__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

ADW ATLANTA DAILY WORLD

Powered by Real Times Media

www.adwnews.com

Volume 85 Issue 39

Dr. Ben Carson in Atlanta Page 3

World Mission Volunteers Page 5

Fiesta Atlanta Celebrates Pages 7

Women of Color and Finances Page 8

May 2 - 8, 2013

Obama Picks Charlotte mayor anthony Foxx for New secretary of Transportation Compiled by ADW Staff

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

President Barack Obama announces Mayor Anthony Foxx, of Charlotte, N.C., as his nominee for secretary of transportation in the East Room of the White House on April 29. Outgoing Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood applauds at right.

President Barack Obama has announced his nomination of Anthony Foxx, the mayor of Charlotte, N.C., to be his new secretary of transportation. Anthony Foxx became mayor of Charlotte in 2009, three years before the city hosted the Democratic National Convention, which formally nominated Obama for a second term. He gave the welcoming speech at that convention. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Foxx would become the first African-American nominee for Obama's second cabinet. He would join Attorney General Eric Holder, another African American who has served since Obama began his presidency in 2009. The president's selection of Foxx goes some way to answer critics, including members of the Congressional Black Caucus, who faulted Obama for a lack of diversity in cabinet selections since his re-election. Obama made no mention of this in remarks praising Foxx, who was Charlotte's youngest elected mayor and only the city's second African-American mayor. In Atlanta, leaders lauded Foxx’s nomination. “I applaud President Barack Obama’s decision to nominate Mayor Anthony Foxx as the U.S. Secretary of Transportation,” said Mayor Kasim Reed. “A committed public servant, Mayor Foxx worked tirelessly to improve infrastructure and foster manufacturing and economic development in his hometown.” MARTA GM/CEO Keith Parker was the assistant city manager for Charlotte when Anthony Foxx was serving on the city council, before he was elected mayor. “I was always very impressed by him personally and professionally, and I think he will make a wonderful secretary of transportation,” Parker said. “He is cerebral. He’s a fact-based decision-maker and he’s fair. He also understands the way you build great cities is by building great neighborhoods.

Page 2

street Vendors Continue to Protest City’s recent Crackdown By James Pressley ADW Staff A small group of sidewalk vendors gathered outside Atlanta City Hall Tuesday to protest a recent crackdown on them selling their wares on city streets. About 15 people demonstrated — most wearing red T-shirts with the slogan "Let Us Vend" — to urge the mayor and city council to relax restrictions and let them get back to selling their goods. The event was a continuation of months of back and forth between the City of Atlanta and the city’s street vendors. The vendors say that the city’s new policy of not renewing street vending permits is preventing them from making a living in order to “take care of our children and families.” The previous administration required vendors to contract with a single company to sell items in public spaces. The company provided colorful kiosks for the vendors but required a rental fee and regulated the merchandise for sale. A Fulton County Superior Court judge in December struck down that policy, leaving the city with no ordinance under which to

issue permits. Police started enforcing the prohibition on public vending in late March, shortly before the NCAA Final Four tournament was held at the Georgia Dome. They went into streets and parks downtown and areas around Turner Field to let vendors know they would no longer be able to sell there. “Vendors can still enter into agreements with private property owners to sell their goods on those spaces,” mayor's office spokesman Carlos Campos said. “But they can't sell on city sidewalks or other public places.” "We will continue to look at other city programs nationwide to see if there are some best practices we might adopt in the event we decide to move forward with a public property vending program," Campos told the Daily World. Some of the vendors who demonstrated said they've been selling goods on the sidewalk for years. The recent crackdown has left them with no way to earn a living, they noted.

Page 2

ADWnews Online Follow us @ADWnews Facebook.com/ADWnews


www.ADWnews.com

WaGa’s amanda Davis announces her retirement By ADW Staff

After more than 26 years at WAGA-TV, broadcast anchor Amanda Davis announced her retirement in a message that aired recently on the Fox station’s 10 p.m. newscast. "There have been awards, honors and accolades. There have also been challenges, disappointments and stumbles," Davis told the audience at 10:14 p.m. Then paraphrasing Psalm 23:4, she said, "Yea, though I have walked through the valley, with God's help, I made it through. And that's what I want you to know. I am blessed. So it's with a heavy heart that I announce now that I am officially retiring from Fox 5, as I look ahead to a new chapter in my life." Davis was arrested by Atlanta police late last year after she crashed her car going northbound in a southbound lane on Piedmont Ave. off 14th Street in midtown, hitting and injuring another driver. She was charged with reckless driving, failure to maintain lane and DUI. She has been off the air awaiting trial at Fulton County state court. Co-anchor Russ Spencer ("My TV husband," she said jokingly) and meteorologist Ken Cook, both long-time Fox 5 veterans as well, came up to her and offered their own accolades. "We want to thank you for what you meant to us," Spencer said. "We hope you know how much we love and appreciate you."

NEWS May 2 - 8, 2013 White House is looking for Interns, Including african americans

The station aired tributes from retired Channel 2 Action News Anchor Monica Pearson, former Atlanta Mayor and U.N. Ambassador Andy Young and V-103 radio host Ryan Cameron. This was followed by a highlight reel of her time on the station, her coverage of Coretta Scott King's funeral, an interview with President Barack Obama and her work with Wednesday's Child, a weekly Fox 5 feature that helped place foster children into adoptive homes.

Obama Picks mayor anthony Foxx Page 1 He demonstrated one of the ways you do that is with effective transit, which helps attract investment, helps the environment and creates stability in those neighborhoods.” Obama said Foxx helped Charlotte recover from an economic downturn by investing in transportation infrastructure, which prepared him well to handle the nation's transportation issues. "When Anthony became mayor in 2009, Charlotte, like the rest of the country, was going through a bruising economic crisis," said President Obama. "But the city has managed to turn things around. The economy is growing, there are more jobs, more opportunity and if you ask Anthony how that happened, he will tell you that one of the reasons is that Charlotte made one of largest investments in transportation in the city's history." Obama predicted Foxx would be

"extraordinarily effective," saying much work remains to rebuild and modernize infrastructure to ensure the U.S. remains competitive in the global economy. Foxx would replace outgoing Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, a former Illinois congressman, who was the second Republican in Obama's first-term cabinet. Foxx praised LaHood for his "no-nonsense approach" in heading the Department of Transportation, saying the job requires leaving politics aside. "There is no such thing as a Democratic or Republican road, bridge, port, airfield, or rail system," said Foxx. "We must work together across party lines to enhance this nation's infrastructure." LaHood credited Obama with raising gasoline efficiency standards for vehicles and Published weekly at 3485 N. Desert Drive Suite 2109 providing leadership and vision Atlanta, Georgia 30344-8125. to improve high speed rail in Periodicals Postage Paid at Atlanta Mailing Offices. America. Publication Number 017255 "What he said to America is, POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Atlanta Daily World, we know you want a different 3485 N. Desert Drive Suite 2109 Atlanta, Georgia 30344-8125. kind of transportation," said Subscriptions: LaHood. "And [Abraham] One Year: $52 Lincoln started the rail system Two Years: $85 in America, Obama has started high speed rail in America. Forms of Payment: Check, Money Order, What a great legacy." American Express, MasterCard, VISA

ADWnews

2

By ADW Staff

The 2013 White House Initiative’s Year-round Internship Program provides current undergraduate and graduate students with an opportunity to learn about AfricanAmerican-focused education policy, communications, and outreach at the U.S. Department of Education in Washington, D.C. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: collecting and compiling research and data on African-American education, institutions and communities; performing data entry and managing the office database; greeting and escorting visitors to meetings; participating in strategic planning and staff meetings and other department policy briefings and meetings relevant to the work of the initiative; responding to constituent inquiries verbally or in writing; and more. Throughout the course of their internships, students will have the opportunity to attend

and potentially lead in the planning and management of meetings, briefings and other special events on Capitol Hill, at the White House and in other federal agencies. To apply for the 2013 White House Initiative’s Year-round Internship Program, visit:www.findinternships.com/2013/04/white -house-initiative-year-round-internshipprogram.html To search hundreds of other internships, visit: www.FindInternships.com.

A dozen of the nation's leading civil rights leaders told participants at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's 2013 America Healing Conference that mobilizing civic participation, collaborating on issues and changing the established narratives are the keys to addressing racism and moving the nation toward more equitable opportunities. Moderated by acclaimed broadcast journalist Soledad O'Brien, the panelists cited the critical role of narratives in shaping the most important public and social policy issues of the day. Much of the conversation addressed the modern environment for seeking change, citing the emergence of new priorities and methods. Rinku Sen, president and executive director of the Applied Research Center, noted that policy and mindset change are critical. She articulated how people of color are cast in particular roles. Sen said, "And if we want to change the role that we're given, the way that we are cast, we have to tell a set of stories again and again and again and again,

and ...in many different ways." Sen reflected on the successful efforts to remove the word "illegal" for undocumented immigrants from the media lexicon. Both the Associated Press and USA Today have done so and others are moving toward it. Ultimately, she said, it helped push for a new immigration policy. Ben Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, reminded the audience of the need to be inclusive in approaches to changing the narratives. "When we talked about a new majority, if our new majority doesn't have a vision for white folks who've been locked in poverty generationally, then we're never going to quite get there." President and CEO of the National Council of La Raza Janet Murguía celebrated recent gains in this work with conference participants. "And now - I tell people; I correct them, we created this moment. And we did so by overcoming incredible barriers."

Civil rights leaders Call for a ‘Change in the Narrative’

street Vendors Continue to Protest

Page 1 “They’re hoping we just go away. But we won’t. The key to this whole thing is due process,” Larry Miller, president of the Atlanta Vendors Association told the Daily World. “They just showed up on Opening Day for the Braves and said I couldn’t vend.” “I told them I had permanent injunction from the Superior Court, but they said it did not matter because they did not renew my vending permit.” The average vendor grosses anywhere from $25,000 to $35,000 a year off of sales, Miller said. Profits, however, are small percentages, he noted. “I couldn’t survive without doing this. I’ve been doing it for 30 years.” Miller said. “I was able to send my kids to school and buy a house through vending, what else do I do after doing something for 30 years?”

Miller believes that the city is insensitive to small business people and wants street vending to disappear completely. “This puts the mayor and the city council on the wrong side of history,” he added. “It’s like Black on Black crime. Here I am a Black man in Atlanta with a Black mayor who’s constantly trying to keep me down. . . . I feel like I’m in a civil rights struggle.”


www.ADWnews.com

POLITICS

May 2 - 8, 2013

Ben Carson speech is a Hit with atlanta republicans

By DION raBOuIN ADW Digital Editor Neurosurgeon Ben Carson, the celebrated doctor who has recently become a rising star among political conservatives, was a big hit in Atlanta last week at the Fulton County Republican Party’s Spring Reception, touted as “An Evening with Dr. Carson.” He spoke to a packed house at the Westin Buckhead, which included some of the state’s biggest political names including Gov. Nathan Deal, Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and majority Speaker Pro Tempore Jan Jones. Carson has been celebrated on GOP platforms across the country after lecturing President Obama on healthcare reform and the federal debt while speaking at a February national prayer breakfast,. He has been touted as a potential Republican candidate in 2016.

But, Carson says he is an independent and suggests that he has no political affiliation. And, while he leans toward the Republican message of self-reliance, he cites John F. Kennedy as the presidential model to follow. Before his Atlanta speech to a room that event organizers tallied at 500 people, Carson spoke to VIPs who had shelled out $500 each for a chance to meet with him one-on-one and get a copy of his latest book, “America The Beautiful.” He has written six books and is working on a seventh. He was introduced by Gov. Deal who showered Carson with effusive praise, calling him “an inspirational figure.” “People like Dr. Carson come along rarely in our lives, and we certainly need to listen to their story, listen to what they have to say, the instructions that they have to give,” he said. Carson’s background is indeed inspirational. He told the crowd that he was raised in the ghettos of Detroit by a single mother who made him and his brother read two books a week, and write reports on them. These were books that she couldn’t read herself, “but we didn’t know that,” he said. His mother was one of 24 children and had only a third grade education. Ultimately he became the first surgeon to successfully separate conjoined twins. Cuba Gooding, Jr. played Carson in “Gifted Hands” the TNT movie about that historic event. The doctor maintains he

has “no intention of running for political office,” and it may be just as well. A recent appearance on Fox News landed him in some hot water because of a comment he made comparing homosexuality to bestiality and child molestation. The comments generated a petition from Johns Hopkins University students asking the administration to remove Carson as their commencement speaker. Carson apologized and withdrew. But the controversy seems to have only strengthened his resolve to “expand civil discourse and get rid of ‘political correctness.’” He called for the Republican Party to support state-wide funding for schools, rather than by individual community income, which "leads to disproportionate allocation of resources that is not beneficial to society." He told the Atlanta Daily World that he believes this type of conversation, coupled with action, can attract more minorities to the GOP. “When we look at the big picture, see desperate kids running around in depressed Atlanta neighborhoods, and see how many are being incarcerated, what we need to do is say, ‘What can we do to stop that?’ The answer is not more handouts," he said. "For every one of those little kids that goes down the path of self-destruction, that’s one more person that we have to be afraid of and protect our family from. We really can’t afford to let them go down go down that path.” His speech received a standing ovation. “Here is a guy that has personified all the things that make America great,” said District 6 State Sen. Hunter Hill, who attended the speech and VIP reception. “He came from nothing and became a brain surgeon. We can do nothing but honor that.”

Cynthia McKinney Autobiography Details Congress Challenges By ADW Staff

Former U.S. Rep. Cynthia McKinney (D-Ga.) has written an autobiography titled Ain't Nothing Like Freedom that is now available from Clarity Press, and in e-book format on Amazon.com. The book is described by Amazon.com as follows: “Detailing her six terms in the House of Representatives, this memoir by the United States congresswoman for Georgia's fourth district reveals the woman behind the engaging political career. Best known for her vote in Congress against the Iraq war, a stance which she has continued to hold, she has also stirred controversy over legislation to dismantle corruption in Washington and elsewhere. Describing the personal history that has informed her convictions, the congresswoman points to her pioneering parents, her own pursuit of the best possible education, her experiences as a community organizer, and her juggling act as a mother and a working woman.” McKinney writes about her work on redistricting while in the Georgia Legislature; her lesser known work on human rights and international relations issues, especially involving Africa, while in U.S. Congress, her work assisting constituents with cases involving the federal government, and on a wide variety of issues of federal policy.

The stories attempt to illustrate the machinations of a system that she believes seems to be stacked against progressive change and potential agents of such change. For example, McKinney writes about the rules of the U.S. Congress -- how seniority is allocated, how decisions are made regarding what Congressional hearings will be held, who gets to invite witnesses or ask questions at these hearings, what bills come up for a vote -- that constrain what a lone progressive member of Congress can accomplish beyond simply their roll call vote. She also writes about the tricks "the powers that be" use to dodge Congressional oversight, and how she responded: by being so well-prepared, she writes, that her questions would be framed well enough not to be evaded. The book includes pages of photographs, letters, and other archival materials, as well as excerpted speeches, in addition to narrative text. McKinney writes that she is still hoping to write her dissertation and complete her Ph.D. and that she continues to look for ways to be involved in the struggle for social justice. Her son, Coy McKinney, recently received his J.D. from the University of the District of Columbia.

3


www.ADWnews.com

COMMUNITY

May 2 - 8, 2013

Historic Westview Neighborhood Former 100 Chairman receives Home Tour Held this Weekend Gift from atlanta Group By Jay laWreNCe Special to ADW

The Committed to Communities Home Tour is back, with the next stop the Westview neighborhood on Saturday, May 4, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Event attendees will find homes priced from $50,000 to $225,000 in communities filled with history, and residents committed to building neighborhoods. Attendees will tour homes for sale along quaint streets and have a chance to talk with builders, lenders, real estate professionals, and housing counseling agencies. Refreshments will be served and neighborhood residents will be on hand. Buyers with mortgage pre-approval letters may be able to put a contract on a home during the event. The free, family-friendly house tour will feature homes in Westview and surrounding neighborhoods located in southwest Atlanta – primarily in the 30310 zip code. This zip code -- once home to high rates of foreclosure and mortgage fraud – continues to rebound as homeownership rises in Atlanta. Westview is a 103-year-old bungalow neighborhood along the Atlanta Beltline, minutes away from downtown. Over 170 families, some in Westview, have purchased homes in the city of Atlanta with $15,000 down payment assistance grants from the NeighborhoodLIFT program. Several million dollars are still available. Those qualifying must buy and live in a home in the city of Atlanta and meet requirements including a maximum income of 120 percent of the Atlanta area median income, which is $79,550 for a family of four. The event is hosted by The Beltline Team of Morris & Raper Real Estate Consultants and EpiCity. The theme this year is “Resolution 2013 – Own It!” “Committed to Communities Open House

Events introduce many buyers to charming Atlanta neighborhoods that are unfamiliar to many of them,” says Derrick Duckworth, a REALTOR® who started the open house events over two years ago. “At recent events some people have toured the neighborhoods and homes and then placed a contract on a house during the event! That’s very exciting to see.” Duckworth is part of The Beltline Team of Morris & Raper Real Estate Consultants and EpiCity. Other participants are Resources for Residents and Communities (RRC), Invest Atlanta, Loan South Mortgage, Area West Realty, Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership and Wells Fargo. RRC and Invest Atlanta are administering the NeighborhoodLIFT program, which was funded by Wells Fargo. “Committed to Communities” will kick off at a home located at 1630 Rogers Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30310 in the Westview neighborhood. Persons interested in attending the May 4 event can register for free at www.CommittedtoCommunities.com. Registration is encouraged but not required. For more information, email Derrick Duckworth at Derrick@thebeltlineteam.com or John Mangham at JMangham@epicity.com.

Fulton County sheriff Hosts Girls Teen Talk Panel The Fulton County Sheriff’s Office will host a teen talk panel for girls aged 12-18 on current issues faced by most teenage females today. The event will be held Saturday, May 4, from 10 a.m. until noon at Romae T. Powell “Juvenile” Justice Center, located at 395 Pryor Street, Atlanta, GA 30312. The purpose is to allow girls the opportunity to talk openly amongst their peers about the issues. Additionally, they will receive professional guidance from female leaders to help them navigate into becoming better thinkers and communicators. Parents are

4

Outgoing 100 Black Men of Atlanta Chairman Greg Hawkins is presented with a collage of photos of his activities during his term as head of the organization. Hawkins was honored at the group’s Annual Stakeholders & Community Briefing luncheon, which featured Gov. Nathan Deal as the keynote speaker. New 100 Black Men of Atlanta President Henry Kelly of Georgia Power was sworn in at the event.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE ATLANTA BRAVES PRESENT

CHAMPIONS FOR JUSTICE LUNCHEON IN CONJUNCTION WITH ATLANTA BRAVES HERITAGE WEEKEND MAY 31, 2013 AT 11:30 AM 755 CLUB AT TURNER FIELD $100 - LUNCHEON TICKETS $250 - LUNCHEON TICKETS AND TICKETS TO THE ATLANTA BRAVES HERTIAGE GAME VS THE NATIONALS

encouraged to stay and attend a parent workshop with their peers to discuss ways to connect, understand and communicate effectively with their daughters. Admission is free and lunch is provided. For more information, contact Deputy J. Hambrick at 404-612-3113 or Natasha Mootoo at 404-612-5138.

SPECIAL GUEST HANK AARON WILL PRESENT THE 2013 HANK AARON CHAMPIONS FOR JUSTICE AWARD TO SENATOR LEROY JOHNSON AND AMBASSADOR ANDREW YOUNG

Purchase Tickets at http://bit.ly/bravesluncheon Tickets are tax-deductible, and all proceeds benefit the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. For additional information call 404-991-6970


www.ADWnews.com

PRAISE

May 2 - 8, 2013

energetic Church of God Volunteers spruce up senior Center By ADW Staff

More than 100 volunteers from the World Mission Society Church of God (WMSCOG) gathered on a rainy day last weekend to help The Lithonia Senior Center with a spring spruce up. Welcomed with heartfelt thanks from Lithonia Mayor Deborah Jackson, the WMSCOG members helped improve the look and feel of the senior center, located at 2484 Bruce Street. The group has the support of The Home Depot, Lowes, Walmart, and other local businesses that donated mulch,

equipment and yard goods. Over the course of a long day, the volunteers completed the following tasks: • Removing all debris • Trimming and laying mulch for all the bushes and trees to create a walking area • Digging and laying 90 feet of stone tile (180 blocks) for seniors to walk on • Fixing the pond area and adding gold fish

• • • • •

Cleaning and painting all five benches that are located in the garden and cementing two more Adding bird feeders for bird watching Adding shading in some key areas Fixing five large pots and planting vegetables, plants and flowers in the 9’ by 11’ pots Replacing the existing sign that says "Community Center" with a newer sign that says "Senior Center."

Three Generations Team up For Gospel event By ADW Staff

Three generations of gospel music's finest are teaming with McDonald's to give back to communities nationwide through the McDonald's Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour. Headlined by Grammy-winning gospel sensation Smokie Norful, the concert series offers an assortment of soulful sounds through contemporary gospel with Tamela Mann, hip-hop with Lecrae and traditional/ contemporary gospel with John P. Kee and Vickie Winans. McDonald's Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour which kicks off May 9 and runs through Aug. 30. The tour stops in Atlanta on June 7 at the Greater Travelers Rest Baptist Church. "I'm elated to again headline the McDonald's Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour," said Norful. "From sharing some of my new music to introducing my son Ashton's career on the tour, this is a phenomenal season in life. And, I'm excited to share it with fans across the nation, all in an effort to give back." Now in its seventh year, McDonald's Inspiration Celebration Gospel Tour emphasizes the importance of giving back. As a part of each show, concertgoers will learn more about Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) and the important role it plays in helping families and children worldwide. Attendees will also have an opportunity to participate in a love offering to support families served by the Charity, including those in their community. "Giving back to those around us is crucial, especially with the recent tough times our families and communities have faced," said Winans, who will also host each concert. "Now more than ever, our communities need to know we are there for them, and that's something the McDonald's Inspiration

SMOKIE NORFUL

Celebration Gospel Tour has set out to do. I'm honored to take part in the cause, and I look forward to bringing joy and laughter to everyone who attends the concerts." "I'm humbled to share the stage with legendary gospel artists," said Lecrae, who won the 2013 Grammy for Best Gospel Album. "It's amazing to see a classic brand like McDonald's stand behind a message that's needed in communities everywhere. Gospel fans are in for an experience I believe they'll talk about long after the tour." The multi-city tour will make stops in nine markets, including Atlanta, Birmingham, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Louisville, Newark, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Concerts are free, with the exception of the May 11 show in Newark, which is part of McDonald's Gospelfest. "For generations, McDonald's has continued its efforts to be deeply rooted — and invested — in the areas we serve, both in restaurants and in the community," said Rob Jackson, McDonald's U.S. marketing director. "McDonald's is committed to giving back and we're honored to bring messages of joy and hope to thousands of our neighbors."

5


BUSINESS

renee Glover is Business league’s CeO of the year Renée Lewis Glover, chief executive officer of the Atlanta Housing Authority, will receive the "CEO of the Year" award at the Atlanta Business League's (ABL) 35th Annual CEO Appreciation Luncheon, Tuesday, May 7, at 11:30 a.m. at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. The ABL serves as a leading organization for minority business development and advocacy in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Each year the ABL recognizes chief executive officers (CEOs) for their outstanding participation in minority vendor development and community activities. "As CEO of the Atlanta Housing Authority, Renée Glover is lauded nationally for changing the model of public housing in Atlanta," says Leona Barr-Davenport, president & CEO of ABL. "By creating

public-private partnerships for housing developments, she demonstrates that she understands what it means to service the community and help uplift those that need it most." In addition to recognizing Glover, the ABL also will honor Maceo Brown, president and CEO of System 5 Electronics Inc. (Corporation of the Year); Sam Williams, president, Metro Atlanta Chamber (Distinguished Service Award); Maria Saporta, journalist, SaportaReport (Visions of Excellence Award); and Laron Walker, president, Sciberus Inc. (League Leadership Award). Each year ABL members nominate leaders in the city and state for the various awards and a selection committee reviews the nominations and makes a final decision based on the best qualifications for the award descriptions. The CEO Luncheon is a fundraising event, and this year's proceeds will be used to support the Youth Entrepreneur Programs and the Business Enrichment Seminar Series for Entrepreneur Development. For more information and tickets, call 404-584-8126 or visit www.atlantabusinessleague.org.

‘Buying Power of Black America’ Report Probes Spending Shifts By rICk rODGers Special to ADW According to the data found in a new report, “The Buying Power of Black America,” Black consumers have shifted their priorities and preferences. With the nation slowly recovering from recession, businesses need to develop strategies for regaining and increasing their share in the Black American economy. Black consumers now represent the margin of profitability in most consumer product categories. “What the recession did to Black consumers’ buying habits was to give them a reason to re-evaluate how they spent billions of dollars,” said Ken Smikle, president of Target Market News and editor of the report. “Before tight economic times, many companies were in the habit of taking their loyalty -- especially to top brands -- for granted. That changed during the downturn. Price became a bigger factor driving purchasing decisions. Now brands have to earn the loyalty of Black consumers all over again, and Black consumers are asking brands, ‘what have you done for me lately.’” For the past 17 years, Target Market News has published the only report that details in dollars the impact of the Black Consumer Market. Now approaching a trillion dollars in spending, the earned income of Black America already makes it the 16th largest market in the world, and it is on the verge of surpassing the gross national income of Mexico. This 105-page report breaks down how much of Black consumers' $836 billion in

income during 2011 was spent on clothing, entertainment, food, beverages, toys, consumer technology, cosmetics, autos, travel and dozens of other categories. The top five categories with the largest dollar expenditures were Housing and Related Charges - $206.2 billion; Food - $70.7 billion; Health Care - $25.5 billion; Cars and Trucks (new and used) - $22.6 billion; and Apparel Products - $21.1 billion. The top five categories showing an increase in spending between 2010 and 2011 were Appliances, $2.7 billion (29%); Sports and Recreational Equipment, $850 million (28%); Personal and Professional Services, $5 billion (27%); Computers, $5 billion (21%); and Non-Alcoholic Beverages, $4.3 billion (16%). Besides the economy, another factor causing a shift in the loyalty Black consumers is social media and increased access to business information. The new edition of The Buying Power of Black America debuts a section detailing the advertising dollars spent by major companies in Black media. It also compares the ad spending of companies by categories. The Buying Power of Black America is an analysis of data compiled annually by the U.S. Department of Commerce. It is based on interviews and diaries collected from 3,000 Black households, and is the most comprehensive survey conducted on Black consumers.

Jewel Burks Wins New Business Idea Pitch Competition Jewel Burks, a 23-year-old 2010 Howard University graduate and current Atlanta resident won START ATL’s “Idea Pitch Session” during the recent symposium at Spelman College. The competition featured 60-second pitches from pre-selected entrepreneurs in front of a panel of judges for a chance to win a Dell laptop, a $500 Office Depot gift card and five hours of web consulting services. Burks’ pitch was for her mobile app, PartPic, which she started in January. According to its website, www.partpic.com, PartPic was designed to help people discover the right part for repair and maintenance projects. PartPic was designed to help make locating industrial supplies easy by letting users snap a picture of a part to find more information about it or where they can purchase its replacement. “I have always wanted to be an entrepreneur and have been dabbling with different ideas for a long time,” said Burks. “I thought a mobile app would be a great first step to start my journey as a full-time entrepreneur.” START is part of a nationwide series created by digitalundivided (DID), a social enterprise that builds forward thinking initiatives that ultimately change the digital space by increasing the number of Black and Latino women digital entrepreneurs. The START Atlanta symposium was developed to teach urban entrepreneurs the tools to create and grow successful digital companies.


www.ADWnews.com

ENTERTAINMENT

May 2 - 8, 2013

Fiesta atlanta at Centennial Park on Cinco de mayo By ADW Staff Atlanta will pulse to a Latin beat this weekend for Fiesta Atlanta, a Cinco de Mayo explosion which celebrates the culture, achievements and experiences of people with a Mexican background, who live in the United States. The event, which officially commemorates the anniversary of an early victory by Mexican forces over French forces in the Battle of Pubela on May 5, 1862, has morphed in the U.S. into an opportunity to promote Mexican services and goods, including food, drinks and music. Centered at Centennial Olympic Park, the 7th annual Fiesta Atlanta will feature international, national and local recording artists, mariachi music and Mexican folk dancing on two stages; a morning 5K Run/Walk; youth soccer clinics and sponsor displays with free product samples, arts and crafts and authentic international foods. For more information on the family friendly day-long event, visit www.fiestaatlanta.com.

‘Brer rabbit & Friends’ Bring african2013 sweet auburn music Fest aims to Capture Original essence american Folklore to Puppetry stage By mayNarD eaTON S.E. Region News

The Muhammad family’s Sweet Auburn Music Fest, aims to re-capture the essence of the original Sweet Auburn Festival in full swing during the 70’s and 80’s, they say. That original essence, festival producer Yusef Muhammad asserts, is compellingly captured through their event’s focus on “family, music, culture, and community involvement.” The multi-genre music festival featuring three distinct forms of music -- R&B, hip-hop and Gospel -- will be held on Auburn Avenue Saturday and Sunday, May 4 and 5. “I was involved when the festival first brought thousands of people to Auburn Avenue and the entire community benefited,” says senior producer and Auburn Avenue businessman Steven Muhammad. “I do not approve of the profiteering that has taken place in the past decade, and we are determined to get it right, once again.” S.E. Region News conferred with Mr. Bennie Smith, the founder of the first Sweet Auburn Festival, to get some sense of the character of the first festival. “The idea began in 1976,” claimed Smith. “It was to circulate the money back into the community – that’s why I became involved. All of us who had businesses wanted a cleaner, safer environment. Every business bought into it. It was universal. ” Smith went on to recount how he had been urged by the late Dr. William Holmes Borders, then the politically influential pastor of Wheat Street Baptist Church, to “make something happen on Auburn Avenue” to revitalize Sweet Auburn, known as “Sweet” because it was acknowledged as the wealthiest Black business district in

By marIa ODum-HINmON ADW Staff

the country at one time. In 1986, the music festival, according to long-time community businessman Smith, was especially noteworthy, with appearances of James Brown, SCLC civil rights icon Hosea Williams, barbecue cooking by the Rib Shack, and the March Against Crime and Violence. “The merchants and the entire community on Auburn Ave. participated,” Smith shared. “We had the popular entertainers of the time to sponsor and help underwrite the costs of the festival. And the merchants thrived from the festival, out of their participation in the Sweet Auburn Merchant Association.” “We want to see progress on Auburn Avenue. Atlanta’s economic power brokers and those constructing the Trolley must commit to reviving Auburn Avenue,” says Muhammad. “We want everyone to benefit, so we’re taking this festival back to its original essence, as a community-based, inclusive event.”

Digital Daily Online www.ADWnews.com

The Center for Puppetry Arts has brought back the fun-filled trickster tales of “Brer Rabbit & Friends,” featuring the talents of several African-American artists, including Spencer G. Stephens, the show’s director; S. Renee Clark, the music director; and puppeteers Jared Brodie and Janeé Ann Smith. Audiences will be captivated by the uproarious tales of a cunning rabbit, his notorious friends and their comical attempts to stay out of a briar patch of trouble. The show runs through May 26. “Brer Rabbit & Friends” is based on a collection of tales passed down as spoken stories through multiple generations of AfricanAmerican slaves while living on Southern plantations. These oral traditions were recreated in print and then publicized by Joel Chandler Harris. The word “brer” is shortened dialect for the word “brother.” In the show, the excitement begins as Brer Bear, Brer Fox, Brer Rabbit, Sister Mud Turtle and Sister Bird find themselves in a battle for bragging rights to see who is the swiftest, the strongest and the smartest. Stephens, the show’s director, has been a puppeteer with the Center for Puppetry Arts for over 10 years, and this show marks his professional directorial debut with the center. Stephens said illustrating the story with puppets is what really brings the tale to life. “Honestly the use of puppetry is the easy thing, because these are such lively characters,” Stephens said. Clark plays live piano and sings throughout the performance, as well as serves as the show’s narrator. She not only performs previouslywritten music, she also plays and sings original music she wrote for the show. The songs in the show “are very influenced by gospel, blues and jazz,” Clark said. “We tried to capture more of the AfricanAmerican tradition in this particular production,” Clark said. “We tried to take those songs and shape them so they would have more of the African-American sound. I wrote a couple of

Photo Courtesy of Center for Puppetry Arts

additional pieces to go along, as well.” Jared Brodie, a first-time puppeteer with the Center for Puppetry Arts, plays Brer Rabbit. Another first-time puppeteer is Janeé Ann Smith, who plays Sister Mud Turtle. Brodie, who has an acting background, said one of the challenges when doing a puppet show is “taking what you know to do with your body as an actor and incorporating that into the movements of the puppet. The thing I kept in mind is that the rabbit is really fast, really active and is a trickster. You’re always thinking on your toes. He’s always one-upping his opponent. You have to keep the character alive and exuding energy throughout the play, not only when you’re singing, but also when showing emotions.” The ensemble also includes veteran puppeteers Dolph Amick and Tim Sweeny. Audiences who see “Brer Rabbit & Friends” can receive a coupon for one free admission to the Wren’s Nest, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary as the historic West End-area home of Brer Rabbit and Joel Chandler Harris. Show times are as follows: Tuesday – Friday 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.; Saturday 12 p.m. and 2 p.m.; Sunday 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Tickets are $9.25 (members) and $16.50 (nonmembers) and can be purchased online at WWW.PUPPET.ORG or by calling the ticket sales office at 404-873-3391.

7


www.ADWnews.com

FEATURES

Study: Attitudes on Financial Security Differ for Women of Color Special to ADW

A newly-released study from The State Farm Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College shows how differently women of color gauge their financially security compared to women in the general population. The pressure to pay off debt amid the challenge of meeting their own and their family's immediate needs are key challenges preventing many women of color from saving and building cash reserves. These trends are common among the general population of women who, despite using a variety of approaches to meet their financial goals, still don't feel financially secure. The report titled "Survey on the Financial Needs & Attitudes of Women of Color" polled 3,000 Asian, Hispanic and African-American women ages 25 to 75, along with a comparison group representative of women in the general public. "Our research uncovered the key roles a systematic savings plan and cash reserves play in the financial security and stability of women of color," said Professor Mary Quist-Newins, director of The State Farm Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College. "Women don't need to choose between saving and paying off debt -- they must do both to build a stronger and brighter long-term financial future for themselves and their families."

The lack of cash reserves exists across all income levels, hitting middle-income households the hardest. The survey found the presence of cash reserves are generally correlated with income and women who reported annual household earnings of more than $80,000 are more likely to have these funds. Among the noteworthy findings on African-American women were these: While African-American women report feeling the least financially secure, they are also the most hopeful about the future. Only 18 percent of African-American women with incomes of $45,000 to under $75,000 feel extremely or very secure, significantly less than average American women in the general population, who are predominantly Caucasian (26 percent) or Asian women (28 percent) with the same income. Yet, 74 percent of African-American women expect a brighter financial future as compared with 56 percent of women in the general population, 48 percent of women in the Asian population, and 62 percent of women in the Hispanic population. To determine their economic priorities, respondents are asked to rank the importance of a wide range of financial issues: Debt: The need to reduce debt trumps other financial goals, including saving in general and for retirement. Overall, three quarters of women say reducing or eliminating debt is a high priority, and this is most often named the top priority by women of all racial or ethnic backgrounds. African-American women (83 percent) are more likely than Hispanic (78 percent) and Asian women (70 percent) to call dealing with debt a high priority. The proportion of African-American women citing this as a priority is high, even among those with incomes of $75,000 or more (85 percent). Retirement: Following closely after debt reduction, nearly three in four women say investing for retirement is a high financial priority. African-American women (74 percent) were more likely to place an emphasis on retirement savings than women in the general population (predominantly Caucasian, 73 percent). Cash Reserves: A majority of women report that they are focused on saving for an emergency and growing their cash reserves. More so than women overall, African American (79 percent) and Hispanic (75 percent) women say that one of their high priority goals is simply to build up their general cash reserves. These differences are evident regardless of income level. Protection Planning: Few view adequate insurance coverage as their top priority, but about six in 10 women agree that having enough insurance to protect what is important to them and their family is a priority. African-American women (67 percent) are particularly likely to report that having adequate insurance is a high priority for them. The survey was conducted on behalf of The American College’s State Farm Center for Women and Financial Services. Responses were gathered through an online survey of 3,000 women, including 2,250 interviews with Asian, Hispanic and African-American women, plus a comparison group of 750 women in the general public.

8

May 2- 8, 2013


www.ADWnews.com

SPORTS

May 2 - 8, 2013

aTl Braves Host Free screening of ‘42’ for local Teens Special to ADW

Major League Baseball and the Atlanta Braves will host a private screening of the movie “42” for teenagers from metro Atlanta on May 5 at 2:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Station Regal Theatre 16. The youth have access to the movie free of charge and can share their experience online via Iam42.com. Attending the screenings will be youth from the Boys & Girls Club of Metro Atlanta, RBI, Andrew & Walter Young Family YMCA, L.E.A.D., Friendship Baptist Church, Shiloh Baptist Church Drum Line, Carver High School and Old National Athletic Association Red Knights. “We have the unique opportunity to impact the next generation of ball players by introducing them to the man that changed the course of baseball history,” said Atlanta Braves Community Affairs Director Ericka Newsome. “The exceptional film ‘42’ provides us an outlet to educate our youth on the importance of equality and progression. We are honored to share this significant piece of history with metro Atlanta teens.” “’42’ brilliantly depicts not only the proudest and most powerful event in baseball history, but also a watershed moment in American history and the Civil Rights Movement,” said Commissioner Selig. “This film is a profound way for all of us throughout Major League Baseball to educate our next generation about Jackie Robinson’s

vital impact on our nation. I thank Thomas Tull and his colleagues for working with the Robinson family and allowing this enduring American story to be told to a worldwide audience. With our annual April 15 celebration, the wide-ranging efforts of all 30 Clubs and now this inspirational film, it is an honor for our industry to continue to shine a light on the vibrant legacy of Jackie Robinson.” The film is currently in theaters and stars Chadwick Boseman as Jackie Robinson and Academy Award nominee Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers executive who signed Jackie to the team. Presented by Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures, “42” is written and directed by Academy Award winner Brian Helgeland and is a Legendary Pictures Production. In its opening weekend, “42,” which is available in more than 3,000 theaters nationwide, took in $27.5 million, marking the best opening weekend ever for a baseball movie, according to multiple industry references. Major League Baseball, in cooperation with all 30 MLB Clubs, is hosting private screenings of the film “42” for thousands of teenagers across the country and in Canada. All MLB Clubs will select students in grades 8-12 from their respective communities to fill local theaters for the screenings.

Warrick Dunn Charities Host Celebrity Golf Tournament Special to ADW

Warrick Dunn Charities (WDC), a public non-profit organization serving single-parent families across the country, will host its 3rdAnnual Celebrity Golf Classic presented by Bank of America on Monday, May 6, at The Golf Club of Georgia in Alpharetta. All proceeds will benefit WDC’s Homes for the Holidays and Betty’s Hope programs that enrich the lives of families academically, economically and socially. The 36-hole golf classic will include a shotgun start, hole-in-one and putting contests, longest drive award, and closest to the pin award. Participants will receive a gift bag, breakfast, lunch, snacks, and open bar. An awards reception and raffle will take

place after the tournament. Celebrity Foursomes are $2,500 and include a celebrity golfer and cart and green fees with caddy included. Each foursome also receives eight tickets to the Pairings Party on Sunday, May 5, at Shout in Atlanta. The celebrity meet and greet will feature Cinco de Mayo themed food and drinks, as well as a silent auction with vacation getaways and entertainment memorabilia. Visit www.wdc.org/golf for more information or for ticket sales. Additionally, there are other sponsorship opportunities available. For more details, contact Amanda Hamman at 404-367-2230 or at hamman@wdc.org.

9


www.ADWnews.com

EMPLOYMENT

HOURLY/NON-TECHNICAL (POULTRY PROCESSING POSITIONS) Koch Foods, LLC has employment opportunities in poultry processing (deboning) at their Gainesville and Cumming, Georgia deboning facilities. Positions are full time/shift work. Experience preferred but not required. Competitive pay/benefit programs, including health, dental, 401-k. Apply in person for Gainesville positions at 950 Industrial Blvd., Gainesville, GA 30501, Wednesdays only, 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM or for Cumming positions at 221 Meadow Dr., Cumming, GA 30040, Wednesdays only, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM. EEO M/V/F/D. _______________________________________________ Attorney, Korean Practice Team, Atlanta, GA: JD Degree and GA license req’d; must have 1 yr. exp. in int’l business transactions at Asia-based multinational corporations. Send resume to Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP, 201 17th St., Ste. 1700, Atlanta, GA 30363. _______________________________________________ Master Teacher – Sci&Tech: Fernbank Elementary Foundation in Atlanta, GA: Dev. & lead schoolwide sci&tech instr prog for K-5 science curriculum. Req Master’s or foreign equ.in Edu/Sci/Pol, Soc, or Cult Studies /rel & 2 yrs elem sch teaching exp. In lieu of Master’s or foreign equ.in Edu/Sci/Pol, Soc, or Cult Studies /rel & 2 yrs elem sch teaching exp will acc Bach or foreign equ in Edu/Sci/Pol, Soc, or Cult Studies /rel & 5 yrs prog post-bacc elem sch teaching exp. Also req 1 yr exp integrating Promethean Int Whiteboard technology AND following skills through edu or work exp: coord/manage after-school sci activities/clubs; grant writing AND GA certification. All exp may or may not be acq concurrently. To apply, cont Drew Schuler, schuleram@bellsouth.net or 157 Heaton Park Dr. Atlanta, GA, 30307. _______________________________________________ RFP/Part-time Grants Administrator Go to www.afcra.com _______________________________________________ TIBCO Software Inc. has an opening in Atlanta, GA for a Principal Consultant (Software Engineer) to deliver system architecture & hardware/software specification consulting project activities. Must have unrestricted U.S. work authorization. Mail resumes to Att: D. Dzapo, HR, Ref#AGA3, 3307 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304. _______________________________________________ Cooper Green Mercy Health Services Birmingham, AL NOW HIRING Internal Medicine/Family Practice Physician Excellent opportunity to work in a developing multi-speciality medical practice located in the city’s expanding medical and research community. The successful candidate will be joining an organization that is supported by one of the most outstanding clinical sub-speciality groups in America. This position is a part-time contract position for physician services for an out-patient clinic, no hospital coverage, no on-call, no weekends, no site rotation, no evenings and no holidays. Must have M.D. or D.O., completion of U.S. Residency Program and Board Certified or Board eligible. Three years practicing medicine preferred. If interested, e-mail resume to jccjobs@jccal.org and include on the subject line, “Physician Resume”.

BIDS AND PROPOSALS REQUEST FOR SEALED BID REC-051613-PLE ADVERTISEMENT for PARKING LOT EXPANSION DESIGN for BILL BADGETT STADIUM The City of College Park is accepting Sealed Bids from qualified vendors for PARKING LOT EXPANSION DESIGN for BILL BADGETT STADIUM. Sealed proposals will be received no later than 10:00am, Thursday, May 16, 2013 at the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park Georgia, 30337, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the above date and time, or in any other location other than the Purchasing Department will not be considered. A bid packet may be obtained from the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park, Georgia 30337, or from www.collegeparkga.com. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:00am, Monday, April 22, 2013 at the City of College Park City Hall. Questions arising AFTER the Pre-Bid Meeting will be accepted via email ONLY to bgregory@collegeparkga.com until COB April 26. An Addendum with all Q&A will be posted to the City’s website on or about COB Wednesday, May 1. It is always the vendor’s responsibility to check the City’s website for any/all addenda. The City of College Park reserves the right to reject any or all bids based on past performance and to waive technicalities and informalities and re-advertise. All Minority, Woman and Small Businesses are strongly encouraged to apply. Only responsive proposals that are determined to meet the requirements and criteria set forth by the City of College Park will be considered.

10

CLASSIFIED BIDS AND PROPOSALS

BIDS AND PROPOSALS

May 2 - 8, 2013

REQUEST FOR SEALED BID REC-050913-GCO ADVERTISEMENT for GOLF COURSE OPERATOR

REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS FIRE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION UNIFORMS BID #FD-060613-ADMIN UNIF ADVERTISEMENT for FIRE DEPARTMENT UNIFORMS

The City of College Park is accepting Sealed Bids from qualified vendors for COLLEGE PARK GOLF COURSE OPERATOR. Sealed proposals will be received no later than 10:00am, Thursday, May 9, 2013 at the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park Georgia, 30337, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the above date and time, or in any other location other than the Purchasing Department will not be considered. A bid packet may be obtained from the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park, Georgia 30337, or from www.collegeparkga.com. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:00am, April 18, 2013 at the City of College Park City Hall. Questions arising AFTER the Pre-Bid Meeting will be accepted via email ONLY to bgregory@collegeparkga.com until COB April 23. An Addendum with all Q&A will be posted to the City’s website on or about COB Friday, April 26. It is always the vendor’s responsibility to check the City’s website for any/all addenda. The City of College Park reserves the right to reject any or all bids based on past performance and to waive technicalities and informalities and re-advertise. All Minority, Woman and Small Businesses are strongly encouraged to apply. Only responsive proposals that are determined to meet the requirements and criteria set forth by the City of College Park will be considered. _______________________________________________

The City of College Park is accepting Sealed Bids from qualified vendors for FIRE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION UNIFORMS. Sealed proposals will be received no later than 2:00 pm, June 6, 2013 at the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park Georgia, 30337 at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the above date and time, or in any other location other than the Purchasing Department will not be considered. A bid packet may be obtained from the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park, Georgia 30337, or from www.collegeparkga.com. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 9:30am, Thursday, May 16 at the City of College Park City Hall. Questions arising AFTER the Pre-Bid Meeting will be accepted via email ONLY to bgregory@collegeparkga.com until COB Thursday, May 23. An Addendum with all Q&A will be posted to the City’s website on or about COB Thursday, May 30. It is always the vendor’s responsibility to check the City’s website for any/all addenda. The City of College Park reserves the right to reject any or all bids based on past performance and to waive technicalities and informalities, to ignore small price differences when there is a rational benefit to the City, and re-advertise. All Minority, Woman and Small Businesses are strongly encouraged to apply. Only responsive proposals that are determined to meet the requirements and criteria set forth by the City of College Park will be considered. _______________________________________________

Mr Gallokho african psychic solves your issues bring back love ones business success court issues luck black magic&voodoo spell evil&more quick results call 6788873927 _______________________________________________

REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS UNIFORMS BID #FD-060613-OPS UNIF ADVERTISEMENT for FIRE DEPARTMENT UNIFORMS

REQUEST FOR SEALED BID #ST-050213-LMIG ADVERTISEMENT for 2013 LOCAL MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENT GRANT STREET RESURFACING PROJECT

The City of College Park is accepting Sealed Bids from qualified vendors for FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS UNIFORMS. Sealed proposals will be received no later than 3:00 pm, June 6, 2013 at the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park Georgia, 30337 at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the above date and time, or in any other location other than the Purchasing Department will not be considered. A bid packet may be obtained from the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park, Georgia 30337, or from www.collegeparkga.com. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:30am, Thursday, May 16 at the City of College Park City Hall. Questions arising AFTER the Pre-Bid Meeting will be accepted via email ONLY to bgregory@collegeparkga.com until COB Thursday, May 23. An Addendum with all Q&A will be posted to the City’s website on or about COB Thursday, May 30. It is always the vendor’s responsibility to check the City’s website for any/all addenda. The City of College Park reserves the right to reject any or all bids based on past performance and to waive technicalities and informalities, to ignore small price differences when there is a rational benefit to the City, and re-advertise. All Minority, Woman and Small Businesses are strongly encouraged to apply. Only responsive proposals that are determined to meet the requirements and criteria set forth by the City of College Park will be considered.

The City of College Park is accepting Sealed Bids from qualified vendors for STREET RESURFACING PROJECT - 2013 LOCAL MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENT GRANT. Sealed proposals will be received no later than 10:00am, Thursday, May 2, 2013 at the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park Georgia, 30337, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the above date and time, or in any other location other than the Purchasing Department will not be considered. A bid packet may be obtained from the City of College Park Purchasing Department, 3667 Main Street, College Park, Georgia 30337, or from www.collegeparkga.com. A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:00am, April 11, 2013 at the City of College Park City Hall. Questions arising AFTER the Pre-Bid Meeting will be accepted via email ONLY to bgregory@collegeparkga.com until COB April 17. An Addendum with all Q&A will be posted to the City’s website on or about COB Friday, April 19. It is always the vendor’s responsibility to check the City’s website for any/all addenda. A ten percent (10%) Bid Bond is required to be submitted with bid. Prospective bidders should also be aware that a Performance and Payment Bond for one hundred percent (100%) of contract amount will be required of the successful bidder. The City of College Park reserves the right to reject any or all bids based on past performance and to waive technicalities and informalities and re-advertise. All Minority, Woman and Small Businesses are strongly encouraged to apply. Only responsive proposals that are determined to meet the requirements and criteria set forth by the City of College Park will be considered. _______________________________________________ Notice of Incorporation Notice is given that Articles of Incorporation which will incorporate “DENIM GARAGE, Incorporated, INCORPORATED,” will be delivered to the Secretary of State for filing in accordance with the Georgia Nonprofit Corporation Code (O.C.G.A. $14-3-202). The initial registered office of the corporation will be located at 2916 Brookfield Lane SW, Atlanta, Georgia 30331 and its initial reigstered agent at such address is JOSHUA C. LEWIS _______________________________________________

FOR RENT

Apt for Rent Southwest near Marta. 1 Bdrm; 1 1/2 Baths; Den; furnished Kitchen and Sunroom. $450 @ month + deposit. Call 404-691-5656 . _______________________________________________ Property For Sale – 1921 Cummings Dr. S.W., Atlanta 30311 Contact trustee 404-353-6222. Best Offer/Highest Bidder

ADW Contact: Barbara Cullings P.O. Box 5043 Atlanta, GA 30302 (404) 353-6222

ATLANTA DAILY WORLD Powered by Real Times Media

www.adwnews.com


www.ADWnews.com

VIEWPOINTS

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION

learning to Teach students How to learn

america Needs a Truth Commission on racism

BY GLORIA BROWNE-MARSHALL

BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX

African-American students achieve at a different level than White students. Test scores are lower, as are high school and college completion rates, and the number of African Americans attending four-year institutions is falling. The rate of African-American suspensions and expulsions from K-12 schools is higher than that of other groups. By almost any metric there are gaps between African-American students and White or Asian students (Latinos achieve at about the same rate as African Americans). Why does this happen? The late sociologist John Ogbu hypothesized that the gap was the result of young African Americans thinking that learning was “acting White.” His theory was batted around as if it were fact, even after Duke economist William Darity refuted the Ogbu theory. Why? Because it fits somebody’s stereotype to describe African-American youngsters as culturally alienated from the mainstream, so much that they eschew the very institution that could be a bridge for them into the middle class. Give the history of African Americans and education; it is hard to swallow these stereotypes. Some states had laws on the books to prevent African Americans from learning to read and write in the pre-Civil War period. Both White and Black people risked flogging, fines and other penalties for “teaching a slave to read.” Millions of African Americans sacrificed for the right to be literate, and ensured that their children would also have opportunities by baking cakes, frying chicken, and raising a few dollars to get to college by whatever means necessary. At the beginning of the 20th century, the only colleges open to African Americans were historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and we went despite the obstacles. Our presence rejected the notion that learning was “acting White.” In fact, we were acting learned and literate. Still, it is in the interest of some to continue that stereotype. You’ve heard the adage that if you don’t want an African American to know something, just hide it in a book. That kind of ignorance is the very reason that African-American people were able, during the Civil War, to spy on Confederates who thought they were only illiterate enslaved people. That is why Mary Ellen Pleasant was able to eavesdrop on conversations on stock and turn them into wealth. Those who write about the achievement gap ought not underestimate African Americans. Where does the achievement gap come from, then? It comes from the opportunity gap. The average household) earns $31,000 a year, compared to $51,000 for Whites. Fifty-one thousand ($51,000) can buy a lot more opportunity than $31,000 can. If income determines housing clusters, neighborhoods with a $51,000 mean income have better schools and more involved parents than the $31,000 neighborhood does. Closing income gaps closes opportunity gaps, according to a Ford Foundation-sponsored book written by Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond, an Obama education adviser. She says poverty and segregation means that some students attend schools that have fewer resources than others. Indeed, inner city high schools are less likely to offer Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) classes. Sometimes when these courses are available in suburban high schools, African-American students are discouraged from taking them. Ivory Toldson, a professor at Howard University and a contributor to the Root also refutes the notion that African-American students think learning is “acting White.” Most African-American students, he says, are interested in attending college but may not because of cost factors. He also says that academic support should be provided to all students, and that the way to close achievement gaps is to “reduce racial disparities in income and to increase equity and inclusion in education.” For a great deal of students the issue is not “acting White,” but being connected to educational options and outcomes. One of the more important factors in student achievement is parental involvement, yet many parents find themselves “too busy” or too uninformed to interact with teachers. One study says that parents don’t necessarily have to help with homework, but simply to reinforce that homework should be done, and to be inquisitive about it. Unfortunately, many parents, frustrated with the school system, write it off. Further, too many of our community organizations don’t sufficiently emphasize education, or if they do, don’t get into the “down and dirty” of it, preferring to raise much-needed scholarship funds than to take a young person by the hand and guide them through next steps to education. The majority of African-American students are still first-generation college students. They aren’t always sure what next steps are, and they often need help maneuvering through a system with which their parents have no familiarity. Too many smart students don’t have the parental and societal support, they need to achieve. The United States falls way behind the rest of the world when we don’t value students who have the potential to be high achievers, regardless of race or ethnicity. We further disservice ourselves as a nation when we fail to value those who have the intelligences to change our world. Julianne Malveaux is a Washington, D.C.-based economist and writer. She is President Emerita of Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, N.C.

ADWnews Founded August 5, 1928; Became Daily, March 12, 1932 W.A. Scott, II, Founder/Publisher, August 5, 1928 To February 7, 1934 C.A. Scott, Publisher February 7, 1934 to July 26, 1997 M. Alexis Scott, Publisher July 26, 1997 to Present Published every Thursday at N. Desert Drive, Suite 2 109A, Atlanta, Georgia 30344.

May 2 - 8, 2013

Until the Lion writes his own history, he will always be misrepresented. That’s what Frederick Douglass said. Until America convenes a Truth and Reconciliation Commission on racism, the complete African-American story will not be told. Last month, an exasperated Justice Elena Kagen asked attorneys arguing the Shelby County voting rights case if the Supreme Court should really decide when racism has ended. Respectfully, no such decision on racism can be made without first convening a Truth and Reconciliation Commission. South Africa’s government sponsored a Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Cape Town, in 1995. Apartheid ended legal segregation there. Black South Africans testified to life in wooden shack ghettos; of how murder, torture, and kidnapping by police comprised their daily lives. Students and teachers testified to schools without books, chairs, and heat. South African men and women spoke of humiliating body searches, beatings, and arrests while living under constant curfews without rights under law. America’s first Race Commission followed the Chicago Race Riots of 1919. Twenty-three Blacks and 15 Whites died in attacks on African-American communities by Europeans. This 700-page Chicago report, published in 1922, sought to educate European immigrants by emphasizing their similarities with African Americans in hopes of reducing unfair housing, employment discrimination, and political disenfranchisement. In 1997 President Bill Clinton convened a Race Commission led by renowned historian John Hope Franklin. The Commission met for 15 months, taking testimony, visiting schools and communities, before presenting “One America in the 21st Century: The President's Initiative on Race.” Clinton’s Race Commission examined the impact of racism hoping to build a more united America by embracing common values instead focusing on divisions. Times changed. Nelson Mandela, revered today, was once a hunted terrorist. A trained lawyer, this former President of South Africa, served 27 years in prison. Both Martin Luther King Jr. and Mandela received a Nobel Peace Prize. Unlike King, Mandela lived to tell his story. Few African Americans have spoken publicly about their grief over Dr. King’s assassination. Few have spoken about working on prison chain gangs. Few African-American elders who fled, like refugees in combat zones, have spoken publicly about leaving behind family and farm ahead of the Ku Klux Klan. Few women have spoken of retaliatory rapes following gains in civil rights. Yet, these are real racial experiences. Racism remains threaded in and out of criminal justice, housing, employment, and education. Like oil stains, racism taints the joy of oppressed Americans. Their spiritual wounds are left to fester for fear a Truth Commission would unleash uncontrolled emotions and stir prejudices. If Americans are weary of racism, then consider African Americans who have wrestled with it for nearly 400 years. America grew tired of hearing about slavery as early as 1883. Less than 20 years after slavery ended, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Joseph Bradley wrote "it would be running the slavery argument into the ground to make it apply to every act of discrimination.” With that, five racial discrimination lawsuits were dismissed. Today, America is simmering in racial injustice. Inner-city ghettos cannot contain growing discontent. Mass incarceration has not made Black people disappear. Police harassment has increased racial tensions. Selecting a handful of Blacks for special treatment, while disregarding millions, has failed. Divide and conquer has run its course. In 2006, the American Bar Association (ABA), the world’s largest legal organization, passed Resolution 108A, which asks Congress to create and appropriate funds for a Commission to study and make findings relating to the present day social, political, and economic consequences of both slavery and the denial thereafter of equal justice under law for persons of African descent living in the United States. For full disclosure, I served on the ABA committee which submitted this resolution. A Truth and Reconciliation Commission will not end racism. However, for America to move forward the Lion must add its story to the history book. Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, an associate professor of Constitutional Law at John Jay College in New York City, is author of “Race, Law, and American Society: 1607 to Present,” and a legal correspondent covering the U.S. Supreme Court and major court cases.

Periodicals Postage Paid at Atlanta Mailing Offices. Publication Number 017255. Send address changes to Atlanta Daily World, 3485 N. Desert Drive, Suite 2 109A, Atlanta, Georgia 30344

E-MAIL: Publisher@atlantadailyworld.com ADWnews@atlantadwilyworld.com Advertising@atlantadailyworld.com Circulation@atlantadailyworld.com Classified@atlantadailyworld.com Sports@atlantadailyworld.com

TELEPHONE: 404-761-1114 FAX: 404-761-1164

MEMBER: Associated Press Atlanta Business League Central Atlanta Progress Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce National Newspaper Publishers Association

WEB SITE: www.ADWnews.com

MARIAN ALEXIS SCOTT – Publisher WENDELL S. SCOTT – Operations WILLIAM A. SCOTT, IV – Controller CHARLOTTE ROY – Managing Editor MICHELLE GIPSON – Advertising Director KAI SCOTT – Graphic Designer DION RABOUIN – Digital Editor

The Atlanta Daily World is not responsible for unsolicited photos, manuscripts, etc., unless return is requested with postage. Address all correspondence to, and make checks payable to Atlanta Daily World, rather than to individuals.

Atlanta Daily World is powered by Real Times Media

Mail subscription rates: 1 year-$52 / 2 years-$85 Forms of Payment: Check, Money Order, American Express, Master Card or VISA

11


Actress/Director LaTanya Richardson Jackson enjoys the True Colors Theatre Company benefit on April 20 with Brian McKissick, CEO of Backstory Entertainment.

The Lumpkins were among the True Colors patrons, including Pat (from left), her husband Alton, Alton Jr. and his wife Vanessa.

12

AROUND TOWN

May 2 - 8, 2013

Photos By M. Alexis Scott

www.ADWnews.com

Sharmeen Hawkins, chair of the True Colors benefit, stands with her husband Greg Hawkins. Proceeds from the benefit support the theatre company’s student program.

Former Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell, his wife Sharon and former Atlanta First Lady Valerie (Maynard) Jackson were among the guests at the party at the exclusive private home on the city’s northside.

Tirrell D. Whittely, CEO of Liquid Soul Media, and his wife Kristen enjoy the True Colors festivities inside and outside a lovely private home.

Ernest Greer, corporate attorney with Greenberg Traurig, enjoys the True Colors benefit with his wife Patrise.

Profile for Atlanta Daily World

Atlanta Daily World Digital Edition 5-2-13  

ADW Digital Edition 5-2-13

Atlanta Daily World Digital Edition 5-2-13  

ADW Digital Edition 5-2-13

Profile for adwnews
Advertisement