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MIAD

BRIDGE

BE THE DIFFERENCE TODAY

A RT F O R O I L : A CLEANER GULF FUNDRAISER A WORLD APART: T W O P E O P L E , T W O W O R L D S ECO FA S H I O N : CLOTHES THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE


MIAD

BRIDGE


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LETTER FROM EDITOR

FEATURES

6

ART FOR OIL: A CLEANER GULF FUNDRAISER ECO FASHION: CLOTHES THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE

18

10

A WORLD APART: TWO PEOPLE, TWO WORLDS

DEPARTMENTS THIS I BELIEVE: I BELIEVE IN SUMMER CAMP HALF FULL OR HALF EMPTY?

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SERVICE LEARNING: SWEET WATER ORGANICS

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2010 MIAD BRIDGE

LETTER FROM

THE

EDITOR A

fter three and the half years at MIAD, I learned that design is not just a pretty picture. It’s hard work, constantly trying to come up with new ideas to create new solutions for the messages designers are trying to tell. Good design is a continual fight with yourself trying to find new unique ways to approach the subject and to make a connection with potential clients. To create a vision, that will let you bridge with others and inspire them to take an interest and later on, an action. MIAD Bridge is all about taking action. The magazine is a call for other people to use their creativity and imagination to help others. The idea behind creading the Magazine is to invite all to do something, to make a difference in our community. MIAD Bridge is an inspiration for all of us to realize that we all can do things to help improve not only ours communities but also the whole world. One person can make important differences that could have huge impact on others’ lives. Hopefully you find inspiration in these pages to go out there and be a difference today. Thank you for reading.

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2010 MIAD BRIDGE

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I l l u s t r a t i o n s by M o l ly F l o o d


ART FOR OIL

A CLEANER GULF FUNDRAISER


ART FOR OIL: A CLEANER GULF FUNDRAISER

On April 20, 2010 there was a great oil

disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon caught fire and exploded. Swiss-based Transocean Ltd Owns the Deepwater Horizon and leased the rig to Uk-based BP PLC. The 56-million gallon oil spill created environmental and political dilemmas and has led to the largest natural disaster in United States History. When reading many articles about the disaster, writers put the main focus on how it is affecting tourism and people who live and work near the coast when they are forgetting how it is affecting natural habitat. According to federal authorities at Associated Press, nearly 800 dead birds, sea turtles, dolphins, and other animals have been found in the Gulf and on its shores. At MIAD, we have many enthusiastic ar tists who are eager to help out in their community. Sometimes many students reach farther than just the community by also helping out with issues in the environment.

Alex Perez, a painting major at MIAD, set up an art show labeled Art for Oil to help raise money for the clean up in the Gulf of Mexico. Art for Oil featured eleven artists whose work ranges from these categories: Printmaking, painting, photography, drawing, handmade, and digital artwork. Alex was inspired to start Art For Oil after she was given the opportunity to put on an art show. She was also able to help others in the mean time. Her intentions were not only to help out the oil spill but also to support injured and disabled seabirds due to oil pollution. Alex states, “By purchasing an art piece through the show, you are supporting a young and upcoming local artist and also helping save the lives of wildlife struggling in some ver y impor tant ecosystems.� All donations go towards the National Audubon Society and Save Our Seabird, Inc. Save Our Seabirds Incorporation helps to rehabilitate seabirds. Lee Fox founded SOS in 1990. They have been privileged to receive permits from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Each year, they have saved hundreds of native and migratory birds. Lee has been working with major oil companies, environmental groups, and state officials for almost ten years now.


Other creative pieces donated were produced by: Erick Fruehling, Jeff Herwig, Erik Johnson, NERS, Cassandra Warren, and Lindsay Woods. These artists spent long hours on these pieces that they donated to help support the cause. They wanted this show to provide proof that art can make a impact. Alex really believes that this will make a difference since the community will be exposed to different styles of ar t not only from MIAD but also other ar tists from around the United States.

2010 MIAD BRIDGE

9 The National Audubon Society organization works directly with oil damaged seabirds. Their mission is, “To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity”. Even By purchasing an trough the you are though the oil has stopped leaking, the Gulf of Mexico a and local artists and also helping save the and its wildlife continue to lives of wildlife in some very be threatened by millions - Alex Perez of gallons of oil that is both on the surface as well as below the surface She has set up a tumblr site for people to of the water. NAS is looking for support so view and purchase artwork still available that they will have the funds to assist birds from the art show at artforoil.tumblr.com. and other wildlife. They have been pretty Written by Brittany Patz successful since they have a mighty fusion of science and education to protect and restore local habitat in the U.S. and across America. Alex originally picked SOS, but she says, “SOS really hasn’t seen any oil like NAS, who will really reach out to oil soaked birds.” Audubon was the first non-profit group to have volunteers on the ground when U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service needed them because of their quick response.

young

Both of these organizations need all the donations they can get. Even though the Gulf oil spill has already had tragic consequences for birds, other wildlife, coastal communities, and essential beach and wetland habitat, we know that its continuing impacts will be revealed over time resulting in a long-term process. Alex Perez brought together not only students from MIAD but also Chicago, Madison, Indiana, and Massachusetts. The artists from MIAD that donated their creative pieces are Alex Perez, Autumn Clark, Janson Rapisarda, Lilly Duermeier, and Nate Pyper.

art piece upcoming

struggling

show,

supporting

important ecosystems. ”


SERVICE LEARNING: SWEET WATER ORGANICS

Written by Carlie Nesgoda

S

weet Water Organics is a noncertified organic urban farm. What this means is we abide by regulations and standards provided by the USDA organics system and are pursuing our certification. Our goal is to provide fresh, safe food for our local communities while maintaining reasonable prices and respecting our environment.

Now that I have my own garden at my house I am rewarded daily when I water and weed and watch my own fruits grow. Ever yone tells me how much work gardening is and I just don’t agree, with the amount of time I have put into it, I have been paid back not only with new experiences and a deeper know edge plants but also a vast array of fresh produce! Lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, and even potatoes! When I listen to or read about the current issues in America, specifically, hunger, lack of jobs, sub standard communities and housing I can’t help but wonder why. Why aren’t we wor king towards fixing these ills of society?

SWEET

WATER

ORGANICS

On my first day of work at Sweet Water my job was to transplant some small tomatoes into larger buckets, after doing about 50 of them I hadn’t thought once about what they would become. Now, almost three weeks later I water the same tomato plants “ it take the in the green house, which are now over 4 feet tall, and producing fruit. All of the tomatoes I planted are growing! It has been really rewarding to learn about a new species and watch it grow, watch something I worked on produce food, in a relatively short period of time. The many interesting people I have meet and the interesting conversations we have had about plants and urban agriculture have opened my eyes to a whole new world.

same energy to say why something

can’t be done as to figure out how to do it “ Maybe this is a question that I will never be able to truly answer but when the list of reasons becomes longer to count on one hand I must smile and agree with Paul Loeb “…it takes the same energy to say why something can’t be done as to figure out how to do it.” (Loeb) This course is about action. About getting involved, about reflecting on ones role with in a community, a school, a city, or even just a family and see what one person, or a group of individuals can accomplish when working together.


2010 MIAD BRIDGE

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2008 - 26%

2009 - 38%

Urban Gardening (% of people growing their own food in last 3 years - Wisconsin)

2010 - 66%


2010 MIAD BRIDGE

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clothes

that makea

difference


ECO FASHION


Written by Vanessa Wainwright

I

t’s the simple things in life that make a world of difference. From the food you eat to the clothes you buy everything we use on a day to day basis effects the world around us. From organic, eco, to fair trade; what you’re wearing can make a difference. When looking around MIAD it’s not too hard to notice that many of the students have decided to support this environmentally healthy lifestyle too. Many students are making an impact through the artwork they make and the clothing they wear. Before you consider this the next fashion fad, consider how they’re helping out around Milwaukee.


ECO FASHION: CLOTHES THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE

“It’s the simple things

make a world of difference” in life that

This isn’t about what kind of canvas you’re using, although it could be. Buying and wearing eco-friendly clothing can not only help you, but it also helps the world around you in a variety of different ways. Hemp or bamboo fiber clothing leave less of a carbon footprint and require less chemicals to produce. As young artists we like to make a statement through our fashion style. Not only do many MIAD students try to make artwork that is in support of being eco-friendly, but they are also wearing clothing brands like Levi Strauss and American Apparel. Both of these brands make sure their products are produced in heathy safe environments from fabrics that are helpful to us and the planet. Imagine all of the t-shirts in your closet; are any of them organic? By buying organic clothing you can help the environment they were produce in.

p: Crystal Miller & Chase Baker t: Matt Spain & Nikki Carr

Not only does it matter whether or not you’re clothes are hurting the environment; but also whether or not they’re hurting the people producing them. Many clothing companies such as American Apparel have taken action to produce clothing that follows labor laws. In some cases workers are too young to be working or working too long to take care of their families. They are making next to nothing for the hours they spend producing t-shirt after t-shirt. Knowing that someone was paid honestly for their work and treated properly can give you a piece of mind when you’re looking at something fair trade or not. Another factor that students at MIAD consider with their clothing is whether or not it’s vegan or animal friendly. Knowing this can be beneficial to a vegan or someone who cares about animals. When looking for vegan clothing make sure you’re buying fake leather or thick fabrics and simulate heavy materials. Tanning animals skins is harmful to the environment and the workers as well. Many toxins are used in the process of making a pair of leather shoes or purse. Wool sweaters aren’t just itchy for us, they are actually needed to keep the animal warm in their natural habitat. MIAD students have taken a stance against animal cruelty in many of their works, now many of those students are wearing clothing that they know isn’t made from animals. Take a step to make a difference for the things you care about.


ECO FASHION: CLOTHES THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Crystal Miller :P Matt Spain & Crystal Miller :T

As students, many MIAD students want to be ensured that they’re buying a quality pair of shoes that won’t fall apart. In general, most organic or eco-friendly clothing is made to last. Many companies today are using recycled car tires for soles and hemp for the canvas of their shoes. Brands like TOMS and Simple are making an impact with their either recycled or organic materials. As a student if you want to give to a charity through your clothing purchases, go ahead and order a pair of TOMS. For every pair of shoes you buy, they’ll give a pair to a child in another country. Although they might not fill this seasons fashion trend; they’ll keep you warm or cool. Another simple step you can take is to buy used. Not only is it cost effect for a college student, it helps keep anything from sitting wasted in a landfill. Many MIAD students shop at thrift stores like St.Vincents and Yellow Jacket. Also, many thrift stores give their profit to different groups around their community like Goodwill. You’ll leave with bargains and something a little more unique than what you’d find from Boston Store.

Take a look around you and you’ll see many of the students at MIAD have on a pair of TOMS or an American Apparel t-shirt with a custom design. Before you think it’s the next fashion trend consider the fact that buying eco-friendly clothing could not only benefit you but also benefit your own community, like MIAD or Milwaukee. Like

MIAD

students, make an

impact everyday through

simple things

like the shoes you put on your feet. Help make a change in your community like our students have done by suppor ting your local fair trade clothing stores and thrift shops. Find your nearest Goodwill or American Apparel store to make your closet a little bit more green and help Milwaukee’s habitat.


P: Crystal Miller T: Jasmine Barmore

2010 MIAD BRIDGE

THE GARAGE CLOTHING CO. 8757 N. Port Washington Rd Milwaukee WI 53217 414.228.0291

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JASMINE’S FASHION 709 W. Historic Mitchell St Milwaukee WI 53204 414.351.3707

GOODWILL 1100 W. Oklahoma Ave. Milwaukee WI 53227 414.541.6330

PLAY IN AGAIN SPORTS

A-HEM CLOTHING COMPANY 1625 E. Ir ving Pl Milwaukee WI 53202 414.975.4538

THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUTH 1651 S. 11th St Milwaukee WI 53204 414.232.9361

TIP TOP ATOMIC SHOP 2343 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. Milwaukee WI 53207 414.486.1951

RETHREADS 190 N. BROADWAY Milwaukee WI 53202 414.273.1797

YELLOW JACKET VINTAGE CLOTHING 1237 E. Brady St Milwaukee WI 53202 414.372.4744

ANNIE’S 2ND HAND CHIC 1668 N Warren Ave Milwaukee WI 53202 414.727.5586

LOCAL SECOND HAND SHOPS

10111 W. Capitol Dr. Milwaukee WI 53202 414.461.5600


Lydia Jarvis


THIS I BELIEVE: I BELIEVE IN SUMMER CAMP

2010 MIAD BRIDGE

Written by Lydia Jarvis

My feelings about Camp are complicated

and varied. I have met some of my best friends there. I have experienced some of my hardest times there. It has thrust me into new situations and thrust new responsibilities upon me. It has taught me about myself, my community and the natural world. It has given me the courage to do the things I believe are important. It has taught me the things I believe are important. It has made me who I am today.

19 I believe the starry night sky, observed from a field far away from any cities inspires love for nature and love for life. One year our counselors helped us celebrate everyone’s birthday by letting us sneak into the kitchen after hours to bake brownies. We spent the rest of the night resting on cots that we carried into the field, watching meteors flit across the sky. I believe that Camp invigorates the soul. I believe that cooking over a fire encourages responsibility and teaches independence. When I first mastered the art of fire building, I knew I could do more than heat up pop-tarts when I got home from school. I believe that growling like a polar bear and jumping into the icy lake before breakfast is better than any cup of coffee. I believe in campfires. I believe in singing before you go to bed.

I BELIEVE IN SUMMER CAMP

When I was eight years old, I attended summer camp for the first time. It was strange and different and I loved every second of it.You could sing and yell and play games and make crafts.You had to sleep in a about myself, tent. There was a lake. And horses. “ Camp has I believe that Camp made me into and the natural world. the person I am today. My counselors were my role models. Their multicolored hair I believe that the friends you find at Camp and tank tops were banners, waving me are your family. I met some of my closest on towards the courage, confidence and friends at Camp during middle school and character that Camp strives to inspire. worked with them many years later when we all applied as counselors. Now that I have been a camp counselor, I believe in running down the path after the bus to wave goodbye to all the kids a second time.

taught me community

my “


2010 MIAD BRIDGE

20

WORLD

WOR A


LD

Written by Hether Nemec

Imagine if you will, a small child growing up beneath the broken

RLD

shadows and of a once great city. Playing in rubble searching for anything that calls to be found. The ghostly remains of a thriving metropolis now mimic what one might think of in a post-apocalyptic world. But to this little boy, here is where he calls home.

APART


A WORLD APART: TWO PEOPLE, TWO WORLDS

“ Friendship and a union of two different worlds.”

His name is John, John Wycliffe, he is six years old and the son of Margaret Nsangi. Margaret, or Maggie as she prefers to be called, is a twenty four year old single parent who has become the main provider for her close-knit family of five. This may seem like a daunting task for a woman in Uganda, but Maggie has something that many Ugandan women could only dream of, a college education. Because of this advantage, Maggie has been able to acquire a job as a teacher on the outskirts of Masaka, at a small orphanage and school aptly named, The Good shepherd Child Care Centre. She is among some of the highest paid women in Africa, bringing in just over three dollars a day. This allows her to buy the bare necessities to live in a country where bare necessities are a luxury. Maggie now has access to an internet café, one of three Masaka has to offer, where she visits every Sunday. This small privilege has been her tool to finding friends from every corner of the world. A small group of friends of which I am privileged to be a par t of.

While I was living in El Paso, Texas on a base out in the middle of the deser t, I found myself looking for friends. I stumbled upon a pen pal web site, I decided to give it a try. I filled out my information and waited to hear if anybody was desperate enough to want to learn about me, sure enough, nobody did. So I did a search on the computer and I found a woman whose profession was teaching and her passion was God; two things I highly admire. So I wrote to her expressing my own desire to one day have a teaching career and the love of our shared Faith. This shor t note to a nameless, faceless profile would soon transform into a long standing friendship and a union of two different worlds. Being a student, and an art student at that, I would never have thought I would have anything to contribute to a school full of African children but it seems that being an art student was all it took. All one needs to do is work upon the skills they have and the skills I know I have is in design and photography. MIAD has been a tremendous tool in aiding not only in my skill development but in my confidence levels as well. First off, I created an identity for the GSCCC, a logo and


a compilation of pictures for people to be able to relate to. Then through various pieces of art I was able to raise $100 to send to Uganda, directly to the ones who needed it most. It was a big milestone for me because it showed me that all the hard work and long hours spent at MIAD, really paid off, not only for me but also for these less fortunate children in Africa. For my first donation I asked Maggie to keep fifty percent for her and her family, although she makes a decent wage for a woman in Uganda, caring for five people is still a struggle. With as little as $50 Maggie was able to purchase food, clothing, open her first bank account and even purchase a pig, which is also used as currency. At one time in my life, I would have thought handing away a large amount of money to a stranger would have been next to impossible but in a letter Maggie had once written me she said, “As a teacher, I come across so many poor children that can hardly afford to buy an exercise book or a pen which cost $0.05, some children even go without food and clothes.” Her words clung to me, and this is where I knew I could help. I may not have been financially able to care for these children, but surely other people could, they just didn’t know it yet and I was here to tell them! With my phone in hand I dove in to get as many donations as I could to help these children get the necessities they need to live and gain an education. A week had passed and my enthusiastic vigor had turned to disappointment. Every church, every business, every charitable foundation had rejected my proposed partnership with the Good Shepherd Child Care Centre. I was almost at my wits end when a small light went off in my head, that small light was Blessed Sacrament School. My catholic junior high that didn’t have much for themselves but always sought to find new ways for students to interact with the world around them. It was a long

shot but it was worth it, Blessed Sacrament became my first official donor. After having a staff meeting with both the church and school council, Blessed Sacrament was able to devise a fund-raiser, the always-popular bake sale.

2010 MIAD BRIDGE

Turnout was tremendous for this school of two hundred students and $153.34 was raised and sent off to the Good Shepherd Child Care Centre. A few days later I received a letter from the financial coordinator of the GSCCC. “Dear Heather, This is Beatrice. This time I need to extend our appreciation to you on behalf of GOOD SHEPHERD CHILD CARE CENTRE for your heartily efforts to see that you reach out people to help our centre. We are so grateful from the bottom of our hearts. We have stocked food for the children and some scholastic materials for the teachers to use when preparing lessons.” The letter went on to say that with the donation they were able to purchase: 550 lbs of corn flower, 200 lbs of beans, 50 manila envelopes, 1 packet of red pens, 1 packet of blue pens, 2 packets of markers, 3 textbooks, 2 boxes of chalk, 10 teachers preparation books and 3 packets of pencils. This is just the beginning of a friendship between two different worlds and one that would have been difficult to achieve if not for the skills learned at MIAD.

out there and make a difference for just one person, my If I can get

whole education has been worth it

and to think of the things I will be able to achieve after I graduate, makes me wonder if everyone had an education and a desire to help one another, what would the world become? It’s time to find out.

23


THIS I BELIEVE: HALF FULL OR HALF EMPTY?

by Derek Bacon

I

’ve always thought the notion that a person is either an optimist or a pessimist to be a bit ridiculous. The optimist sees the glass as half full, while the pessimist sees the glass as half empty. This test suggests that the value of the cup is in it’s ability to be filled, so that when it only reaches fifty percent the obser ver brings their own value. When I was younger I could never take the test at what it was supposed to be, always wondering what’s in the cup; soda, poison?

Half Full Half

or

It should be obvious which are the stereotypical pessimistic and optimistic reactions. Though, look again at the pessimistic reaction. If we as human beings are all capable this kind of act, but don’t, isn’t that a good thing? When you can take a so-called pessimistic reaction and then give it an optimistic spin, things start to look a little grey. The possibilities of how you could view an event are so infinite, that giving it a definite positive or negative outlook seems limiting. The internal debate of shifting value is much more interesting than the cut and dry pessimistic or optimistic reaction, by not prejudging and by debating yourself you can gain much deeper understanding of that which you are investigating.

Empty?

The truth is, the beauty of the cup is that it could hold anything, at any amount. Straight pessimism or optimism is impossible when you can see that the cup is filled to the amount that you filled it, nothing more. “ This isn’t to say there is no positive or negative, good or bad. I’m sure there are not many people in the world that would argue an unprovoked, cold-blooded murder isn’t a negative act. It’s your reaction to this act that most people use to divide you into a pessimist or an optimist. You can blame the act on the sickness of mankind; say that at our core we are all capable of committing this act. On the other side you could blame their upbringing, saying something went wrong in the past to cause this.

the beauty of the cup is that it could hold anything at any amount” The world is a complicated place; to approach it with any sort of preconceived notions just seems false. To use an act to create a tapestry of positive or negative outlook denies the act it’s own identity. This is how I approach my day-to-day life, with the uncer tainty that brings me closer and closer to defining myself in the context of the world around me.


2010 MIAD BRIDGE

25

Derek Bacon


ART DIRECTOR AGNIESZKA WOJNAR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR ANNE GHORY-GOODMAN AGNIESZKA WOJNAR

ILLUSTRATION MOLLY FLOOD

PHOTO CHASE BAKER CRYSTAL MILLER

TALENT NIKKI CARR JASMINE BARMORE ALMA AVINA MATT SPAIN CRYSTAL MILLER

ARTICLES BRITTANY PATZ CARLIE NESGODA VANESSA WAINWRIGHT LYDIA JARVIS HETHER NEMEC DEREK BACON


MIAD Bridge  

Annual communication design MIAD Bridge magazine (Milwaukee Institue of Art & Design)

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