63rd Annual GRAMMY AWARDS® Program Book

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63RD ANNUAL ®

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RECORDING ACADEMY

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Fulwell 73 are honored to be producing the GRAMMYs® this year. We want to thank all our amazing team and crew who made this show possible in the most trying of times.


THE RECORDING ACADEMY® PRESENTS

SUNDAY MARCH 14, 2021

For The Recording Academy Harvey Mason jr.

Recording Academy Television Committee Advisory Group

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Gabriel Abaroa Jr.

INTERIM PRESIDENT/CEO

Branden Chapman

Mike Clink

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12:00 P.M. GRAMMY AWARDS PREMIERE CEREMONY®

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Harvey Mason jr.

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“A FA S C I N AT I N G M U S I C A L O DYS S E Y ” E R I C KO H N , I N D I E W I R E

B E S T M U S I C F I LM

A S P I K E J O N Z E L I V E D O C U M E N TA RY




MESSAGE FROM THE

INTERIM PRESIDENT/CEO

Harvey Mason jr.

n behalf of the Recording Academy, welcome to the 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards. Our welcome is no less heartfelt for being virtual. We’re confident you’ll enjoy this year’s show as much as ever, even though we can’t be together in person. Tonight, we recognize musical excellence. That excellence is reflected in each nomination — across every genre and creator — as well as those who will receive the ultimate recognition of their peers, the GRAMMY Award. This has been an extraordinarily challenging year for everyone and the music world in particular. So many of us have endured disruptions to our lives and livelihoods, as well as concerns about our health and the health of the people close to us. Yet, despite those hardships, many of us found creative and powerful ways to do what music has always done: heal, inspire and bring people together. Tonight, in addition to honoring the musical excellence that the GRAMMYs represent, we celebrate all those who helped our society and our communities endure and overcome these tough times, often at great personal sacrifice. The Academy is proud to have played a role in helping the music world meet these challenges. Through MusiCares and with the help of your generous contributions, we provided more than $25 million in support for 20,000 music people who lost gigs and livelihoods as the result of the coronavirus. In Washington, D.C. — and, thanks to our 12 Chapters, throughout state capitals across America — we championed, advanced and achieved important advocacy initiatives that helped ensure that self-employed music creators, such as songwriters, were included in the unemployment compensation provisions of COVID-19 relief legislation. At the same time, we ushered in a new chapter at the Academy to ensure that the GRAMMY Awards, the Academy’s membership and our staff reflect the diverse music community that we represent. We spoke out for #BlackLivesMatter and social justice. And we took concrete steps to further strengthen and affirm the integrity and transparency of the GRAMMY Award process to ensure that the GRAMMYs remain cherished by music creators and respected by the public. As musicians, we know that the only way to improve our skills is to tackle the toughest challenges head-on. During this difficult year, we at the Academy have embraced transformation, innovation, resilience, and a bias for action. I want to express my gratitude to our staff and to our many volunteers for demonstrating all those qualities and more. We cannot achieve our goals without you. We need your participation, your ideas, your feedback, and yes, even your constructive criticism. Ever since the Recording Academy was founded, its role has been to be your voice. Our membership is an unparalleled group of working creatives and business professionals. I personally invite you and everyone in our community to join us in our work and become an active participant in our commitment to the future of music. Thank you for joining us, and I hope you enjoy Music’s Biggest Night, the 63rd GRAMMY Awards. Musically yours,

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WE KNOW YOU’LL SHINE BRIGHT

BEYONCÉ - 9 NOMS

DUA LIPA - 6 NOMS

JUSTIN BIEBER - 4 NOMS

PHOEBE BRIDGERS - 4 NOMS

DABABY - 4 NOMS

BILLIE EILISH - 4 NOMS

JOHN BEASLEY - 4 NOMS

AKIL KING - 3 NOMS

BLACK PUMAS - 3 NOMS

ASCAP MEMBERS WITH 2 NOMINATIONS AARON DESSNER ADRIENNE LENKER BAD BUNNY BECK BILLY WALSH BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN BRANDY CLARK D SMOKE

GERALD CLAYTON GRACE POTTER HAIM JON BATISTE LECRAE LIL BABY LIL DURK MARIA SCHNEIDER

MATTHEW RAMSEY MICHAEL TILSON THOMAS REMY LE BOEUF SETHINTHEKITCHEN STEPHEN BRAY TED HEARNE WE THE KINGDOM


O N M U S I C ’ S B I G G E S T N I G H T.

DENISIA ANDREWS - 3 NOMS

FINNEAS - 3 NOMS

FIONA APPLE - 3 NOMS

JACOB COLLIER - 3 NOMS

JAY-Z - 3 NOMS

KAYTRANADA - 3 NOMS

See our full list of nominees at ASCAP.COM/GRAMMYNOMS21

LOUIS BELL - 3 NOMS

THOMAS ADÉS - 3 NOMS

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT HONOREES GRANDMASTER FLASH & THE FURIOUS FIVE

SALT-N-PEPA TALKING HEADS

FROM YOUR

MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD JEFFREY MURDOCK

FAMILY


CONTENTS

WELCOME

8

SPECIAL MERIT AWARDS

Interim President/ CEO & Chair’s Message

18

66 Lionel Hampton 68 Marilyn Horne

18 Beyoncé Black Pumas

20

DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch Doja Cat

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24

by Joyce DiDonato

70 Salt-N-Pepa by MC Lyte

20

72 Selena

Billie Eilish Dua Lipa

by Ángela Aguilar

76 Talking Heads

Post Malone Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé

Trustees Awards 28

Jhené Aiko Coldplay

84 Benny Golson

by Quincy Jones

28

30

Taylor Swift Ingrid Andress

86 Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds by Toni Braxton

30

Technical GRAMMY Award

90 Daniel Weiss

32

Phoebe Bridgers Chika

34

by Bob Ludwig

Music Educator Award

Noah Cyrus D Smoke

92 Jeffrey Murdock

36 Kaytranada

Megan Thee Stallion

38 40

Song Of The Year

72

by Dekarius Dawson

Hall Of Fame

98 2021 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame

Complete Nominations List

80

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80 Ed Cherney

by Maureen Droney Kessie

26

Jacob Collier HAIM

64 Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five

NOMINEES

Lifetime Achievement Awards


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CONTENTS

FEATURES

106

106

A Year of Change And Challenges Inside the Academy’s response to COVID-19 and a racial reckoning

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In Memoriam

Remembering music people we lost in 2020

THE RECORDING ACADEMY TODAY

114 Recording Academy

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

115 Advocacy & Public Policy 116 Membership & Industry Relations MusiCares

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The Latin Recording Academy

118 GRAMMY Awards Process 120 Executive Staff 122 National Trustee Officers And Trustees 124 National Staff 127 Recording Academy Chapters 131 Past Chairs The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc., owns, among others, the following trademarks: Recording Academy®, GRAMMY®, GRAMMYs®, GRAMMY Awards®, GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®, The Latin Recording Academy®, MusiCares®, and GRAMMY Museum®. The 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards Program Book is published by the Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, in association with AFM. © 2021 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved.

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The Recording Academy CO-PUBLISHER

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The Official 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards program book is published by the Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, and produced in association with AFM. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form, by means electronically, mechanically, photocopying, or otherwise, and no article or photography can be printed without the written consent of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without written consent is forbidden. The Recording Academy and AFM assume no responsibility for statements made by advertisers; the quality or deliverability of products or services advertised; or positioning of advertising. GRAMMY Awards is a registered trademark of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc. The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. ©2021 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved.

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In keeping with her career-long tradition of socially conscious lyrics and unrelenting musical innovation, Beyoncé dropped her Pan-African anthem “Black Parade” on June 19 — aka Juneteenth, the African American holiday celebrating the date in 1865 when Texas slaves were informed of their emancipation. The iconic singer/songwriter then watched as her riotously rhythmic single became the unofficial theme song for a global Black activism movement. Co-produced by Beyoncé and trusted collaborator Derek Dixie, “Black Parade” adroitly juxtaposes soulful gospel choir harmonies, pulsating Afropop rhythms, and American trap beats against majestic horns that evoke a Black college brass band. Beyoncé’s formidable voice floats above the song’s sublime musical arrangement, effortlessly transitioning from mesmerizing rap passages to serpentine vocalizing reminiscent of West African apala music. The single captured four nominations, including Song Of The Year, Record Of The Year, Best R&B Song, and Best R&B Performance. With 24 GRAMMY wins to date, Beyoncé earned nine total nominations this year, making her the most-nominated female artist in GRAMMY history. — Bruce Britt

BLACK PUMAS Resplendent with blue skies, gray clouds and brown leaves, “Colors” by Black Pumas is a celebration of life’s multihued beauty, with a subtext of empowerment that glances back at the Black is beautiful aesthetic of the ’60s and ’70s. The throwback sound is also redolent of classic soul music from that same period. But there’s something in the immediacy of frontman Eric Burton’s gospel-inflected vocals and guitarist Adrian Quesada’s crisp yet warm production that makes this a song for our time. “Colors” is just one highlight from Black Pumas (Deluxe Edition), which adds 11 new tracks to the group’s self-titled 2019 debut album. With new originals, live versions of beloved songs, and inspired covers ranging from the Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” to Bobby “Blue” Bland’s “Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City,” the album showcases the duo’s masterful command of music’s broad, multicolored spectrum.— Alan di Perna

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RECORD OF THE YEAR

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

LYZE RENEE

BEYONCÉ



In 2019, DaBaby told Forbes that selling two of his cars to invest in his rap career was more than worth it: “I always said I’d get it back tenfold, and it happened.” For an artist who began his journey just over six years ago by handing out CDs and posting flyers on lampposts around his hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, DaBaby’s investment has already paid off. This year, he scored four GRAMMY nominations, three of them for “Rockstar” featuring Compton’s latest star Roddy Ricch. “It’s safe to say I earned it,” DaBaby kicks off his verse on the Record Of The Year contender produced by SethInTheKitchen. In between the song’s guitar plucks and catchy chorus, DaBaby raps openly about past traumas and measures he has taken to protect himself and his family. Roddy Ricch follows suit with tales of calculated caution and a narrow escape from danger. Together, they lament that success doesn’t exempt them from some of life’s challenges. Even through trying circumstances, this pair was able to construct Billboard’s Song of the Summer. — Ogden Payne

RECORD OF THE YEAR BEST NEW ARTIST

Los Angeles-born 25-year-old rapper/singer Doja Cat got her start uploading music to SoundCloud as a teen, building a fan base with playful lyrics and animated social media antics. The Best New Artist nominee first went viral in 2018 with her humorous music video for “Mooo!” “Say So,” from her 2019 sophomore album, Hot Pink, on which she co-wrote every song, is her biggest release to date. Before it was officially released as a single, it became a hit on TikTok; then a massive Nicki Minaj remix last May resulted in the first No. 1 spot on Billboard’s Hot 100 for both artists. On the Record Of The Year contender, Cat carries airy vocals and confident bars over a lively ‘70s disco-tinged beat produced by Tyson Trax, aka Dr. Luke, who signed Cat to his label in 2013. — Ana Monroy Yglesias

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DABABY FEATURING RODDY RICCH RECORD OF THE YEAR


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RECORD OF THE YEAR Inspired by a tragic nightmare, Billie Eilish’s “Everything I Wanted” is a beautifully haunting track that sheds light on the 19-year-old’s state of mind while dealing with depression. “It was definitely one of those dreams that was everything you’ve been thinking put into a horrible, horrible reality,” she told the “Song Exploder” podcast. But Eilish, who earned five GRAMMYs last year on the strength of her bedroom-made pop debut, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, turned the unpleasant dream into a deeply touching record with the help of her brother and collaborator, Finneas. Last year’s Producer Of The Year, NonClassical winner co-penned lyrics for “Everything I Wanted” and crafted a pulsing piano intro that “drew me in right away,” Eilish said. Finneas used a kick drum, cleverly muted at first, to sidechain the piano and added a tonal, snare-like sound that reminded him of Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs to complete his production color palette. The song’s dark emotional theme made it a tough one to work through, the siblings revealed, but, ultimately, strengthened their bond. — Jennifer Velez

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

When Elton John says, “You’ve probably made one of the greatest albums of the year,” that’s a very good sign you’ve done something special. British pop star Dua Lipa’s sophomore album, Future Nostalgia, earned praise from the GRAMMY-winning legend, who called it a “zeitgeist” for disco’s revival. After a Best New Artist GRAMMY win just two years ago, Lipa earned five of her six nominations this year for Future Nostalgia, including Album Of The Year, Record and Song Of The Year, and Best Pop Solo Performance for “Don’t Start Now,” the album’s disco-infused lead single. “You want a timeless song, I want to change the game,” Lipa sings on the title track. And she’s doing just that. Some say disco died at the end of the 1970s, but as Forbes wrote, Future Nostalgia is a “declaration of Lipa’s intent to bring it back to life with her forward-thinking sensibilities.” — Crystal Larsen

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Post Malone’s Hollywood’s Bleeding holds a tune for everybody. On his third studio album, the genrebending superstar teamed up with 11 guest artists, including hip-hop heavyweight Travis Scott and heavy metal icon Ozzy Osbourne on the trap-rock mashup “Take What You Want.” Young Thug appears on the heart-wrenching ballad “Goodbyes,” and the album’s wild ride features contributions from Future, Halsey, SZA, and DaBaby, among others, before culminating with the bouncy club hit “Wow.” Like last year’s Record Of The Year-nominated “Sunflower,” “Circles” topped the Billboard Hot 100. The up-tempo bop documents the sun setting on a once-passionate relationship. Produced by Louis Bell, Frank Dukes and Malone, the song’s groovy drum beat and serene acoustic guitar lay a snappy, psychedelic bed for the singer/songwriter who shows off his pop chops on his way to receiving his third-consecutive Record Of The Year nomination. — Ogden Payne

ADAM DEGROSS

POST MALONE

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Megan Thee Stallion’s “Savage” first went viral in early 2020 as the soundtrack to social media’s hottest dance challenge. Yet, it was the hit’s unexpected remix with fellow Houstonian Beyoncé that made it one of the most iconic sonic linkups in recent history. With new verses, subtle production tweaks and dirty South flavor, the J. White Did Itproduced collaboration harkens back to a time when remixes were an event in themselves. Over a simple piano beat, “Hot Girl Meg” provides palpable energy and charisma, an endearing mix accentuated by Queen Bey’s versatile vocal assist. Throughout the Billboard Hot 100 chart-topper, which earned both artists their first Best Rap Song and Performance nominations, the talented twosome trade bars about everything, including Texas pride, jumping to pull up their jeans and — rather appropriately — participating in the latest TikTok dance craze. The result is a star-making turn from one of rap’s most prominent rising talents, and another world-stop moment from “Big B.” — J’na Jefferson 24 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

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MEGAN THEE STALLION FEATURING BEYONCÉ RECORD OF THE YEAR



ALBUM OF THE YEAR After spending years on a spiritual journey since her 2011 debut, Jhené Aiko has now found her center with her third album, Chilombo. The 32-year-old, who received her first GRAMMY nominations in 2014, has picked up three more this year: Album Of The Year and Best Progressive R&B Album for Chilombo, as well as Best R&B Performance for “Lightning & Thunder” with John Legend. Recorded in Hawaii (the birthplace of her great-grandmother), Aiko used the Big Island’s lush greenery — along with meditation and recording sound bowls to align chakras — to create Chilombo’s healing experience. From the explicitly sexual allure of “P*$$Y Fairy (OTW)” to the post-breakup frustration of “Triggered (Freestyle)” and the self-confident “B.S.” featuring GRAMMY winner H.E.R., the album reflects all facets of Aiko’s transformation. “In a sense, I am like a volcano, and this album is an eruption,” Aiko told Billboard. “Then it settled — and it became this beautiful land where there’s new life.” Just like lava, the singer’s free-flowing energy has broken boundaries and led to her first General Field nomination. — Bianca Gracie

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

More than two decades into Coldplay’s extraordinary career, Everyday Life stretches the British band’s boundaries and earned them a second nomination for Album Of The Year. The double album’s genre-spanning tracks showcase a plethora of guest musicians, offer up lyrics in different languages, and explore everything from stringladen ambience to bluesy swagger and gospel exuberance. Everyday Life’s often-atmospheric backdrop provides contrast — as frontman Chris Martin takes aim at serious topics like American gun culture and the Syrian refugee crisis — to the poppier sounds of their last studio release, 2015’s A Head Full Of Dreams. As NME noted, the album “regularly steps to the left-field, proving that Coldplay are more adventurous than they’re often given credit for.” Mirroring the LP’s split into Sunrise and Sunset sections, Coldplay balance timehonored tones and fresh sonic ideas on Everyday Life, which climbed to the top of the charts in nearly a dozen countries. — Bryan Reesman

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JAMES MARCUS HANEY

COLDPLAY

UNIVERSAL MUSIC

JHENÉ AIKO



ALBUM OF THE YEAR By pushing digital musicmaking technology to its outer limits, composer, producer, arranger, and multi-instrumentalist Jacob Collier forges fastforward soundtracks for our age of information overload. His most recent realization, Djesse Vol. 3, is a rapid-fire, cut-and-paste collage crafted from obsessively tweaked shards of jazz, funk, hip-hop, R&B, dubstep, and other contemporary styles. The Album Of The Year-nominated project took Collier all around the world to record with an all-star cast of artists, including Ty Dolla $ign, Tori Kelly, Jessie Reyez, T-Pain, Rapsody, and Tank And The Bangas. Collier then brought all the tracks back to his North London home studio, where he processed and mixed the ambitious sessions himself. For all its complexity, the music manages to communicate on a gut level. As Collier once told Rolling Stone India, “It might sound strange, but the essence of complexity is simplicity.” — Alan di Perna

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Sisters Alana, Danielle and Este Haim comprise this enthralling Los Angeles pop-rock trio, whose sound has earned comparisons to classic-rock mainstays Fleetwood Mac and scored them a Best New Artist nomination in 2014. Continuing their rise to pop’s upper echelon, HAIM teamed up with super producers Rostam Batmanglij and Ariel Rechtshaid on their third studio album, Women In Music Pt. III, which is nominated for Album Of The Year, while its single, “The Steps,” is up for Best Rock Performance. Recorded in Los Angeles and London and co-produced by Danielle, Women In Music Pt. III captures the band’s evolution both personally and sonically, ruminating on their relationships with each other, the music industry and the media, and moving through a spectrum of genres, from rock and pop to R&B, folk and beyond. Despite their increased visibility, HAIM have not lost sight of their roots. As Este told GRAMMY.com in 2020, “We’re just three sisters from the Valley, you know.” — Rachel Brodsky

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RETO SCHMID

HAIM

DYAN JONG

JACOB COLLIER


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If Taylor Swift wins Album Of The Year for Folklore, she’ll be making history: No other female artist has won the category three times, and only a trio of men — Paul Simon, Stevie Wonder and Frank Sinatra — have pulled off the feat. Swift, of course, is familiar with breaking records. When Fearless won in 2010, she was the youngest to win. And when 1989 won in 2016, she became the first woman to win twice as a lead artist. Wise bettors, then, will know better than to count her out, as will most anyone who has listened closely to Folklore. This is Swift at her most confident and shapeshifting, serving up songs that soothe and bite while taking dips into sonic experimentation with her co-producers, frequent collaborator Jack Antonoff and the National’s Aaron Dessner. At a time when the world is stuck playing it safe, Swift took risks, and it’d be no surprise if those risks come with rewards. — Tammy La Gorce

Ingrid Andress launched her career as a sought-after pop songwriter, penning hits such as Charli XCX’s 2017 smash “Boys,” before funneling her lyrical candor and intimate, soulful voice into her own debut country album, Lady Like. As female artists have struggled to receive country radio airplay in recent years, Andress broke through the barriers to forge a connection with listeners, earning a platinum-certified hit with “More Hearts Than Mine,” a pop-seared ballad about welcoming a significant other home to meet her family, with the warning that more hearts than hers will break if the relationship fizzles. The Best New Artist nominee earned a nod for Best Country Song for her breakthrough hit. With Lady Like, an elegant body of work that layers pop sheen over country lyrical constructs, Andress is one of several women dominating the nominations in this year’s Best Country Album category. — Jessica Nicholson

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BEST NEW ARTIST

JESS WILLIAMS

INGRID ANDRESS

BETH GARRABRANT

TAYLOR SWIFT ALBUM OF THE YEAR


Excellence The people with an eye for investments salute the people with an ear for music The Poppo Group proudly supports the 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards® Michael F. Poppo, CIMA® Managing Director Senior Portfolio Manager Institutional Consultant The Poppo Group UBS Financial Services Inc. 1251 Avenue of the Americas, Second Floor New York, NY 10020 212-626-8721 ubs.com/team/thepoppogroup

CIMA® is a registered certification mark of the Investment Management Consultants Association® in the United States of America and worldwide. As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services Inc. offers investment advisory services in its capacity as an SEC-registered investment adviser and brokerage services in its capacity as an SEC-registered broker-dealer. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business, that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information, please review the PDF document at ubs.com/relationshipsummary. © UBS 2020. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. CJ-UBS-1316129900 Exp.: 12/31/2021


BEST NEW ARTIST

Phoebe Bridgers’ acclaimed sophomore album, Punisher, finds the L.A.-born singer/songwriter seeking community in an increasingly distant, absurd universe. This Best New Artist contender — also up for Best Alternative Music Album and Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song for “Kyoto” — creates “a world unto itself” on the album, according to Pitchfork, who laud Bridgers as “a master of collapse.” She wrote or co-wrote every track on Punisher, which topped more than a dozen year-end lists. Bridgers’ beautiful, candid and commanding songs can be intensely autobiographical, as in “Kyoto,” comparing the alienation of touring in that Japanese city to complex emotions about her family, self-identity and disassociation. On the title track — musicians’ code for an overzealous fan — she fawns over the late alt icon Elliott Smith, and writes about re-visiting his L.A. haunts while imagining an intimate conversation. As Bridgers herself puts it in the banjo and fiddle-laced “Graceland Too,” “She can do anything she wants to.” — Roy Trakin

BEST NEW ARTIST

“I’m finna take it all,” Alabama-born Chika declares on the title track of her debut EP, Industry Games. In 2016, the self-described “musical theater kid” turned rapper/singersongwriter began her quest for stardom by dropping songs online about being a Black, queer woman from the South. Thanks to a few viral freestyles, she received co-signs from the likes of President Barack Obama, Cardi B, Missy Elliot, and Ice T. But, don’t mistake Chika for just another social media rapper. She is an activist at heart, using music to touch on themes of love, social injustice and body positivity — all delivered with a sense of humor also found in like-minded Gen Zers who grew up on the internet. Last year, she followed an unapologetic Calvin Klein ad with a star-making turn on NPR’s “Tiny Desk,” was a member of XXL’s lauded Freshman Class, and wrote music (plus made her acting debut) for the Netflix film Project Power. Chika is here to take whatever she wants. — Kiana B. Jabangwe

32 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

LEEOR WILD

CHIKA

FRANK OCKENFELS

PHOEBE BRIDGERS


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BEST NEW ARTIST Sure, the Cyrus name is a familiar one, but Best New Artist nominee Noah Cyrus is unequivocally her own artist with a stunning, singular voice. The Nashville-born artist got her start at age 2, appearing in films and TV before officially following in her father, Billy Ray Cyrus, and big sister Miley Cyrus’ musical footsteps in 2016. Cyrus showed the promise of her 2019 hit single “July” was just the beginning, delivering a masterful EP, The End Of Everything, that belies her age of 21. On songs like the title track and “I Got So High That I Saw Jesus,” she shows a depth and soul twice her age. NPR said of the superb eight-song collection, “Blending the spirit of classic country music with the sensibilities of today’s pop, it’s called The End Of Everything — which feels like a good title for this moment. — Steve Baltin

BEST NEW ARTIST

An overnight sensation with more than two decades on the grind, Inglewood rapper D Smoke has dedicated his life to capturing his hood’s stories in song. The product of a musical family, Daniel Farris began his own artistic journey in the early 2000s as part of the R&B group N3D and the songwriting team WoodWorks, both family units. While juggling his blossoming music career, he doubled as a Spanish and music theory teacher at his alma mater, Inglewood High School. In 2019, D Smoke got his big break when he landed a spot on the Netflix rap competition series, “Rhythm + Flow.” He won in late October and one day later, he self-released his Inglewood High EP. All this momentum ultimately led to his 2020 debut album, Black Habits, an introspective take on being Black in America. The album earned a Best Rap Album nod, proof that success is worth the wait. — John Ochoa

34 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

TERON BEAL

D SMOKE

LEX MERICO

NOAH CYRUS



Anywhere can become your own club when Louis Kevin Celestin, better known as Kaytranada, is the mastermind behind the music. As a follow-up to his 2016 debut album 99.9%, the Haiti-born, Canada-raised producer dropped BUBBA, a true dance album from start to finish that flows the way a live DJ set should — cohesively. As NPR puts it, “BUBBA transports you to a very specific space and in that way, Kaytranada captures dance music's central tenet. You have to feel it in your bones, your belly and your whole body.” Highlights of the project, up for Best Dance/Electronic Album, include the Best Dance Recording-nominated “10%” starring the sultry-sweet vocals of Kali Uchis and the intoxicating “Midsection” featuring Pharrell Williams. Like so many fans and critics of late, NME poured on the praise, writing, “Whether it’s the choice of samples, beat construction or even the pitch and spaciness of the keys, his work is instantly identifiable.” Kaytranada’s signature production style is as daring as it is distinctive, compelling you to dance. — Gabrielle Pharms

MEGAN THEE STALLION Megan Thee Stallion’s journey to her inaugural GRAMMY year started with the world claiming a “Hot Girl Summer” in 2019. When critics pondered whether a 2020 summer anthem would raise its hand during an unprecedented year, Meg — with help from TikTok creator Keara Wilson and a remix featuring Beyoncé — swept the internet with the ubiquitous hit “Savage,” which earned three nominations, including Record Of The Year. The 25 year-old Houston native’s visibility continued to grow last year with a massive Cardi B collaboration, “WAP,” and the release of her highly anticipated, full-length debut, Good News. While hitting new career heights, the rising rapper continued her studies at Texas Southern University and faced tumultuous personal battles, including the loss of her mother and manager Holly Thomas to cancer in March 2019. The tragedy has driven the Best New Artist nominee to push forward, as she confessed on Twitter: “After my mom passed I promised myself I was going to keep going hard [because] not only is music my dream but it was her dream for me, too.” — Naima Cochrane

36 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

XAIVER TERA

BEST NEW ARTIST

BEST NEW ARTIST

ROC NATION

KAYTRANADA


TO EVERYONE WHO CONTRIBUTED TO MUSICARES’ EFFORTS THIS YEAR, THANK YOU FOR HELPING THE MUSIC COMMUNITY THROUGH THIS DIRE TIME OF NEED. OUR WORK IS NOT POSSIBLE WITHOUT YOU. A S P ECIA L TH ANKS TO OU R BIG G EST C O N TRI B UTO RS: AMAZON MUSIC

ASCAP

BMI

CITY OF AUSTIN

COUNTRY MUSIC ASSOCIATION

ELMA PHILANTHROPIES • FACEBOOK • THE PERENCHIO FOUNDATION ENTERTAINMENT • TIKTOK INC.

SPOTIFY

THE RECORDING ACADEMY

UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP

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SONY MUSIC

TIDES FOUNDATION •

WARNER MUSIC GROUP


SOF O THE N GYEAR

BLACK PARADE

Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters Beyoncé, artist Beyoncé released “Black Parade” on Juneteenth, which commemorates when Union soldiers came to Texas with news of the emancipation of the enslaved. In the thick of a modern uprising against social injustice, she wrote this so people would remember, and for a worthy cause. On this charity single, Beyoncé channeled her ancestors and empowered those who have endured and triumphed. “Share joy and celebrate each other,” she wrote. “Even in the midst of struggle, please remember our beauty, strength and power. ‘Black Parade’ celebrates you, your voice and your joy and will benefit Black-owned small businesses.”

THE BOX

Larrance Dopson, Samuel Gloade, Rodrick Moore, Adarius Moragne, Eric Sloan & Khirye Anthony Tyler, songwriters Roddy Ricch, artist The first rap song of the decade to become a No. 1 hit, “The Box” sparks with such compelling sonics and viral appeal that its smash hit status seems to be a calculated move. But it wasn’t. “We never were like, ‘Oh, it’s a single,’” Roddy Ricch said to Entertainment Weekly. “I don’t even believe in singles ... I believe in full albums ... I really just wanted to put out songs with people that I was rocking with.” About the suddenness of his success, he said, “I feel like it’s just God’s timing. God just chose me to be a leader of the new era … and I’m thankful for it every day.”

CARDIGAN

CIRCLES

It’s a song about “lost romance,” Taylor Swift said on Twitter, “and why young love … leaves such an indelible mark.” She wrote it with Aaron Dessner, who told Vulture that Swift invited him to send music. “Just send anything … it could be the weirdest thing you’ve ever done.” He sent a folder with many new pieces he was excited about. One song sketch was called “Maple,” and it was the one she chose. Five hours later, she sent back “Cardigan” complete. “That’s when I realized something crazy was happening,” he said. “She just dialed directly into the heart of the music and wrote an incredible song.”

Written by Post Malone with Adam Feeney (aka Frank Dukes), Billy Walsh, Kaan Gunesberk, and Louis Bell, “Circles” was the third single from Hollywood’s Bleeding, and Malone’s fourth No. 1 hit. It began with a distinctive track by Dukes, Gunesberk and Bell. Malone loved it. “[It had] another cool unique vibe,” he said to Spotify. “I was super inspired working in Toronto with Frank Dukes while sitting down playing the instruments. Super Fleetwood Mac vibe. A lot of my music is about being a glutton for pain. Knowing you are in a sh**ty situation, but you keep on going back.”

Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, songwriters Taylor Swift, artist

38 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Louis Bell, Adam Feeney, Kaan Gunesberk, Austin Post & Billy Walsh, songwriters Post Malone, artist


SOF O THE N GYEAR

DON’T START NOW

EVERYTHING I WANTED

“It’s about moving on,” Dua Lipa told Radio.com about “Don’t Start Now.” “It’s about finding confidence in that and not letting anyone get in the way of your happiness. I think it’s always important to remember that your happiness should come first.” Featured on her highly anticipated sophomore album, Lipa wrote the track to counteract some of the other songs’ pervasive sense of “dance crying,” the underlying sorrow woven into her music. It’s a serious journey, but also “very nostalgic and fun and dancy,” she said. “It’s honest but not taking itself too seriously.”

A perfect crystallization of their singular collaboration, “Everything I Wanted,” grew out of a dream Billie Eilish had of leaping off a building. A dream too dark for producer/co-writer Finneas, who wouldn’t go there with her. “I felt like an enabler in helping her write a song as bleak as that,” he told The New York Times. In his resistance, she saw the bigger truth of the song, and it expanded to become a message of love through the darkness. “We had a complete block,” she said, “and the way we got through it was to make it about us as siblings and what we mean to each other.”

I CAN’T BREATHE

IF THE WORLD WAS ENDING

Caroline Ailin, Ian Kirkpatrick, Dua Lipa & Emily Warren, songwriters Dua Lipa, artist

Dernst Emile II, H.E.R. & Tiara Thomas, songwriters H.E.R., artist It’s one of the saddest song titles of recent times, echoing the last words of George Floyd and the rage of the world that witnessed his death in real-time. “I have a responsibility as an artist to talk about what’s happening around me,” H.E.R. said to “Access Hollywood,” “and put it in a song … We had all these injustices flood the internet. I am really proud of my generation for taking a stand and trying to make a change.” “I Can’t Breathe” is a song about “all people who are suffocating in this life,” she added. “That’s not a way to live — in fear — knowing that could be you.”

Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters Billie Eilish, artist

Julia Michaels & JP Saxe, songwriters JP Saxe Featuring Julia Michaels, artists It was while writing a love song that they fell in love. It was also the first song they ever wrote together. “That session was one of the most magical in my life,” JP Saxe said to People. “That song just poured out of us.” The idea was triggered by a recent earthquake, which led to a discussion about the effect of apocalypse on the heart. “[The song] is about that special person in your life,” Julia Michaels told E! Online, “that for whatever reason you can’t make it work with. If the world is ending, and there was nothing left to hold you back, would you make your way back to them for one last night?” — Paul Zollo

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 39




NOMINATIONS For recordings released during the Eligibility Year Sept. 1, 2019, through Aug. 31, 2020. More or less than 8 nominations in the General Field or 5 nominations in the other Fields is the result of ties.

GENERAL FIELD

2

1

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

RECORD OF THE YEAR Award to the Artist and to the Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s), and Mastering Engineer(s), if other than the artist.

BLACK PARADE Beyoncé

Beyoncé & Derek Dixie, producers; Stuart White, engineer/mixer; Colin Leonard, mastering engineer

COLORS Black Pumas

Adrian Quesada, producer; Adrian Quesada, engineer/mixer; JJ Golden, mastering engineer

ROCKSTAR DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch

SethinTheKitchen, producer; Derek “MixedByAli” Ali, Chris Dennis, Liz Robson & Chris West, engineers/mixers; Glenn A Tabor III, mastering engineer

SAY SO Doja Cat

Tyson Trax, producer; Clint Gibbs, engineer/ mixer; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer

EVERYTHING I WANTED Billie Eilish

Award to Artist(s) and to Featured Artist(s), Songwriter(s) of new material, Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s), Mixer(s), and Mastering Engineer(s) credited with at least 33% playing time of the album, if other than Artist.

CHILOMBO Jhené Aiko

Fisticuffs & Julian-Quán Viêt Lê, producers; Fisticuffs, Julian-Quán Viêt Lê, Zeke Mishanec, Christian Plata & Gregg Rominiecki, engineers/ mixers; Jhené Aiko Efuru Chilombo, Julian-Quán Viêt Lê, Maclean Robinson & Brian Keith Warfield, songwriters; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer

BLACK PUMAS (DELUXE EDITION) Black Pumas

Adrian Quesada, producer; Adrian Quesada, engineer/mixer; Eric Burton & Adrian Quesada, songwriters; JJ Golden, mastering engineer

EVERYDAY LIFE Coldplay

Daniel Green, Bill Rahko & Rik Simpson, producers; Mark “Spike” Stent, engineer/mixer; Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, Will Champion & Chris Martin, songwriters; Emily Lazar, mastering engineer

DJESSE VOL.3 Jacob Collier

Finneas O’Connell, producer; Rob Kinelski & Finneas O’Connell, engineers/mixers; John Greenham, mastering engineer

Jacob Collier, producer; Ben Bloomberg & Jacob Collier, engineers/mixers; Jacob Collier, songwriter; Chris Allgood & Emily Lazar, mastering engineers

DON’T START NOW

WOMEN IN MUSIC PT. III

Dua Lipa

Caroline Ailin & Ian Kirkpatrick, producers; Josh Gudwin, Drew Jurecka & Ian Kirkpatrick, engineers/mixers; Chris Gehringer, mastering engineer

CIRCLES Post Malone

Louis Bell, Frank Dukes & Post Malone, producers; Louis Bell & Manny Maroquin, engineers/mixers; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer

SAVAGE Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé Beyoncé & J. White Did It, producers; Stuart White, engineer/mixer; Colin Leonard, mastering engineer

HAIM

Rostam Batmanglij, Danielle Haim & Ariel Rechtshaid, producers; Rostam Batmanglij, Jasmine Chen, John DeBold, Matt DiMona, Tom Elmhirst, Joey MessinaDoerning & Ariel Rechtshaid, engineers/ mixers; Rostam Batmanglij, Alana Haim, Danielle Haim, Este Haim & Ariel Rechtshaid, songwriters; Emily Lazar, mastering engineer

FUTURE NOSTALGIA Dua Lipa

Lorna Blackwood & Koz, producers; Josh Gudwin & Cameron Gower Poole, engineers/mixers; Clarence Coffee Jr. & Dua Lipa, songwriters; Chris Gehringer, mastering engineer

HOLLYWOOD’S BLEEDING Post Malone

Louis Bell & Frank Dukes, producers; Louis Bell & Manny Maroquin, engineers/mixers; Louis Bell, Adam Feeney, Austin Post & Billy Walsh, songwriters; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer 40 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

FOLKLORE Taylor Swift

Jack Antonoff, Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, producers; Jack Antonoff, Aaron Dessner, Serban Ghenea, John Hanes, Jonathan Low & Laura Sisk, engineers/mixers; Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, songwriters; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer

3 SONG OF THE YEAR A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BLACK PARADE Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Sean Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters (Beyoncé)

THE BOX Larrance Dopson, Samuel Gloade, Rodrick Moore, Adarius Moragne, Eric Sloan & Khirye Anthony Tyler, songwriters (Roddy Ricch)

CARDIGAN Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)

CIRCLES Louis Bell, Adam Feeney, Kaan Gunesberk, Austin Post & Billy Walsh, songwriters (Post Malone)

DON’T START NOW Caroline Ailin, Ian Kirkpatrick, Dua Lipa & Emily Warren, songwriters (Dua Lipa)

EVERYTHING I WANTED Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)

I CAN’T BREATHE Dernst Emile II, H.E.R. & Tiara Thomas, songwriters (H.E.R.)

IF THE WORLD WAS ENDING Julia Michaels & JP Saxe, songwriters (JP Saxe Featuring Julia Michaels)


SESAC CONGRATULATES OUR 63RD GRAMMY® AWARD NOMINEES BURNA BOY —

BEST GLOBAL MUSIC ALBUM

JAMES KRIVCHENIA of Big Thief —

BEST ROCK PERFORMANCE

DISCLOSURE —

BEST DANCE RECORDING BEST DANCE/ELECTRONIC ALBUM

BOB LANZETTI AND MICHAEL LEAGUE of Snarky Puppy —

DEREK JAMES DIXIE

BEST CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM

RECORD OF THE YEAR SONG OF THE YEAR BEST R&B SONG

ORRIN EVANS

and the Captain Black Big Band — BEST LARGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ALBUM

ROBERT GLASPER —

BEST R&B SONG BEST PROGRESSIVE R&B ALBUM

JACK HARLOW

KATE McGARRY —

BEST LARGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ALBUM

PJ MORTON —

BEST GOSPEL ALBUM

CHRISTIAN NODAL —

BEST REGIONAL MEXICAN MUSIC ALBUM (INCLUDING TEJANO)

SAINT BODHI —

BEST RAP PERFORMANCE

BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC PERFORMANCE/SONG

THOMM JUTZ

HILLARY SCOTT

BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM

MYKAL KILGORE —

BEST TRADITIONAL R&B PERFORMANCE

EMILY KING —

BEST R&B PERFORMANCE

of Lady A —

BEST COUNTRY DUO/GROUP PERFORMANCE

BECCA STEVENS —

BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTS AND VOCALS


NOMINATIONS 4

6

BEST NEW ARTIST

BEST POP DUO/GROUP PERFORMANCE

This category recognizes an artist whose eligibility-year release(s) achieved a breakthrough into the public consciousness and notably impacted the musical landscape.

For new vocal or instrumental duo/ group or collaborative pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

Ingrid Andress

UN DIA (ONE DAY)

Phoebe Bridgers

J Balvin, Dua Lipa, Bad Bunny & Tainy

Chika Noah Cyrus D Smoke Doja Cat Kaytranada Megan Thee Stallion

POP

5 BEST POP SOLO PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

YUMMY Justin Bieber

SAY SO Doja Cat

EVERYTHING I WANTED Billie Eilish

DON’T START NOW Dua Lipa

WATERMELON SUGAR Harry Styles

CARDIGAN Taylor Swift

INTENTIONS Justin Bieber Featuring Quavo

DYNAMITE BTS

RAIN ON ME Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande

EXILE Taylor Swift Featuring Bon Iver

7 BEST TRADITIONAL POP VOCAL ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new traditional pop recordings.

BLUE UMBRELLA (Burt Bacharach &) Daniel Tashian

TRUE LOVE: A CELEBRATION OF COLE PORTER Harry Connick, Jr.

AMERICAN STANDARD James Taylor

UNFOLLOW THE RULES

8 BEST POP VOCAL ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new pop vocal recordings.

CHANGES Justin Bieber

CHROMATICA Lady Gaga

FUTURE NOSTALGIA Dua Lipa

FINE LINE Harry Styles

FOLKLORE Taylor Swift

DANCE/ELECTRONIC MUSIC

9 BEST DANCE RECORDING For solo, duo, group or collaborative performances. Vocal or instrumental. Singles or Tracks only.

ON MY MIND Diplo & SIDEPIECE

Diplo & SIDEPIECE, producers; Luca Pretolesi, mixer

MY HIGH Disclosure Featuring Aminé & Slowthai Guy Lawrence & Howard Lawrence, producers; Guy Lawrence, mixer

THE DIFFERENCE Flume Featuring Toro y Moi

Rufus Wainwright

Flume, producer; Eric J Dubowsky, mixer

JUDY

BOTH OF US

Renée Zellweger

Jayda G

Fred Again.. & Jayda G, producers; Fred Again.. & Jayda G, mixers

10% Kaytranada Featuring Kali Uchis

Kaytranada, producer; Neal H. Pogue, mixer

42 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards


Congratulations to all of the nominees and winners — especially those who are part of the Sound Royalties family.

Thank you to the music creatives whose songs and stories continue to lift our spirits.

Experience the Sound Royalties Difference.

soundroyalties.com


NOMINATIONS 10

ROCK

BEST DANCE/ ELECTRONIC ALBUM

12

For vocal or instrumental albums. Albums only.

KICK I Arca

PLANET’S MAD Baauer

ENERGY Disclosure

BUBBA Kaytranada

GOOD FAITH Madeon

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

11 BEST CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM For albums containing approximately 51% or more playing time of instrumental material. For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

BEST ROCK PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/ group or collaborative rock recordings.

SHAMEIKA Fiona Apple

NOT Big Thief

KYOTO Phoebe Bridgers

THE STEPS HAIM

STAY HIGH Brittany Howard

DAYLIGHT Grace Potter

13 BEST METAL PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/ group or collaborative metal recordings.

BUM-RUSH

14 BEST ROCK SONG A Songwriter(s) award. Includes rock, hard rock and metal songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

KYOTO Phoebe Bridgers, Morgan Nagler & Marshall Vore, songwriters (Phoebe Bridgers)

LOST IN YESTERDAY Kevin Parker, songwriter (Tame Impala)

NOT Adrianne Lenker, songwriter (Big Thief)

SHAMEIKA Fiona Apple, songwriter (Fiona Apple)

STAY HIGH Brittany Howard, songwriter (Brittany Howard)

15 BEST ROCK ALBUM

Body Count

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rock, hard rock or metal recordings.

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah

UNDERNEATH

A HERO’S DEATH

CHRONOLOGY OF A DREAM: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD

THE IN-BETWEEN

AXIOM

Code Orange

Jon Batiste

In This Moment

TAKE THE STAIRS

BLOODMONEY

Fontaines D.C.

KIWANUKA Michael Kiwanuka

DAYLIGHT

Black Violin

Poppy

Grace Potter

AMERICANA

EXECUTIONER’S TAX (SWING OF THE AXE) — LIVE

SOUND & FURY

Grégoire Maret, Romain Collin & Bill Frisell

LIVE AT THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL Snarky Puppy

44 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Power Trip

Sturgill Simpson

THE NEW ABNORMAL The Strokes


WHAT IF THE COLD WAR WENT HOT AND YOUR FATE

RESTED IN THE HANDS OF A ‘70s COVER BAND?

“THE PLOT LINE IS FANTASTIC AND THE AUTHOR HAS CRAFTED EACH ASPECT WITH SUCH AUTHORITY THAT IT IS IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO BE COMPLETELY TAKEN IN... WELL DONE.” ~ JACOB CLEVELAND, LITERARY CRITIC

J. H. Sanderson, just like the rock and roll spies in his novels, leads two lives: AUTHOR...

NOVELS ~ GRAPHIC NOVELS ~ AUDIOBOOKS ~ MUSIC WWW.ROADHOUSESONS.COM

...and philanthropic Holiday icon, “SPY SANTA” ~ and now he’s YOUR Santa! HE'S SEEN IN:


NOMINATIONS ALTERNATIVE

WONDER WHAT SHE THINKS OF ME

16

LET ME GO

BEST ALTERNATIVE MUSIC ALBUM Vocal or instrumental.

FETCH THE BOLT CUTTERS Fiona Apple

HYPERSPACE Beck

PUNISHER Phoebe Bridgers

JAIME Brittany Howard

THE SLOW RUSH Tame Impala

R&B

17

Chloe X Halle

Mykal Kilgore

ANYTHING FOR YOU Ledisi

DISTANCE Yebba

19 BEST R&B SONG A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BETTER THAN I IMAGINE Robert Glasper, Meshell Ndegeocello & Gabriella Wilson, songwriters (Robert Glasper Featuring H.E.R. & Meshell Ndegeocello)

BLACK PARADE

20 BEST PROGRESSIVE R&B ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded progressive vocal tracks derivative of R&B.

CHILOMBO Jhené Aiko

UNGODLY HOUR Chloe X Halle

FREE NATIONALS Free Nationals

F*** YO FEELINGS Robert Glasper

IT IS WHAT IT IS Thundercat

21 BEST R&B ALBUM

Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new R&B recordings.

(Beyoncé)

Ant Clemons

Jhené Aiko Featuring John Legend

COLLIDE

TAKE TIME

BLACK PARADE

Sam Barsh, Stacey Barthe, Sonyae Elise, Olu Fann, Akil King, Josh Lopez, Kaveh Rastegar & Benedetto Rotondi, songwriters

BEST R&B PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental R&B recordings.

LIGHTNING & THUNDER

Beyoncé

ALL I NEED Jacob Collier Featuring Mahalia & Ty Dolla $ign

GOAT HEAD Brittany Howard

SEE ME Emily King

18 BEST TRADITIONAL R&B PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental traditional R&B recordings.

SIT ON DOWN The Baylor Project Featuring Jean Baylor & Marcus Baylor 46 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

HAPPY 2 BE HERE

Giveon

TO FEEL LOVE/D

(Tiana Major9 & EARTHGANG)

Luke James

DO IT

BIGGER LOVE

Chloe Bailey, Halle Bailey, Anton Kuhl, Victoria Monét, Scott Storch & Vincent Van Den Ende, songwriters (Chloe X Halle)

SLOW DOWN Nasri Atweh, Badriia Bourelly, Skip Marley, Ryan Williamson & Gabriella Wilson, songwriters (Skip Marley & H.E.R.)

John Legend

ALL RISE Gregory Porter


NOMINATIONS RAP

22 BEST RAP PERFORMANCE For a rap performance. Singles or Tracks only.

DEEP REVERENCE Big Sean Featuring Nipsey Hussle

BOP DaBaby

WHATS POPPIN Jack Harlow

THE BIGGER PICTURE Lil Baby

SAVAGE Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé

DIOR Pop Smoke

23 BEST MELODIC RAP PERFORMANCE For a solo or collaborative performance containing both elements of R&B melodies and rap.

ROCKSTAR DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch

LAUGH NOW CRY LATER Drake Featuring Lil Durk

LOCKDOWN Anderson .Paak

THE BOX Roddy Ricch

HIGHEST IN THE ROOM Travis Scott

24

COUNTRY

BEST RAP SONG

26

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

THE BIGGER PICTURE

BEST COUNTRY SOLO PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental solo country recordings.

Dominique Jones, Noah Pettigrew & Rai’shaun Williams, songwriters

STICK THAT IN YOUR COUNTRY SONG

THE BOX

WHO YOU THOUGHT I WAS

Larrance Dopson, Samuel Gloade, Rodrick Moore, Adarius Moragne, Eric Sloan & Khirye Anthony Tyler, songwriters

WHEN MY AMY PRAYS

(Lil Baby)

(Roddy Ricch)

Eric Church

Brandy Clark

Vince Gill

BLACK LIKE ME

LAUGH NOW CRY LATER

Mickey Guyton

D. Banks, R. Chahayed, A. Graham, D. Jackson, R. La Tour & R. Martinez, songwriters

Miranda Lambert

(Drake Featuring Lil Durk)

ROCKSTAR Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, Ross Joseph Portaro IV & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch)

SAVAGE Beyoncé, Shawn Carter, Brittany Hazzard, Derrick Milano, Terius Nash, Megan Pete, Bobby Session Jr., Jordan Kyle Lanier Thorpe & Anthony White, songwriters

BLUEBIRD

27 BEST COUNTRY DUO/ GROUP PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative country recordings.

ALL NIGHT Brothers Osborne

10,000 HOURS

(Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé)

Dan + Shay & Justin Bieber

25

OCEAN

BEST RAP ALBUM

Lady A

SUGAR COAT

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rap recordings.

Little Big Town

BLACK HABITS

SOME PEOPLE DO

D Smoke

Old Dominion

ALFREDO Freddie Gibbs & The Alchemist

A WRITTEN TESTIMONY Jay Electronica

KING’S DISEASE Nas

THE ALLEGORY Royce 5’9”

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 47


NOMINATIONS 28

NEW AGE

BEST COUNTRY SONG

30

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental new age recordings.

BLUEBIRD

SONGS FROM THE BARDO

Luke Dick, Natalie Hemby & Miranda Lambert, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)

THE BONES Maren Morris, Jimmy Robbins & Laura Veltz, songwriters (Maren Morris)

CROWDED TABLE Brandi Carlile, Natalie Hemby & Lori Mckenna, songwriters (The Highwomen)

BEST NEW AGE ALBUM

Laurie Anderson, Tenzin Choegyal & Jesse Paris Smith

PERIPHERY Priya Darshini

FORM//LESS Superposition

MORE GUITAR STORIES Jim “Kimo” West

MEDITATIONS

MORE HEARTS THAN MINE

Cory Wong & Jon Batiste

Ingrid Andress, Sam Ellis & Derrick Southerland, songwriters

JAZZ

(Ingrid Andress)

SOME PEOPLE DO Jesse Frasure, Shane McAnally, Matthew Ramsey & Thomas Rhett, songwriters (Old Dominion)

29 BEST COUNTRY ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new country recordings.

LADY LIKE Ingrid Andress

YOUR LIFE IS A RECORD Brandy Clark

WILDCARD Miranda Lambert

NIGHTFALL Little Big Town

NEVER WILL Ashley McBryde

31 BEST IMPROVISED JAZZ SOLO For an instrumental jazz solo performance. Two equal performers on one recording may be eligible as one entry. If the soloist listed appears on a recording billed to another artist, the latter’s name is in parenthesis for identification. Singles or Tracks only.

GUINNEVERE Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, soloist Track from: Axiom

PACHAMAMA Regina Carter, soloist

ALL BLUES Chick Corea, soloist

Track from: Trilogy 2 (Chick Corea, Christian McBride & Brian Blade)

MOE HONK Joshua Redman, soloist

Track from: RoundAgain (Redman Mehldau McBride Blade)

32 BEST JAZZ VOCAL ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal jazz recordings.

ONA Thana Alexa

SECRETS ARE THE BEST STORIES Kurt Elling Featuring Danilo Pérez

MODERN ANCESTORS Carmen Lundy

HOLY ROOM: LIVE AT ALTE OPER Somi With Frankfurt Radio Big Band Conducted By John Beasley

WHAT’S THE HURRY Kenny Washington

33 BEST JAZZ INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new instrumental jazz recordings.

ON THE TENDER SPOT OF EVERY CALLOUSED MOMENT Ambrose Akinmusire

Track from: Ona (Thana Alexa)

WAITING GAME

CELIA

Terri Lyne Carrington And Social Science

Gerald Clayton, soloist

HAPPENING: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD Gerald Clayton

TRILOGY 2 Chick Corea, Christian McBride & Brian Blade

ROUNDAGAIN Redman Mehldau McBride Blade

48 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards


NOMINATIONS 34 BEST LARGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new ensemble jazz recordings.

DIALOGUES ON RACE Gregg August

MONK’ESTRA PLAYS JOHN BEASLEY John Beasley’s MONK’estra

THE INTANGIBLE BETWEEN Orrin Evans And The Captain Black Big Band

SONGS YOU LIKE A LOT John Hollenbeck With Theo Bleckmann, Kate McGarry, Gary Versace And The Frankfurt Radio Big Band

DATA LORDS Maria Schneider Orchestra

35 BEST LATIN JAZZ ALBUM For vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material. The intent of this category is to recognize recordings that represent the blending of jazz with Latin, Iberian-American, Brazilian, and Argentinian tango music.

TRADICIONES Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra

FOUR QUESTIONS Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

CITY OF DREAMS Chico Pinheiro

VIENTO Y TIEMPO - LIVE AT BLUE NOTE TOKYO Gonzalo Rubalcaba & Aymée Nuviola

TRANE’S DELIGHT Poncho Sanchez

GOSPEL/CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC

36 BEST GOSPEL PERFORMANCE/SONG This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best traditional Christian, roots gospel or contemporary gospel Single or Track.

WONDERFUL IS YOUR NAME Melvin Crispell III

RELEASE (LIVE) Ricky Dillard Featuring Tiff Joy; David Frazier, songwriter

COME TOGETHER Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins Presents: The Good News; Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins & Jazz Nixon, producers; Lashawn Daniels, Rodney Jerkins, Lecrae Moore & Jazz Nixon, songwriters

HOLY WATER We The Kingdom; Andrew Bergthold, Ed Cash, Franni Cash, Martin Cash & Scott Cash, songwriters

FAMOUS FOR (I BELIEVE) Tauren Wells Featuring Jenn Johnson; Chuck Butler, Krissy Nordhoff, Jordan Sapp, Alexis Slifer & Tauren Wells, songwriters

THERE WAS JESUS Zach Williams & Dolly Parton; Casey Beathard, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

38 BEST GOSPEL ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional or contemporary/R&B gospel music recordings.

2ECOND WIND: READY Anthony Brown & group therAPy

MY TRIBUTE

WON’T LET GO

Myron Butler

Travis Greene; Travis Greene, songwriter

CHOIRMASTER

MOVIN’ ON

Ricky Dillard

Jonathan McReynolds & Mali Music; Darryl L. Howell, Jonathan Caleb McReynolds, Kortney Jamaal Pollard & Terrell Demetrius Wilson, songwriters

GOSPEL ACCORDING TO PJ

37

Kierra Sheard

BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC PERFORMANCE/SONG This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best contemporary Christian music Single or Track, including pop, rap/hip-hop, Latin, or rock.

THE BLESSING (LIVE) Kari Jobe, Cody Carnes & Elevation Worship; Chris Brown, Cody Carnes, Kari Jobe Carnes & Steven Furtick, songwriters

SUNDAY MORNING Lecrae Featuring Kirk Franklin; Denisia Andrews, Jones Terrence Antonio, Saint Bodhi, Rafael X. Brown, Brittany Coney, Kirk Franklin, Lasanna Harris, Shama Joseph, Stuart Lowery, Lecrae Moore & Nathanael Saint-Fleur, songwriters

PJ Morton

KIERRA

39 BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, contemporary Christian music, including pop, rap/hip-hop, Latin, or rock recordings.

RUN TO THE FATHER Cody Carnes

ALL OF MY BEST FRIENDS Hillsong Young & Free

HOLY WATER We The Kingdom

CITIZEN OF HEAVEN Tauren Wells

JESUS IS KING Kanye West 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 49


NOMINATIONS 40

42

44

BEST ROOTS GOSPEL ALBUM

BEST LATIN ROCK OR ALTERNATIVE ALBUM

BEST TROPICAL LATIN ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional/roots gospel music, including country, Southern gospel, bluegrass, and Americana recordings.

BEAUTIFUL DAY Mark Bishop

20/20 The Crabb Family

WHAT CHRISTMAS REALLY MEANS The Erwins

CELEBRATING FISK! (THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY ALBUM) Fisk Jubilee Singers

SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL Ernie Haase & Signature Sound

LATIN

41 BEST LATIN POP OR URBAN ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin pop or urban recordings.

YHLQMDLG Bad Bunny

POR PRIMERA VEZ Camilo

MESA PARA DOS Kany García

PAUSA Ricky Martin

3:33 Debi Nova

50 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin rock or alternative recordings.

AURA Bajofondo

MONSTRUO Cami

SOBREVOLANDO Cultura Profética

LA CONQUISTA DEL ESPACIO Fito Paez

MISS COLOMBIA Lido Pimienta

43 BEST REGIONAL MEXICAN MUSIC ALBUM (INCLUDING TEJANO) For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new regional Mexican (banda, norteño, corridos, gruperos, mariachi, ranchera and Tejano) recordings.

HECHO EN MÉXICO Alejandro Fernández

LA SERENATA Lupita Infante

UN CANTO POR MÉXICO, VOL. 1 Natalia Lafourcade

BAILANDO SONES Y HUAPANGOS CON MARIACHI SOL DE MEXICO DE JOSE HERNANDEZ Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez

AYAYAY! Christian Nodal

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new tropical Latin recordings.

MI TUMBAO José Alberto “El Ruiseñor”

INFINITO Edwin Bonilla

SIGO CANTANDO AL AMOR (DELUXE) Jorge Celedon & Sergio Luis

40 Grupo Niche

MEMORIAS DE NAVIDAD Víctor Manuelle

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

45 BEST AMERICAN ROOTS PERFORMANCE For new vocal or instrumental American Roots recordings. This is for performances in the style of any of the subgenres encompassed in the American Roots Music Field, including Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots. Award to the Artist(s).

COLORS Black Pumas

DEEP IN LOVE Bonny Light Horseman

SHORT AND SWEET Brittany Howard

I’LL BE GONE Norah Jones & Mavis Staples

I REMEMBER EVERYTHING John Prine


NOMINATIONS 46 BEST AMERICAN ROOTS SONG A Songwriter(s) award. Includes Americana, bluegrass, traditional blues, contemporary blues, folk, or regional roots songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

CABIN Laura Rogers & Lydia Rogers, songwriters

48

50

BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM

BEST CONTEMPORARY BLUES ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental bluegrass recordings.

MAN ON FIRE Danny Barnes

TO LIVE IN TWO WORLDS, VOL. 1 Thomm Jutz

(The Secret Sisters)

NORTH CAROLINA SONGBOOK

CEILING TO THE FLOOR

Steep Canyon Rangers

Sierra Hull & Kai Welch, songwriters

HOME

(Sierra Hull)

HOMETOWN Sarah Jarosz, songwriter (Sarah Jarosz)

I REMEMBER EVERYTHING Pat McLaughlin & John Prine, songwriters (John Prine)

MAN WITHOUT A SOUL Tom Overby & Lucinda Williams, songwriters (Lucinda Williams)

47 BEST AMERICANA ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental Americana recordings.

OLD FLOWERS Courtney Marie Andrews

TERMS OF SURRENDER Hiss Golden Messenger

WORLD ON THE GROUND Sarah Jarosz

EL DORADO Marcus King

Billy Strings

THE JOHN HARTFORD FIDDLE TUNE PROJECT, VOL. 1

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental contemporary blues recordings.

HAVE YOU LOST YOUR MIND YET? Fantastic Negrito

LIVE AT THE PARAMOUNT Ruthie Foster Big Band

THE JUICE G. Love

BLACKBIRDS Bettye LaVette

UP AND ROLLING

(Various Artists) Matt Combs & Katie Harford Hogue, producers

North Mississippi Allstars

49

51

BEST TRADITIONAL BLUES ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental traditional blues recordings.

ALL MY DUES ARE PAID Frank Bey

YOU MAKE ME FEEL Don Bryant

THAT’S WHAT I HEARD Robert Cray Band

CYPRESS GROVE Jimmy “Duck” Holmes

RAWER THAN RAW

BEST FOLK ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental folk recordings.

BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN Bonny Light Horseman

THANKS FOR THE DANCE Leonard Cohen

SONG FOR OUR DAUGHTER Laura Marling

SATURN RETURN The Secret Sisters

ALL THE GOOD TIMES Gillian Welch & David Rawlings

Bobby Rush

GOOD SOULS BETTER ANGELS Lucinda Williams

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 51


frankbeyfilm.com

frankbeymusic.com


NOMINATIONS 52

GLOBAL MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD

BEST REGIONAL ROOTS MUSIC ALBUM

54

56

BEST GLOBAL MUSIC ALBUM

BEST SPOKEN WORD ALBUM (INCLUDES POETRY, AUDIO BOOKS & STORYTELLING)

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental regional roots music recordings.

MY RELATIVES “NIKSO KOWAIKS”

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental global music recordings.

ACID FOR THE CHILDREN: A MEMOIR

Black Lodge Singers

FU CHRONICLES

Flea

CAMERON DUPUY AND THE CAJUN TROUBADOURS

Antibalas

TWICE AS TALL

ALEX TREBEK—THE ANSWER IS...

Cameron Dupuy And The Cajun Troubadours

LOVELY SUNRISE Nā Wai ‘Ehā

ATMOSPHERE

Burna Boy

Ken Jennings

AGORA

BLOWOUT: CORRUPTED DEMOCRACY, ROGUE STATE RUSSIA, AND THE RICHEST, MOST DESTRUCTIVE INDUSTRY ON EARTH

Bebel Gilberto

LOVE LETTERS

New Orleans Nightcrawlers

Anoushka Shankar

Rachel Maddow

A TRIBUTE TO AL BERARD

AMADJAR

CATCH AND KILL

Sweet Cecilia

Tinariwen

REGGAE

CHILDREN’S

53

55

BEST REGGAE ALBUM

BEST CHILDREN’S MUSIC ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new reggae recordings.

Ronan Farrow

CHARLOTTE’S WEB (E.B. WHITE) Meryl Streep (& Full cast)

COMEDY

57 BEST COMEDY ALBUM

Buju Banton

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new musical or spoken word recordings that are created and intended specifically for children.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

HIGHER PLACE

ALL THE LADIES

BLACK MITZVAH

UPSIDE DOWN 2020

Skip Marley

Joanie Leeds

Tiffany Haddish

IT ALL COMES BACK TO LOVE

WILD LIFE

I LOVE EVERYTHING

Maxi Priest

GOT TO BE TOUGH

Justin Roberts

Patton Oswalt

THE PALE TOURIST

Toots & The Maytals

Jim Gaffigan

ONE WORLD

PAPER TIGER

The Wailers

Bill Burr

23 HOURS TO KILL Jerry Seinfeld

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 53


NOMINATIONS MUSICAL THEATER

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

60

58

59

BEST MUSICAL THEATER ALBUM

BEST COMPILATION SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA

BEST SCORE SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings. Award to the Principle Vocalist(s) and the Album Producer(s) of 51% or more playing time of the album. The Lyricist(s) and Composer(s) of a new score are eligible for an award if they have written and/or composed a new score that comprises 51% or more playing time of the album.

AMÉLIE Michael Fentiman, Sean Patrick Flahaven, Barnaby Race & Nathan Tysen, producers; Nathan Tysen, lyricist; Daniel Messe, composer & lyricist (Original London Cast)

AMERICAN UTOPIA ON BROADWAY David Byrne, producer (David Byrne, composer & lyricist) (Original Cast)

JAGGED LITTLE PILL Neal Avron, Pete Ganbarg, Tom Kitt, Michael Parker, Craig Rosen & Vivek J. Tiwary, producers (Glen Ballard, composer; Alanis Morissette, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Will Van Dyke, Michael Mayer, Alan Menken & Frank Wolf, producers (Alan Menken, composer; Howard Ashman, lyricist) (The New Off-Broadway Cast)

THE PRINCE OF EGYPT Dominick Amendum & Stephen Schwartz, producers; Stephen Schwartz, composer & lyricist (Original Cast)

SOFT POWER Matt Stine, producer; David Henry Hwang, lyricist; Jeanine Tesori, composer & lyricist (Original Cast)

Award to the Artist(s) and/or “in studio” Producer(s) of a majority of the tracks on the album. In the absence of both, award to the one or two individuals proactively responsible for the concept and musical direction of the album and for the selection of artists, songs and producers, as applicable. Award also goes to appropriately credited Music Supervisor(s).

Award to Composer(s) for an original score created specifically for, or as a companion to, a current legitimate motion picture, television show or series, video games or other visual media.

AD ASTRA Max Richter, composer

BECOMING Kamasi Washington, composer

JOKER

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

Hildur Guðnadóttir, composer

(Various Artists) Nate Heller, compilation producer; Howard Paar, music supervisor

Thomas Newman, composer

BILL & TED FACE THE MUSIC (Various Artists) Jonathan Leahy, compilation producer

EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: THE STORY OF FIRE SAGA (Various Artists) Savan Kotecha, compilation producer; Becky Bentham, music supervisor

FROZEN 2 (Various Artists) Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez, Tom MacDougall & Dave Metzger, compilation producers

JOJO RABBIT (Various Artists) Taika Waititi, compilation producer

1917 STAR WARS: THE RISE OF SKYWALKER John Williams, composer

61 BEST SONG WRITTEN FOR VISUAL MEDIA A Songwriter(s) award. For a song (melody & lyrics) written specifically for a motion picture, television, video games or other visual media, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BEAUTIFUL GHOSTS [FROM CATS] Taylor Swift & Andrew Lloyd Webber, songwriters (Taylor Swift)

CARRIED ME WITH YOU [FROM ONWARD] Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth & Tim Hanseroth, songwriters (Brandi Carlile)

INTO THE UNKNOWN [FROM FROZEN 2] Kristen Anderson-Lopez & Robert Lopez, songwriters (Idina Menzel & AURORA)

NO TIME TO DIE [FROM NO TIME TO DIE] Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas Baird O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)

STAND UP [FROM HARRIET] Joshuah Brian Campbell & Cynthia Erivo, songwriters (Cynthia Erivo)

54 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards



NOMINATIONS COMPOSING/ARRANGING

64

66

62

BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTS AND VOCALS

BEST BOXED OR SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION PACKAGE

BEST INSTRUMENTAL COMPOSITION A Composer’s award for an original composition (not an adaptation) first released during the Eligibility Year. Singles or Tracks only.

BABY JACK Arturo O’Farrill, composer

(Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra)

An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ASAS FECHADAS John Beasley & Maria Mendes, arrangers (Maria Mendes Featuring John Beasley & Orkest Metropole)

DESERT SONG

Christian Sands, composer

Erin Bentlage, Sara Gazarek, Johnaye Kendrick & Amanda Taylor, arrangers

(Christian Sands)

(Säje)

PLUMFIELD

FROM THIS PLACE

BE WATER II

Alexandre Desplat, composer

Alan Broadbent & Pat Metheny, arrangers

(Alexandre Desplat)

(Pat Metheny Featuring Meshell Ndegeocello)

SPUTNIK

HE WON’T HOLD YOU

Maria Schneider, composer

Jacob Collier, arranger

(Maria Schneider)

(Jacob Collier Featuring Rapsody)

STRATA

SLOW BURN

Remy Le Boeuf, composer

(Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows Featuring Anna Webber & Eric Miller)

63 BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTAL OR A CAPPELLA An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BATHROOM DANCE Hildur Guðnadóttir, arranger (Hildur Guðnadóttir)

DONNA LEE John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley)

HONEYMOONERS Remy Le Boeuf, arranger

(Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows)

LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING Alvin Chea & Jarrett Johnson, arrangers (Jarrett Johnson Featuring Alvin Chea)

URANUS: THE MAGICIAN Jeremy Levy, arranger

(Jeremy Levy Jazz Orchestra)

Talia Billig, Nic Hard & Becca Stevens, arrangers

(Becca Stevens Featuring Jacob Collier, Mark Lettieri, Justin Stanton, Jordan Perlson, Nic Hard, Keita Ogawa, Marcelo Woloski & Nate Werth)

PACKAGE

65 BEST RECORDING PACKAGE EVERYDAY LIFE Pilar Zeta, art director (Coldplay)

FUNERAL Kyle Goen & Alex Kalatschinow, art directors (Lil Wayne)

HEALER Julian Gross & Hannah Hooper, art directors (Grouplove)

ON CIRCLES Jordan Butcher, art director (Caspian)

VOLS. 11 & 12 Doug Cunningham & Jason Noto, art directors (Desert Sessions)

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FLAMING PIE (COLLECTOR’S EDITION) Linn Wie Andersen, Simon Earith, Paul McCartney & James Musgrave, art directors (Paul McCartney)

GIANTS STADIUM 1987, 1989, 1991 Lisa Glines & Doran Tyson, art directors (Grateful Dead)

MODE Jeff Schulz & Paul A. Taylor, art directors (Depeche Mode)

ODE TO JOY Lawrence Azerrad & Jeff Tweedy, art directors (Wilco)

THE STORY OF GHOSTLY INTERNATIONAL Michael Cina & Molly Smith, art directors (Various Artists)

NOTES

67 BEST ALBUM NOTES AT THE MINSTREL SHOW: MINSTREL ROUTINES FROM THE STUDIO, 1894–1926 Tim Brooks, album notes writer (Various Artists)

THE BAKERSFIELD SOUND: COUNTRY MUSIC CAPITAL OF THE WEST, 1940–1974 Scott B. Bomar, album notes writer (Various Artists)

DEAD MAN’S POP Bob Mehr, album notes writer (The Replacements)

THE MISSING LINK: HOW GUS HAENSCHEN GOT US FROM JOPLIN TO JAZZ AND SHAPED THE MUSIC BUSINESS Colin Hancock, album notes writer (Various Artists)

OUT OF A CLEAR BLUE SKY David Sager, album notes writer (Nat Brusiloff)


NOMINATIONS HISTORICAL

68 BEST HISTORICAL ALBUM CELEBRATED, 1895–1896 Meagan Hennessey & Richard Martin, compilation producers; Richard Martin, mastering engineer (Unique Quartette)

HITTIN’ THE RAMP: THE EARLY YEARS (1936–1943) Zev Feldman, Will Friedwald & George Klabin, compilation producers; Matthew Lutthans, mastering engineer (Nat King Cole)

IT’S SUCH A GOOD FEELING: THE BEST OF MISTER ROGERS Lee Lodyga & Cheryl Pawelski, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Mister Rogers)

1999 SUPER DELUXE EDITION Trevor Guy, Michael Howe & Kirk Johnson, compilation producers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Prince)

SOUVENIR Carolyn Agger, compilation producer; Miles Showell, mastering engineer (Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark)

THROW DOWN YOUR HEART: THE COMPLETE AFRICA SESSIONS Béla Fleck, compilation producer; Richard Dodd, mastering engineer (Béla Fleck)

PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL

69 BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, NON-CLASSICAL An Engineer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

BLACK HOLE RAINBOW Shawn Everett & Ivan Wayman, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Devon Gilfillian)

EXPECTATIONS Gary Paczosa & Mike Robinson, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Katie Pruitt)

HYPERSPACE Drew Brown, Julian Burg, Andrew Coleman, Paul Epworth, Shawn Everett, Serban Ghenea, David Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Jaycen Joshua, Greg Kurstin, Mike Larson, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco & Matt Wiggins, engineers; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer (Beck)

JAIME Shawn Everett, engineer; Shawn Everett, mastering engineer (Brittany Howard)

25 TRIPS Shani Gandhi & Gary Paczosa, engineers; Adam Grover, mastering engineer (Sierra Hull)

70 PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, NON-CLASSICAL A Producer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

JACK ANTONOFF • August (Taylor Swift) (T) • Gaslighter (The Chicks) (A) • Holy Terrain (FKA Twigs Featuring Future) (T) • Mirrorball (Taylor Swift) (T) • This Is Me Trying (Taylor Swift) (T) • Together (Sia) (S)

DAN AUERBACH • Cypress Grove (Jimmy “Duck” Holmes) (A) • El Dorado (Marcus King) (A) • Is Thomas Callaway (CeeLo Green) (A) • Singing For My Supper (Early James) (A) • Solid Gold Sounds (Kendell Marvel) (A) • Years (John Anderson) (A)

DAVE COBB • Backbone (Kaleo) (S) • The Balladeer (Lori McKenna) (A) • Boneshaker (Airbourne) (A) • Down Home Christmas (Oak Ridge Boys) (A) • The Highwomen (The Highwomen) (A) • I Remember Everything (John Prine) (S) • Reunions (Jason Isbell And The 400 Unit) (A) • The Spark (William Prince) (S) • You’re Still The One (Teddy Swims) (S)

FLYING LOTUS • It Is What It Is (Thundercat) (A)

ANDREW WATT • Break My Heart (Dua Lipa) (T) • Me And My Guitar (A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie) (T) • Midnight Sky (Miley Cyrus) (S) • Old Me (5 Seconds Of Summer) (T) • Ordinary Man (Ozzy Osbourne Featuring Elton John) (T) • Take What You Want (Post Malone Featuring Ozzy Osbourne & Travis Scott) (T) • Under The Graveyard (Ozzy Osbourne) (T)

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 57


NOMINATIONS 71

PRODUCTION, CLASSICAL

74

BEST REMIXED RECORDING

73

PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, CLASSICAL

A Remixer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses for identification.) Singles or Tracks only.

DO YOU EVER (RAC MIX) RAC, remixer (Phil Good)

IMAGINARY FRIENDS (MORGAN PAGE REMIX) Morgan Page, remixer (Deadmau5)

PRAYING FOR YOU (LOUIE VEGA MAIN REMIX) Louie Vega, remixer (Jasper Street Co.)

ROSES (IMANBEK REMIX) Imanbek Zeikenov, remixer (SAINt JHN)

YOUNG & ALIVE (BAZZI VS. HAYWYRE REMIX) Haywyre, remixer (Bazzi)

PRODUCTION, IMMERSIVE AUDIO

72 BEST IMMERSIVE AUDIO ALBUM For vocal or instrumental albums in any genre. Eligible recordings must be commercially released for sale or streaming on a consumer format/configuration (DVD-Video, DVDAudio, SACD, Blu-Ray, Atmos, Auro-3D, immersive download, etc.) that provides an original immersive mix (not electronically re-purposed) of four or more channels. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Best Immersive Audio Album Craft Committee was unable to meet. The judging of the entries in this category has been postponed until such time that we are able to meet in a way that is appropriate to judge the many formats and configurations of the entries and is safe for the committee members. The nominations for the 63rd GRAMMYs will be announced next year in addition to (and separately from) the 64th GRAMMY nominations in the category.

58 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, CLASSICAL An Engineer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

DANIELPOUR: THE PASSION OF YESHUA Bernd Gottinger, engineer

(JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)

GERSHWIN: PORGY AND BESS David Frost & John Kerswell, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (David Robertson, Frederick Ballentine, Angel Blue, Denyce Graves, Latonia Moore, Eric Owens, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus)

HYNES: FIELDS Kyle Pyke, engineer; Jesse Lewis & Kyle Pyke, mastering engineers

(Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion)

IVES: COMPLETE SYMPHONIES Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers; Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, mastering engineers (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic)

SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 13, ‘BABI YAR’ David Frost & Charlie Post, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer

(Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra)

A Producer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

BLANTON ALSPAUGH • Aspects Of America — Pulitzer Edition (Carlos Kalmar & Oregon Symphony) • Blessed Art Thou Among Women (Peter Jermihov, Katya Lukianov & PaTRAM Institute Singers) • Dvořák: Symphony No. 9; Copland: Billy The Kid (Gianandrea Noseda & National Symphony Orchestra) • Glass: The Fall Of The House Of Usher (Joseph Li, Nicholas Nestorak, Madison Leonard, Jonas Hacker, Ben Edquist, Matthew Adam Fleisher & Wolf Trap Opera) • Kahane: Emergency Shelter Intake Form (Alicia Hall Moran, Gabriel Kahane, Carlos Kalmar & Oregon Symphony) • Kastalsky: Requiem (Leonard Slatkin, Steven Fox, Benedict Sheehan, Charles Bruffy, Cathedral Choral Society, The Clarion Choir, The Saint Tikhon Choir, Kansas City Chorale & Orchestra Of St. Luke’s) • Massenet: Thaïs (Andrew Davis, Joshua Hopkins, Andrew Staples, Erin Wall, Toronto Mendelssohn Choir & Toronto Symphony Orchestra) • Smyth: The Prison (Sarah Brailey, Dashon Burton, James Blachly & Experiential Orchestra) • Woolf, L.P.: Fire And Flood (Julian Wachner, Matt Haimovitz & Choir Of Trinity Wall Street)

DAVID FROST • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas, Vol. 9 (Jonathan Biss) • Gershwin: Porgy And Bess (David Robertson, Frederick Ballentine, Angel Blue, Denyce Graves, Latonia Moore, Eric Owens, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus) • Gluck: Orphée & Eurydice (Harry Bicket, Dmitry Korchak, Andriana Chuchman, Lauren Snouffer, Lyric Opera Of Chicago Orchestra & Chorus) • Holst: The Planets; The Perfect Fool (Michael Stern & Kansas City Symphony) • Muhly: Marnie (Robert Spano, Isabel Leonard, Christopher Maltman, Denyce Graves, Iestyn Davies, Janis Kelly, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus) • Schubert: Piano Sonatas, D. 845, D. 894, D. 958, D. 960 (Shai Wosner) • Shostakovich: Symphony No. 13, ‘Babi Yar’ (Riccardo Muti, Alexey Tikhomirov, Chicago Symphony Orchestra & Chorus)


NOMINATIONS JESSE LEWIS • Gunn: The Ascendant (Roomful Of Teeth) • Harrison, M.: Just Constellations (Roomful Of Teeth) • Her Own Wings (Willamette Valley Chamber Music Festival) • Hynes: Fields (Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion) • Lang, D.: Love Fail (Beth Willer & Lorelei Ensemble) • Mazzoli: Proving Up (Christopher Rountree, Opera Omaha & International Contemporary Ensemble) • Sharlat: Spare The Rod! (NOW Ensemble) • Soul House (Hub New Music) • Wherein Lies The Good (The Westerlies)

DMITRIY LIPAY • Adams, J.: Must The Devil Have All The Good Tunes? (Yuja Wang, Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic) • Cipullo: The Parting (Alastair Willis, Laura Strickling, Catherine Cook, Michael Mayes & Music Of Remembrance) • Ives: Complete Symphonies (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic) • LA Phil 100 — The Los Angeles Philharmonic Centennial Birthday Gala (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic) • Langgaard: Prelude To Antichrist; Strauss: An Alpine Symphony (Thomas Dausgaard & Seattle Symphony Orchestra) • Nielsen: Symphony No. 1 & Symphony No. 2, ‘The Four Temperaments’ (Thomas Dausgaard & Seattle Symphony)

ELAINE MARTONE • Bound For The Promised Land (Robert M. Franklin, Steven Darsey, Jessye Norman & Taylor Branch) • Dawn (Shachar Israel) • Gandolfi, Prior & Oliverio: Orchestral Works (Robert Spano & Atlanta Symphony Orchestra) • Singing In The Dead Of Night (Eighth Blackbird) • Whitacre: The Sacred Veil (Eric Whitacre, Grant Gershon & Los Angeles Master Chorale)

CLASSICAL

75 BEST ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE

HANDEL: AGRIPPINA Maxim Emelyanychev, conductor; Elsa Benoit, Joyce DiDonato, Franco Fagioli, Jakub Józef Orliński & Luca Pisaroni; Daniel Zalay, producer (Il Pomo D’Oro)

Award to the Conductor and to the Orchestra.

ZEMLINSKY: DER ZWERG

ASPECTS OF AMERICA — PULITZER EDITION

Donald Runnicles, conductor; David Butt Philip & Elena Tsallagova; Peter Ghirardini & Erwin Stürzer, producers

Carlos Kalmar, conductor (Oregon Symphony)

CONCURRENCE Daníel Bjarnason, conductor (Iceland Symphony Orchestra)

COPLAND: SYMPHONY NO. 3 Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony)

IVES: COMPLETE SYMPHONIES Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)

LUTOSŁAWSKI: SYMPHONIES NOS. 2 & 3 Hannu Lintu, conductor

(Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra)

76 BEST OPERA RECORDING Award to the Conductor, Album Producer(s) and Principal Soloists.

DELLO JOIO: THE TRIAL AT ROUEN Gil Rose, conductor; Heather Buck & Stephen Powell; Gil Rose, producer (Boston Modern Orchestra Project; Odyssey Opera Chorus)

FLOYD, C.: PRINCE OF PLAYERS William Boggs, conductor; Alexander Dobson, Keith Phares & Kate Royal; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra; Florentine Opera Chorus)

GERSHWIN: PORGY AND BESS David Robertson, conductor; Frederick Ballentine, Angel Blue, Denyce Graves, Latonia Moore & Eric Owens; David Frost, producer

(Orchestra Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin; Chorus Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin)

77 BEST CHORAL PERFORMANCE Award to the Conductor, and to the Choral Director and/or Chorus Master, where applicable, and to the Choral Organization/Ensemble.

CARTHAGE Donald Nally, conductor (The Crossing)

DANIELPOUR: THE PASSION OF YESHUA JoAnn Falletta, conductor; James K. Bass & Adam Luebke, chorus masters

(James K. Bass, J’Nai Bridges, Timothy Fallon, Kenneth Overton, Hila Plitmann & Matthew Worth; Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus & UCLA Chamber Singers)

KASTALSKY: REQUIEM Leonard Slatkin, conductor; Charles Bruffy, Steven Fox & Benedict Sheehan, chorus masters (Joseph Charles Beutel & Anna Dennis; Orchestra Of St. Luke’s; Cathedral Choral Society, The Clarion Choir, Kansas City Chorale & The Saint Tikhon Choir)

MORAVEC: SANCTUARY ROAD Kent Tritle, conductor

(Joshua Blue, Raehann Bryce-Davis, Dashon Burton, Malcolm J. Merriweather & Laquita Mitchell; Oratorio Society Of New York Orchestra; Oratorio Society Of New York Chorus)

ONCE UPON A TIME Matthew Guard, conductor

(Sarah Walker; Skylark Vocal Ensemble)

(The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus)

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NOMINATIONS 78

80

81

BEST CHAMBER MUSIC/SMALL ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE

BEST CLASSICAL SOLO VOCAL ALBUM

BEST CLASSICAL COMPENDIUM

For new recordings of works with chamber or small ensemble (24 or fewer members, not including the conductor). One award to the Ensemble and one award to the Conductor, if applicable.

Award to Vocalist(s), Collaborative Artist(s) (Ex: pianists, conductors, chamber groups) Producer(s), and Recording Engineers/Mixers with 51% or more playing time of new material.

CONTEMPORARY VOICES

AMERICAN COMPOSERS AT PLAY — WILLIAM BOLCOM, RICKY IAN GORDON, LORI LAITMAN, JOHN MUSTO

Pacifica Quartet

HEALING MODES Brooklyn Rider

HEARNE, T.: PLACE

Stephen Powell

(Attacca Quartet, William Bolcom, Ricky Ian Gordon, Lori Laitman, John Musto, Charles Neidich & Jason Vieaux)

Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s) and Engineer(s) of over 51% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

ADÈS CONDUCTS ADÈS Mark Stone & Christianne Stotijn; Thomas Adès, conductor; Nick Squire, producer

SAARIAHO: GRAAL THÉÂTRE; CIRCLE MAP; NEIGES; VERS TOI QUI ES SI LOIN Clément Mao-Takacs, conductor; Hans Kipfer, producer

Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods, Diana Wade & Place Orchestra

Nicholas Phan; Myra Huang, accompanist

SEREBRIER: SYMPHONIC BACH VARIATIONS; LAMENTS AND HALLELUJAHS; FLUTE CONCERTO

HYNES: FIELDS

FARINELLI

José Serebrier, conductor; Jens Braun, producer

Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion

THE SCHUMANN QUARTETS Dover Quartet

79 BEST CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL SOLO Award to the Instrumental Soloist(s) and to the Conductor, when applicable.

ADÈS: CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA Kirill Gerstein; Thomas Adès, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)

BEETHOVEN: COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS Igor Levit

BOHEMIAN TALES Augustin Hadelich; Jakub Hrůša, conductor (Charles Owen; Symphonieorchester Des Bayerischen Rundfunks)

DESTINATION RACHMANINOV — ARRIVAL Daniil Trifonov; Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor (The Philadelphia Orchestra)

THEOFANIDIS: CONCERTO FOR VIOLA AND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Richard O’Neill; David Alan Miller, conductor (Albany Symphony)

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CLAIRIÈRES - SONGS BY LILI & NADIA BOULANGER

Cecilia Bartoli; Giovanni Antonini, conductor (Il Giardino Armonico)

THOMAS, M.T.: FROM THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK & MEDITATIONS ON RILKE

A LAD’S LOVE

Isabel Leonard; Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Jack Vad, producer

Brian Giebler; Steven McGhee, accompanist

(Katie Hyun, Michael Katz, Jessica Meyer, Reginald Mobley & Ben Russell)

SMYTH: THE PRISON Sarah Brailey & Dashon Burton; James Blachly, conductor

(Experiential Chorus; Experiential Orchestra)

WOOLF, L.P.: FIRE AND FLOOD Matt Haimovitz; Julian Wachner, conductor; Blanton Alspaugh, producer


NOMINATIONS 82

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

BEST CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL COMPOSITION

83

A Composer’s Award. (For a contemporary classical composition composed within the last 25 years, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year.) Award to the Librettist, if applicable.

ADÈS: CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA Thomas Adès, composer

(Kirill Gerstein, Thomas Adès & Boston Symphony Orchestra)

DANIELPOUR: THE PASSION OF YESHUA Richard Danielpour, composer

BEST MUSIC VIDEO Award to the Artist, Video Director and Video Producer.

BROWN SKIN GIRL Beyoncé, Blue Ivy & WizKid Beyoncé Knowles-Carter & Jenn Nkiru, video directors; Astrid Edwards, Aya Kaido, Jean Mougin, Nathan Scherrer & Erinn Williams, video producers

LIFE IS GOOD

(JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)

Future Featuring Drake Julien Christian Lutz, video director; Harv Glazer, video producer

FLOYD, C.: PRINCE OF PLAYERS

LOCKDOWN

Carlisle Floyd, composer

(William Boggs, Alexander Dobson, Kate Royal, Keith Phares, Florentine Opera Chorus & Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra)

HEARNE, T.: PLACE Ted Hearne, composer

(Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods & Place Orchestra)

ROUSE: SYMPHONY NO. 5 Christopher Rouse, composer

(Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

Anderson .Paak Dave Meyers, video director; Nathan Scherrer, video producer

ADORE YOU Harry Styles Dave Meyers, video director; Jo Coombes, Ellen De Faux, Tom Gardner & Nathan Scherrer, video producers

GOLIATH Woodkid Yoann Lemoine, video director; Horace de Gunzbourg, video producer

84 BEST MUSIC FILM For concert/performance films or music documentaries. Award to the Artist, Video Director, and Video Producer.

BEASTIE BOYS STORY Beastie Boys Spike Jonze, video director; Amanda Adelson, Jason Baum & Spike Jonze, video producers

BLACK IS KING Beyoncé Emmanuel Adjei, Blitz Bazawule, Beyonce Knowles Carter & Kwasi Fordjour, video directors; Lauren Baker, Akin Omotoso, Nathan Scherrer, Jeremy Sullivan & Erinn Williams, video producers

WE ARE FREESTYLE LOVE SUPREME Freestyle Love Supreme Andrew Fried, video director; Andrew Fried, Jill Furman, Thomas Kail, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sarina Roma, Jenny Steingart & Jon Steingart, video producers

LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE Linda Ronstadt Rob Epstein & Jeffrey Friedman, video directors; Michele Farinola & James Keach, video producers

THAT LITTLE OL’ BAND FROM TEXAS ZZ Top Sam Dunn, video director; Scot Mcfadyen, video producer

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 61


L IFE T IM E AC H I E VE M EN T AWA R D

G R A M M Y L E G E N D AWA R D

The Lifetime Achievement Award, established in 1962, is

Recording Academy to individuals or groups for ongoing

presented by vote of the Recording Academy’s National

contributions and influence in the recording field. The

Trustees to performers who, during their lifetimes, have

GRAMMY Legend Award was inaugurated in 1990.

made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording.

TRUST E E S AWA R D

This Special Merit Award is presented on occasion by the

MU S IC E DU CATO R AWA R D™ Launched in 2013, in collaboration with the GRAMMY Museum, the Music Educator Award recognizes current

This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of the

educators who have made a significant and lasting

Recording Academy’s National Trustees to individuals

contribution to the field of music education and who

who have made significant contributions, other than

demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause of

performance, to the field of recording. The Trustees

maintaining music education in their schools. The recipient

Award was established in 1967.

is approved by the Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees.

TE CHN I CA L GRA M M Y ® AWA R D

G RA MMY H A L L O F FA ME ®

Presented by vote of the Recording Academy’s National

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award was established by the

Trustees, the Technical GRAMMY Award recognizes

Recording Academy’s National Trustees in 1973 to honor

individuals and companies that have made contributions of

recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance

outstanding technical significance to the field of recording.

that are at least 25 years old. Inductees are selected

The Technical GRAMMY was first awarded in 1994.

annually by a special member committee of experts and historians from all branches of the recording arts with final approval by the Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees.

VISIT GRAMMY.COM FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF PAST SPECIAL MERIT AWARDS RECIPIENTS.

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L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

Hip-hip got its start on Aug. 11, 1973, when DJ Kool Herc isolated the breakbeat on the records he played at his sister’s birthday party in the South Bronx. Another Bronx native son, by way of Barbados, was taking notes. Joseph Saddler noticed that the guests at his parent’s house parties got excited during the drum solo on records. So he set out to make that part last longer. First, he got the right needle. Next, he invented the slipmat, a piece of felt that made it easier for him to spin vinyl counterclockwise and touch it with his hands — a first. The only thing missing was the perfect turntable. He found the Technics SL-23 at a local store and saved the money he earned working as a messenger after school until he had enough to buy two. In his bedroom, Saddler dissected his new turntables, as Edison did with his phonograph, until he developed groundbreaking DJ techniques such as scratching, cutting, the clock theory, and the quick-mix theory. A fan said he controlled turntables like martial arts grandmaster Bruce Lee and Grandmaster Flash was born. An innovator who could sense where the music was going, Flash recruited five of his friends to rap over his beats: Melvin “Melle Mel” Glover, Nathaniel “The Kidd Creole” Glover, Robert Keith “Keef Cowboy” Wiggins, Eddie “Mr. Ness/Scorpio” Morris, and Guy Todd “Rahiem” Williams. Clad in flashy leather reminiscent of Parliament-Funkadelic, Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five took their act from the Black Door to international stages. While the five MC’s traded rhymes — and flawless choreography — Flash used everything from his elbows down to his toes to spin. In 1979, they released their debut single, “Superappin,” followed by party starters “Freedom,” “The Birthday Party” and “It’s Nasty (Genius Of Love).” On “The Adventures Of Grandmaster Flash On The Wheels Of Steel,” a live mix, Flash blended records from Spoonie Gee, the Sugar Hill Gang, Chic, Blondie, and Queen. It was the first time someone chopped up sections of other songs and mixed them to create a new song.

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ECHOES/REDFERNS

GRANDMASTER FLASH & THE FURIOUS FIVE

If that wasn’t enough, in 1982, they dropped “The Message.” Broken glass everywhere People pissing on the stairs, you know they just don’t care I can’t take the smell, can’t take the noise Got no money to move out, I guess I got no choice Melle Mel’s iconic lyrics painted a vivid picture of poor and neglected neighborhoods, creating hip-hop’s first social commentary. It is the blueprint for a long line of storytellers including Public Enemy, Snoop Dogg, OutKast, Notorious B.I.G., and Jay Z. Though rap’s first supergroup only released two albums, their impact is immeasurable. They are the architects of an art form that changed the world. — Kiana B. Jabangwe


Milk & Honey

congratulates client and friend

Grand Master Flash on his Recording Academy ® Li Lifetime Achievement Award

the greatest story-tellers in the world learn more at milkhoneyla.com


L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

Lionel Hampton popularized the vibraphone, but his trailblazing career kicked off on the drums. Born in 1908 in Louisville, Kentucky, and raised in Chicago, he got his first gig as a teenager, playing drums with the Chicago Defender Newsboys’ Band. In the late 1920s, during an L.A. session with Les Hite’s band, Louis Armstrong was so impressed by Hampton’s recreation of one of his songs on the vibraphone — a skill he practiced religiously — he invited him to play the instrument in the studio. Backing Armstrong on “Memories Of You” and “Shine,” Hampton recorded jazz’s first improvised vibraphone solos. There was no slowing him down after that. Hampton took his flamboyant drumming antics, including high jumps and fanciful twirls of his sticks, to the vibes. After hearing him play at Paradise Cafe in downtown Los Angeles in 1936, Benny Goodman invited Hampton to come make his trio a quartet. The interracial band broke barriers during America’s Jim Crow era with appearances in films and public performances at venues as revered as Carnegie Hall. Hampton formed his own orchestra in 1940 and performed internationally over the years with a series of big and small combos alongside influential greats like Illinois Jacquet, Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, Billy Mackel, Charles Mingus, Wes Montgomery, and Clifford Brown as well as dynamic vocalists such as Betty Carter, Annie Ross, Aretha Franklin, and Dinah Washington. The GRAMMY Hall of Fame-inducted “Flying Home” and “Hamp’s Boogie Woogie” are two of his most popular swing-era hits, while other recordings such as “Hey! Ba-Ba-Re-Bop,” “On The Sunny Side Of The Street” and “Blow-Top Blues” hint at rock and roll, bebop and rhythm and blues sounds on the horizon. A mesmerizing musician, record label owner, philanthropist, and composer of more than 200 works, Hampton continued to perform and receive accolades — such as the National Medal of Arts, National Endowment of the Arts Jazz Master fellowship and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame — until his death at age 94 on Aug. 31, 2002. — Kiana B. Jabangwe

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RALPH CRANE/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION VIA GETTY IMAGES

LIONEL HAMPTON


We miss you and love you, LIONEL. Keeping the good vibes alive. The Boys in the Band!


L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

M A R I LY N H O R N E “Legacy” in the real world is one thing, but “operatic legacy” implies an achievement of both the superhuman and the supernatural. Achieving such iconic status demands perfection beyond any expected standards, charisma reserved for a select few, and a stamina and longevity granted to the rarest of creatures over the musical centuries. Marilyn Horne has not only arrived to such exalted heights, but she made it look easy. Trust me. It’s not. Opera continues to fascinate for its Herculean demands as well as its astonishing purity and unrivaled musical scope, and “Jackie,” as she is known by those who love her, luxuriated in these demanding challenges, brazenly bringing us along with her at each juncture. Whether she was breaking international boundaries as an American in a predominantly European art form, crossing over from stage to screen with panache and humor right at home alongside the great stars, or blazing new trails for repertoire seemingly long outdated, she forged a new path that was audacious, spectacular, unique, and left our industry changed for the better. Possessing an immediately identifiable — and utterly unforgettable — voice of equal parts fiery steel and gorgeous velvet, she blazed through historic opera productions of wildly demanding repertoire scanning four centuries; has left an astonishing library of award-winning recordings that students and opera lovers will continue to turn to for study and admiration for decades to come; and raucously paved a way free of limitation for future classical artists to know that whether it is the White House, “The Tonight Show,” or “Sesame Street,” we belong in prime time. But perhaps the greatest element of her legacy is that rather than remain content to simply hit her mark center stage — while singing flawless roulades that scale the extreme depths and heights of a human’s voice — she takes her fierce determination, discipline and dedication into everything she does: surviving pancreatic cancer, being a dedicated mother and grandmother, passing on her wisdom to the generations following her through teaching and mentoring, or assuring that arts organizations thrive in the future. She is a true star, a true legend, and she has left our music industry much stronger, more colorful, more audacious, and more thrillingly alive than ever. Jackie, thank you for all that you are and all

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RON SCHERL/REDFERNS

By Joyce DiDonato

that you have given the world. Please know that this very deserved Lifetime Achievement Award rightfully celebrates every note you sang (and my God, there were a lot of them), every risk you took (how grateful we are that you dared), every sacrifice you made (hoping you feel it was worth it), and the immense impact you have had on our industry. Brava! Three-time GRAMMY winner Joyce DiDonato has received a 63rd GRAMMY nomination for Best Opera Recording for Handel: Agrippina.


CONGRATULATIONS, MARILYN HORNE, ON A LIFETIME OF EXCELLENCE! BROADWAY RECORDS

www.broadwayrecords.com

www.lyricfest.org

Marilyn Horne’s career is historic in terms of the scope of her talent, success, and stunning virtuosity. Her warmth and down-to-earth sense of humor, evident in her many television appearances, and her versatility, voicing the title role in Carmen Jones, all helped make her a household name. It was a privilege to watch her consummate professionalism when we both premiered our roles in John Corigliano’s The Ghosts of Versailles at the Metropolitan Opera. She became a trusted mentor and dear friend, and her advocacy for the art of the recital has been an inspiration to me. Renée Fleming, Soprano Four-time GRAMMY ® Award winner

The Carnegie Hall family salutes Marilyn Horne, applauding her distinguished career, her brilliant artistry, and her steadfast dedication to nurturing young talent, supporting the next generation of great singers. Huge congratulations to a remarkable friend and artistic legend! Clive Gillinson, Executive and Artistic Director Carnegie Hall

She is a giant in the industry. There isn’t any singer alive who hasn’t learned from her and copied her. Hearing her spin out exquisitely breath-stopping phrases was a masterclass in vocal technique and beauty. She set the bar at an impossible height! Denyce Graves, Soprano 63rd GRAMMY Award nominee

One of the greatest careers in the history of Opera, her performances on our stage are part and parcel of the legacy of the Met.

Peter Gelb, General Manager Metropolitan Opera

Marilyn Horne is not only a very great artist, but a real trooper who defined the role in the premiere of my opera, The Ghosts of Versailles, at the Metropolitan Opera. That year, Marilyn canceled all appearances with the Met, except her role in our opera. Despite a temporary injury, she literally sailed onto the stage and gave her indelible performance. Brava, Marilyn!! John Corigliano, Composer Five-time GRAMMY Award winner

Our dad, Leonard Bernstein, described Marilyn Horne’s voice as “peaches and cream.” We think that’s a pretty great description for Marilyn Horne in her glorious entirety. Jamie, Alexander, and Nina Bernstein

When we talk about bright lights, Marilyn Horne is the brightest. I cannot thank her enough for being present in my life, career, and in the lives of so many. A beacon of strength and brilliance we all strive for. Isabel Leonard, Mezzo-Soprano Two-time GRAMMY Award winner

As one of the preeminent voices of her time, and a fierce mentor to young singers, Ms. Horne’s dedication to artistic excellence, racial equality, and educating the next generation of great singers, is unparalleled. Our entire team congratulates her on this extraordinary achievement. Jonathan Estabrooks, Director of BLACK OPERA BlackOperaFilm.com

Marilyn Horne has not only given us the greatest standard of singing, but also the greatest standard of humanity. When I think of her, the words that come to mind are generosity, and humor. She gave us trills, legato, coloratura, exquisite melody and rhythm, for sure, but adds to that care and devotion, and commitment to this great art form. Frederica von Stade, Mezzo-Soprano GRAMMY Award winner

A great singer, mentor, teacher and, more than that, a cherished friend of 55 years, Marilyn Horne has not only contributed extraordinarily to the art form, but has profoundly influenced generations of American singers. Matthew A. Epstein, Impresario

On behalf of everyone at Opera Ithaca and Raylynmor Opera, we send our heartfelt congratulations to Marilyn Horne, in honor of her stunning lifetime of contributions to our collective art form. Ben Robinson, Artistic Director

I was at Marilyn Horne’s Carnegie Hall recital debut in 1966, and her singing was electrifying. This superb artist went on to electrify audiences and inspire musicians for decades. Composer William Bolcom once said she had “a glorious Hollandaise of a voice,” and I’d go even further: Marilyn Horne’s singing was a ten-course meal! Steven Blier, Pianist Founder/Artistic Director, New York Festival of Song

Photo by James Heffernan, courtesy Metropolitan Opera

Tribute Page Proprietor: Mia Moravis


L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

S A LT - N - P E PA When I first heard the youthful-but-sassy voices of Salt-N-Pepa, it was 1985 in Hammels projects, way off in Far Rockaway, Queens. The small crowd of young people surrounded the three-foot high, black and silver radio as it boomed what I would come to know as the group’s first release, “The Show Stoppa.” Their rhyme style demanded all the attention it received. I remember being in awe and asking if the owner of the radio would play it again. I was hit with inspiration: I wanted to be an MC. Salt-N-Pepa forged their own style of finessing phrases, creating word play while being clear and transparent with their message. The two young women’s points of view were distinct, yet similar enough to have a cohesive, powerful, pro-woman message. They were fierce while laying down the law with their fight for equality and push for the freedom of expression. They embodied all the elements of TLC before there was a TLC: crazy, sexy, cool. They were poised and confident. The two were fearless in their approach as they confronted men by either calling them out (“Tramp”) or praising them (“Whatta Man”). When I first experienced Salt-N-Pepa in concert, it was at the popular hip-hop club Union Square in downtown NYC. In 1986, they had released their debut album, Hot, Cool & Vicious, and were performing all over the nation. By then, I had played the cassette just enough times to drive my mom crazy and to know all of the words. They overpowered the tiny stage, flexing their thick gold chains, red hoodies and leather jackets. They commanded the crowd of 500 screaming teens who chanted every single word. One of the first times I actually met the duo was in midtown Manhattan. I was charged with interviewing them for the hip-hop magazine Rap Masters. By this time, I had quite a few releases of my own and Kate Ferguson, the editor in chief of the magazine, thought it would be a great idea for one rapper to interview another. The pair were on fire with their critically acclaimed, socially charged hit “Let’s Talk About Sex” and were rehearsing for yet another video and tour when they invited me to stop by to ask a few questions. Meeting them was nothing short of a dream come true. After all, I had followed their career since I was 15. I knew every lyric and every nuance. I practiced getting my vocals strong by reciting all the words to their complete body of work. They gave me life! MC Lyte is a hip-hop pioneer and two-time GRAMMY-nominated artist. She also served as a Governor, Trustee and President of the Recording Academy Los Angeles Chapter. 70 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

1987 ©JANETTE BECKMAN

By MC Lyte


GRAMMY AWARDS® WE PROUDLY CELEBRATE OUR CLIENTS

SALT-N-PEPA

Recording Academy® Lifetime Achievement Award

KENNETH BABYFACE EDMONDS

Recording Academy® Trustees Award

LUKE JAMES – Best R&B Album, To Feel Love/d EARTHGANG – Best R&B Song, Collide ROBERT GLASPER Best R&B Song, Better Than I Imagine Best Progressive R&B Album, F*** YO FEELINGS RUFUS WAINWRIGHT* – Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album, Unfollow The Rules BUJU BANTON – Best Reggae Album, UPSIDE DOWN 2020 QUAVO – Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for his collaboration Justin Bieber on Intentions

JERRY SEINFELD – Best Comedy Album, 23 Hours To Kill DAN AUERBACH – Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical TAMMY BLANCHARD – Best Musical Theater Album, Little Shop Of Horrors CHRISTIAN SCOTT ATUNDE ADJUAH Best Contemporary Instrumental Album, Axiom Best Improvised Jazz Solo, Guinevere KAMASI WASHINGTON – Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media, Becoming

* Primary Talent International


L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

SELENA

To talk about Selena is to talk about the flower of a bicultural family who held tradition in their hands and music in their hearts. Selena was the product of everything that was lacking in the music industry, a strong woman with two cultures that influenced every chord and song. From performing at her family’s restaurant to performing in arenas, Selena channeled her mother’s dance moves and her father’s determination throughout her career. Her life wasn’t only her own because she dedicated it to her fans. With original songs and big dreams, Selena was able to conquer many of her goals, including winning a GRAMMY Award in 1994. Though I was born in 2003 and never saw her onstage, her photos, videos and songs inspired me and guided me in the most heartfelt way. She not only sang to a whole generation of Mexican Americans, but she also sang to anyone who had a forbidden love (“Amor Prohibido”) or anyone who knows how to lose (“yo sé perder” from “Como La Flor”). In 2019, I decided to make a tribute album in homage to one of the greatest in history. Selena inspired me in so many ways. She showed me what it is like to be a woman and an artist. As a woman who grew up in a musical family sharing their talents and traditions with the whole world, Selena taught me the importance of dedication and being proud of your roots. She planted little seeds of inspiration that later turned into dreams for young boys and girls all around the world, including me. No matter where you’re from or who you are, Selena taught us that love, music and dance are universal languages that we can all share. Ángela Aguilar is a GRAMMY and two-time Latin GRAMMY nominee. She released a Selena tribute album, Baila Esta Cumbia, in 2020.

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BLANCA CHAROLET/Q PRODUCTIONS

By Ángela Aguilar


NETFLIX CELEBRATES THE INCREDIBLE LIFE AND LEGACY OF RECORDING ACADEMY® LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT

SELENA QUINTANILLA


IN HONOR OF

The Queen of Tejano Music For The Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award ®

Your story has inspired millions, and we are proud to have been a part of it.

Share your TASCAM Story at tascamfans@tascam.com



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L I F E T I M E A C H I E V E M E N T AWA R D

TA L K I N G H E A D S New York City’s underground arts, culture and music scene in the mid-’70s was teeming with fresh ideas, bold statements and raw energy. Still, no one could prepare for — or compare to — Talking Heads. Equal parts clever art-pop, convincing funk groves and ambitious instrumental experimentation, their enduring collection of unconventional hits and striking imagery from the ’70s and ’80s continue to influence music’s boldest changemakers today. After meeting at art school in Rhode Island, singer/guitarist David Byrne, bassist Tina Weymouth and drummer Chris Frantz moved to New York City in 1974, playing their first live show opening for the Ramones at legendary East Village punk petri dish CBGB in 1975. Modern Lovers keyboardist Jerry Harrison joined the following year, and the quartet officially arrived with their 1977 debut album, Talking Heads: 77, featuring the hit single “Psycho Killer.” The band further established their oddball brilliance working with innovative producer Brian Eno on 1978’s More Songs About Buildings And Food and 1979’s Fear Of Music, blazing new sonic trails that would inspire the generation of indie-pop artists to come. Standouts include the soulful Al Green cover “Take Me To 76 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

The River” and the intellectual dance anthem “Life During Wartime.” By their final collaboration with Eno, the 1980 masterpiece Remain In Light, Talking Heads’ scope had fully expanded to include cascading African polyrhythms, pulsing electronic textures and Byrne’s signature eccentricity, heard on the dreamlike hit “Once In A Lifetime.” When MTV debuted the following year, the song’s entrancing music video fell into heavy rotation. Three decades later, TIME named it one of the 30 AllTime Best Music Videos. Talking Heads continued to release quality eclectic pop albums well into the ’80s, such as Speaking In Tongues and Little Creatures. In 1984, director Jonathan Demme captured the fruits of the group’s extensive touring efforts in the concert film, Stop Making Sense, which was also released as a highly acclaimed live album. In their 12 years, eight studio albums and two live albums together, Talking Heads pushed the creative limits of sound, style and songcraft. After officially calling it quits in 1991, the members found individual success, Weymouth and Frantz performing with their band Tom Tom Club, Harrison producing albums by Live and No Doubt, and Byrne pursuing a solo career. But the energy and magic of Talking Heads remain a unique, seminal and relevant link in pop music’s lineage. — Nate Hertweck


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WE CONGRATULATE

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YOU ARE LEGENDS IN OUR LIFETIME.

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OUR BEST WISHES TO ALL OF THE 63RD ANNUAL GRAMMY AWARDS® NOMINEES.

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T R U S T E E S AWA R D

ED CHERNEY

By Maureen Droney Kessie Ed was from Chicago and although he moved to L.A. early in his career, the Chicago in him always showed. He had a big personality, he spoke the truth as he saw it and he made friends everywhere he went. From the waiter in the restaurant, to the doorman at the hotel, to the assistant engineers — and of course, the artists — Eddie saw them, and treated them with respect. He got lucky in his early days when he met the great engineer Bruce Swedien in Chicago. They reconnected in L.A., and Ed became Bruce’s assistant engineer on Michael Jackson’s Off The Wall album at Westlake Studios. Quincy Jones, who, of course, produced Off The Wall, dubbed Ed, “Big Joolie,” because, according to music executive Ed Eckstine, Ed would affect a Chicago gangster persona when cutting and splicing tape, to the amusement of all those present. “Big dude with a big heart, who endeared himself to all, and was a joy to be around,” is what Eckstine has said about him. Per Niko Bolas, producer/engineer for, among others, Neil Young, “Ed was everyone’s big brother. Brave, scared, empathetic, sympathetic, bold, curious, tough, innovative, heart on his sleeve, hysterically funny. He made everything sound better just walking in the room, because everyone just felt better.” 80 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

That’s a big lesson for anyone learning how to be a great recording engineer: just make people feel better when you walk in the room. But, of course, the other part is real skill, and Ed worked very hard at that. One year, he was the engineer on three of the five GRAMMY nominees for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical! (He won for Bonnie Raitt’s Longing In Their Hearts.) He cared deeply about the craft, he cared about quality and he cared enormously about the recording community. It was Ed who founded the Music Producers Guild of the Americas, which became the Recording Academy Producers & Engineers Wing. The love of his life (in addition to recording!) was legendary studio manager Rose Mann Cherney, who understood him. It’s not easy to be married to someone who has a calling. Ultimately, for Ed, I believe it was all about the musicians, from Raitt and the Rolling Stones to the session players. Like most engineers, he lived for his craft. It’s no accident that he was blessed to work with the best; he loved the job — and the musicians — so much. He hung out with them, he played golf with them and he knew he was privileged to be the person who recorded them. Maureen Droney Kessie is Sr. Managing Director of the Producers & Engineers Wing. She is also an accomplished pro audio journalist, author and recording and mix engineer, having worked on recordings for artists such as Carlos Santana, Aretha Franklin and Whitney Houston.


Everyone who was lucky enough to spend time with Eddie was the better for it...one of the very greatest audio engineers and a sweet and loving man who was loved by all... God bless you Eddie! – DANNY KORTCHMAR

You just couldn’t have a bad time in the studio with Ed. Aside from his beautiful personality and that sense of humor, it was his sense of balance and rhythm and sound and harmony that were always correct and always so evident. Ed Cherney was one of the pleasures of my life. I miss him every day, as I know we all do. – WADDY WACHTEL Ed was a gifted engineer, a creative producer and one of the finest human beings I have ever known. Miss him every day! – LELAND SKLAR

Ed Cherney is universally revered in the industry for his legacy as a producer/engineer with immaculate taste and ears. But those who never worked with him may not know that his greatest gift was his generosity and humanity, being in a room with Ed made you a better person. – STEVE POSTELL Ed Cherney was one of the kindest caring and loving people I have ever met in my life. When my daughter Elsie was working at The Village Recorders as a receptionist if she ever had a bad day Eddie told her to come by his studio and hang with him until she felt better. That’s the kind of guy Ed Cherney was. – RUSS KUNKEL

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T R U S T E E S AWA R D

BENNY GOLSON I first met Benny Golson in 1952 after I heard him play with Tadd Dameron’s band at Club Harlem in Atlantic City, New Jersey, as part of the Larry Steele Harlem Revue. At the time, I was on tour as a trumpeter with the great Lionel Hampton nearby in Wildwood (one of the stops on our 300 one-nighter run), but since I was always on the lookout for new be-boppers, I would frequently find myself at local theaters after my nightly gig with Hamp was over. I’ll never forget that show because I was absolutely blown away by Benny’s talent, and that of his two peers onstage: Clifford Brown and Gigi Gryce. I couldn’t wait to tell Hamp about these three cats, and I even offered to split my own pay (which was only $17/night) to hire them! After I practically begged to add them to the band, he didn’t need any further convincing once he heard them himself. My brother Tack (inside joke with Benny) and I had the time of our lives on that tour, and our adventures bonded us like the brothers we were always meant to be. Benny is one of the smartest, most talented and unique human beings I have ever had the pleasure of having in my corner, and it makes my soul smile to know that he is receiving the Trustees Award from the Recording Academy. He is an incredibly deserving individual, who also just happens to be one of the greatest saxophone players and composers on the planet. So, you know it was an honor for me to write the lyrics to his “Killer Joe.” At the time of this writing, he is also one of the last two living members (alongside the legendary Sonny Rollins) of the 57 jazz musicians who proudly stood on the steps of 17 East 126th Street, between Fifth and Madison Avenue, on August 12, 1958, to take what would later become the famous “A Great Day in Harlem” photograph by Art Kane (I was supposed to be there that day, but was stuck in Paris for a gig — at least they got my brother Benny!). A true treasure to jazz, history and my life. I always joke around that I have to consult with the Oxford Dictionary in order to translate the letters that Benny has sent me over the years, because his intelligence is

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FRANS SCHELLEKENS/REDFERNS

By Quincy Jones

simply on another level. Well, I guess that’s appropriate, because that’s what he is: on another level. Congratulations, my dear Boss Tack. Sending all my love to you and Bobbie. From, Boss Nails. With 28 wins, Quincy Jones is the most awarded living GRAMMY winner. He received the Trustees Award in 1989 and the GRAMMY Legend Award in 1991.



CLARENCE WILLIAMS/LOS ANGELES TIMES VIA GETTY IMAGES

T R U S T E E S AWA R D

K E N N Y “B A B Y FA C E” EDMONDS By Toni Braxton

It was in the winter of 1987, and I was in college. I was studying to be an educator, but I had dreams of being a singer and performer. I would sing at nightclubs around the Baltimore, Annapolis and Washington, D.C., area at night. The week before finals, I was driving in my 1985 Honda Civic that was nearly two weeks behind in payments. I remember checking the gas gauge, and it was approaching empty (again!). I was at a light on Ritchie highway, and my radio dial was set to V-103-FM. The DJ’s name was Randy Dennis. I remember him saying, “Coming up in the next hour, new music from the Deele.” I was rushing to class and not really paying attention until I heard these synthesized strings, accompanied by an 808 drum machine, then a flute sound, followed by the bass. I heard a lead singer start the first verse. “Very nice,” I thought. Then, another male singer began singing the B-section. The two vocals were similar, but there was something about the second performer: He had a bit more timbre that was seductive and original, something about the way he delivered 86 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

the melody. It was beauty and art. Whoever he was, I was hooked immediately. It was the first time I had fallen in love with talent. This was before Wikipedia or iPhones. There was no streaming service to help me find the song and play it on repeat. I wanted so badly to hear this music again. I had to know about that singer. Immediately after class, I went to the local record store and attempted to find “Day And Night” by “The Deal.” But I couldn’t find anything. No one knew what I was talking about. I went to another store … again, nothing. But then, just as the universe works out, when I got back into the car and turned on the ignition, the radio was playing the song. I caught the last chorus, ad-libs out, and refrain: “Shoo be doop doop.” Then DJ Frank Ski chimed in and announced, “That’s ‘Two Occasions’ from the Deele.” He spelled it: D.E.E.L.E. I learned that not only was I spelling it wrong, I also had the incorrect title. I turned around, went back to the record store, and found the cassette I was searching for. It cost me $10.54, including taxes. Best 10 bucks I ever spent. Even though I was hungry all week after that, I never felt so full. That’s how I first learned of the master, the talent, the superstar, the star-maker, the producer, the writer, the singer, the performer, the baron himself … Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds. Seven-time GRAMMY winner Toni Braxton signed to Babyface’s LaFace Records in 1991. Her most recent album, Spell My Name, was released last year.


To our Friend, Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds Your songs are our gift. Your love and artistry is beyond measure. We are proud to call you our friend and look forward to the incredible journey ahead. Congratulations on receiving this year’s Recording Academy® Trustees Award! Shelli, Irving & Jeffrey Azoff & Susan Markheim & everyone at Full Stop Management and the Azoff Company

Photography: Randee St. Nicholas



Even without stages, music still shined. Congrats to all winners and nominees and thank you for creating music that brought us joy when we needed it the most. Start Something Priceless

GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards®, and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of the Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2021 The Recording Academy. Mastercard is a registered trademark, and the circles design and Start Something Priceless are trademarks, of Mastercard International Incorporated. ©2021 Mastercard.


T E C H N I C A L G R A M M Y AWA R D

DA N I E L W E I S S It was March 1986, and the Audio Engineering Society was holding its 80th convention in Montreux, Switzerland. The “big thing” to see at this show was the new Dolby SR noise reducer. However, a friend of mine mentioned that he’d also noticed a tiny booth at the show where people were crowding around a little box and a very modest, but also very clever, Swiss engineer named Daniel Weiss. Daniel had started building amplifiers and synthesizers as a teenager. After earning a bachelor of science in electrical engineering, he joined the Willi Studer company — the renowned manufacturer of now-classic Studer tape recorders — where he worked in the PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) laboratory on digital products. At the time, each manufacturer made their own non-standard machines. The only way one digital machine could talk to another was by analog playback, rerecording to the digital machine, with all the degradation that added. It had taken years for even common digital sample rates to standardize. In 1984, Bruce Springteen’s Born In The U.S.A. became the first commercially pressed CD in America. Also in 1984, Daniel founded Weiss Engineering Ltd. in cooperation with Dr. Ben Bernfeld’s mastering studio, Harmonia Mundi. Daniel designed a modular 24bit digital processing system, and that was what caused the big stir at Montreux. The crowd was witnessing the introduction of the “bw102,” which consisted of a broad range of digital audio processing modules suited for CD mastering, mixing and digital audio signal processing. Daniel went on to invent 76 modules for the bw102 plus external controls and metering, and to build the first 24bit digital console that I used daily! He was also the first to design an equalizer that works internally at twice the input sample rate, a technique now routinely employed in almost every digital plug in. Through the years, I have seen Daniel make devices that serve great sounding

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JOSCHKA WEISS

By Bob Ludwig

music. He has been uncompromising in his love and devotion to music, and that is why his inventions have always been so welcome. Daniel Weiss richly deserves this Technical GRAMMY Award. Bob Ludwig is a 12-time GRAMMY-winning mastering engineer and president of Gateway Mastering Studios, Inc., in Portland, Maine. He has received a 63rd GRAMMY nomination for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical, for his work on Devon Gilfillian’s Black Hole Rainbow.



M U S I C E D U C AT O R AWA R D

JEFFREY MURDOCK

In our lives, we come across people who are selfless in their work and who always look out for the good of those with a limited voice. Dr. Jeffrey Murdock is one of those people. A remarkable music educator dedicated to helping students grow as individuals through their talents and gifts, Dr. Murdock is internationally known as a conductor, educator and adjudicator, and I believe he is the person who deserves this award as an acknowledgment of his sincere, hard work. Dr. Murdock has always had a passion for education and a heart for the community, and he has consistently shown the communities he impacts what it means to love the work you do and be truly skilled at it. I have had the privilege of being under his leadership during two very different phases of my life and can whole-heartedly say that he is a musical genius and knows what it means to carry the mantle of being a legendary educator. I first encountered Dr. Murdock in Memphis, Tennessee, at the Stax Music Academy, where he was one of the instructors for the main ensemble Street Corner Harmonies. It was there where I first noticed his charismatic spirit, warm personality, and how his interaction with us students provided the perfect balance of support, enabling us to excel in this afterschool music program. Dr. Murdock began his current career as the associate professor of music education at the University of Arkansas, where he heads the Inspirational Chorale from the late Dr. Eddie Jones. The choir was formed to keep Black sacred music alive in a predominantly white institution and, with that foundation, Dr. Murdock amplified the program and continued keeping its legacy alive. His naturally enthusiastic spirit brings together students of all backgrounds to create great music and grow mentally and spiritually as a collective unit. He helps students become focused risk-takers who understand that everything they do should be done with excellence, and he’s made a lot of people stronger for it. Dr. Murdock is a man with a great vision. He sees the talent and potential in his students, and he helps them see it 92 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

RON SCHERL/REDFERNS

By Dekarius Dawson

in themselves. He has made such an impact on my life and the lives of my friends and peers. I cannot think of anyone who deserves this honor more than a talented, selfless and dedicated educator such as Dr. Murdock. Dekarius Dawson is a current educator at Shelby County Schools in Memphis, Tennessee, where he also serves as a worship leader at a local church. He received a bachelor’s degree in music from the University of Arkansas in 2019.


Congratulations, Dr. Murdock! The University of Arkansas is so incredibly proud of you and grateful for all you do each day to help our students succeed, create and thrive. The U of A’s Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences and our Department of Music thank you and all music educators who are making a difference in the lives of their students, which in turn makes the world better for us all.

Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences



The music world loves a hybrid. Mashups and collaborations work wonders for music. A hybrid cloud approach with IBM can do the same for business. It offers agility and security, and that’s music to anyone’s ears. Gain the tools to work smarter with IBM, the official Cloud and AI partner of the GRAMMYs®. The world is going hybrid with IBM.

ibm.com/grammys IBM and the IBM logo are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available at ibm.com/trademark. ©International Business Machines Corp. 2021. GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of the Recording Academy® and are used under license ©2021 The Recording Academy.



THE AWARD WINNERS & NOMINEES OF THIS YEAR’S GRAMMY AWARDS® ®

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2 02 1 G RA M M Y

OF


The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was created in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting significance that were issued prior to the 1958 inception of the GRAMMY Awards. Consisting of more than 1,140 recordings, the Hall is now open to any recording that has been in release for at least 25 years. New submissions are voted on annually by a special member committee of experts and historians drawn from all branches of the recording arts. Their choices are subject to final approval by the Trustees of the Recording Academy. The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame is unique in that it is open to all genres of music — popular as well as specialized forms.

By Jed Gottlieb

S

ince its inception, the GRAMMY Hall of Fame has honored more than 1,140 recordings across all genres. Music in the Hall span recordings that have both reached the top of the charts and had a significant impact on our society. This year, the GRAMMY Hall of Fame welcomes 29 recordings, continuing the Recording Academy’s tradition of honoring music that has influenced our culture. The 2021 inductees range

from the first recorded song, “Au Clair De La Lune,” captured on Édouard-Léon Scott De Martinville’s phonautograph invention in 1860, to A Tribe Called Quest’s 1991 hip-hop-meets-jazz masterpiece, The Low End Theory. This year, the Academy also honors classical (Leonard Bernstein, Kolisch String Quartet), blues (Kansas Joe and Memphis Minnie, John Mayall with Eric Clapton), jazz (Billie Holiday), soul (Isaac Hayes), country (Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris) and disco (The Village People) as well

as iconic debut albums from Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, the Cars, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and more. Twenty-four artists saw their first recordings inducted in the Hall of Fame this year, including Beastie Boys, Elizabeth Cotten, Peter Gabriel, Fletcher Henderson, Dr. John, Kenny Rogers, and Patti Smith. From Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’” to Betty Wright’s “Clean Up Woman,” this diverse collection of recordings celebrates music that has been the soundtrack to our lives.

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AU CLAIR DE LA LUNE

Édouard-Léon Scott De Martinville N/A (1860), Single

Nearly 20 years before Alexander Graham Bell’s first telephone call and Thomas Edison’s phonograph debut, on April 9, 1860, Édouard-Léon Scott De Martinville recorded a fragment of the song “Au Clair De La Lune.” Calling his invention the phonautograph, Scott used a stylus to map soundwaves on paper or glass. He thought people would “read” the waves instead of listening to them. It wasn’t until 2008 that computers were able to process the mapped waves into digital files. And so, after a century and a half, the first recorded song could finally be heard.

BLUES BREAKERS

John Mayall With Eric Clapton London (1966), Album

When people started scrawling “Clapton is God” around London in the mid-’60s, they had the guitarist’s live shows with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers in mind. This LP put the loud, fresh energy of those club dates on wax. Clearly influenced by Chicago blues, this pairing of Mayall and Eric Clapton had them pushing the genre through rock and roll and toward the experiments Clapton would engage in with Cream just a few months later.

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THE CARS CANCIONES DE MI PADRE Linda Ronstadt

Asylum Records (1987), Album Linda Ronstadt’s homage to the traditional Mexican folk songs she heard as a child helped close the gender gap in the mariachi world. Ronstadt’s passionate vocals paired with many of the genre’s finest players made for music both English- and Spanish-speaking audiences loved. The album won a GRAMMY for Best MexicanAmerican Performance and achieved double-platinum status.

The Cars

Elektra (1978), Album On the band’s debut album, the Cars combined hip new wave, rough hard rock, smooth soft rock, retro rockabilly and dashes of prog and punk. “Bye Bye Love” swaggered in with a big, bold rock sound while “Moving In Stereo” looked ahead a few years to ’80s synth pop. An LP that connected the dots between Buddy Holly and the Killers, it went platinum six-times over and launched rock radio staples “Just What I Needed,” “My Best Friend’s Girl” and “Good Times Roll.”


CLEAN UP WOMAN

DON’T STOP BELIEVIN’

THE GAMBLER United Artists (1978), Single

Betty Wright

Journey

Alston (1971), Single

Columbia (1981), Single

Betty Wright used her huge voice to tell tales of heartbreak and triumph. With her breakout single “Clean Up Woman,” Wright sang a groovy, soulful rant about a woman who “cleans up” men who women cast aside. The song became the foundation for a long career and inspired countless artists; Mary J. Blige, Chance The Rapper and more sampled “Clean Up Woman” to build their own hits.

When the song played during the “The Sopranos” finale in 2007, the smash entered the zeitgeist once more. But even before the extra exposure, “Don’t Stop Believin’” was ubiquitous. Released at the dawn of a decade when slick and loud reigned, the single sold more than a million copies on vinyl alone. The story nodded to Springsteen, the hook predicted Bon Jovi, the combo became irresistible to Gen X (and every generation to follow).

COPENHAGEN

Fletcher Henderson And His Orchestra

FREIGHT TRAIN Elizabeth Cotten

Vocalion (1924), Single

Folkways (1958), Single

Fletcher Henderson had quite an ear. Not only did the jazz pioneer play a mean piano, but he knew a hit when he heard one and could pick out ace talent (Henderson cajoled Louis Armstrong to come to New York and play in his band in 1924). On his recording of “Copenhagen,” you can hear why swing music had started to take the world by storm along with the emergence of virtuoso voices such as Armstrong’s.

Elizabeth “Libba” Cotten wrote this folk standard when she was 11 or 12 years old using a unique picking method that came to be known as the “Cotten style.” A lefty who reversed instruments to suit her approach, she taught herself banjo and guitar by sneaking time with her brother’s instruments. Many tried to claim and copyright “Freight Train” as their own, but Cotten eventually found vindication. In her 90s, she won a GRAMMY Award in 1985, almost 80 years after she wrote “Freight Train,” and her signature song was performed by Chet Atkins, Peter, Paul and Mary and (reportedly) the Quarrymen before they became the Beatles.

Kenny Rogers

Kenny Rogers found an ace up his sleeve in Don Schlitz’ “The Gambler.” Rogers’ singular voice, that unique mix of smoky cool and fatherly warmth, turned the song into a massive hit that topped the country charts. And “The Gambler” kept going. The song won Rogers’ a GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male. The Library of Congress preserved it in the National Recording Registry. Rogers even turned the character into a string of successful TV movies.

GREETING FROM ASBURY PARK, N.J. Bruce Springsteen

Columbia (1973), Album The album where a kid from New Jersey became the Boss. While it would take a few years for Bruce Springsteen to become a household name, everything fans love about the icon shines on his debut. He turns his Bob Dylan admiration into a bar room symphony on “Blinded By The Light,” starts to mine his tumultuous youth for gold on “Growin’ Up,” and shows off big man Clarence Clemons’ sax on “Spirit In The Night,” which would go on to become an E Street Band setlist staple. 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 101


LICENSED TO ILL Beastie Boys

DEF JAM (1986), Album

IN THE RIGHT PLACE Dr. John

Atco (1973), Album

HORSES

Patti Smith

Arista (1975), Album “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine,” sings Patti Smith on the opening cut of Horses. Sung in both a whisper and a sneer, the line called punks and outsiders into an album that captured the chaotic magic of New York’s underground scene. Everyone from R.E.M. to SleaterKinney have looked to Horses as the template for elevating garage rock to the empyrean.

HOT BUTTERED SOUL Isaac Hayes

Enterprise (1969), Album Released in 1969, Hot Buttered Soul provided a window into the decade to come. Occasionally glancing in the rearview mirror to grin at R&B, Isaac Hayes rides on toward the freaky funk of George Clinton. With backing band the Bar-Kays, Hayes lays down four songs over 45 minutes. On an album stand out, he turns ’60s torch song “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” into an 18-minute soul symphony powered by a storm of organ, piano, horns and crashing drums. 102 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

The new kings of New Orleans came together in the studio to distill their city’s ’70s sound into a single album. Dr. John’s hepcat growl and swaggering songs got revved up by master producer Allen Toussaint and backing band the Meters. It would become the good doctor’s best-selling album powered by singles “Right Place, Wrong Time” and “Such A Night.”

Booming beats and heavy metal guitar laid the foundation for three musical geniuses to lampoon adolescent knucklehead fantasies. Mike D, Ad-Rock and MCA worked with producer Rick Rubin to map uncharted (and unimagined) territory between humor, satire and shocking samples: Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, the Clash. Giggling fifth graders and floored college kids from Long Island to Los Angeles made this monument hip-hop’s first No. 1 album.


THE LOW END THEORY A Tribe Called Quest Jive (1991), Album

Hip-hop aficionados cheered The Low End Theory as a masterpiece upon its release. Looking back three decades later, the album only seems more impressive and important. The pinnacle of blending hip-hop and jazz, the album spotlights laid-back, clever and wise rhymes of Q-Tip and Phife Dawg that feel closer to Miles Davis’ Kind Of Blue than N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton. Even hard bop upright bass legend Ron Carter shows up to kick it on “Verses From The Abstract.”

MAD DOGS & ENGLISHMEN Joe Cocker

A&M (1970), Album Recorded in March of 1970 at New York City’s Fillmore East, Mad Dogs & Englishmen documents an age when artists took sledgehammers to genre walls. With an enormous band behind him, including Rita Coolidge and Leon Russell, the gruff and grinning Joe Cocker cooked up a gumbo of hippie rock, Memphis soul, New Orleans R&B and electric blues on covers ranging from the Beatles to Otis Redding to Leonard Cohen.

MERCY, MERCY, MERCY! LIVE AT “THE CLUB” The Cannonball Adderley Quintet

Capitol (1967), Album The title track became a surprise Billboard Hot 100 hit for saxophonist Julian “Cannonball” Adderley. Written by keyboardist Joe Zawinul, “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy!” has a lazy-but-bright soul-jazz magic to it. But the entire album shows off a hard bop band cooking with the heat way up high. “The Club” was actually a Capitol studio on Vine Street in Hollywood outfitted with an open bar that gave the freewheeling set a party vibe. The album won a much-deserved GRAMMY for Best Instrumental Jazz Performance, Small Group Or Soloist With Small Group.

RAVEL: PIANO CONCERTO IN G MAJOR

Leonard Bernstein With The Philharmonia Orchestra Of London RCA Victor (1946), Album

Leonard Bernstein was such a gigantic force as a conductor, composer and educator that his skills as pianist can be overlooked. In a rare move, Bernstein acted as both conductor and piano player for this early recording of one of Ravel’s masterpieces. In his dual role, Bernstein balanced complex and delicate jazz tones with the composer’s homages to Mozart and Camille Saint-Saëns, while still highlighting a piano score fit for a virtuoso.

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SCHOENBERG: THE FOUR STRING QUARTETS Kolisch String Quartet Alco (1949), Album

Violinist Rudolf Kolisch and his group championed Arnold Schoenberg’s work and other modernist music in the ’20s in Europe. Forced to leave the continent by impending World War II, the musicians came to America and recorded all four of Schoenberg’s string quartets on a United Artists soundstage in the ’30s with input from Schoenberg. The extraordinary sessions featured an almost unprecedented collaboration between the legendary composer and string quartet.

SO

Peter Gabriel

Geffen (1986), Album Peter Gabriel spent his early career flirting with pop on arty and experimental albums. On So, he crafted the sharpest hooks of his career without abandoning his avant-garde leanings. Between Top 40 hits, including “Sledgehammer” and “In Your Eyes,” he fit a Kate Bush duet, a guest spot from Senegalese star Youssou N’Dour, some art rock with Laurie Anderson, and loads of world beat and new wave flourishes. The album’s sales and critical acclaim made it the singer’s benchmark. 104 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

SOLITUDE Billie Holiday

OKeh (1941), Single Duke Ellington’s ballad became a thesis statement in the hands of Billie Holiday. The singer found a perfect vehicle for her aesthetic in the song: satin jazz with Ma Rainey’s defiance bleeding in at the edges, a deep ocean of loneliness held at bay by the joy of hearing Holiday’s natural-but-meticulous phrasing. Everyone else who sang “Solitude” failed to imbue it with the same calm and conflict.

TEN

Pearl Jam

Epic Associated (1991), Album A Rolling Stone readers’ poll named Ten the greatest debut album of all time. Somehow, this underestimates the release. Combining the fire-breathing monstrosity of Led Zeppelin and the ragged fury of ’80s alternative rock, the Seattle quintet defined the sound, look and attitude of the

early ’90s. With signature songs such as “Even Flow,” “Alive” and “Black,” the band brought violently loud explorations of depression, abuse and anger to a generation looking to escape vapid, polished mainstream music.

TEXAS FLOOD

Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble Epic (1983), Album

During a decade when blues was increasingly niche, Stevie Ray Vaughan became a mighty ambassador for the genre. David Bowie had already recruited the guitar ace for work (see Vaughan’s solos on Let’s Dance), but this debut made it clear that Vaughan was no sideman. Featuring the Texas backing band Double Trouble, the album showed how Vaughan could honor the cats that inspired him while exploding with shocking bursts of speed, taste and originality.


WRECK OF THE OLD 97 Vernon Dalhart

Victor (1924), Single

TIME IS ON MY SIDE

WE ARE THE WORLD

Imperial (1964), Single

Columbia (1985), Single

Irma Thomas

Irma Thomas sounds like the queen of New Orleans soul on this immortal arrangement of “Time Is On My Side.” It’s a title she would later earn, but she was just 23 when she laid down the track. Her vocals on the cut roar, cry, moan, shout and wail with strength and defiance. Weeks later, the Rolling Stones would turn the song into a hit with an arrangement that nods to Thomas. The Brits did it well. Thomas did it definitively.

TRIO

Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris Warner Bros (1987), Album

Three songbirds of unrivaled grace and power teamed for a set full of rich harmonies and timeless melodies — listening to “My Dear Companion” feels like a walk in the woods and trip to church all at once. Critics gushed. Fans rejoiced (and sent the album to the top of country charts). The album won a GRAMMY for Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal and was nominated for Album Of The Year.

USA For Africa

A landmark recording, pop miracle and massive mid-’80s radio hit, “We Are The World” brought together dozens of A-list artists to sing the most successful charity single ever. Lionel Richie, Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones spearheaded the project with help from Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Tina Turner, Diana Ross, Bruce Springsteen, Cyndi Lauper, Bob Dylan, and more. The song dominated the cultural consciousness, raised millions for famine relief and won four GRAMMYs, including Song Of The Year and Record Of The Year.

WHEN THE LEVEE BREAKS Kansas Joe And Memphis Minnie

Columbia (1929), Single Before the tune became a Led Zeppelin warhorse, “When The Levee Breaks” showed off the innovative two-guitar approach Kansas Joe and Memphis Minnie brought to the blues. The duo’s dark lyrics about the devastating Mississippi floods of 1927 sit in stark contrast with the almost swinging guitar shuffle. Minnie took the lead lines, Joe sang and strummed along hinting at the full blues band sound just around the corner when the genre plugged in a few years later.

Considered the first million-selling record in country music, Vernon Dalhart’s “Wreck Of The Old 97” told the story of a rail disaster involving a mail train headed from Virginia to North Carolina in 1903. While the wreck inspired plenty of songs, none matched the early twang and emotion of Dalhart’s tune. The Texas-born former cowboy born Marion Try Slaughter recorded literally hundreds of other songs under a dozen names, but nothing stuck like “Wreck Of The Old 97,” which went on to be recorded by Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, John Mellencamp and many more.

Y.M.C.A.

Village People

Casablanca (1978), Single The disco smash went to No. 2 in the States and topped the charts in more than a dozen countries. But even those achievements undersell its impact. In “Y.M.C.A.,” the Village People delivered a gay anthem and a universally beloved song. The group belted out a campy hook and created something the Library of Congress preserved in its National Recording Registry. With the shout of four letters, people from every walk of life can get together and boogie.

Jed Gottlieb spent a decade as the music and theater critic at the Boston Herald and has written about arts, politics and Back To The Future for Newsweek, The Atlantic and many more publications.

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2020: A YEAR OF

CHANGE AND CHALLENGES Protesters at a march in New York on June 19, 2020


By Eric Diep

BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES

Inside the Recording Academy’s response to two of the biggest cultural events of our time: COVID-19 and a global racial reckoning


THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC CHANGED OUR WORLD. The year 2020 will be remembered for many things, including social distancing and how COVID-19 created a “new normal” for music creators who couldn’t perform live at a venue or bar, go on tour or safely collaborate in the studio. In the United States, as of this writing, there have been over 21 million cases and more than 361,000 deaths caused by the coronavirus, which has crippled our economy and led to massive unemployment. For the majority of 2020, we were stuck at home, finding ways to stay creative through uncertainty. On top of the devastation caused by the pandemic, on May 25, 2020, the killing of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis police was captured on video, sparking ongoing protests for justice and worldwide racial reckoning. In the aftermath, the music industry looked inward, and many groups announced steps to implement constructive change in their practices. On June 2, #TheShowMustBePaused was launched by friends and music executives Brianna Agyemang and Jamila Thomas, who urged the entire industry to disconnect and reflect on “the role the music business must play in consideration of Black lives.” The Recording Academy stood in solidarity with the grassroots campaign, but that was just the beginning. During a life-changing year, the Academy proactively responded to these events as they unfolded. They partnered with MusiCares to establish the COVID-19 Relief Fund in March and kept their promise to push forward with new diversity and inclusion initiatives, teaming up with civil rights nonprofit Color Of Change and inviting a diverse new membership class in July. During a rigorous election year, the Recording Academy lobbied in Washington, D.C., to help save music creators and empowered members to engage in virtual conferences with their elected officials on District Advocate Day in August. Through the lens of a pandemic and social unrest, the Recording Academy remained dedicated to music creators, exemplifying an industry leader who listens, learns and takes action. But it hasn’t been easy. “It’s definitely been a challenge,” says Harvey Mason jr., Recording Academy Chair and Interim President/CEO. “Logistically, it’s been more difficult than ever working remotely and trying to communicate and collaborate through computer screens, but it’s been a unique opportunity for us to be an organization that brings people together, that tries to heal, and tries to support through some of the things we’re doing through MusiCares and with our advocacy.” Mason took on the CEO role on a voluntary basis last January, explaining he wanted to help the Recording Academy get through

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a tough period and enter a new chapter. “We realized that the Academy is important to the music community, but we had gotten a little bit complacent in our ways,” he says. “I think people realized that there needed to be some improvement and some adapting to the times, adapting to listening to and learning from the music community and the people that we represent, our members, and we realized that we can’t continue doing the same things.” While he maintains the organization is “always evolving,” Mason says, “I think as of late, we’ve all realized and recognized that we had to implement more transformational changes, systemic changes in the Academy in order for us to do the work that we do.” Mason, the Academy’s second Black Chair of the Board (the first, Jimmy Jam, held the position from 2007 to 2009), has worked alongside an integral hire who came aboard in May: Valeisha Butterfield Jones, the first Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at the Academy. They work in tandem, thinking critically about how a 63-year-old organization can be more diverse and inclusive, from its voting body to its Trustees, staff and leadership. “We have those conversations every day,” Mason says. “And that’s something that’s really important to us, making sure that our organization looks like our membership and that our membership looks like the music community at-large.” When the Academy partnered with Color Of Change, they committed $1 million to the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. Butterfield Jones brought the idea of a strategic partnership with Color Of Change to Mason and has worked closely with the organization and its president, Rashad Robinson. “Color Of Change can challenge us, be honest with us, look at where we are, and help us navigate where we want to go from a DEI perspective,” Butterfield Jones says. “More specifically, they help us focus on making sure that underrepresented creators have equity in everything that we do.” Forbes called the collaboration “the most forceful plan of action yet,” and since its announcement in July, the Academy has made considerable progress. In September, they launched the Black Music Collective, a Black music advisory group whose goal is to amplify Black voices. Led by Co-Chairs Riggs Morales and Jeriel Johnson, the group includes Honorary Chairs Quincy Jones, Debra Lee, Jeff Harleston, Jimmy Jam, John Legend, and Sylvia Rhone as well as a leadership council comprising 22 Black artists and executives, including Agyemang, Thomas, Catherine Brewton, H.E.R., No I.D., MixedByAli, and Tuma Basa. In October, the Recording Academy joined Color Of Change to host a virtual industrywide #ChangeMusic Summit with leaders in music and media for panel discussions on shifting culture, best practices to encourage systemic change and more. At the summit, Butterfield Jones presented data about the Academy’s diversity efforts across all entities. In October 2020, the Recording Academy had 169 employees: 60% female and 40% male; 46% diverse and 54% non-diverse; 55% under age 40 and 45% over age 40.


A. RYAN BUTLER

Clockwise: Harvey Mason jr., Valeisha Butterfield Jones, Roc Nation Co-President Shari Bryant, and Motown President & Capitol Music Group EVP Ethopia Habtemariam at the virtual #ChangeMusic summit on Oct. 1, 2020

Last month, the Recording Academy and Color Of Change announced the #ChangeMusic Roadmap — an initiative detailing methods to bring racial justice and equity to Black creators and professionals in the music industry. The roadmap encourages the industry to invest in Black talent and careers, commit to transparent reporting of Black representation, align and partner with the Black community, promote civic advocacy and participation, and invest in Black safety. Transparency is driving progress at the Academy. On Dec. 12, 2019, the Recording Academy’s Diversity & Inclusion Task Force published a 47-page report that included 18 recommendations for reform. Butterfield Jones has used the findings as a foundation for her work. In 2020, she focused on increasing Academy membership, building bridges and partnerships in the music industry to develop shared goals on diversity and inclusion, and supporting the existing membership. “I think you have to know where you’ve been and you have to know where you’re going. Full stop,” she says. “And for us, transparency meant, one, looking at our data, understanding where are the gaps, where are the opportunities, but then sharing it. And I think there are some examples of that with other industries where it shows that transparency goes a long way when you’re trying to earn trust.”

“It’s been a unique opportunity for us to be an organization that brings people together, that tries to heal, and tries to support.” Last year, the Academy hired a Chief Industry Officer, Ruby Marchand, and promoted Kelley Purcell to Vice President of Membership & Industry Relations. Under their leadership, the Academy invited more than 2,300 diverse music professionals to join the 2020 new member class.

The invitees are 48% female, 21% African American/African descent, 8% Hispanic, and 3% Asian American and Pacific Islander. The Recording Academy’s current membership is 26% female and 25% from traditionally underrepresented communities. Their goal is to have 2,500 new women voters by 2025. Though best known for Music’s Biggest Night, the Recording Academy’s doors are open year-round. During the first wave of the coronavirus, the organization, along with its charitable arm, MusiCares, established the COVID-19 Relief Fund on March 17 to support music creators and community members affected by the pandemic. The fund launched at $2 million — with $1 million base donations from both the Recording Academy and MusiCares — and has raised more than $22 million. More than 24,000 music people have received funds to date thanks to donations from large benefactors such as Amazon Music, ASCAP, BMI, City of Austin, Country Music Association, Elma Philanthropies, Sony Music Entertainment, Spotify, TikTok, Universal Music Group, and Warner Music Group, among others. “We had no idea what the size, the scope or what the needs would even be at that moment, but we knew that we were privileged in our position to do something to help,” says Laura Segura, the Executive Director of MusiCares. “So we threw caution to the wind and we just put ourselves out there and we said, ‘We know people are going to need help. We’re here to help. How can we help?’” Many artists helped spread awareness about MusiCares’ Relief Fund and more than 100 companies participated in various ways, says Segura, from corporate donations to donating a portion of their product proceeds, while music creators who have helped fundraise range from college orchestras to major live streaming events and festivals. “Thomas Rhett put out a song for us, Stevie Nicks put out a song for us,” Segura says. “We had a lot of really bigname artists support us, but the most astounding thing that I feel worth highlighting is the thousands of artists across the country who maybe aren’t household names, who got on livestreams, and just started doing their own performances from their homes to try to raise money for MusiCares to support their friends and their community.” In December, MusiCares continued providing COVID-19 relief by offering $250 essential goods e-cards to the first 4,000 applicants, recognizing that some people had difficulty purchasing basic needs like food and toiletries. This year, the nonprofit hopes it can continue raising money and provide

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Several CARES Act provisions designed to assist in pandemic recovery were scheduled to end on Dec. 31, so the Academy launched a campaign to call on Congress to pass additional financial relief for creators and small businesses before the year was over. The activation resulted in thousands of letters and hundreds of calls to elected officials,

2020 INVITED MEMBER CLASS

GENDER

®

AGE MALE 48% FEMALE 48%

51% 39 & UNDER

DID NOT DISCLOSE 3% OTHER 1%

24% 40 & OVER

25% DID NOT DISCLOSE

ETHNICITY CAUCASIAN 50% AFRICAN AMERICAN/AFRICAN DESCENT 21% DID NOT DISCLOSE 13% HISPANIC 8% OTHER 5%

TERA ALLEGRI

ASIAN AMERICAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER/ASIAN 3%

RECORDING ACADEMY

more tools for people who need further assistance beyond MusiCares’ grants for mental health services, coping resources and recovery support groups. Segura says they want to be “responsive to the needs that we’re seeing in the community as it continues to change this far into the pandemic.” On the advocacy front, the Recording Academy played a vital role in securing key protections and provisions to help freelancers in the CARES Act, which was signed into law on March 27, 2020. The pandemic only accelerated the Academy’s virtual advocacy, where lobbying with letters and emails proved to be effective. “I think the most important thing from that bill was that freelancers — who never before in the history of the country — were now able to secure unemployment benefits,” says Daryl P. Friedman, the Recording Academy’s Chief Advocacy Officer. “Usually, unemployment was a function of traditional employment relationships, not the freelance, gig kind of workers, and of course, many in our community are not traditional employees. So to add independent contractors and freelancers into that unemployment provision was a big win for our members, and we appreciate all the activity that they did to help move that forward.” To help navigate the process of accessing unemployment assistance, paycheck protection loans, small business loans, and National Endowment for the Arts grants for applicants in need, the Recording Academy held a webinar for people to ask questions and hear experts explain how the $2 trillion stimulus bill impacted them. In addition, the Academy established a CARES Act hotline to help creators in need. During the webinar, Congresswoman Linda Sanchez (D–Calif.), who introduced the Academy-supported Help Independent Tracks Succeed (HITS) Act, which would help independent artists expense the cost of new studio recordings on their taxes, praised the Recording Academy for their dedication. “I just want to let you know that your voices were heard. Recording Academy members sent tens of thousands of emails to Congress and those messages matter and were heard,” she said. “I want to thank you for your advocacy and for being a part of the democratic process. It really does make a difference.” After the first coronavirus relief package, the Recording Academy never stopped fighting for music and its creators. Its Summer of Advocacy, a seven-week long effort from June 26 to Aug. 12 highlighting various legislations and funding decisions that affect musicians, culminated with the 7th annual District Advocate event. The call-to-action initiative resulted in nearly 2,000 members participating in virtual meetings with their elected officials, addressing proposed legislation such as the HITS Act and the Save Our Stages Act, which will allow live music venues to apply for grants through the Small Business Administration. Yolanda Adams, Brandy Clark, José Feliciano, John Legend, Ziggy Marley, Victoria Monét, and more were among the artists who participated.

Nearly 2,000 Academy members participated in virtual meetings with their elected officials on District Advocate Day on Aug. 12, 2020. Clockwise: Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries, Academy Trustee John Legend, Republican Whip Steve Scalise, and Academy Trustee PJ Morton


MusiCares’ COVID-19 relief efforts raised over $22 million for more than 24,000 music creators in need

“Thousands of artists across the country … just started doing their own performances from their homes to try to raise money for MusiCares to support their friends and their community.”

encouraging them to consider how they can help the music ecosystem thrive again. Congress reached a bipartisan agreement for a $900 billion coronavirus relief package on Dec. 21. The 5,593-page legislation was signed into law on Dec. 28, allocating $15 billion as a lifeline for performance venues and promoters through the Save Our Stages Act. The CASE Act, previously introduced in 2019, will create a small claims system for resolving infringement cases. As outlined in the bill, copyright owners could be awarded up to $30,000 if they find their creative work being shared online in a meme or video. Wrapped in the package are also critical provisions for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance and small business loans. But the road to a full recovery is a long one. “We’re hoping by the second half of the year, between the vaccine and testing, concerts will be able to reopen and our people will be able to get back to work,” Friedman says. “They

don’t want to live by a government program. They want to live by their craft, and they want to make their music, and they want to share their music with the public.” To provide some musical relief after a tough year, the Academy chose to move forward with its 63rd annual GRAMMY Awards telecast. The organization has implemented necessary precautions to host the show, including the use of satellite locations, pre-recorded content and limiting the number of artists that can be in a room or stage at one time. They hope to create memorable GRAMMY Moments following an unforgettable year. The Recording Academy has remained optimistic through trying times, and it shows through the work put in internally and externally. From changing the names of multiple awards categories — in June, they dropped the term “urban” — to addressing claims of conflicts of interest by tightening rules for the awards and nominations process and making the official GRAMMY Awards Rulebook publicly available for the first time, every change is intentional. They are earning the trust of members and the music community. “I think everybody at the Academy recognizes there’s more we can do, and we can do it better,” Mason says. “I’ve felt nothing but support and excitement for a change. I think everyone realizes that for us to be effective, we need to evolve.” ○

Eric Diep has written for Billboard, Complex, Vulture, HipHopDX, and XXL. He is a freelance journalist based in New York.

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Congratulations To All The GRAMMY® Award Nominees and Winners!

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The Recording Academy® At A Glance

I

n 1957, a visionary group of music professionals recognized the need to create an organization that would support and award the artistic achievements of talented musicians, singers and songwriters, and important behind-the-scenes contributors such as producers and engineers.

The Recording Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, California.

Conceived as a way to create a true music industry community, the Recording Academy was born.

© THE RECORDING ACADEMY 2018/CAROL FLORES

Today, the Academy fights for creators’ rights on Capitol Hill, supports music education and preservation initiatives, helps music people in times of need, represents thousands of music makers in 12 regional Chapters across the country, and celebrates musical excellence through the GRAMMYs — the industry’s only peer-recognized award. As the world’s leading society of music professionals, the Academy is dedicated to fostering a more inspiring and inclusive world for music and its creators.

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

A

s an organization focused on helping music and its makers thrive, the Recording Academy embraces its responsibility to drive real and meaningful change. The Academy seeks to inspire the music industry to become a place where all voices are welcome, embraced and belong. In 2020, the Recording Academy partnered with Color of Change, the largest online racial justice organization in the world, to drive systemic change in music and society. The Academy held three Diversity, Equity and Inclusion summits with thought leaders and subject-matter experts and launched the Black Music Collective, an advisory group dedicated to the inclusion, recognition and advancement of Black music creators and professionals within the Academy and music industry at-large. The Academy is committed to taking the necessary steps to ensure all areas of the industry reflect the diverse music community it proudly represents.

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Diversity, equity and inclusion are fundamental to our core values as an organization. We’ve made significant progress, and it is just the beginning. We further commit to the work ahead and will keep learning, listening and growing, but most importantly, taking action.” — Harvey Mason jr. BUILDING TOGETHER Join the Academy’s efforts to create a global culture of diversity at recordingacademy.com/inclusion.


JESSE GRANT/GETTY IMAGES

Advocacy & Public Policy

T

he Academy’s year-round Advocacy work makes it easy for music creators and fans to stay informed, engaged and active to support the policies that affect music and its makers. District Advocate On District Advocate Day, the largest nationwide grassroots lobbying campaign for music, Academy members visit the district offices of their congressional members to discuss the issues that matter most to music makers. GRAMMYs On The Hill Each spring, GRAMMY winners and nominees descend on the nation’s capital to advocate for creators’ rights,

The Recording Academy’s congressional briefing on Jan. 25, 2020, in Beverly Hills, California. From left: Rep. Michael McCaul, Jac Ross, Cyndi Lauper, Rep. Norma Torres, Rep. Stephanie Murphy, Rodney Jerkins, Rep. Linda Sánchez, and Rep. Billy Long

while thousands of members across the country join the effort online. GRAMMY Fund For Music Creators This political action committee gives members the opportunity to help protect the rights of music makers by supporting the Academy’s congressional champions. COVID-19 Relief When the government began discussions on a COVID-19 relief bill, the Academy was there to ensure creators’ needs were met. The Academy’s Washington, D.C.-based Advocacy office collaborated with Academy membership to lobby for the CARES Act, which contained a number of key protections and provisions

benefitting music creators, including a new unemployment program for selfemployed workers, small business loans and dedicated arts funding. The Advocacy office also opened a helpline to aid Academy members navigate government assistance programs and continues to advocate for additional relief programs that will ensure all music makers and businesses can weather the pandemic.

STAY INFORMED Need policy updates and an action tool that allows you to connect directly with legislators? Visit grammy.com/advocacy

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Membership & Industry Relations

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ecording Academy members advocate for creators’ rights and for diversity, equity and inclusion throughout the industry. Academy members care about the future of music and are dedicated to expanding educational and mentorship opportunities. Voting Members Music creators who are integral to the recording process vote for the GRAMMY Awards, the pre-eminent, peer-to-peer award celebrating musical excellence.

Professional Members Members of the broad professional community within the music industry bring state-of-the-art knowledge, perspective and opportunity to the membership body. Producers & Engineers Wing Producers, engineers, remixers, technologists and other audio professionals address critical issues affecting the art and craft of music. GRAMMY U Connecting college students with the industry’s brightest and most innovative minds, GRAMMY U provides aspiring creators and professionals with the awareness and tools necessary to pursue a career in music.

PACIFIC NORTHWEST CHICAGO

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA WASHINGTON, D.C.

LOS ANGELES FLORIDA SAN FRANCISCO TEXAS

ATLANTA MEMPHIS NASHVILLE

Academy membership is community-driven and peer-reviewed on an annual cycle. If you would like to get involved or recommend someone for membership, visit grammy.com/join.

M

usiCares safeguards the health and well-being of music people nationwide. Through various efforts to help music creators affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, MusiCares’ safety net of services provided more than $22 million to 24,000 music professionals in the last fiscal year. COVID-19 Relief MusiCares, in partnership with the Recording Academy, launched the COVID-19 Relief Fund in mid-March to provide vital financial assistance to music people in need. Hundreds of corporations and creators made donations and launched fundraisers 116 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Aerosmith at the 2020 MusiCares Person of the Year gala in their honor

to help the creative community weather this unprecedented pandemic. Need-Based Grants MusiCares provides emergency funding for rent, insurance payments, medical and dental bills and other expenses. Mental Health & Addiction Recovery Free nationwide recovery and mental health support groups,

Sober Jams, psychotherapy referrals, and assistance for inpatient and outpatient treatments, ensure that no one goes through the recovery process alone. Preventive Care Prevention is the most powerful tool to keep people from falling into crisis. MusiCares hosts a variety of Healthy Essentials preventive services, including dental and medical screenings, hearing

clinics, and health and wellness workshops.

HOW TO HELP Please consider a direct donation or get involved: • Host an online fundraiser • Donate proceeds of ticket sales • Donate proceeds of a recording • Help spread the word on social media Learn more at musicares.org

KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES

MusiCares


Billie Eilish at the GRAMMY Museum’s Clive Davis Theater

The Latin Recording Academy

E

stablished as the global authority on Latin music, The Latin Recording Academy is dedicated to nurturing, celebrating, honoring and elevating Latin music and its creators.

GRAMMY Museum

T

he GRAMMY Museum is a philanthropic arts organization dedicated to celebrating and preserving music through exhibitions, music education and public programs. Celebrate Since opening its doors in 2008, the Museum’s permanent and special exhibition galleries have celebrated the iconic artists and music professionals who’ve made a significant mark on our culture. Engage Year-round public programs range from intimate interviews with up-and-coming artists and panels to live performances, lectures and film screenings, which are now available on the

VISIT COLLECTION:LIVE See artist interviews, performances, livestreams, and archival footage. Proceeds benefit the Museum’s music education initiatives. watch.grammymuseum.org

Museum’s official streaming service, COLLECTION:live. Educate The Museum offers a variety of multidisciplinary programs designed to bring music to students, schools and communities in need. Programs such as GRAMMY Camp build students’ knowledge of the world through the arts, while the Museum’s Music Educator Award, in conjunction with the Recording Academy, and Jane Ortner Educator Award recognize teachers who use music in the classroom to inspire the next generation of creators.

Celebration The Latin Recording Academy honors excellence in the recording arts and sciences through the Latin GRAMMY Awards, celebrates a notable Latin recording artist through its Person of the Year gala and acknowledges the careers of legendary music creators with a Special Awards ceremony honoring Lifetime Achievement and Trustees Award recipients. Given the challenges imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the 21st Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards were held with no audience following a virtual awards process. Anchored from Miami, the reinvented telecast featured performances from around the world, embodying the essence of people with diverse stories of hope, community, sense of purpose, and celebration. Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation The Foundation promotes the appreciation and awareness of the significant contributions of Latin music and its creators. Since its establishment six years ago, the Foundation has allocated more than $5 million in scholarships, grants, musical instruments, and educational events throughout the United States and Ibero-America. CNCO perform at a Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation benefit concert in February 2020

JOHN PARRA/GETTY IMAGES

SCOTT DUDELSON

Membership Latin Academy membership is composed of musicians, songwriters, producers and other creative and technical music professionals specializing in Latin genres. Today, there are more than 4,000 Latin Academy members representing approximately 34 countries.

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GRAMMY Awards Process

A

GRAMMY honors the highest degree of musical excellence. The Recording Academy ensures the GRAMMY Awards process is impartial and reflects the evolving world of music. GRAMMY winners are revealed for the first time during the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony and the telecast.

84 Rules are reviewed and updated

Entries are submitted across 84 categories

FPO

Album Notes Historical Package Remixed Recording Immersive Audio

Craft Committees determine final nominees

Composing/Arranging Engineering Producer Of The Year

Screening Committees organize entries into appropriate fields

General Field American Roots Children’s Classical Contemporary Instrumental Country Dance/Electronic Gospel/CCM

Jazz Latin Music Video/Film New Age R&B Rap Rock Global Music

Members vote on first-round ballot

Members vote on first-round ballot

Craft Committees determine final nominees

Nominations Review Committees determine final nominees

GRAMMY NOMINATIONS

Members vote on final ballot

GRAMMY AWARDS 118 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Alternative Comedy Musical Theater Pop Reggae Spoken Word Traditional Pop Visual Media

Members vote on first-round ballot


CONGRATULATIONS GRAMMY® WINNERS

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Billings Artworks Ridgway Colorado

MAKER OF THE GRAMMY® FOR FORTY ONE YEARS

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Recording Academy E X E C U T I V E S TA F F Harvey Mason jr.

Interim President/ CEO

E N T E R TA I N M E N T / C O N S U M E R D I V I S I O N

Branden Chapman

Lisa Farris

Chief Operating Officer

Chief Marketing & Innovation Officer

Lourdes Lopez Patton

Vice President, Communications

Adam Roth

Senior Vice President, Strategic Partnerships & Business Development

Rex Supa

Vice President, Production & Event Operations

O R G A N I Z AT I O N / C R O S S V E R T I C A L S D I V I S I O N

Wayne Zahner Chief Financial Officer

Rick Engdahl

Chief Information Officer

Shonda Grant Chief People & Culture Officer

Valeisha Butterfield Jones

Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer

TRADE/INDUSTRY DIVISION

Daryl P. Friedman Chief Advocacy Officer

120 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Ruby Marchand Chief Industry Officer

Bill Freimuth Chief Awards Officer

Kelley Purcell

Vice President, Membership & Industry Relations



National Trustee Officers & Trustees TRUSTEE OFFICERS

TRUSTEES

Yolanda Adams

Claudia Brant

Darrell Brown

John Burk

Terri Lyne Carrington

Samantha Cox

Jimmy Douglass

Doug Emery

Sue Ennis

Trey Fanjoy

George J. Flanigen IV

Fletcher Foster

Chelsey Green

Tracy Hamlin

John Driskell Hopkins

Texas

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Harvey Mason jr.

Chair Of The Board

Los Angeles

New York

New York

Tammy Hurt Vice Chair

Florida

Florida

Pacific Northwest

Terry Hemmings

Secretary/Treasurer

Nashville

Christine Albert Chair Emerita

122 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Washington, D.C.

Nashville

Washington, D.C.

Nashville

Atlanta


National Trustee Officers & Trustees TRUSTEES

Leslie Ann Jones

Terry Jones

Andrew Joslyn

Lisa Kaplan

Om’Mas Keith

Thomas “TK” Kidd

Emily Lazar

John Legend

Rico Love

Carolyn Malachi

Jonathan McReynolds

Julia Michels

Riggs Morales

PJ Morton

Tim Palmer

Piper Payne

Natalia Ramirez

Carol Riddick

Justin Roberts

Michael Romanowski

Shannon Sanders

Ken Shepherd

Von Vargas

Gebre Waddell

Paul Wall

San Francisco

Atlanta

Chicago

San Francisco

Nashville

Philadelphia

New York

Los Angeles

Florida

Memphis

Pacific Northwest

Los Angeles

New York

Philadelphia

Washington, D.C.

Chicago

Florida

Memphis

Chicago

Memphis

Los Angeles

Washington, D.C.

Texas

San Francisco

Texas

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 123


National Staff T H A N K YO U T O T H E D E D I C AT E D S TA F F O F T H E R E C O R D I N G A C A D E M Y, M U S I C A R E S , T H E L AT I N R E C O R D I N G A C A D E M Y, A N D G R A M M Y M U S E U M

RE C O RD I NG ACA D E M Y Tracey Adlai Mazen Alawar Christee Albino Jessica Allen Michael Almanza Lyn Aurelius Grace Baca Matthew Bango Gaige Barahona Christina Bauer Kristen Baum Erin Baxter Kate Blair Bradford Bridgers Ceora Brown Len Brown Nicole Brown Rory Burbeck Ryan Butler Kiana Butler Jabangwe Valeisha Butterfield Jones Michele Caplinger Jose Cardenas Jamieson Chandler Anthony Chanes Branden Chapman Chris Chhoeun Joanna Chu Marta Clark Brian Clasby Amy Cohen Uziel Colon Qiana Conley Kenny Cordova Elizabeth Cortes-Mateo Andie Cox Laura Crawford Neil Crilly

124 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Nick Cucci Amanda Davenport Yasmin de Soiza Ivan Diaz Timie Dolan Thea Domingo Maureen Droney Christina Dudash Todd Dupler Rick Engdahl Patricia Eredia Ashley Ernst Virginia Faddy Lisa Farris Rachel Fentz Juan Frausto Bill Freimuth Daryl P. Friedman Marlon Fuentes Lindsay Gingerich Jason Gino Lisa Goich-Andreadis Daniel Goodman Shonda Grant Brian Haack Ryan Hanson Tera Healy Anthony Helguera Shannon Herber Erica Hernandez Naomi Hernandez Priscilla Hernandez Jon Hornyak Casey Immoor Sharon Ingram Sarah Jansen Jeriel Johnson Pauly Kaeowichien Maurice Kalous Michael Kepler Jane Kim Kristin Klimas

Brian Klinsport Stephanie Lamond Leah LaRocco Katrina Lee Michael Lewan Claudine Little Jenna Lizerbram Yra Lopez Lourdes Lopez Patton Lauren Loverde Brandon Lukoff Nora Luna Ricky Lyon Paul Madeira LaShon Malone Ruby Marchand Shelly Maree Alan Matkovic Christen McFarland Ann Meckelborg Yeri Medina Joe Melendez Hillary Melin Daniel Mendoza Charles Lee Mills IV Miranda Moore Alexis Mouer Jalyn Nelson Kiyumi Nishida John Ochoa Ralph J. Olivarez Todd Parker Arielly Peñalo Scott Petersen Chris Phengsisomboun Jessica Pickett Brittany Presley Kelley Purcell Esperanza Ramirez Moises Ramirez Jamesina Rammelkamp Aubrie Reimerink

Sean Riley Lewis Robertson Ashley Robinson Tricia Robinson Adriana Rodriguez Laura Rodriguez Yari Romero Adam Roth Rachel Ryding Stephen Salazar Taylor Saucedo Chantel Sausedo Luke Savage Mark Schulz Ashley Sheehan Lani Simmons Julie Smith Susan Stewart Kennelia Stradwick Rex Supa Ashley Thomas Jonathan Tol Jessica Toon Yana Trofimova Clay Upton Kevin Veiga Jennifer Velez Tanushree Verma Alina Vission Alicia Warwick Tim Whalen Courtney White Reid Wick Charlotte Williams Ashton Wilson Linda Wilvang Candice Yang Ana Monroy Yglesias Wayne Zahner


National Staff

M USI CARE S EXECUTIVE STAFF

Laura Segura

Executive Director

Debbie Carroll

Vice President, Health & Human Services

Donna Caseine Phylicia Fant Ben Haggerty Ali Harnell Lalah Hathaway Tamara Hrivnak Jeff Jones Rob Light Carianne Marshall Harvey Mason jr. Paul “PJ” Morton Dr. Steven Shoptaw Rita Wilson

LATIN R ECOR DING ACADEMY

LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY BOARD OF TRUSTEES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Laura Dergal

Vice President, Marketing & Content Development

Luis Dousdebés

Chief Awards, Membership & Preservation Officer

MUSICARES BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chair Steve Boom

Iveliesse Malavé President/CEO

Manuel Abud

Chief Operating Officer

Trustees Christine Albert Carlos Alvarez Luis Alvarez-Fiol Luis Balaguer Eduardo Bergallo

Paty Cantú Carla Estrada Alexandra Lioutikoff Rafa Sardina Manuel Tejada

Legal Counsel Jorge Hernandez-Toraño Joel Katz Bobby Rosenbloum

LATIN GRAMMY CULTURAL FOUNDATION

Aida Scorza

Senior Vice President, Awards

Gabriel Abaroa Jr.

STAFF

Javier Aguirre

Chief Financial Officer

Secretary/Treasurer Jeffrey Harleston

Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Christine Albert Tuma Basa

Vice President, Communications

Latin Recording Academy President/CEO Gabriel Aboroa Jr.

EXECUTIVE STAFF

Vice Chair Ambrosia Healy

Chair Emeritus Michael McDonald

Secretary Treasurer Aloysio Reis Eduardo Weise

Chair Emerita Laura Tesoriero

EXECUTIVE STAFF

Gabriel Abaroa Jr.

Vice Chair Eva Cebrián

Recording Academy Interim President/CEO Harvey Mason jr.

STAFF Kara Barosi Angela Bilkic Lindsey Burris Stefanie Curtiss Ryan Donahue Kate Ferber Mikaela Freeman Shireen Janti Erica Krusen Hannah Kulis Jennifer Leff Harold Owens Anita Ramsarup Roger Tang Jigar Thakarar Wynnie Wynn

Chair Eduardo Hütt

Davina Aryeh

Chief Marketing Officer

Diana Alvarado Alejandria Artiles Livys Cerna Berenice Diaz Marcelo Figola Melanie Galarce Adriano Haubenthal Andrés López Eddaliz Martínez Andres Mendez Ixamar Patiño Jhanluis Peralta Laura Pieretti Grace Santa-Ana Claudia Santos Justin Tejada Angelica Veliz Victoria Villegas

President/CEO

Manolo Díaz

Senior Vice President

Becky Villaescusa

Vice President, Strategic Planning & Corporate Development 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 125


National Staff

STAFF Kevin Forte Coralys Julian Nannette Vélez

LATIN GRAMMY CULTURAL FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Bob Santelli

Founding Executive Director

Chair Luis Cobos Vice Chair Harvey Mason jr. Secretary/Treasurer Raúl Vázquez Director Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Director Mireya Cisneros

GRAMMY M U S E UM F OUNDATI O N EXECUTIVE STAFF

David Sears

Vice President, Education for GRAMMY in the Schools

President

Rita George

Chief Operating Officer

Hilary Fahlsing

Vice President, Finance & Administration

126 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

GRAMMY MUSEUM FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chair Tim Bucher* Vice Chair John Burk* Secretary/Treasurer Michal Katz*

Lynne Sheridan

Vice President, Artist Relations, Programs & Content

STAFF Michael Sticka

Schyler O’Neal Maria Pacheco Vivek Paul Michael Rohrbacher Melissa Ruiz Rosalie Sanchez Adriana Saragosa Bryan Schiller Derek Spencer Ashley Stagg Stacie Takaoka Christian Tejero Nick Vega Kevin Yang

Alejandra Aceves Shaun Carter Kevin Choto Ali Courtemanche Meredith Crabtree Warner Ana Estrada Eric Forcen Erlin Frausto Sergio Galvez Pablo Garces Kelsey Goelz Scott Goldman Cynthia Gomez Kristen Jennings Kimber Kristy Daniel Lopez Jasmine Lywen-Dill Ben Moore Hillary Morimoto John Morrison Wendy Murphy Julie Mutnansky Kaitlyn Nader

Pamela Alexander Dan Beckerman* Traci Blackwell John Branca Branden Chapman Ken Ehrlich Giselle Fernandez Ted Fikre Todd Goldstein Jon Harris Brian Hoesterey Jimmy Jam Joel Katz Andra Liemandt Terry Lickona Jay Marciano Harvey Mason jr.* Mattie McFadden-Lawson* Chuck Ortner* Carolyn Powers Brenda Robinson Brian Sheth David Webster David Wu * Executive Committee Member

GRAMMY MUSEUM AFFILIATES GRAMMY Museum Mississippi — Cleveland, Mississippi GRAMMY Museum Gallery at the Musicians Hall of Fame — Nashville, Tennessee GRAMMY Museum Experience Prudential Center — Newark, New Jersey GRAMMY Museum Gallery at the Anguilla Music Academy — Anguilla


Chapter Boards & Staff E AST RE GI O N

Senior Director Tera Healy

Senior Project & Production Manager Ashley Sheehan

Administrative Assistant Arielly A. Peñalo

Administrative Assistant, East Region/New York Chapter Priscilla Hernandez

CHICAGO

NEW YORK

PHILADELPHIA

WASHINGTON, D.C.

J. Ivy

Jennifer Blakeman

Lauren Hart

Elise Perry

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

Trustees

Trustees

Executive Director

Trustees

Trustees

Nick Cucci

Terry Jones Carol Riddick

Project Manager

President

Lisa Kaplan Jonathan McReynolds Justin Roberts

President

Terri Lyne Carrington Samantha Cox Emily Lazar Riggs Morales

Vice President

Jennifer Blakeman

J. Ivy

Dani Deahl

Secretary Jeffrey Becker

Governors

Ryan Argast Andrew Barber Alex E. Chávez Alison Chesley Shemekia Copeland Sima Cunningham Mark Hubbard Terry Hunter Daryl Jones Clara Lyon Elaine Martone Stacey McMichael Ugochi Nwaogwugwu Omen David Roberts Rob Sevier David Skidmore Karim Sulayman Twista Jamila Woods

Advisors

Chris “Classick” Inumerable Tarrey Torae

CHAPTER STAFF Senior Executive Director Sarah Jansen

Senior Membership Manager Maurice Kalous

Project Manager Kristin Klimas

President

Vice President Torae Carr Secretary Erika Elliott

Governors

Nabil Ayers Nikisha Bailey Richard Barone Linda Lorence Critelli Joe D’Ambrosio Lee Dannay John Doelp Jamie Dominguez Jerry “Wonda” Duplessis David Frost David ‘Swagg R’ Celious’ Harris José James Tracey Jordan Lucy Kalantari Angelique Kidjo Dave Kutch Michael League Jeff Levenson Martha Mooke Mireya Ramos Maria Rice Kim Rosen Jenna Rubenstein Catherine Russell Falguni “Falu” Shah Ebonie Smith Sharon Tapper Judy Tint Miguel Zenon

Advisors

Travis McFetridge Stefani Scamardo

Lauren Loverde

Lauren Hart

Membership Manager

Vice President

Yasmin de Soiza

Coordinator, Chapter Administrative Operations Kristen Baum

Mitch Beer

Secretary Kaisha Blackstone

Governors

Chelsey Green Tracy Hamlin Carolyn Malachi Von Vargas

President Elise Perry

Vice President Tamara Wellons Secretary

Marcus Baylor Marcus Bryant Matt Cappy Catherine Marie Charlton Alexandra Cutler-Fetkewicz Donn T Jahlil Beats Kosta Johnson Lori Landew Michael McArthur Chill Moody Ryan Moys Deidre Robinson Stephanie Seiple Dana Sorey Laurin Talese Dan “Dilemma” Thomas Gerald Veasley Richard Waller Dyana Williams

Anshia Crooms

Advisors

Advisors

Senior Executive Director

Executive Director

Aalyah Duncan Octavius “Ted” Reid

CHAPTER STAFF Mark Schulz

Senior Membership & Project Manager Ashley Thomas

Governors

Diane Blagman Ferddy Calderon Priscilla Clarke Alexandria Davila DJ Thommy Davis Brandon Felder Dom Flemons Angie Gates Tom Goldfogle Jake Grotticelli Tracey Lee Dan Merceruio Caleb Nei Dante Pope Pete Reiniger Vincent Richardson Aramide Sarumoh Michelle Shellers Wayna Mumu Fresh Simone Eccleston Kariz Marcel

CHAPTER STAFF Jeriel A. Johnson

Membership & Project Manager Sharon Ingram

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 127


Chapter Boards & Staff S O UTH RE GIO N

Senior Director Susan Stewart

Senior Project & Production Manager Lyn Aurelius

Manager, Administrative Operations Ashley Ernst

Administrative Assistant, South Region/Nashville Chapter Chris Phengsisomboun

ATLANTA

FLORIDA

MEMPHIS

NASHVILLE

Matt Still

Milcho

Susan Marshall

Jennifer Hanson

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

Trustees

Trustees

Trustees

Trustees

Executive Director

John Driskell Hopkins Thom “TK” Kid

President Matt Still

Vice President Martina Albano

Secretary Ian Schumacher

Governors

David Barbe Michael Burton Brandon Bush Chantae Cann Bryan-Michael Cox Mara Davis Diane Durrett Kennard Garrett Kat Graham Henny Tha Bizness Peggy Still Johnson Crystal Nicole Shay M. Lawson April Ledbetter Al “Butter” McLean Jason Reddick Mike Rizzi Ben Tanner Kris “Red” Tanner Simone Torres

Advisors

Cannon Kent-Grant William Murphy

CHAPTER STAFF Senior Executive Director

Michele Rhea Caplinger

Senior Membership & Project Manager Erin Baxter

Jimmy Douglass Doug Emery Rico Love Natalia Ramirez

President Milcho

Vice President Alex Harris Secretary Lolo Reskin Governors

Carlos Alvarez Marcella Araica Maria Elisa Ayerbe Julio Bague Chad Bernstein Lena Burke Rodrigo Cardenas Billy Chapin Beth Cohen Stephen Gibb Joey Mercado Marianne Mijares Boris Milan Teedra Moses Ms. Meka Nism Jean Rodriguez Ana Rosa Santiago Elsten Torres Tracy Young Angel Zamora

Advisors

Jorge “Quaz” Palacio Troy Sanders

CHAPTER STAFF Executive Director Kenny Cordova

Senior Membership Manager Marta Clark

Senior Project Manager Jessica Allen 128 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

PJ Morton Ken Shepherd Gebre Waddell

President

Trey Fanjoy George J. Flanigen IV Fletcher Foster Shannon Sanders

Vice President

Jennifer Hanson

Susan Marshall Vicki Loveland

Secretary Pat Mitchell Worley

Governors

Erin Bode Alicia Cotabish Jeff DeLia Johnette Downing Drumma Boy Kevin Houston Tikyra Jackson Tim Kappel John Paul Keith Kirby Quiana Lynell Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell Oona Mitchell-Bean Carl Nappa Halley Phillips Jeff Powell Matt Ross-Spang Terrance Simien Tyrone “Tyke T” Stroble Kirk Whalum

Advisors

Betsy Brumley Doug Williams

CHAPTER STAFF Senior Executive Director Jon Hornyak

Senior Membership & Project Manager Reid Wick

President

Vice President Dave Haywood Secretary Beverly Keel Governors

Chuck Ainlay Ruby Amanfu Julie Boos Alison Brown Joanna Carter Nathan Chapman Brandy Clark Callie Cunningham Jessie Jo Dillon Leslie DiPiero Crystal Dishmon Cyndi Forman Leslie Fram Garth Fundis EJ Gaines Shani Gandhi Tracy Gershon Ben Glover Jordan Hamlin Armand Hutton Gena Johnson Chandra LaPlume Frank Liddell Matt Maher Gramps Morgan Darin Murphy Vance Powell Liz Rose Ben Vaughn Kristin Wilkinson

Advisors

Gina Miller Derek Wells

Alicia Warwick

Project Manager Courtney White

Membership Manager

Laura Crawford

Administrative Assistant Mike Kepler


Chapter Boards & Staff WE ST RE GIO N

Senior Director Neil Crilly

Project Manager Jessica Pickett

Administrative Coordinator Luke Savage

Administrative Assistant, West Region/Los Angeles Chapter Patricia Eredia

LOS ANGELES

PACIFIC NORTHWEST

SAN FRANCISCO

TEXAS

Evan Bogart

Dave Gross

Jessica Thompson

Carlos Alvarez

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

Trustees

Trustees

Trustees

Trustees

President

President

Vice President

Vice President

Kev Choice

Bernard “Bun B” Freeman

Claudia Brant Darrell Brown John Burk Om’Mas Keith John Legend Julia Michels

President

Evan Bogart

Vice President Lynne Earls

Advisors

Phylicia Fant Jeff “Gitty” Gitelman

CHAPTER STAFF Executive Director

Qiana Conley

Loretta Muñoz

Senior Manager, Chapter Administrative Operations

Governors

Nicole Brown

Secretary

Cheche Alara Peter Asher Edie Lehmann Boddicker Bernie Cahill Deana Carter Jenn Decilveo Maria Egan Gregg Field MAJOR. Michael Graves Jeff Greenberg Lynn Grossman Josh Gudwin Lalah Hathaway Sarah Hudson Mike Knobloch Ledisi Michelle Lewis MarcLo Julie Pilat Nicole Plantin Patrice Rushen Amanda Samii Dana Sano Rafa Sardina Ryan Shore Rachel Stilwell Beka Tischker Katy Wolaver Jonathan Yip

Project Manager

Jamesina Rammelkamp

Membership Manager Brittany Presley

Sue Ennis Andrew Joslyn

President

Leslie Ann Jones Piper Payne Michael Romanowski

Vice President

Jessica Thompson

Dave Gross Eric Lilavois

Secretary

Yolanda Adams Tim Palmer Paul Wall Carlos Alvarez

Secretary

Secretary

Governors

Sarah Jones

Heather Wagner Reed

Governors

Governors

Advisors

Kenya Autie Larry Batiste Nahuel Bronzini Tony Brooke Cory Cullinan Michael Denten Bonny Dolan Anna Frick McKay Garner Brian Gibbs Michelle Jacques Aaron Joseph Jumbo Camilo Landau Lyz Luke Michael Prommer Freya Seeburger Shawn Thwaites Heidi Trefethen Christopher Verdugo

Advisors

Advisors

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER STAFF

Jody Brotman Ethan Anderson Paula Boggs Niffer Calderwood Amy Dragon Elena Dubinets Amy Hānaiali’i Gilliom Adam Gonsalves Ryan Hadlock Sharlese Metcalf Kimié Miner Whitney Mongé Jovino Dos Santos Neto Chris Pack Chris Porter Gen Rubin Andy Stokes Andy Stoller Amber Sweeney Michael Wansley Frankie Yaptinchay Sylvia Massy Darek Mazzone

CHAPTER STAFF Executive Director Jessica Toon

Membership & Project Manager Timie Dolan

Ann Moss Max Perry

Senior Project Manager

Christen McFarland

Project Manager

Stephanie Lamond

Membership Manager

Lewis Robertson

Chip Adams Rodney Alejandro Chris Bell Tamera Bennett Ruthie Foster Kam Franklin Ernest Gonzales Larry Griffin “S1” Taylor Hanson Erin Ivey Danny Jones Caren Kelleher Teresa LaBarbera Lisa Morales Edwardo Perez Chris Shaw Tami Thomsen Kathy Valentine Kelly Willis Brian Courtney Wilson Mitch Ballard Gina Chavez

Executive Director Christee Albino

Project Manager Rory Burbeck

Membership Manager

Amanda Garcia Davenport

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 129



Past Chairs

James B. Conkling

Acting National Chairman 1957–1961

Paul Weston

Robert L. Yorke

Chairman/President 1961–1962

Chairman/President 1962–1963

John Scott Trotter

Nesuhi Ertegun

F.M. Scott III

Chairman/President 1965–1966

George Avakian

Chairman/President 1964–1965

Pete King

Mort L. Nasatir

Irving Townsend

Wesley H. Rose

Bill Lowery

Jay L. Cooper

Chairman/President 1975–1977

Chairman/President 1977–1979

J. William Denny

Jay S. Lowy

William Ivey

Michael Melvoin

Michael Greene

Alfred Schlesinger

Ron Kramer

Hank Neuberger

Joel A. Katz

Phil Ramone

Leslie Ann Jones

Garth Fundis

Daniel Carlin

Terry Lickona

Christine Albert

John Poppo

Chairman/President 1963–1964

Chairman/President 1967–1968

Chairman/President 1973–1975

Chairman/President 1981–1983, Chairman 1989-1991

Chairman 1991–1993

Chairwoman 1999–2001

Jimmy Jam Chair 2007–2009

Chairman/President 1968–1969

Chairman/President 1983–1985

Chairman 1993–1995

Chairman 2001–2003

George J. Flanigen IV Chair 2009–2013

Chairman/President 1969–1971

Chairman/President 1985–1987

Chairman 1995–1997

Chairman 2003–2005

Chair 2013–2015

Chairman/President 1966–1967

Chairman/President 1971–1973

Chairman/President 1979–1981

Chairman 1987–1989

Chairman 1997–1999

Chairman 2005–2007

Chair 2015–2019

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 131


THE THUMBS DON’T LIE It’s been a crazy year but your music has inspired us all. Congratulations to all the nominees, and thank you to all the artists that helped us stay sane in the year 2020.

Discover more on GRAMMY Awards® Radio. Coming February 2021

Official sponsor of the 63rd GRAMMY Awards®



IN MEMORIAM Marcello Abbado Malik Abdul Basit aka Malik B Alan Abel Ray Abshire Biff Adam Darrell Andr’e Adams Fiona Adams India Adams Dan Andrei Aldea Dick Alen Barney Ales Randy Alexander Tom Alexander Alejandro Algara Alauddin Ali Rance Allen Tony Allen Wade Allison Pelle Alsing Kenneth Alwyn Frank Amadeo Norm Amadio Fabiana Anastácio Edward Anderson Bob Andy Tom Annastas Clay Anthony Ryan Anthony

Winston Errol Barbour aka Daddy Boastin’

Mark Brunner

Anton Coppola

Robert “Bootsie” Barnes

Kobe Bryant

John Corcoran

Harold Budd

Nick Cordero

Sam “The Man” Burns

J.T. Corenflos

Don Burrows

Chamín Correa

Tre Burwell

David Corrêa

Johnny Bush

Jerome Cosey aka 5th Ward Webbie

Len Barry Waldemar Bastos Jennifer Bate “Little” Charlie Baty Bucky Baxter Orson Bean Harold Beane LD Beghtol McKenzie Bell Ronald “Khalis” Bell Hamdi Benani Mac Benford Dayvon Bennett aka King Von Bettye Berger Roger Berlind Warren Berlinger Norman Bernal Rod Bernard Rafael Berrio Overton Berry Harold Betters Frank Bey Salome Bey Bert Bial Bob Biggs

Alexander Mark Antonyyo Jr. aka Lil Yase

Steve Bing

MK Arjunan

Martin Birch

Darrin Arriens

Trevor Birdsong

Carol Arthur

Aldir Blanc

Phil Ashley

Else Blangsted

Mickey Atkins

Richard Blaustein

Hillard “Sweet Pea” Atkinson

Kofi “Kofi B.” Boakye Yiadom

Luis Eduardo Aute

Hamilton Bohannon

William “Willie K” Awihilima Kahaiali’I

Claude Bolling

Gabriel Bacquier

Dr. John P. Boyd

Nusrat Badr Alec Baillie Braxton Baker aka Brax SP Balasubrahmanyam Dalton Baldwin Bobby Ball Frankie Banali Josef Bansuelo Lucien Barbarin John Barbe Ornetta Barber

Howell Binkley

Ezio Bosso Steve Boyer Ryan Brady Julian Bream Jim Brewer Jr. Romualdo Brito Big George Brock Michael Brooks Andrew Brough Van Broussard Hux Brown Marvin Brown Steve Brown

134 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Lamonta Butcher Stan Byrd Edd Byrnes Steven Cagan Buddy Cage Cándido Camero Jimmy Capps Joaquín Carbonell Steve Martin Caro Pearl Carr Pete Carr Alton “Big Al” Carson Rosanna Carteri Brent Carver Nedda Casei Juliano Cezar Paul “Tonka” Chapman Oscar Chávez Hamid “Idir” Cheriet Ken Chinn aka Mr. Chi Pig Adelaide Chiozzo Jon Christensen Christophe Adrián Cionco Renée Claude Jeff Clayton Lawrence Clayton Sam Clayton Jr. Jimmy Cobb Bob Cobert Michael Cogswell Oscar Cohen Rick Cohen Stu Cohen Freddy Cole Richie Cole Quinn Coleman aka DJ Spicoli Anthony “Tony” Colvin-Baraka Bobby Comstock Arthur Conner

Tony Costanza Bobbi Cowan Stanley Cowell Simeon Coxe Julia Craik Noah Creshevsky Stanley Crouch Charlie Daniels William Daniels aka Kiing Shooter Chris Darrow Alexander Datsyuk Wolfgang Dauner Robert Bunyan Davie aka Hutch Davie Eddy Davis Mac Davis Spencer Davis Tony de Boer Liu Dehai Suzy Delair Jim Delehant Gabi Delgado-López Jerry Demara Gloria DeNard Sergio Denis Lou Dennis John E. Denny Curtis Denton Jr. aka Young Curt Tommy DeVito Frédéric Devreese Sunil Dhar Mickey Diage Sandra Dianne Manu Dibango Joe Diffie Bryan Dilworth Georgia Dobbins Carl Dobkins Jr. Highland “Dobby” Dobson Lucy Dolène

Robert Conrad

Pau Donés

Tony Cook aka Cookie Monsta

Sergei Dorensky

Manuel “Cowboy” Donley


Mirna Doris

Ramona Galarza

Joseph Hannesschläger

Kent James

Martin Douglas

Eddie Gale

Andre Harrell

Pandit Jasraj

Judy Drucker

Riley Gale

Lynn Harrell

Sam Jayne

Ja’Net DuBois

Bryan Wayne Galentine

Alex Harvey

Zizi Jeanmaire

Daniel Dumile aka MF DOOM

Anthony Galindo

Gordon Haskell

Joseph B. Jefferson

Rick Durrett

Benny Garcia

Katsuhisa Hattori

William E. “Bill” Jefferson

Doriot Anthony Dwyer

Bob Garcia

Michael Hawley

Kim Jeong-hwan aka Yohan

Judy Dyble

Vladimir “Jamir” Garcia

David Hayman

Kenny Jeremiah

Justin Townes Earle

Seymour Gartenberg

Roy Head

Charles Lawton Jiles

Russell Easter

Yogesh Gaur

Claude Heater

Bruce Johnson

Cleveland Eaton

George Gerdes

Jimmy Heath

Denise Johnson

Christiane Eda-Pierre

Ranjon Ghoshal

Ron “Rontrose” Heathman

Joe Johnson

Jay Edwards

Bob Gibson

Jimmy Henley

Larry W. Johnson

Maurice Edwards

Jon Gibson

Warner Henry

Kevin Eggers

Henry “Seaman Dan” Gibson

Ken Hensley

Rudolph Johnson aka Lil Marlo

Lionel Eguienta aka Lionel D.

Patrick Gibson

Walter Hernandez

Abdel Aziz el Mubarak

Andy Gill

“Toots” Hibbert

Rosalind Elias

Ivry Gitlis

Phyllis Unger Hiller

Patrick Ellis

Bennett Glotzer

Donny Hillier

Bobby Engel

Billy Goldenberg

Bones Hillman

Paul English

Andy González

Rupert Hine

John Erhardt

Ebow Graham aka Metropolis

Shanti Hiranand

Mory Kante

Donelle Hodges aka Big Booda

John Kaparakis

Shirley Grant

Patti Karr

Henry Gray

Steve Holland

Vernard Gray

W.S. “Fluke” Holland

Virgile Karuranga aka DJ Miller

Juliette Gréco

Chris Hopson

Herman Green

S. Roger Horchow

Jim Green

Rita Houston

Peter Green

Jan Howard

Jeffrey A. Greenberg

Sam Howard

Dave Greenfield

Brian Howe

Martin Griffin

Hsiao Feng Hsien

Albert Griffiths

Alien Huang

Henry Grimes

Mike Huckaby

Jordan Groggs aka Stepa J. Groggs

Arturo Huizar

Steve Grossman

Peter H. Hunt

Lee Kerslake Stan Kesler

Steve Gulley

Ahmed Ismail “Hudeydi” Hussein

Hal Ketchum

Bob Gullotti

Pamela Hutchinson

Pierre Kezdy

Onaje Allan Gumbs

Rinat Ibragimov

Wajid Khan

Ida Haendel

Joey Image

Frank Kimbrough

Don Hahn

Rahat Indori

Thom King

Harry Hains

Alex Ingram

Astrid Kirchherr

Margareta Hallin

Kenny Ingram

Volker David Kirchner

Pete Hamill

Ed Irwin

Richard “Dickie” Kline

Roy Charles Hammond aka Roy C

Teddy Irwin

Naděžda Kniplová

James Hand

Pedro Iturralde

Tom Kobayashi

Bashar Jackson aka Pop Smoke

Ronnie Kole

Gary Jackson

Lee Konitz

Carlos “Cano” Estremera Bill Evanov Bent Fabric Len Fagan Diego Farias Steve Farmer Majek Fashek Bill Field Ian Finkel Tom Finn James Fisher David Fitzgerald Leon Fleisher Rhonda Fleming John “Ecstasy” Fletcher Merwin Foard Wayne Fontana Horacio Fontova Robert Ford Jr. Rosita Fornés Nick Apollo Forte Bob Fouts Lawrence Franks Jr. aka Huey Hugh Fraser Glenn Fredly Gerald Freedman Barry Freeman Mirella Freni Andre Gagnon

Cady Groves

Terry Hands Steven “Thee Slayer Hippy” Hanford

Hachalu Hundessa

Sir Peter Jonas Derek Jones Terry Jones Troy Jones Bobby Jonz Kasongo wa Kanema

Al Kasha Alby Kass Ryo Kawasaki Phil Kaye Ramsey Kearney Lynn Kellogg Dan Kelly Jonathan Kelly Paula Kelly Didi Kempot Kimberly Kennedy

Toshinori Kondo

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 135


IN MEMORIAM Ben Kouijzer

Johnny Mandel

Xavier Montes

Khari Parker

Lou “L.A.” Kouvaris

Carl Mann

Charlie Monttana

Robert Parker

Ivan Kral

Ray Mantilla

Margaret “Bonnie Lou” Moore

Sonny Parsons

Herbert Kretzmer

Armando Manzanero

Moraes Moreira

Joseph Payne

TN Krishnan

Benny Mardones

Laurie Morgan

Gary Peacock

Bob Kulick

Detto Mariano

Joseph “Mogo” Morganfield

Ken Pedersen

Dave Kusworth

Marjan

Erick Morillo

Lindsey Lagestee

Jeremy Marre

Ennio Morricone

Ronnie Peel aka Rockwell T. James

Alexi Laiho

Ellis Marsalis Jr.

Dan Morrison

David Lander

Marty Martel

Reed Mullin

Holly Lane

Barbara Martin

Naomi Munakata

Neil Lasher

Craig Martin

Dave Munden

Marc Lawrence

Daniel Lee Martin

Marcos Mundstock

Danny Leake

Don Martin

Paravai Muniyamma

Ciro Pessoa

Bryan Lee

Kirke Martin

Alan Peters

Edward “Bunny” Lee

Moon Martin

Daniel Muñoz Borrego aka El Dany

Lucky Peterson

Valentina Legkostupova

Vaughan Mason

Peg Murray

Knox Phillips

Sonam Tshering Lepcha

Kim Massie

Eva Pilarová

Bobby Lewis

Ron Mathewson

Gustavo Nakatani Ávila aka Yoshio

Tony Lewis

Paul Matters

Todd Nance

Bucky Pizzarelli

Lily Lian

Phil May

Mike Lilly

Lyle Mays

Gustava “Tavo” Limongi

Jota Mayúscula

Matthew Lin

Franz Mazura

Buzzy Linhart

Jim McCown

Margo Lion

Sid McCray

Vincent Lionti

Lynsey McDonald

Little Richard

William E. McEuen

Garrett Falls Lockhart aka i_o

Phyllis McGuire

Giuseppi Logan

Nikki McKibbin

Sonny Lonas

Terrence McNally

Mike Longo

Armelia McQueen

Trini Lopez

Gary McSpadden

Gienek Loska

Edward “Felix” McTeigue

Martin Lovett

José Ángel Medina

Erwanda Lukas aka Papa T Bob

Trudy Melvin

Rebecca Luker

Tânio Mendonça

Eddie Lunn Jr. Walter Lure Tamiya “Tami” Lynn Vera Lynn Bill Mack Bonnie MacLean John Macurdy Sterling Magee Alicia Maguiña Skip Mahoney Patricia Majalisa Sean Malone Lynn Evans Mand

136 - 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards

Aaron Melzer Alan Merrill Jymie Merritt Max Merritt Mady Mesplé John Meyer Kerstin Meyer Kizito Mihigo Walter C. Miller Miss Mercy Harold Mitchell Ian Mitchell Cristina Monet-Palaci Doreen Montalvo

Johnny Nash Meritxell Negre Travis Nelsen Jack Nelson Lennie Niehaus Melvin Noble aka Mo3 Tammy Nobles Mike Noga Robert Northern aka Brother Ah Larry Novak John Nzenze Victor Olaiya Jamie Oldaker David Olney Keith Olsen Ronan O’Rahilly Marc Orleans Xavier Ortiz K.T. Oslin Leah Ottman Charles “Fuzzy” Owen Jim Owen José Padilla Nexhmije Pagarusha Kaulana Pakele Ellis J. Paliet Lou Pallo Josh Pappe Tommie Pardue Narciso Parigi Dan Parise

Krzysztof Penderecki Ray Pennington Marcelo Peralta Max Perenchio Charli Persip

Lloyd Pinchback Bonnie Pointer Joe Porcaro Genesis P-Orridge Rod Powell Tom Powell Margarita Pracatan Erwin Prasetya Calder Prescott Francis “Rocco” Prestia Charley Pride Steve Priest Alexander Priko John Prine Willis Prudhomme Orlando Puerta Boris Purgalin William Pursell Dale Pyatt Ejaz Qaiser Tommy Quinn Adolfo Quiñones aka Shabba-Doo Paul Quirk Terry Quirk Jimmy Rabbitt Mats Rådberg AL Raghavan Lou Ragland Jason Rainey Maiesha Rashad Georg Ratzinger Glenn Ray


Helen Reddy Tony Redz Alto Reed Harold Reid Carl Reiner Sean Reinert Janine Reiss Ray Repp Joel Revzen Emitt Rhodes Tony Rice Marga Richter Bill Rieflin Diana Rigg Naya Rivera David Roback Alfred “Uganda” Roberts

Edward Montre Seay aka Tre Da Kid

Bobby Susser

Maudell Watkins aka FXXXXY

Joe Segal

Robin Sutherland

Pete Way

Bruce Swedien

Andrew Weatherall

Tony Tanner

James Weaver

Duane Tatro

Jimmy Webb

Eric Taylor

Steve Weber

Scott Taylor

Carlton Weekly FBG Duck

Richard Teitelbaum

Eric Weissberg

Gregory Theisen

Constance Weldon

Jacob Thiele

Edward West

Christen Thomas

Leslie West

Gene Shay

Fredrick Thomas aka Fred The Godson

Paul Whaley

Paul Shelden

Danny Ray Thompson

Jack Sherman

Nickalus Thompson aka Nicky Blixky

Ian Whitcomb

Matthew Seligman Klaus Selmke Peter Serkin Eddie Setser Joseph Shabalala Mohammad Reza Shajarian Bob Shane Pat Shannahan Billy Joe Shaver

Larry Sherman Flor Silvestre

Alonzo Robinson

Hal Singer

Demetrius Chawton Robinson aka DJ Shay

Susan Skaggs Jonty Skrufff

Claudio Roditi

Jason Slater

Clementino Rodrigues aka Riachão

Mitch Slater

Freddy Rodriguez Sr.

Sergei Slonimsky

Xavier Rodriquez Chynna Rogers DeWayne Julius Rogers aka D.J. Rogers Kenny Rogers Carlos “Cuco” Rojas Tito Rojas aka El Gallo Salsero David Romano Wallace Roney Dick Rosenzweig Annie Ross Elinor Ross Alan Rowe Vern Rumsey Bassam Saba Rudy Salas Vexi Salmi Gary Salzman Jorge Santana Nello Santi Esteban Santos Arlene Saunders Adam Schlesinger Florian Schneider Alan Schulman Gerard Schurmann J. Scott

Jerry Slick Millie Small Kathy Smardak Dmitri Smirnov Clay Smith Laura Smith Michael P. Smith Tim Smith Toni Smith Voila Smith Troy Sneed Eleanor Sokoloff Maynard Solomon Mike Somerville Dominic Sonic Peter Starkie Lucille Starr Geoff Stephens Hellmut Stern

Ron Thompson Steven “Saint Dog” Thronson Cheryl Tiano Eliot Tiegel Frederick C. Tillis Keith Tippett Aaron Tokona Narcisa Toldrà Bill Torbert Christopher Treadwell aka Bris Chris Trousdale Fou Ts’ong Jimmy Tucker Barry Tuckwell Ron Tudor Ty McCoy Tyner “Blue” Gene Tyranny Tommy Uzzo Ricky Valance Eddie Van Halen Danny “Wepa Man” Vargas Alexander Vedernikov Joan-Pau Verdier Víctor Víctor Dragan Vucic

Jerry Stiller

Alexander Vustin

Oliver Stokes Jr. aka Black N Mild

Howard Wales Gary Walker

Mark Stone

Jerry Jeff Walker

Pauline Anna Strom

Erin Wall

Chad Stuart

Tres Warren

Natasha Stuart

Delroy Washington

Chris Sullivan aka DJ Spinbad

Delores Washington-Green

Ira Sullivan

Fanny Waterman

Doug Supernaw

Jas Waters

Charlie Whitaker Andrew White Chet “Jr” White Jay White Dick Whitehouse Camilla Wicks Willie Wilkerson Rev. John Wilkins Brian “Slick Rick” Williams Jimmie Williams Steve “Stezo” Williams Bruce Williamson Jim Williamson Hal Willner Wes Wilson Bill Withers Baron Wolman Suthep Wongkamhaeng Helen Jones Woods Maceo Woods Betty Wright Edna Wright Eugene Wright Rosemarie Wright Willie Wright Charles Wuorinen Kansai Yamamoto Brent Young Kentray Young aka Tray Savage Isidora Žebeljan Don Zimmermann (List through Dec. 31, 2020)

63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 137



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#WeMakeEvents congratulates all the GRAMMY® Nominees and supports all the crew and businesses behind the scenes The “Ghost Light” illuminates the bare stage at the renowned and now empty Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado.

It’s a scene repeated all over the world, and symbolizes the countless jobs and businesses that have been lost, along with the forgotten people who devote themselves to the live event community. Stand with #WeMakeEvents as we honor the people who bring stages and sets to life, adjust mic levels, hold cameras, cater and secure events, drive, transport and arrange travel, hang and light events, set off fireworks, sing back-up, sew wardrobe, play and tune instruments, run cables that power speakers, lights and video, the crew, promoters and venues that accommodate shows, films and gatherings, and all of the performing artists. #WeMakeEvents advocates for and stands with those in need. Photo: Nicholas Guzzo @ SharedViews Media

STAND WITH US! WeMakeEvents.org


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63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards - 143


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