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Abigail Eichebaum

Professional and Student Portfolio


Table of Contents Resume Professional Work Northern Treatment Plant Soda Springs Park Phase II Marketing Work City of Thornton Parks, Open Space and Trails Master Plan Update Student Work Phyto-Accumulation: Remediating RiNo Taxi Riverfront: Phenomenology Lower 9th Ward: Recycling Center Canal Bois de ChĂŞne: Garden Machine Growing Light: Urban Art Installation Drawings + Graphic Design


Abigail Eichenbaum aeichenbaum@gmail.com

Education

University of Colorado (UCD), Denver, Co August 2010 - Present Masters of Landscape Architecture GPA: 3.60

Louisiana State University (LSU), Baton Rouge, LA August 2005 - May 2010 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture GPA: 3.08

Skills

Computer Skills Photoshop Illustrator Indesign AutoCad GIS Sketchup Wordpress


Experience

In House Contract Employee, StudioCPG, Denver, Colorado

May 2012 - Present Work on marketing material, graphic design, photography, construction documents and website for StudioCPG.

Graphic Design Student Employee, College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Colorado February 2012 - May 2012 Designed marketing material and lecture posters for the Department of Landscape Architecture.

Teaching Assistant, College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Colorado

August 2011 - December 2011 Assisted professor with Graphic Media Class by teaching computer programs, lecturing about design and creating assignments.

Intern, Living City Block, Denver, Colorado

April 2011 - May 2011 Researched and developed a storm water management feasibility study.

Intern, Turenscape Landscape Architecture, Beijing, P.R. China

February 2009 – July 2009 Worked on various global projects by creating graphics, researching and designing with a team of professionals

Designer, Eichenbaum Displays Inc., Austin, TX

July 2003 – September 2008 Designer of holiday street decorations and lights for current 6th Street District in Austin, Texas. Worked on various large scale event production décor.

ASLA

ASLA Student Personal Relations Officer, University of Colorado at Denver Member of the student chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) During Undergraduate degree actively participated in community service projects with ASLA including sewer drain marking in downtown Baton Rouge, planting trees in South Baton Rouge, volunteering for the LSU Arboretum Annual Plant Sale, as well as other landscape architecture related activities. As P.R officer, created social networking sites for UCD’s ASLA chapter, promote ASLA events through posters and flyers, and volunteer for landscape related events.


Professional Work

C ontr ac t Wor k fr om Studi oC PG


Northern Treatment Plant Brighton, Colorado

This group of illustrative drawings were created from a 3d model rendering that was created by the engineers of this project. My job was to add the plant material from the planting plan to the renderings so the client could see what the Treatment Plant would look like from the road. Each view had two drawings one for the initial year of planting and one for the 25 year mark. The program used for these drawing was Photoshop.


View 1 Initial Year

25 Years


View 2 Initial Year

25 Years


View 3 Initial Year

25 Years


View 4 25 Years

I helped update this aerial image by adding in new buildings and changing their facade colors in Photoshop.


Soda Springs Park Phase II Manitou Springs, Colorado

For this poject I created presentation materials for town meetings and worked on the CD set. I put together detail sheets and redrew details to better fit the project. I also fixed redlines on the various construction plans. The programs used on this project were Indesign, Illustrator and Autocad.


Marketing Work Colorado

While working at StudioCPG, I’ve had to opportunity to work on lots of marketing material. I’ve put together presentations for interviews and helped with RFPs. The biggest marketing project I worked on is the StudioCPG new website.


City of Thornton Parks, Open Space & Trails Master Plan Update Brighton, Colorado

The City of Thornton Parks, Open Space and Trails Master Plan update project gave me the opportunity to work on a planning project. For this project I played the role of photographer and mapper. I drove around Thornton photographing it’s many parks, open spaces and trails and used GIS to create informational maps for the master plan update.


Student Work

Pr ojects an d Wor k D one at LSU and U C D EN VER


Phyto-Accumulation: Remediating RiNo R i v e r N o r t h , D e n v e r, C o l o r a d o

The River North or RiNo area is located north of Downtown Denver along the Platte River. Historically RiNo was the destination of industry and manufacturing. These land uses have left this neighborhood with toxic riddled soils. Arsenic and lead are some of the extremely dangerous pollutants found here. The worst area of contamination is also a part of a larger Superfund site. This means the land there exceeds healthy levels of toxins. The land uses in RiNo give clues to how the neighborhood got to this status. Automotive service businesses and warehouses dominate the site. Historically a neighborhood was created in this area to help house workers for the nearby smelter factories. Some remints of these residential areas still exist. In recent years flight from site has caused vacant lands to appear. Some vacancies contain large buildings while others plots are stripped down to bare ground.


These diagrams show the current condition of the projects site. The teacher defined this site boundary. Currently automotive service businesses and Warehouses dominate RiNo. These land uses are keys to the continuation of soil pollution on site. It is also important to note the Superfund site’s proximity to the Platte River, allowing toxic water from RiNo to enter the water system. Other current site condition problems are created from massive amounts of impervious surfaces. Approximately 90% of the site is either concrete or highly compacted soil.


Businesses:

Businesses are required to plant 20% of their outdoor property with Alyssum. Once the 20% plots are clean a new one can be planted. This process will occur in rotation until the whole site is clean.

Clean Automotive Businesses: Automotive Businesses are required to plant 20% of their outdoor property with Alyssum + 1 tree. Once the 20% plots are clean a new one can be planted. This process will occur in rotation until the whole site is clean.

Clean

Residential:

Residents are required to plant 100% of their lawns with Allysum + Pennycress until the soil is clean. Once the property is remediated residents can plant their lawns as wanted. This includes planting herbs and vegetables.

Clean

Vacant land: Fields

100% of Fields are required to be planted with Sunflowers until vacant land is remediated. After remediation, it is requested that fields continue to be planted with sunflowers until plots are redeveloped.

Clean


The projects purpose is to remediate the current soil conditions while allowing current business owners and residents to stay on site. The remediation process will create a new site identity through mass planting of flowering plants. These plants were chosen because of their native and remediating qualities. This process is two fold. Part one splits the site into land use categories giving specific instruction of how much land and plant material should be planted, while the second part defines the annual process of growing and disposing of the plant material. Part one is illustrated on the pervious page and part two is described below.

seeds planted in spring

The site was split into four categories based on the current land uses. The four categories are: automotive businesses, businesses, residential and vacant land/fields. Each category went through an evaluation of how much toxins/pollution that

the land use would introduce on site. Since, automotive service businesses leak oils and other toxins in it’s own and surrounding properties the automotive businesses land uses category requires planting of at least one tree plus other herbaceous plant material. Other categories do less damage to the environment so their planting strategies consist of just herbaceous plants. The annual process starts with the planting of seeds in the spring. Throughout the summer plants will germinate and grow. As they grow their roots will suck up all the different toxins in the soil. In the fall before winter the plant material will die and be removed. The dead plant material will then be taken to a processing center located on site. The toxins and plant materials will be separated so the metals such as lead can then be shipped to manufacturing facilities to be repurposed.

cut in winter

grow toxins are stored in plant material

As

Pb

oil

plants suck up toxins in soil

As

Pb

oil

As

Pb

oil


Then

plant material is processed and left over metals are shipped to be reused

Pb

As


The planting strategies, especially the vacant land/ fields one, give the RiNo site a new identity. The flowers educate and tell a story to the public about how to solve the problems that industry creates. During the spring/summer new green fields begin to appear. Then in the summer bright yellow sunflowers transform ugly vacant land in to beautiful fields of flowers. In the late fall and winter the pallet is wiped clean preparing for next years flower reemergence.


During remediation the site will gain a new identity. Ugly vacant land will transform into beautiful fields of sunflowers, changing the way people see the RiNo neighborhood. It is recommended that the site be redeveloped once the soils are clean. Currently there is a trend of art studios moving the into RiNo area creating a small art community. I would like to see this continue. Below is an illustration of how the site could look in the future. Art studios and galleries, cafes and coffee shops will emerge in vacant land near the Platte River. Sunflowers have become the identity of the site so remnants of the past remediation are preserved. RiNo becomes a cultural gem for the city.


Taxi Riverfront: Phenomenology Ta x i C a m p u s , R i v e r N o r t h , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o

The Taxi Campus is located in the River North part of Denver Colorado. This site has a strict aesthetic created by the industrial frame left from the historic land uses in the area. The problem faced was as decision on whether to remove the current road running along the front of the campus. The road separates the campus from the Platte River, so removing it would allow for a stronger connection to the riverfront. This project was explored in a partnership with Letora Anderson. Together we created a scheme that would remove the existing road and create a new landscape connecting the Taxi Campus with the Platte River. The removal of the road gave us the opportunity to create a new drainage system into the water that would be aesthetically pleasing and environmentally beneficial.


created by Letora Anderson


The Taxi Campus is a multi-use site. There are lofts and apartments located on the upper floors of the Taxi 2 building with businesses and art studios below. The other two buildings house more businesses and creative studios with one restaurant. For this project my partner and I explored the idea of “being there.” What makes the Taxi Campus special and how can you recreate that concept to connect the Platte River to the complex. During the analysis phase we spent a lot of time at the Taxi Campus mapping: plant material, sounds and intrigue on site. The plant material found on the Taxi Campus consists of native ornamental native grasses and poplar trees. The sounds there gave us clues to Taxi’s context and it’s programmatic uses. Intrigue helped us to understand what “being” at Taxi really meant. The sections are transects of our site starting north and going south up the Platte River. Below the sections are color indicators telling information like intrigue, plant material, and sound on the site.

wind w

wind w

ind ind in d w w in d w

ind ind in d w w in d w

wind w

A1

ind ind in d w w in d w

A RIVER

RIVER’S EDGE

ROAD

ABANDONED PARKING LOT

THE MOUND


Sounds People

B

Tree Leaves & Birds Automobiles

wind wind wind wind wind

River Water

B1 Trains

RIVER

RIVER’S EDGE

ROAD

WATER DETENTION

PARKING LOT

BUILDING

Vegetation Emergent Grasses Tree Canopy Manicured Vegetation wind wind wind wind wind

C

Wet Vegetation Intrigue

C1

RIVER

RIVER’S EDGE

ROAD

WATER DETENTION

High Fascination & Intrigue Medium Fascination & Intrigue High Fascination & Intrigue

D

D1

RIVER

RIVER’S EDGE

ROAD

WATER DETENTION

SLOPE

BUILDING


Design equation defining “being� in the Taxi Campus:

[

Light

+

Ground

Vegetation

+

+ Industrial Frame

Topography

Neon

+

=

+

Weather

]

+ Sound

Taxi Campus The design equation gave the framework to how we designed the campuses riverfront. We decided that the important factors to creating a sense of being in Taxi was a combination of natural factors like light, ground, topography, vegetation, weather, sound and man made elements like the industrial frame and neon accents. Some factors within the equation were deemed more important. These elements are the industrial frame, topography, the use of neon and vegetation. These are elements we can control to create an experience true to the Taxi Campus aesthetics. The purpose of the design, for the Taxi Campus, was to connect the complex to the riverfront. To do that the current road running between the two spaces was removed. When the road is


RIVER

PARKING LOT

RIVER’S EDGE

PATH

MAJOR VEGETATIVE DRAINAGE

RECLAMATION PLAZA

PATH

VIEWING DECK

DRAINAGE AREA

RIVER

LIVING MOUND

RTD BUILDING

THE BOWL

PATH

THE BOWL OUTLET

PLATTE RIVER

removed the front of the complex can now serve as its backyard. Another opportunity created by the road removal is topography change. Currently the slope between the road and the river is very steep making it hard for people to access it. We designed a gentler slope with places where storm water run off could pool and enter the river at a slower pace. This design will allow for easier access and a healthier water drainage system. To connect the design to the Taxi Campus aesthetically industrial looking bridges with orange neon accents were placed over drainage ways. These bridges are connected to a trail along the riverfront. The trail gives people a chance to engage the river.

PARKING LOT

OPEN FLAT

PATH

RIVER’S EDGE

RIVER


Lower 9th Ward: Recycling Center New Orleans, Louisiana

On August 23, 2005 hurricane Katrina hit the city of New Orleans. This storm changed the city. Many people were displaced due to extreme flooding. One of the famous places effect by Katrina is the Lower Ninth Ward located east of downtown New Orleans along the Mississippi River. Over 8 ft. of water covered the neighborhood lifting houses off their foundations. The Lower Ninth Ward is surrounded by water on three sides with levees making it a bowl. The water body north is Bayou Bienvenue, on the west is the Industrial canal and to the south the Mississippi River. The levee in the northwest corner of the site failed causing the neighborhood to flood during Katrina. The sites high point is located south and the lowest point is in the north. This means the deepest water was located in the northern part of the Lower Ninth ward where the worst damage occurred.


created by Abigail Eichenbaum, Andrea Sinnaeve and Laura Handschumacher


This timeline explorers the Lower Ninth Ward’s history through a section line. The history starts before the site was developed by man and was a swamp. Dashed lines towards the end of the timeline show the different flooding events that have occurred here and their water depths.


The focus of this project was trash. What trash is located on the site? Where it goes? and is there a way to reintroduce recycling? The intervention designed is a recycling center located in the heart of the neighborhood along an intersection of two major roads. The concept for the recycling centers design came from an exploration of models and photography. Through folding paper and bending thin sheets of wood the concept of layers originated. Each site has different physical and social layers that make it special.


The site for the recycling center is split into two halves. One half is the actual recycling center and the other is a garden and plaza. For the recycling center design the ground layer was lifted to house the actual building. The roof of the building slops down to ground level and is a large green roof lawn. This lawn also doubles for a park allowing families a place to recreate. Children can roll down the hill created by the architecture while other can enjoy the view of the whole neighborhood and river. The other half of the site is at street level. This street level portion has a plaza and a remediation garden, which is planted with ferns and large pecan trees. These plants were selected because of their remediation qualities. People from the neighborhood can come here to learn about recycling and remediation.

B1

Another aspect of this project was a marketing strategy. This strategy was developed to educate the community about recycling and give them the necessary tools to do it correctly. A brochure outlining how to recycle was created along with trash/ recycling identity badges for the resident’s trash receptacles. These three items would be delivered to all residents of the Lower Ninth Ward. Residents would also receive a new recycling bin. The purpose of the stickers were to give the neighborhood it’s own identity when dealing with trash.

Recycling Center

A

A1 Plaza

Remediational Garden

B

B


A

A1

B1


Canal Bois de ChĂŞne: Garden Machine Port Au Prince, Haiti

The overall system proposed is a non-traditional botanic garden. It is an urban system that showcases different types of plants while remediating the storm water system. The majority of the system is public for people to use everyday. This group project was done in collaboration with Allison Mendes, Angela Urrego and me.


Growing Light: Urban Art Installation Carlsberg, Copenhagen, Demark

This art installation was designed, with my partner Erin Devine, for the new UCC campus in Copenhagen, Demark. Our instillation of outdoor environmental art will be a moveable, interactive, and dynamic experience. The UCC campus plaza is primarily in shadow due to the tall buildings that surround it. This installation takes advantage of the small amount of light available by reflecting, amplifying, and enhancing the ambient light into the space. The materials chosen to create the instillation are recycled water bottles filled with clear water absorbent polymer pearls. The primary function of the pearls is to act as a conduit of light expansion. These pearls also support plant life transforming the instillation into something more than a static art piece; it becomes an ecological system.


Photo taken by Erin Devine


Main Structural Support

Plants grow in clear polymer pearls. A tube along the main structural support feeds them nutrients and water. Every year new plants are planted and then grow. This adds life to the installation truly making it a

Growing Light

Secondary Structural Support

l i ght is a m p l i fi e d a t nig h t t h ro u g h a ddit io n a l lig hts


Natural light hits the polymer beads and...........

Light is Amplified The instillation has a lifespan of seven years, giving it a definitive time line as the water pearl will begin to deteriorate and can not sustain plant life after that time. The temporal quality will be further expressed through seasonal plant cycles. During the winter months, no plant life will be present due to the lack of sunlight and cold weather. This will change during the spring and summer seasons. Increased sun and warm temperatures will create the appropriate conditions to sustain vegetation. On a daily scale, the ephemeral experience of this instillation will continuously evolve. As people navigate through the plaza and building floors, their engagement with the instillation will change. From above, the plant life will be most visible; from below the dappled light is the principal experience. LED lights that are embedded within the hanging system will ignite the instillation during events. This activates opportunities for nighttime engagement and dĂŠcor. The overall goal is to enhance the character and identity of the plaza. For the visitor the instillation adds interest as the light constantly changes. The instillation will be elegant from all vantage points.


These perspectives show the art installation within the courtyard at different vantage points.


Base Sketchup model provided by WAW Architects.


Drawings + Graphic Design This section of the portfolio is a collection of drawing and graphic design done during my landscape architectural education. The graphic design work was created for the University of Colorado at Denver College of Architecture and Planning. These works were created for the promotion the Landscape Architecture Department within the college.


1 minute

2 minute

2 minute

2 minute

5 minute

5 minute


 College of

Architecture and Planning

Department of Landscape Architecture

LANDS UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER

COLORADO


URBAN RURAL social equity

Department of Landscape Architecture

local research

cultural landscape

College of Architecture and Planning

sustainability communication

design

SCAPE your journey starts here: www.root-land.org and http://cap.ucdenver.edu

global

infrastructure

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER


Abigail Eichenbaum Professional/Student Portfolio