited to continue working on a broad range of unique projects that will inform the future.

Do you have any advice for those looking to build a resilient future? There are so many ways to contribute to social and physical resiliency. Find a cause that you are passionate about and engage in the conversation. Never stop listening and learning.

That said, we should also look to the past for traditional building methods that withstand weather, earthquakes, and other threats over time. In partnership with Metsä, a Finnish wood company, we just recently organized an ideas competition to spark conversation about increasing urbanization and the need to build upward in established cities. How do we do so while retaining the existing buildings that make up the city? The competition focuses on the notion that many existing buildings have the capacity to carry additional storeys of lighter construction.

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Profiles

Graeme Bristol Retired Architect AIBC Graeme Bristol Retired Architect AIBC is the founder and Executive Director of the Centre for Architecture and Human Rights, a foundation advancing rights-based development in the practice of architecture through education, research and demonstration projects. He holds a Master of Architecture from the University of British Columbia and a Master of Human Rights Law from Queen’s University Belfast.

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How can society benefit from the lens architects take to their work? I have found the answer to that question in my work with students in Thailand, I would organize studios in different slum communities in and around Bangkok. Before we began work with the community I would caution the students that they were not there to tell community members what they know but to ask the community about what they don’t know. There is information and understanding in every community known only by the people who live there. At the same time, these architecture students have information the community does not have or cannot see – things like collecting data on city plans for development, improving fire safety, infrastructure issues, simple ways to find or improve open space and storage. Architecture students also look for ways to improve the utility of space and make it more visually coherent.

What is the highlight of your career so far? First, I’ve never had a career. I started out studying English and Philosophy at Western. In the 1960s I, along with many others, had little thought of what to do with such a degree. I just wanted to know more about the history of thought and architecture was a natural continuation of that investigation. That line of thinking is now at a point of intersection between human rights and design. With this in mind, I would note the following as highlights: working with students in the construction camps and slums of Bangkok, supporting the Pom Mahakan resistance and the bamboo school we built for children of migrant workers. In these examples, a number of questions were raised about our understanding of history as well as the exploitation of migrant construction workers and their families in many parts of the world.


What lies at the heart of the value architects bring to bear on the projects they work on? I think the heart of it must be the public good and, we must play a role in defining what that is. In turn this requires public engagement and political engagement. We cannot be passive. We have to be “Citizen Architects,” as Sam Mockbee defined the term.

How is the concept of resilience applied in your work? I looked at the AIA’s “Reframing Resilience” report and the Rockefeller Foundation’s “City Resilience Index” and saw that they were mainly focused on recovering from natural disasters. However, one of the points it made was: “…one can build a robust structure. But if that resilient building is situated in a non-resilient community, then what has been achieved?” I’d like to draw on a quick example having been involved with the posttsunami recovery process along the Andaman Coast of Thailand. After the tsunami, survivors from the resorts and locals from the fishing communities were huddled on higher ground until land could be used for accommodating people in tents. One of the urgencies (along with food and water) was for survivors to get back to their land as quickly as possible

because if they didn’t lawyers and gunmen (mainly from Bangkok) were swooping in and occupying the land for developers. Under such circumstances, the resilience of the community is less dependent on buildings than on the community’s ability to withstand the forces of greed and power.

Who do you look to for thought leadership on resilience? Is there a particular concept that informs your thinking? Since I understand resilience from a community perspective, I look to community organizers of one kind or another. The concept of Satyagraha based on the writings of Gandhi, Tolstoy, Gene Sharp, and Martin Luther King informs my thinking. In architecture and its relation to community I lean towards Hasan Fathy, John F.C. Turner, and Sam Mockbee. The Pom Mahakan resistance has been my most enlightening encounter with these ideas. In them, design plays a pivotal role.

How has a focus on resilience influenced architecture? Resilience in the modern sense is just one of many program elements. For me because resilience is about community, it affects all that I do. Mostly, I think of this as an issue of rights.

Which innovations do you anticipate when it comes to resilience? I had an interesting experience while working in Kaolak during the tsunami recovery. There was much talk in Bangkok elite and professional circles about buying modern tsunami detection technology, the likes of which we see in Hawaii. Six months later, there was a mild earthquake in northern Sumatra. The tsunami warning system worked very well. But it wasn’t the expensive technology, it was cable TV and mobile phones.

Where do you plan to focus over the next five years? I will be focused on implementing a UNESCO Chair in Human Rights and Community Architecture. It includes formal undergraduate and graduate studies in architecture; informal education for architects, community organizers, and provincial planning officials, plus children’s built environment education around Bangkok; research in the integration of rights into the design and construction; and, finally, a demonstration building programme to show the issues integrated in built form.

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2016

AIBC Induction & Retirement Ceremony June 1, 2016 Segal Graduate School of Business | Vancouver, BC The following individuals were honoured at this year’s ceremony. RETIRED ARCHITECTS AIBC Charles Bentall Graeme Bristol Randolph Fasan Colin Ronald Floyd Douglas Frankson Raymond Hunt Ivan Ilic Alexandru Ionescu Hywel Jones Janet Lutz Jeana Malick Terrence Mott Jan Timmer Francis Shawn Hubert Wang

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGISTS AIBC Allan Balatico Jeremy Beintema Harpinder Billing Matthew Castillo Jaspreet Dayal Trevor Emery Mark Felt

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Paul Giles Heather Greene Pera Hardy Brian Harvey Ming-Chih Hsu Joseph Gerard Jadie Qian Zi Li Rachael Mason Craig Milton Donald Nunn

ARCHITECTS AIBC Hector Abarca Edward Applebaum David Arnott Jalil Azizi Walter Banadyga Nicolas Bilodeau Thomas Bocahut David Bootsman Daniel Boyne Cary Bremner Juliana Brown Shuangqing Cao Adam Chmielewski Andrew Cohen Brendan Connolly Gustavo Crespo Cilio

Martin Davidson Robert Davies Clark Davis Tyler Dixon Naomi Eastman John Erana John Featherstone Russel Fleischer Jonathan Fountain Michael Fugeta Douglas Gensler David Goldberg Bert Gregory III Chloe Hahn Courtney Healey Anthea Ho Marina Huissoon Todd Jackson Adam James Wendy James Amy Johnston Scott Keck Kenneth Kim Paul Koopman Lok Yan Luanna Lam Mason Lampard Danielle Lawson Suman Lee Joe Lee

Julien Leger Kathleen Lemon Kyle Lewkowich Alice Liang Daniel Ling Ana Maria Llanos David Long Jason Lowe Michael McCullough Alexander McCumber Michael McGale Cian McGarvey Colin Merriam Craig Mitchell Rance Yan Ki Mok Harish Murthy Candice Nichol Stella Nicolet Shora Parvaresh Lara Presber Spencer Purdy Golnaz Rakhshan Jesse Ratcliffe Jacquelyn Richard Jamey Richards Antonio Rigor Inge Roecker Nathaniel Salfas

John Saliken Stefan Schulson Andrew Scott Nathan Shuttleworth Dean Skalski Jason Skladan May Bing Tung So Shane Solomon Elizabeth Songer Nicholas Standeven Lance Steele Nathan Stolarz Jennifer Swansburg Michael Szabo Francis Tanner Natalie Telewiak Tysa Tenebro Sara Theuerkauf Terry-Andrew Tremayne Sergei Vakhrameev Graeme Verhulst Christine Wang David Wilkinson Bruce Williams Erica Wolowidnyk Eli Wolpin Peter Lawrence Wood Tai Ziola


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PHOTO CREDIT: JAY SHAW


THANK YOU to our generous conference sponsors and exhibitors including: Sponsors

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Exhibitors

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2016

AIBC Architectural Awards Jury The responsibility for singling out the best from a worthy roster of candidates is never an easy task, especially when it involves your colleagues and collaborators. However, that is exactly what a volunteer jury is required to do when selecting the worthy recipients of AIBC awards. The jury go about their task with the highest level of respect, diligence and professionalism, as shown in the results. This year’s jury includes:

PHOTO CREDIT: GRACE BATTISTON

from left to right James Bligh Intern Architect AIBC Proscenium Architecture + Interiors Inc., Intern Architect Frances Bula Journalist, Blogger Norm Shearing Architect AIBC Dockside Green Ltd., President Gilbert Larocque P.Eng., LLB, Associate Director, Professional Practice Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of B.C. Jack Kobayashi Architect AIBC Kobayashi + Zedda Architects, President Jury Chair

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Chief Executive Officer's Message

The Responsibilities of Self-Regulation The dramatic changes to the real estate industry have brought considerable attention to the topic of professional self-regulation. This summer, Premier Christy Clark explained that “the point of regulation is to protect people, to protect consumers.” Further, she emphasized that “self-regulation is a privilege.” At the Architectural Institute of British Columbia (AIBC), we take the responsibility of self-regulation seriously and work to uphold and support the highest professional standards in architecture. As a regulatory body the AIBC is tasked with ensuring public and government confidence. This is achieved by focusing on three fundamental pillars of activity: 1. Setting admission and professional standards; 2. Enforcing standards to ensure compliance and the integrity of the profession, and; 3. Providing services to support AIBC registrants in maintaining credentials and overall professionalism. The AIBC touches on other areas, as a matter of course, through public and government representation, and outreach and education. To address the first regulatory pillar, the AIBC establishes and maintains stringent qualifications for those seeking entry into the profession. These standards are applied to the registration of architects, three classes of associates – intern architects, retired architects and architectural technologists – as well as architectural firms and temporary licensees. In parallel, the institute

establishes the expected competency and ethical standards for the profession, with the AIBC’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct as the primary standards document. This June, 101 new architects, 14 retired architects and 17 architectural technologists were welcomed at the annual Induction & Retirement Ceremony, bringing the total number of AIBC architects and all other registrants to more than 3,800. Compliance, the second pillar, is enforced through the powers vested in the institute through the Architects Act. Compliance means addressing complaints about architects, associates, firms and temporary licensees related to competency and professional conduct. Mechanisms for complaint investigation allow any member of the public to pursue questions or concerns about the competency or conduct of registrants. Compliance also means dealing with the illegal practice of architecture by non-architects. The third pillar relates to services to ensure professionalism, which includes practice advice and the Continuing Education System (CES). Both ensure architects and other registrants are up to the problem solving and multifaceted demands of a career in architecture. The most recent CES reporting period ended on June 30, 2016. Though the deadline is quite fresh, we strongly urge architects and architectural technologists to get an early start on earning the next round of learning units.

PHOTO CREDIT: JAY SHAW

Mark Vernon CPA CA CPA (IL) Chief Executive Officer

Registrants and the public can avail themselves of AIBC’s practice advisory services. We support architects and associates in meeting the standards of the profession through practice and ethics advice, and we assist the public with help in determining when an architect is required per the Architects Act. The three pillars outlined above are supported by public representation, outreach and education. In particular, the public interest is represented through AIBC participation on a number of local, provincial and national government and industryrelated bodies where we provide an “architectural” voice on important issues. The institute also engages in public outreach and education through a variety of signature events and programs, including the AIBC Architecture Centre Gallery, AIBC Architectural Awards and the everpopular Architectural Walking Tour summer program. Self-regulation acknowledges that members of a profession, due to their specialized knowledge and expertise, are in the best position to regulate themselves in the public’s interest. This is a privilege granted by government. At the AIBC we value this privilege and look forward to continuing to fulfill our public interest obligation through the provision of responsive, resourceful and effective service.

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Architectural Institute of B.C.

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Architectural Institute of B.C.

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