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ISSUE 12: MaY 2014


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HELLO‌ Welcome to the last edition of Aesthetip. At a massive 136 pages, this issue should have a little bit of something for everyone. Emma and myself would just like to take this opportunity to thank all of our readers and followers for their support, but most of all a massive thank you to all of our contributors of whom there are far too many to mention, however there are several who need a special shout out for their dedication to the magazine, particularly Laura Parsons, Caroline Pedler, Charlotte Davis, Sylvia McKiddie and Lily Rice – big love to you all! x Another thank you goes out to all the artists and creatives who let us into their homes and the private sanctuary of their studios, the photographers who supplied images and exclusive photoshoots, the behind the scenes teams of make up artists and hair stylists who helped create some of the beautiful images we have featured over the last year, and the models who gave up there time to be a part of Aesthetip. Although this is the last issue of the magazine in its current state, there are plenty of ideas on the table, so please keep an eye on the Facebook page for updates and future publications. The AESTHETIP TEAM x

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www.griffin-photography.co.uk 4

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CONTRIBUTORS EMMA GRIFFIN Editor

STEVE KENYON Deputy Editor

CAROLINE PEDLER Illustrator

katie sandow writer / photographer

MAISIE MARSHALL PHOTOGRAPHER

CHARLOTTE DAVIS Artist / curator

Lily Rice Fashion Designer

Chris Thomas designer

LAURA PARSONS Writer

Lisa Lembke Writer

Rochelle Carr Writer

Toni Cogdell Artist / Writer

CONTRIBUTE… If you would like to be featured in Aesthetip. We are looking for, graphic designers, fashion designers, illustrators, designer markers, artists, performers and photographers based in Cornwall. If you have an event you would like to share with us, please get in touch.

follow…

https://www.facebook.com/ pages/Aesthetip/ 385560578221024?ref=hl

http://aesthetipmagazine .blogspot.co.uk/

All enquiries: aesthetip@gmail.com

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contents 08 ARTISTs OF THE MONTH 20 Featured project / insight 36 Featured artist / marie claire hamon 38 A curators diary / charlotte Davis 42 Featured artist / mel Sheridan 48 Featured exhibition / about Home 50 Featured exhibition / 3AM 52 Featured exhibition / Summer shows 54 Featured exhibition / Showroom 56 Featured artist / Amy Lanyon 60 illustration / caroline Pedler 70 Night Lights / Toni Cogdell 72 Photoshoot / flower fairy 76 Photographer / maisie marshall 78 Photographer / Kid Bazzle 90 A spring photoshoot 108 Event calendar 110 Fashion feature / sunglasses 114 Featured business / Beatengreen 118 Fashion / Lexie Sport 128 Featured model / sarah thompson 130 Music Review 132 Book reviews 134 Creative writing / laura parsons

FRONT COVER

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MODEL / Holly-Bee Kristina Scott MAKEUP ARTIST / Sally Orchard stylist / Emma Griffin PHOTOGRAPHER / GRIFFIN PHOTOGRAPHY


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36 42 56 78 110

60 90 118

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artists of the month / tAaP

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Founded January 2010. T A a P — Team Artists are Possessed, formed after a series of posters were created for the Possessed Possessions show at the Exchange Gallery, Penzance. We put our minds together and thought this is the only way forward for all the team to put their imput into Poster Art. Photographs / www.griffin-photography.co.uk

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featured project / INSIGHT

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INSIGHT Preface Insight: a glimpse which leads to deeper understanding. A drumkit, an optician’s chart, dried hydrangea flowers. These are photographed alongside paint-encrusted palettes and stacked canvases. The artists of today and tomorrow are here in Cornwall, at work, and this book pays tribute to them. Emma Griffin, a painter and photographer in her own right, has chosen to photograph some of the most prominent artists on the scene in Cornwall today. And her main focus is not the artists themselves but the places in which they work: their studios. Studios intrigue us. Perhaps because they are seen as crossing points between the world of practicality and the world of the imagination. Perhaps we are delighted to find places where the usual rules do not apply. And, of course, the studio has its own special niche in the history of art, with many artists choosing to paint and – later – film themselves in situ.

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The artist’s studio can’t resist a good metaphor. It is many things to many people: a sanctuary, a playground, a confessional booth. My favourite description comes from the study of the subject by Alice Belloy-Rewald and Michael Peppiatt, who call it, ‘the shell of the artist’s mind: imagination’s chamber’. But I love also Francis Bacon’s bluff, down-to-earth analysis: ‘The artist’s studio isn’t the alchemist’s study where he searches for the philosopher’s stone – something which doesn’t exist in our world – it would perhaps be more like the chemist’s laboratory.’ Occasionally studios are treated with the veneration of shrines: those of Delacroix, Giacometti and Brancusi to name a few. Francis Bacon’s studio with its paint-thickened walls was esteemed so highly that after his death detailed drawings were made of every object and the entire structure was taken apart piece by piece and moved to Dublin, just as London Bridge (a mere echo of its nursery rhyme fame) was once sold, dismantled and re-assembled in Arizona.

The myth and the cliché surrounding the artist’s studio continue to jostle for attention. However, from the moment work begins, all this becomes rather irrelevant. Duncan Hopkins says of painting in oils, ‘I love the the fluidity and the awkward balance between control and accident.’ That awkward balance can also be seen in the studios themselves which accommodate both order and chaos. In these photographs, we are reminded that art is born out of failure as well as success and that mistakes can be fruitful. Source material may or may not prove useful. Words pencilled on the wall may represent a fleeting idea never to be revisited, or may go on to father a generation of new work. Emma Griffin’s photographs are faithful, discerning, sly. It is the details which tell the story: Chris Anthem’s red armchair and the splash of paint which decorates his shoe; Ilker Cinarel’s handwritten notes taped to the wall; Maggie Matthews’ arrangement of cuttlefish and seaweed.


As work progresses, the studio is often the sole witness. It provides inspiration, comfort, tools, reference-points. It becomes a physical record of the artist and, as time goes on, the most faithful chronicler of their working practice. Anyone who loves an artist, anyone who creates, collects or visits galleries knows that an artist’s studio is the place where something happens – something important which may never be repeated. It is at this time and in this way that this work is being created. We are privileged to have been invited inside. Felicity Notley

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All images: Emma Griffin / griffin-photography.co.uk Photographed in various locations across Cornwall from 2011 — 2013.

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FEATURED ARTIST / MARIE CLAIRE HAMON

I started making these paintings in winter. I wanted to experience making large pieces, pieces that would be a lot larger than me, in a way immersing myself in the physicality of the process. After several months of exploration and indulgence, these images took form. I will be hanging them in Porthmeor studio 5 during a mini residency in May, it will be a great opportunity to see them in a large space and give me enough walk back to assess them from an appropriate distance. I will be working on other works too during my stay there. Artists Faye Dobinson and Ben Sanderson will be joining me in the space too. These works can be seen when I open the studio to the public on the 17 — 18th of May from 10 — 5 pm. Heirs 3x2m Anonymous boy 2x2m http://marieclairehamon.com/

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A Curators Diary / Charlotte Davis

Greetings Aesthetip readers… I seemed to have just about caught up and my feet are just touching the ground. Massive apologies for my delayed catch-up with ‘A Curator’s Diary’. You may all be wondering what project has been keeping me out of mischief for the last 2 months... Well here it is.

Artists included: Sam Bradbury, Sarah Burgess, Enoki, Tony Johns, Mat McIvor, Edie OP, Tom Sharpe, Arthur Spear and Eleanor Swingler. Tom Sharpe created and edited a series of field recordings during this project and you can listen to them via the following QR code and link: https://thomasgjsharpe.bandcamp.com/ album/24hoursintruro

Totally Truro very kindly asked me to contribute a series of curated projects for 2014’s ‘Truro Festival’ and this is what we did... A Blank Canvas invited 5 artists to create an artwork no larger than 60 x 60 cm throughout Truro on Saturday 5th April. The aim was to encourage the artists to consider their practice within the contact of a live event and on the streets of Truro. The artists were given an additional 5 days to complete the artworks and they were displayed at Lander Gallery with thanks to Viv Hendra. 24 Hr Comic Etc was an ambitious project which started at 10:18am on Thursday 10th April at Telegraph House. 10 artists, illustrators and sound artists were given the mighty task to create 1 comic each over a 24 hour period, consisting of 24 stages. The idea of 24 stages could be translated in any way, including 24 canvases, 24 sheets of paper or even 24 sound recordings. The artists worked incredibly hard and at 10:18am on Friday 11th April they finished their comics with a sense of achievement and team spirit. This project was embraced by Mustard & Rye who kindly fed the hungry comic creators with Hot Dogs consisting of 24 ingredients!

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Collabor-Art featured 6 artists and illustrators who created 6 mixed media artworks on canvas over 6 hours on Saturday 12th April. The canvases were rotated at varying time periods and each artist contributed to each canvas. The process was certainly character building, testing each individual’s confidence in their mark making and sense of spontaneity. All of the canvases were kindly displayed in shop windows: Rowe’s, 108, Quintessential, Trevails and Limelite. Artists included: Sarah Burgess, Tanja Durrant, Vincent Larkin, Irene Bloq Mayus, Jessica Shoolbraid (Jester) and Nicole White.


My Truro showcased a collage of 75 local children’s artwork in shop windows. Each child (aged 2-10) was invited to paint a picture to describe ‘what they like to do in Truro’. The workshops were delivered at Royal Cornwall Museum and Truro Cathedral and worked with Archbishop Benson and St Mary’s schools. The paintings have been on display throughout the festival in the following shops: The Cheese Shop, Kernow Property Services, Eastern Dragon, House of Mojo, Maison du Chic, Sarah Louise, Wig and Pen, Limelite, Trevails, South West Water, Phones Bought for Cash, The Old Jeans Store, Quintessential, Acorn, The Barber Shop, Lavender’s and Thorne’s Fruit & Veg. Truro Arts Company kindly donated the paint for this project. Pastures new Above all, ‘Truro Festival’ is close to my heart, being a Truro girl; what could be better than sharing my passion with my home town?! Well enough of my random curatorial twitter. I would just like to say a massive thank you to Emma and Steve for this opportunity to share my thoughts. And let’s hope that the next project is just as successful. I think we would all like to say... “Aesthetip Team: Cheers! Great work guys and let’s see what we can do next...” Thank you:) contact@charlottedavisprojects.com http://charlottedavisprojects.com/

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Featured artist / Mel Sheridan

Mel Sheridan is a multi-faceted artist who lives and works in Hayle. She has shown and sold her artwork across the country and also teaches from a home based studio. We recently caught up with Mel to find out more. How has living in Cornwall shaped your creatively (if at all)? Cornwall has given me less distraction, a pared back way of life which leaves me with space to 'Daydream' and be more creative..I have been living in Cornwall for 14 years now and having my own studio is a dream come true. My work is not consciously influenced by my surroundings, I very rarely will paint landscapes. I feel the space helps me remember 'moments' and sometimes my homesickness for London will spur me on to create a piece of work which has an atmosphere or an emotion of something in my past.

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Do you collect anything? Yes, I am a bit of a collector, I cant resist ceramics and antique furniture. I went through a phase of collecting old chairs, at one point I counted 36 dotted all round the house. I love the narrative that goes with them. I have always collected textiles, vintage fabrics, saris from my travels in India.


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Where can people see more of your work? Do you have any exhibitions in the pipeline? I am a member of St Ives Society of Artists and unfortunately due to past 4 years of fighting for my home to be fixed I have missed a lot of the exhibitions although I currently have browser work and cards in there. I am planning to spend this summer in the studio and finally will be able to produce new work, my head is full of ideas. I am planning to have another 'Boudica' Open House on the weekend 2nd and 3rd of August. I will be showing and selling my paintings and upcycled furniture. What is a typical day like for you? I am bit of a 'Nightbird' I struggle to go to bed before 3am in the morning. I feel the most creative at night. I usually get up at 10am..straight in shower and will potter about for a bit, paperwork, housework first...cannot even think if my surroundings are chaotic, my head is constantly chatting so I always need external order. I love to sit with the fire on in the studio and read, I get a lot of visual ideas from just being in silence. I go for a walk midday along to 'Johnny's Vegetarian Cafe' in Hayle, I am very lucky to have such a wonderful cafe 5 minutes from my home... its like my second home in there...with beautiful views across to Lelant and St Ives. Then I will go back into the studio after lunch till early evening.

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Did you study art originally? I took Art O level at school and always loved drawing as a kid. I would spend hours creating little worlds in my bedroom making little theatres out of cornflake packets. I would spend hours drawing with felt tip pens copying characters from my Walt Disney Comics and my really creepy Grim Fairy Tales Book which I would remove from my room when I went to bed. I can remember trying to get my dog to sit still for me to draw her which was near impossible. I grew up on a surburban council estate in Walton on Thames which had a huge park which backed onto the River Thames... I spent many hours down by the river with all the kids from the estate... I think my love of muted tones has stemmed from the changing light from those days and the melancholic feel of the river in winter. You run various workshops and a sewing club tell us more about them? I am running weekly 4 hour classes booked in advance, for a 6 week term. Its great as I can finally use my Cert Ed Teaching, (I graduated in 2009) with 'Lesson Planning' to construct a curriculum my own way. I always only take 4 students at a time as I feel this gives each student more space to work and feels more intimate. Its very cozy when the fire is on when its cold and wet outside. Sewing Club can be booked for people who want to learn the basics of sewing and introducing projects to work towards. I encourage people to bring their own machine if they have one, its like driving a car, your used to your own pedals! Upcoming classes for the studio and sewing room will be posted up on my website throughout the year.

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How did the Boudica Boutique & Gallery come into fruition?

Do you have a favourite place in Cornwall?

I think it was born from 'Hope' really, during those past 4 years I had been in such a stressful situation.

I'm very fond of Mousehole especially in the winter when the stars are out and the smoke is billowing from the chimneys.

I had to carry on...so I gave my self a focus..by setting up a Gallery within my home I could get my work seen. It gave me a reason to bother to keep it clean and try and keep the rooms that were not so bad, beautiful.

St Ives on a deep winters morning.

I would try and produce something, even if it was only 2 paintings in 6 months. Over the years its has taken off and has become a regular local event. It is great fun and a good opportunity to meet people. The Boudica Christmas Soiree's have become part of my start to Christmas season. My paintings are seen in a home setting, sitting alongside the furniture, which creates a relaxed atmosphere.

Lanhydrock in Bodmin which is a beautiful stately home, considered the family's country cottage! just the kitchens alone are worth the visit, the atmosphere there is palpable...If you enjoy atmospheric places and being spooked out 'Bodmin Gaol' is worth a visit. The 'Bluff' beach in Hayle is lovely, its a flip-flopped walk from my home. What is your preferred medium to work with? Depends on my mood, I love 'Windsor & Newton's' Oil bars, I love the flexibility and the intense colours. I use a lot of Bitumen, its fluidness and sheen are beautiful, I have spent years playing around with this stuff, experimenting with different oils with it, heights to drop in and drying times and when to know when it will take another substance and keep it.... although not great for your lungs, also use Shellac and Enamels. Wax is another favourite, Linseed oils, Teak oils. The 'Princess' Series are mainly Pastel, Briko and Gold Ink wheareas 'Melancholia' series mainly bitumen, rabbit skin glue and Procien Dyes. http://www.melsheridan.co.uk/

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Featured exhibition / About home

This inaugural one-person exhibition of Jessica Cooper’s work at Belgrave St Ives results from a number of paintings made by the artist over the previous 12 months or so. Travelling regularly during this period between St Ives and her current home in West Cornwall, the journey became a metaphor for life; evoking memories from childhood, when she lived in a small hamlet just off the famous coast road between St Ives and Cape Cornwall. Conjuring up images of domestic objects and family rituals the journey from home to St Ives acted as a thread between now and then and the meaning of home. The distillation of everyday objects and places in Cooper’s work contain an intense intimacy expressed in the simplest of forms through the artist’s emotive power. About Home / The Belgrave Gallery, St Ives, June 7th — 28th http://www.belgravestives.co.uk/ http://www.jessicacooper.co.uk/

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Jessica Cooper / Dad And Me — The Harbour Beach, St Ives 1967


Jessica Cooper / Hand On Heart 2014 Acrylic on canvas 22 x 22 inches

Jessica Cooper / A Moment Of Madness 2014 Acrylic on canvas 22 x 22 inches

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Featured exhibition / 3AM wonder, paranoia and the restless night Bleary-eyed sleepers woken up to be photographed, prowling coyotes caught on night cameras, and a helicopter spotlight searching the night time waters for a missing person. These are just some of the highlights of a new exhibition, 3am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night at The Exchange. The 22 artists in 3am venture into the far reaches of the night – to the time when we are at our most adventurous and also at our most vulnerable. The exhibition demonstrates how this particular nocturnal hour has captured the imagination as the featured artists explore various themes – psychological, sociological, and natural – to capture something of the strangeness of the night and the extraordinary range of emotions, states and experiences it witnesses. There are photographs by Tom Wood of clubbers during the final stages of a long night out. In Anthony Goicolea's video Code, torch-beams pierce the darkness of a wood, cast excitedly around by youngsters intoxicated by adrenaline. In Nightwatch, a video by Francis Alÿs, a fox is set loose in the National Portrait Gallery in London at night, and filmed by CCTV cameras as it roams from room to room.

Soon, the exhibition draws us into the strangeness of 3am – when time is distorted and the mind plays tricks. A film called Nocturne by Lucy Reynolds is of a lake in a park, with stars orbiting at speed overhead and the surface of the water pulsing and twitching inexplicably. 3am is also an hour to which misfits gravitate: a painting by Anj Smith shows a nocturnal passing-place where an extreme recluse would seem to have left mysterious traces. It becomes menacing and hallucinatory with Marc Hulson's pencil drawings of creatures that lurk in an ordinary home's darkest corners. A life-size, blackened bronze sculpture by Nathan Mabry (shown above) is of a young boy carrying a grimacing monster on his shoulders. On the other hand, 3am is the hour of ultimate freedoms. An installation by Sandra Cinto features galaxies of stars drawn on layers of unfurling cloth and some children's spinning tops. In porcelain sculptures by Rachel Kneebone, tangled heaps of arcing limbs are charged with sexual urgency. Tonico Lemos Auad's installation of suspended white lace orbs, called Sleepwalker, suggests a floating between-state. Full list of artists: Francis Alÿs, Tonico Lemos Auad, Jordan Baseman, Sandra Cinto, Dorothy Cross, Dornith Doherty, Anthony Goicolea, Marc Hulson, Rachel Kneebone, Nathan Mabry, Michael Palm & Willi Dorner, Hirsch Perlman, Ed Pien, Lucy Reynolds, Sophy Rickett, Paul Rooney, Anj Smith, Fred Tomaselli, Danny Treacy, Bettina von Zwehl, Tom Wood.

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3am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night is a touring exhibition from the Bluecoat curated by Angela Kingston. A 3am anthology, with illustrations of the artworks and writings about the night, is published by Liverpool University Press and available to purchase in the gallery bookshop. The Exchange, Princes Street, Penzance, TR18 2NL 10th May - 12th July FREE admission http://www.newlynartgallery.co.uk Tonico Lemos Auad / Sleep Walkers, 2009. Brazilian and Belgian lace and electric parts, 17 individual hand sewn lanterns. Dimensions variable. Unique in a series of three variations.

Nathan Mabry / Process Art (Eat Your Heart Out...), 2007. Bronze, marble and wood.

Dornith Doherty / Dry Creek, 2012. Archival pigment photograph

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Featured exhibition / Early Summer Shows

Drawing a Presence / 10th May — 12th July 2014 A rare opportunity for young artists between the ages of 15 and 25 to present work in a major exhibition, which investigates their sense of presence, place and experience within Cornwall. The gallery’s reputation and commitment to involving young people in its exhibition programme continues with Drawing a Presence, an exceptional and ambitious platform for a new generation of artists in Cornwall. Newlyn Art Gallery has extended its’ commitment further by inviting young Falmouth-based curators Elle Sambrook and Henry Osman to co-curate the exhibition. “Drawing a Presence is a rare opportunity for young artists, one that will undoubtedly have an impact on all involved. The significance of this exhibition is reflected in the volume and sophistication of the responses we received from an open invitation for work,” explains Henry Osman. The works deal with migration, landscape, folklore and social perceptions. They cover many media - wax sculpture, largescale drawings, analogue photography and performance poetry – each conveying their own personal response to Cornwall.

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In addition to the call-out, skateboarders at Wherrytown have been collaborating with photographer James Hankey while 3 Villages Youth Project has been creating a new piece of work with artist Sam Bassett. There have also been several commissions, including a performance by poet Seth Hampshire and photography by Rosie Kliskey. “We have considerable expertise in developing and delivering successful peer-led programmes for the 11 – 18 age range and have drawn heavily on that knowledge in the development of this programme. This exhibition will also provide further opportunity for young people to add their voices to The Exchange’s A Postcard to Penzance,” says Cat Gibbard, Learning & Participation Programmer for Newlyn Art Gallery & The Exchange. Drawing a Presence presents a unique opportunity for visitors to Newlyn Art Gallery to see Cornwall as seen by young artists. The exhibition runs concurrently to an international group exhibition at The Exchange, 3am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night. Mon - Sat, 10am - 5pm, free admission Opening Event: Friday 9th May, 6-7.30pm Free, pay bar plus Penzance’s very own Little Wonder Café will bring its caravan to the gallery selling Mexican street food from 5.45-7.45pm. Performance by Poet Seth Hampshire at 7pm.


Catherine Haines / Lost Soul Trophy 3rd May – 7th June 2014 A body of new work by Cornwall-based artist Catherine Haines. Catherine Haines’ new work explores anthropomorphism and its cultural roots in story telling. A contemporary take on fables from the frontier, Haines’ etchings depict outlandish trophies from expeditions, defunct maps and imaginary beasts described by past explorers. Her collection of these souvenirs and use of poetic licence is attributed to her love of folk art. Haines graduated with an MA in Printmaking from the Royal College of Art in 2009. Since then she has exhibited both in London and Cornwall. Her work was recently included in The Moby Dick Big Read, an online art and literature project curated by author Philip Hoare and artist Angela Cockayne.

Wherrytown skaters with James Hankey

All works are for sale. Private View: Friday, 9th May, 6pm — 7.30pm. Free admission, pay bar available. Newlyn Art Gallery, New Road, Newlyn, Penzance, TR18 5PZ http://www.newlynartgallery.co.uk

Catherine Haines

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Featured Exhibition / SHOWROOM

Students of Newlyn School of Art’s One Year Mentoring Course - Final Show From June 7th PZ Gallery in Penzance are hosting an exhibition of work by participants of Newlyn School of Art’s new One Year Mentoring Course. This exciting show includes painting, film, photography and sculpture and gives students the opportunity to present their work after a year of guidance from a host of the county’s leading artists. Curated by Jesse Leroy Smith, who has previously been behind much talked about artist led group shows including Revolver, The Darkrooms and Suspended Sentences; this multi-media exhibition has been tipped to showcase some names to watch for the future. The artist students exhibiting in the show include Carol Tanner, Laura Hudson, Lindsey Morgan Lundie, Julie Moss, Phil Stevenson, Rachel Damerell, Rachel Ara, Shelly Tregoning and Sue Halliday. The yearlong course includes weekly tutorials and mentoring from a host of well-known artists including Naomi Frears, Kate Walters, Gareth Edwards, Jesse Leroy Smith, Tim Shaw, Jessica Cooper and Patrick Lowry among many others. It has also offered invaluable professional guidance from visiting specialists on crucial issues such as approaching commercial galleries, promotion and gaining artists’ residencies.

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Newlyn School of Art are surely to be commended for providing a course aimed at helping artists to successfully negotiate the challenges of professional practice, and this exhibition will give a fascinating insight into the personal development of its students in the course’s very first year. Applications are now invited for the next One Year Mentoring Course which starts this October. ‘Showroom’ is open on Saturday 7th June 6pm till late and every day from 11am to 6pm until Wednesday 11th June at PZ Gallery, 7 Coinagehall Street, Penzance, TR18 4AY. For information on the exhibition or for the 2014/15 One Year Mentoring Course visit: http://www.newlynartschool.co.uk


Featured artist / Amy Lanyon

My one-off original screen prints evolve from a sequence of processes and exploration of media to produce primarily shape-based and abstract compositions. None of my pieces are named because I want people to interpret the piece themselves, without being influenced by me. Part of my enjoyment of producing abstract pieces is to find out how my work makes people feel, so by leaving my pieces anonymous, I know that I am not influencing their thoughts. I was brought up surrounded by inspirational artwork, my grandfather was the St.Ives artist Peter Lanyon, and so I don't think I could have avoided being influenced by artists such as Barbara Hepworth and Sir Terry Frost. In 1999 I was lucky enough to meet and interview Sir Terry Frost and I was utterly in awe of his work and his stories behind them. He has been a great inspiration to me. When I get a day in the studio, I can spend hours mixing colours, this is a process I enjoy very much. I’m particularly interested in the psychology of colour, complimentary colours and the relationship one colour can have with another, as an example placing a yellow next to a warm grey can give the grey a lilac hue. I tend to print quite instinctively and freely, building up compositions as I go and working on as many as 10 pieces at a time.

I enjoy the juxtaposition of geometric shapes and asymmetrical compositions and when I am not in the studio I am never far from a computer. I find this a very satisfying way of producing compositions and playing with colour combinations, but I never save these and never refer to them when I’m actually printing. As I mentioned earlier, the freedom of printing and working instinctively is very important to me, whenever I get into the studio with a clear idea of what I want to do things never seem to work out! Up until May 2013, my work had been entirely two dimensional, but the opportunity to exhibit at the internationally renowned Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall opened my mind. It gave me a new and exciting approach to outside art. I turned my screen prints into sculptures. There are images of this exhibition on the blog section of my website. Since this exhibition, I have also been working on a range of hand-printed cushion covers and original, one-off lampshades. I completed my degree in Surface Pattern Design at Swansea Institute of Higher Education in May 2005. This course helped me focus on initiating and directing my own projects in order to develop and realise my potential within image making. I currently work as a printmaking technician within the Art and Design department of Truro College, Cornwall. You can see my work online at: www.amylanyon.co.uk

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Illustration / Caroline Pedler

For the final edition of Aesthetip I have chosen illustrator Elisa Cunningham. I saw Elisa’s business card in Truro Arts and liked the look of it, so contacted her. With the right commissions and art direction I believe Elisa could be one of the next new things on the scene. She has the drawing ability and love for sketching from life, married with a good eye for colour and composition. I personally look forward to seeing more and will keep an eye out in all the major publications. Over to Elisa… My name is Elisa Cunningham and I’m a Freelance Illustrator living in Truro, in Cornwall. I graduated in the summer of 2013 from BA Hons Illustration at Falmouth University. Living and working in Cornwall is a source of constant inspiration. The Cornish Coast is second to none and I’ve met lots of lovely, creative people down here. I’ve been working on a wide range of projects recently; from working with architects making artistic impressions of historic buildings to illustrating food packaging and editorials for teenage magazines. I was also shortlisted for the Serco Prize for Illustration 2014, with my image being exhibited at London Transport Museum from February to April 2014.

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I’m never happier than when drawing out and about in my sketch book - drawing people in a cafe or sat near a duck pond or… I love the moment when you happen upon a funny situation or overhear a comment that couldn’t even be scripted. These little sketches often inspire me for future images and projects. I also love to screen print. This is a large part of my personal work and the work that I sell and exhibit. I screen print from home with my own screens and equipment. My methods involve paper stencils and painting different areas of colour onto the screen to create a more organic, rather than overly graphic, feel to the prints. I then draw onto prints, which makes them look more energetic and playful.


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I also love making food. I find cooking to be really therapeutic and I think, consequently, I love illustrating it too. I’d love to do more food focused illustration projects in the future. My working day starts at about 9am - I like to get up early, as I always seem to have far too much to fit in to a single day. I allow myself time to look for inspiration on the internet and then there are always lots of emails to reply to before getting down to drawing, painting and designing. As a contrast to drawing at my desk, I also like to get outside and appreciate the beautiful world around me. I’m on my bike a lot and I love meeting up and having big dinners with lots of friends - my friends all seem to be great cooks, as well as amazing artists! My work is currently on display in a group exhibition at Truro Arts Company. elisacunningham.com twitter.com/elisadraws elisacunningham.tumblr.com www.facebook.com/ elisacunninghamillustration 64

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Studio No.5 Porthmeor Residency Here are a few images from a residency I was lucky enough to accept last month. It offered me the time and space to reconnect with why I create, and make the marks I do. The history of this studio is immense and was home to some of the greatest artists that came out of Cornwall, and their marks and scribbles still have a presence in the space. Other artists included are MarieClaire Hamon, Morwenna Morrison and Faye Dobinson. Look them up for exhibitions in the space in May. Thank you to all of you who have read my articles‌ and especially a huge thank you to Emma and Steve for all the hours they have put into this great publication. Creating a space for us all to sell and advertise our wares, sharing our processes so others can be inspired and learn from. Sharing what inspires us to fail on a daily basis in order to create imagery, stories and ideas that fuel our souls, enlighten our minds and tickle our tastebuds. Thank you! ...to be continued. http://www.carolinepedler.co.uk/ http://carolinepedler.blogspot.co.uk/

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night lights / Toni Cogdell A tiny speck of light silently drifts across the midnight blue. My gaze so focused on its movement in the dark that I can see it even with my eyes closed, a tiny boat, loose in the harbour, the lights of St Ives reflecting like luminous daubs of paint blotted on the surface of a watery canvas. As darkness gently swallows the horizon, the boundary between air and water fading to invisibility, a line becoming space, my window over the bay has become a looking-glass, its gaze directing inwards the more I look out. As the sky and sea merge my vision is pulled upwards, rising in a ghosted landscape. There is no perspective anymore, just a flood of blues and blacks being poured into a tall glass cylinder in malleable drops of liquid clay, willing to form. St. Ives at night transformed into a creature of the soul.

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The day had been filled with the fullness of glorious Cornish light and the happy bustle of people as they explored winding streets and wandered along stretches of sand. But shimmering in the half-light behind the colourful movement of holidaymakers you can glimpse a web of artists, immersed in their craft, working in studios standing stoically on the edge of land facing the raw expanse of sea, or dotted in eddies along cobbled streets. All fuelled by the legacy of St. Ives' rich creative lineage, working with the cries of gulls overhead as their lodestar. Through the window now, watching the land mass of the town become a flood of colour in the dark, I think of them.

Imagining the scores of artists who have been here before me, pulled in by the gift of creative breathing space the place offers, witnessing the tangled strands of beauty gradually reveal themselves, comforts me and I wrap it lovingly around my shoulders for warmth at nightfall. The solitary boat is still bobbing along. This boat is hope and it floats like my dreams across a body of water, like one star moving through a constellation of stars projected onto the surface of consciousness. Pinpoints of memories and wishes now connected by a moving vessel, driven by the wind. Standing safely enveloped by this starry sea of infinity, the artist is free to pluck from its brightest parts and carry bundles of treasure carefully back to the studio.


Being moved by this anything-but-ordinary seaside town, being held in the cradle of its magic in the stillness of the night, reminds me that none of us embarked on this creative voyage alone, as solitary as our walking strides may feel and need to be. And within the soft glare of the isle at eventide I know the Muse lives here, and she doesn't sleep. http://www.toni-art.co.uk/ writing.html

http://toni-art.co.uk/

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flower fairy

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MODEL / Holly-Bee Kristina Scott MAKEUP ARTIST / Sally Orchard stylist / Emma Griffin PHOTOGRAPHER / GRIFFIN PHOTOGRAPHY


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PHOTOGRAPHER / MAISIE MARSHALL

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http://maisiemarymarshall.blogspot.co.uk/

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International Photographer / Kid Bazzle

It was Picasso who said, “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” The trick is I don’t believe I’ve grown up at all. Kid Bazzle

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I have lived in an apartment for all my life and I think that this has contributed to my outlook on life. I was always and still am, by a long shot, the youngest person living in this apartment complex in heart of New Kingston, Jamaica. Every day, I would find myself in new places experiencing new things because of the imagination I was now forced to develop. My mind is always racing with ideas, creating new perceptions of the world around and the people within it.

kidbazzle@gmail.com www.kidbazzle.com www.twitter.com/kidbazzle www.instagram.com/kidbazzle

Right now, I really like portraiture because within that ephemeral moment I gain an insight into who that person really is and that's beautiful. My name is Gianni Jahziel, better known as Kid Bazzle, I am an artist and my medium is photography.

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a SPRING PHOTOSHOOT

Photographers / Kim Baker Ian Heyworth Lizz Young Jenny Livock Chris Bunny Models / Tammie Greygoose Polly Jopling Kip Kaeolor & Tom Holly-Bee Kristina Kendall Royden Hair / Megan Piekarz Location / Perranwell Old Village Hall

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Event Calendar / May

According to Henry Osman, one of the Falmouth-based curators of the exhibition, “Drawing a Presence is a rare opportunity for young artists, one that will undoubtedly have an impact on all involved. The significance of this exhibition is reflected in the volume and sophistication of the responses we received from an open invitation for work.’

Aesthetip might be coming to an end, but the incredible array of creative events held at Penwith’s premier galleries will continue. In our final event calendar we’ll be looking at a particularly exciting range of pre-summer spectaculars.

Meanwhile, Newlyn Art Gallery’s Picture Room gives established artists the opportunity to display their work for sale in iconic surroundings. In May the Picture Room is devoted to locally-based artist Catherine Haines and her collection Lost Soul Trophy. In dissecting the concept of anthropomorphism as a literary device, Haines produces etchings which celebrate the wonder and mystery of historic exploration.

Newlyn School of Art – Chywoone Hill As usual the Newlyn School of Art is encouraging us to get out of our creative ruts and feel inspired by engaging in one of its many, industry-leading classes. Even if you don’t have much time to spare you’ll find something to suit you, like the one-day Mark Making Course on May 31st. The course is headed by renowned artist and illustrator Caroline Pedler and encourages a looser, more intuitive approach to painting and drawing. As with all activities run through the Newlyn School of Art, the Mark Making Course promises to be fun, engaging and rewarding. All drawing materials, supports and paint are supplied by the art school, so all you have to do is turn up and get involved! Check out the Newlyn School of Art calendar for a full run down of all the classes coming up over the next few months. http://www.newlynartschool.co.uk/ art-courses/ Newlyn Art Gallery (Newlyn) and The Exchange (Penzance) With its Drawing a Presence exhibition, running from May 10th to July 12th, Newlyn Art Gallery is offering young artists the opportunity to contribute to a multi-media exhibition investigating a personal sense of presence and belonging in Cornwall.

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http://www.newlynartgallery.co.uk/ The Exchange – Princes Street, Penzance From May 10th to July 12th visitors to The Exchange can enjoy the dark splendour of 3am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night – a multimedia exploration of life after dark and a glimpse at the traditionally unseen. Twenty two UK artists have contributed drawings, photographs, sculptures, paintings and films which explore the stark vulnerability and freedom of night-time, from CCTV footage of London to sculptures of monsters and captured star trails The touring exhibition is curated by Angela Kingston and features the artistic talents of Marc Hulson, Anj Smith, Dorothy Cross and Ed Pien, among many others. For more information about exhibitions and events being held at Newlyn Art Gallery and The Exchange please visit: http://www.newlynartgallery.co.uk/ Millennium – St Ives Marcelle Hanselaar’s Open Secrets exhibition took up residence in the Millennium gallery in on the 25th of April and will remain in place until the 20th of May.


Although Hanselaar’s post-war upbringing in the Netherlands included a brief period of study at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague, as a self-taught painter she developed a raw expressionist style which pays homage to the old Flemish masters. Since discovering an interest in etching and midnight drawing Hanselaar’s work has earned international recognition and numerous awards. If you’re interested in artists who adopt an unconventional approach and tackle unusual subject matter this is one exhibition you’ll love. http://www.millenniumgallery.co.uk/ Cornwall Contemporary – Chapel Street, Penzance In May selected works by Alasdair Lindsay and Fiona Millais will be on display at Cornwall Contemporary. Although born in Cheshire, Lindsay attended Falmouth College of Art and has built his artistic career in the South West. He uses his Cornish surroundings to influence his painting, but often creates imagery from memory and as a result of experimentation. Millias is the descendant of pre-Raphaelite painter Sir John Everett Millias, but has built an enviable artistic reputation in her own right. Millias has exhibited extensively and takes the traditional subjects of landscape and still life in a direction of her own, often incorporating music and literature. Her works are lent additional depth by her recycling of previously painted canvases. http://www.cornwallcontemporary.com/ The Belgrave – 22 Fore Street, St Ives Sven Berlin’s Drawings for Sculpture & Other Works on Paper exhibition will be in place at The Belgrave until the 28th of May. Over the course of his career Berlin experimented with a number of creative processes, producing drawings, paintings and sculpture as well as poetry and literature. In this display many of the drawings featured are representative of the conception and production of sculptures.

In June The Belgrave will be showing the work of Jessica Cooper, a locally-based artist who explores domesticity and familial relationships in her work. Cooper takes everyday objects and places and imbues them with intimate emotion. Both of these displays make The Belgrave well worth visiting over the next few months. http://www.belgravestives.co.uk/ Tate St Ives – Porthmeor Beach, St Ives After a five-month closure the Tate St Ives will reopen in mid-May. The gallery has undergone extensive renovation and promises to become an even more integral part of Cornwall’s creative scene. From May 17th – September 28th the International Exchanges: Modern Art and St Ives 1915-1965 exhibition will be running. The aim of the exhibition is to take visitors on a journey through the artistic history of St Ives, introducing them to the national and international contexts which shaped a creative legacy. A major facet of the collection is to present the two trajectories of post-war modern art in the region and the wider world, one envisaging an idolised utopian future, the other harping back to a tradition of handmade crafts. Chris Stephens, Lead Curator of Modern British Art at Tate Britain, will be leading the project and works by UK artists will be displayed alongside those of their North American and European contemporaries. This exhibition forms part of the run-up to the grand opening of the new display galleries in 2016. Make sure to check out at least one of these key exhibitions over the next few weeks! While we won’t be bringing you an event calendar in June, we hope that you continue exploring all the fantastic creative opportunities Cornwall has to offer. LAURA PARSONS / lp121966@gmail.com

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Fashion Feature / Sunglasses

Like many great wardrobe classics, sunglasses sprung from practical application and, although the practical elements may remain, it’s their transformational ability that has landed them a place on the faces of the masses. If there is one single item that will take your outfit from average to stylish, it's a great pair of shades.

These handcrafted wooden frames from American brand Shwood are made from walnut with a choice of three lense options. A classic style but with a modern twist, these frames are beautiful and unique. http://www.shwoodshop.com/products/ belmont-walnut-grey

Sunglasses are worth that extra little bit of investment and with fairly little effort, will last for decades. Forget the big brands, forget the style of the moment, when it comes to sunglasses, buy frames that suit your face from a quality manufacturer. And then let the collection begin. Luxury Sunglasses manufacturers from the USA, Maui Jims allow you to shop the range by "Facial Feature" to make sure the style suits you. Waterways‘ retro-inspired olive frames featuring anti-corrosive springs make them ideal for the beach and spending time on the water. http://www.mauijim.com/shop/en/uk/menssunglasses/waterways-267-1002?showImage=HTS267-15C

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For a decent pair of sunglasses that are a bit more relaxed and fun, Sherriff and Cherry make their lightweight acetate frames in every colour and style imaginable. Perfect for the pool, this yellow pair comes in a classic shape with dark grey lenses. http://sheriffandcherry.com/shop/product/ g11-classic-yellow


Left to right, Izzy wears Marc Jacobs, Mat wears vintage Raybans, Paolo wears Maui Jims, Gareth wears Boots own brand.

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Lightweight and durable these 60’s inspired frames from Oakley have HD polarised lenses to minimise glare and lense coating to balance light transmission. Aside from the practicals, these violet lenses will look good anywhere. http://uk.oakley.com/store/sunglasses

Ray-Ban have long been known as makers of iconic, quality sunglasses that you’ll still be wearing in a decade. This Clubmaster pair is pleasingly classic in a black and gold frame but with a modern twist through green, pink, blue and grey lenses. http://www.ray-ban.com/uk/products/sun

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Styling, photography and words / www.louise-palazzo.com

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Featured business / Beatengreen Design service with a vintage twist Beatengreen, St Ives’ renown vintage boutique and purveyor of all things retro and reinvented, is about to begin a new phase of life itself. Creative couple Matt and Kerry Knight, who opened the eclectic emporium in the Old Masonic Lodge five years ago, are closing the store in order to focus on their website and flourishing interior design business.

With enquiries for the design service flooding in, the couple decided to close the store this month, but will continue selling their vintage finds online. During its five years in St Andrews St, Beatengreen made a national name for itself, stocking soughtafter vintage and hand-painted furniture, accessories, textiles and artworks, as well as playing host to up-cycling workshops and art exhibitions. In 2013 Beatengreen was nominated in the category of Vintage Shop of the Year in the prestigious Homes and Antiques Magazine Awards.

Beatengreen Design has been transforming homes in Cornwall and beyond with a unique infusion of style “We have loved having the store,” said and carefully sourced period pieces for Matt, who hunts fairs and auction houses several years. Kerry, who is fully trained for special one-off pieces which can be in all aspects of interior design, explained restored and found a loving new home. why their services are now in such high “However the interior design side has demand. “People working to a whole range really taken off and we want to dedicate of budgets all want their home or more time to that, as well as our online investment property to be unique. They shop. I will be free to source items more don’t want to buy off the shelf, generic readily, both for Kerry to use in design products which they have no personal projects and to sell via the website.” connection to; they want something that Kerry can offer design solutions to all reflects their personality or creates sorts of challenges, from structural memorable surroundings for their alterations to reupholstering your guests during their stay.” favourite chair. “Some of our clients want to refresh one room with a new look, while others want to create a consistent style scheme for their whole property. We can project manage on any scale – which is particularly useful for clients who live elsewhere.” With Kerry’s skills and Matt’s keen eye, the pair can source all sorts of pre-loved items for unique interiors – from coat hooks to lamps, tiles to chairs – finding the fabrics that will finish it all off perfectly. The service is perfect for people with plenty of ideas and creativity themselves, but who don’t know where to source those special pieces, or have time to track them down. 114

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For Matt and Kerry, this is a new opportunity to enhance their creativity, in the place which has inspired so many before them. “St Ives has always had a pioneering spirit and a passion for visual beauty. We are enjoying creating interiors which reflect that, and enhance people’s wellbeing by enhancing their surroundings.” www.beatengreen.co.uk beatengreen@me.com

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Fashion / Lexie Sport

Lily Rice, one of Aesthetip's most prolific contributors and supporters has recently released a new capsule range – The Blonde Collection. Aesthetip's editor Emma Griffin seized the opportunity to shoot new Lexie Girl Sarah Thompson out on location giving the collection a thorough testing. WHO IS LEXIE? Pumped from Britain’s Olympic sporting success, Summer 2012 saw Lexie take on the women’s sportswear world. Designed by women, for women, Lexie is not ‘wear-less, go-faster’; instead providing clothing for those who are as serious about fashion as they are about their performance. And we don’t just talk-the-talk. Led by former Central Saint Martin’s student Lily Rice, our founder and head designer was the first UK graduate to hold a First in Unique Performance Sportswear Design BA.

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At team Lexie, we are all equally as passionate about our craft and brand. We’ve shown the industry what we’re made of - appearing in Vogue, Drapers and on BBC3’s programme Be Your Own Boss, securing investment from Innocent Smoothies’ main man Richard Reed along the way. It’s not all about the winning, but we’re proud to have been recognised as one of Future 50’s top young entrepreneurs, be a winner of Jacqueline Gold’s (chief executive of Ann Summers and Knickerbox) WOW Awards and selected as one of Draper magazines '30 under 30' for 2014.


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For more information about Lexie Sport or to view the whole collection: Info@lexiesport.co.uk http://www.lexiesport.co.uk/

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Featured Model / Sarah THompson

Alongside nearing the end of my degree in Surf Science and Technology, I am also a sponsored surfer, apprentice professional dancer, and am currently training for Ultra Marathons.

However, the costs for taking on these extreme races is very high and as a young female in full time study and working as a surf instructor, it is a funding target I can not reach alone!

As well as competing on the UK Pro Surf Tour, I will be testing mind and body in 3 big ultra marathon events, and hope to be the youngest female to complete the deadly 120k distances with dreams of taking on more extreme events. I have the North Pole marathon and the Marathon Des Sables (Sahara Desert marathon) firmly set in my sights.

I intend on documenting all my training and events and would promote anyone who wished to help me on my journey in any way possible.

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If you are interested in helping me meet funding targets through equipment or cost, please contact me via email at: sbeed@btinternet.com

You can also follow me on facebook and twitter for all news updates! https://www.facebook.com/ sarahthomsonsurfer https://twitter.com/ smthomsonsurf


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Music review / LLoyd Jerwood Be taken on an adventure through Cornwall by the Welsh born singer-songwriter Lloyd Jerwood. With his contemplative and personal musical style, he creates a timeless soundtrack for the summer. The young musician offers a wide range of inspiring original songs whose lyrics are generally reflective. His sound is acoustic based; a man and his guitar simply taking life as it is. His sound is mostly influenced by acoustic artists, such as John Mayer, even though he keeps his own music modern by constantly looking for new inspirational artists. Studying at Falmouth campus, as an Exeter student, Lloyd has been inspired by other local musicians. Whilst his songs do not have a specific message, he leaves the listeners to experience those in an open and interpretive personal way.

Lloyd Jerwood processes the everyday life in his songs, making it easy for the listeners to relate to his music and leaving those alone with their own positive vision of life. His sound enables him and the listeners to play around with the lyrics to create a picturesque tone. His music remains simple at the moment; however his intentions for the future lie within a broader musical sphere, as he would like to incorporate different sounds and instruments. Keep your eyes and ears open for this young musician. Future gigs are planned to take place in Cardiff, London and Truro. Find out more about Lloyd Jerwood here: https://www.facebook.com/ lloydjerwoodmusic?fref=ts https://soundcloud.com/ lloyd-jerwood LISA LEMBKE / lisa.lembke@freenet.de Rochelle Carr / rochellecarr@hotmail.co.uk

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Images: 1 — Hattie Ellis https://www.facebook.com/ pages/Hattie-EllisPhotography/106153522812451 and http://hattie94.wix.com/ hattieellisphotography 2 — Rhys Davies / https://www.facebook.com/ FurBallFilms 3 — Tom Bangham / http://banghamphotography. tumblr.com http://banghamphotography. tumblr.com/ http://www.facebook.com/ banghamphotography)

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Book reviews / Chris Thomas

Information is Beautiful / David McCandless

Ways of Seeing / John Berger (‘Bur-shur’, not Burger)

We are surrounded and saturated by information every day, and how we process it determines our understanding of the world. Information graphics can greatly help our absorption of complex issues as by boiling spreadsheets of information down to concise familiar images allows us to imagine and quantify in our heads what we are being told. Information Is Beautiful is a catalogue of intriguing data broken down into elegant and easily accessible diagrams. The real beauty of the book is that we are given access to a world of information that we could have quite easily passed over, but instead is presented in an engaging and infectious way. Information is Beautiful challenges us in two ways. Firstly, in displaying the skill of McCandless at boiling complex webs of data into succinct design ideas which need no further adornment, and in doing so pushing us to see how we can replicate this in our own work. Secondly, in providing inspiration and the urge to discover, to re-look at something forgettable and see what we can extract from it.

Though by no means a new book, Ways of Seeing remains an eye opening text, and one of the best to tackle the theme of our consumerist society. It is as fresh today as it was when released in the 70’s and is a must read for any creative. Berger expertly pulls apart the many levels of modern day advertising and brand image to reveal the monetary motive behind. He looks at how presentation of an idea triggers emotional responses in the viewer which in turn drives behaviour. Rather than being absorbed by the message/world the brand is offering Berger takes a step back and analyses the true nature of the advert, the inspiration behind and draws on contextual links, often referencing renaissance art. There is also a beautifully watchable television series to go with the book, so for those keen web trawlers Ways of Seeing is a must watch.

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Calligraffiti / Niles ‘Shoe’ Meulman Calligraffiti is a collection of works by Niles ‘Shoe’ Meulman, an individual represented in both the calligraphy and graffiti world. Calligraphy is the study of histories of letterforms, encouraging perfect replication, discipline and adherence to the rules in order to ultimately produce practical works of art which are not only functional but beautiful in their craft. In contrast, graffiti art is widely considered as vandalism studied underground in transient locations. What this text seeks to argue is that, in truth, many of the characteristics of a great calligrapher are shared with the graffiti artist. Niels Meulman brings about a collision between these two worlds. While his work demonstrates the power of tradition, it is enlivened by his prowess as a graffiti artist and it’s hard to put this book down. It’s unlikely that Calligraffiti will change the way you work, but it will certainly inspire you to try out some new techniques.

Chris Thomas / ct3687@gmail.com

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Creative Writing / HoW tO lIVe youR LiFE: A MaNiFeSto Accidents will happen. So always take out insurance. All that glitters is not gold. But you might as well check. An apple a day keeps the doctor away, but if you want to be really antisocial, eat garlic. A fool and his money are easily parted. So make friends with fools and be rich.

Health is better than wealth. But having both is smashing. Learn to walk before you run. It’s just common sense. Let the chips fall where they may. Into ketchup, for example. Like father, like son. Baldness is hereditary.

A watched pot never boils, but an ignored pot burns.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. You can’t win the lottery if you don’t buy a ticket.

Better late than never. Unless you’re catching a bus.

No use crying over spilt milk. Spilt beer is a different matter.

Blood is thicker than water, but syrup is nicer on pancakes.

Revenge is sweet. But like caramel coated chocolate flavoured sugar sprinkled marshmallow, it can make you sick.

Don't count your chickens before they're hatched. Twins are always a possibility. Don't judge a book by its cover. Read the blurb. First come, first served. Mc Donald’s opens at six. Great minds think alike. The greatest minds are unique.

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The pen is mightier than the sword, and fencing with words rarely draws blood. You are what you eat. Eat brilliance. LAURA PARSONS / lp121966@gmail.com


Creative Writing / Experimental Writing Using an Oulipo Concept The term Oulipo derives from a French phrase meaning ‘workshop of potential literature’ and was applied to a group of experimental writers who sprung to prominence in the 1960’s. Intrinsically, Oulipo writing aims to inspire creativity by seeing what the writer can produce despite being restrained by strict rules.

Then it was time to start back to the camping place, and Timmy heard Georges whistle. “We’ll keep awake a bit, and see if we hear anything queer?” “I came out in spots and Julian was sick, and it was SO hot”

“I’ll speak to him,” said George. Traditional Oulipo techniques are often based on patterns, repetition and The Black earth, hard as iron, mathematical formulae, but when coming up lay underneath, and nothing else. with your own rules you may find that the “But the odd thing was that they more random your Oulipo concept the more seemed high up when I got near them interesting the result. –not near the ground as I expected” Here’s an example of an Oulipo-style “Don’t be an ass!” guideline. “Don’t be an ass.” Take a book, any kind of book will do, “My, the waters pretty far down as long as it’s divided into chapters. and black as pitch too”. Write down the first sentence “My twin brother- and I wasn’t there to from the first chapter. fight by his side when he needed me!” Then the second sentence “Follow me! Take hold of each from the second chapter. other’s coats or jerseys and hang on”. Then the third sentence “Rather!” said Julian. from the third chapter. Then the forth sentence from the forth chapter. Continue this process until you reach the end of the book. Example using Enid Blyton’s ‘Five on a Secret Trail’ “Mother! Mother, where are you?” shouted George, rushing into the house. Anne couldn’t help smiling. “Let’s have a look at it”, she said. They had tea- biscuits, a sandwich each and a bar of rather soft chocolate. Who knew what might happen if she drew attention to their little camp?

“Of course not,” said Guy. The bicycle was there, with its packages strapped to it. “Go on- there’s something behind all this, that’s certain!” This example shows that it’s possible to produce an interesting (and pretty unusual) piece of text while adhering to an obscure writing construct. When your creativity is flagging this is a great mental exercise to employ. So next time you need some inspiration give this technique a go, or better yet, develop an Oulipo concept of your own! LAURA PARSONS / lp121966@gmail.com

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Aesthetip May 2014  

Aesthetip is an inspirational magazine for a creative soul.

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