Page 1

PORTFOLIO

ADA JAŚKOWIEC

2018 ARCHITECTURE, GRAPHICS & WRITING


FRAMING PROTEST COHOUSING

7 41

MSc Graduation Project

GENERATION Y HOUSING ESTATE

51

Competition, 2nd prize

URBAN BLOCK EXCAVATION OPTIMUM VIRTUAL WORLD ARCHITECTURAL TRANSLATIONS

21 31 64

MSc2 // Public Building

LEGO // SALTHOLMSGADE DWELLINGS IN WROCLAW GRAPHIC DESIGN

60 62 66

Internship work

CROWD AND PUBLIC SPHERE DESIGN AS OPERA APERTA VR AND THE PERIL OF DISCONNECTION

18 28 38

MSc Graduation essay excerpt

Bsc Graduation Thesis

MSc1 // Why Factory MSc2 // Seminar Exercise

Architectural assistant work Bnieuws editorial work

Theoretical thesis excerpt Critical Reflection on Technology essay excerpt


// CV Ir. Ada Jaśkowiec 2018 Architecture Graduate, b. 19.06.1989 MSc in Architecture // TU Delft Bsc in Architecture // Warsaw University of Technology MA&BA in English Studies // University of Warsaw

De Genestetstraat 13

In my architectural endeavours, I intend to combine design with research. It is equally

2612RL Delft

important for me to attain technological expertise to design a resilient building and to foster intellectual discipline to be able to ask proper questions and find the right

ada.jaskowiec@gmail.com

answers. I am most interested in the moment of translation of a concept into a physical structure with all the compromises and mediations it entails.

ABOUT ME

CONTACT INFO

(0048) 664703911

linkedin @adajaskowiec issuu @adjot

Revit concept development

Rhinoceros + Vray

research structuring

Adobe Photoshop

architectural design

Adobe Illustrator

architectural visualisation

Adobe InDesign

writing & editing

SketchUp

graphic design

Grasshopper Microsoft Office

09.2017-08.2018

Editor // Bnieuws at BK TU Delft Writing and proof-reading of articles, layouting, promotion, distribution, assembly, contacting contributors.

02-07.2016

Architecture Intern // C.F. Møller Aarhus, Denmark LEGO office building in Billund, Denmark // plan layouts, development of

WORK

the main patio and staircases, charts, 3D illustrations and building models Residential development of Saltholmsgade, Aarhus // Facade studies, plan layouts, row houses design 06-12.2014

Architectural Assistant // Estudio Lamela Polska Residential building development in Wroclaw // building permit stage: working on flats’ layouts, sections, elevations, CAD details, site plan

07-08.2013

Architectural Engineering Intern // AGP Metro Polska Regular visits to the construction site, reporting on the progress of works, document translations, participation in commissioning

SKILLS

SOFTWARE

Autocad


2016-2018

Delft University of Technology // Architecture and the Built Environment

Msc, cum laude

Msc1: The Why Factory // Msc2 : Public Buildings

Graduation studio: Public building. Topic: Framing Urban Protest

EDUCATION

2015-2016

Warsaw University of Technology // Architecture and Urbanism // Msc Completed one year of the programme

2011-2015

Warsaw University of Technology // Architecture and Urbanism // Bsc, Architect Graduation: ‘Single-family Row Housing Designed as Cohousing’

2011-2013

University of Warsaw // English Studies // MA Computational linguistics // ‘The Use of Corpora in Translation Studies’

2008-2011

University of Warsaw // English Studies // BA Theoretical linguistics

COURSES

02-04.2017

Delftse Methode Nederlands voor buitenlanders course at A1 level

10.2015

The Association of Polish Architects Second Warsaw Urban Workshops

2010-2011

DOMIN School in Warsaw

Polish (native)

ACHIEVEMENTS

British comedy

English (full proficiency)

theoretical linguistics

Spanish (reading, speaking, basic writing)

07.2018

FAVOURITES

LANGUAGES

Drawing and modelling course for aspiring architecture students

progressive music

Italian (reading)

spotify’s discover weekly

Dutch (reading)

shakshuka

BK TU Delft Graduated cum laude

02.2016

2nd Prize at Builder 4Young Architects Competition Residential estate for the generation Y shared with Michal Strupinski (the first prize was not awarded)

09.2015

Warsaw University of Technology Graduated among 10% of the best students

//


INSPIRATIONS

SKILLS ACQUIRED

// research and process structuring Theoretical thesis // Embodied Protest: An Antidote to Mediated Presence // methods of representation Developing a way of drawing which represents the project best // conversation piece development Creation of a drawing which explains the whole project at once

“Tehran – Life Within Walls” // Ed. Hamed Khosravi Michelangelo Antonioni // “Blow Up” Jeff Beck // “The Revolution Will Be Televised”


// FRAMING PROTEST

| Street during protest

7

7 //

| Street without protest

Reworking of the street profile, beyond its traditional surfaces of a pavement and a facade, by adding depth and topography to the street and reusing existing buildings and adjacent empty plots as protest-related edifices. Architectural solutions assume the creation of multiple ways of framing the protest, creating plurality of perspectives, providing both panoramic and immersive experience of the crowd.


PROTEST INFRASTRUCTURE France, Strasbourg, Allee de la Robertsau TU Delft // “Ground Things and Representation: Strasbourg”, Architecture & Public Building Graduation Studio 09.2017-07.2018 tutors: Filip Geerts, Sien van Dam, Mauro Parravicini urban design // architectural design // architectural and material detailing

The section of the street, being a constitutive unit of every city, as a design task requires constant reworking and adjustments according to changing socio-political conditions. The society of the 21st century looks different than it used to, the authorities changed along with social stratification models, technological solutions evolved and, hence, the surrounding urban tissue needs to be updated. The street design of a 21th century European, democratic city needs to be reworked in order to host its citizens’ activities and needs most appropriately, otherwise it may turn out too restrictive. Remodelling the street in the spirit of democratic expression, whether it means agreeing or disagreeing, became the main premise of the project.

The space is meant to provide all the infrastructure for protest as well as to allow for multiple creative uses of space through appropriation. The project devises a system of protest street, which in its universality may prove replicable in various contexts and is not bound exclusively to the chosen location. Due to its importance in the city’s protest network, linking the city centre with the European Quarter, Allee de la Robertsau in 8 // Framing protest

Strasbourg, creates a fruitful ground for experimenting with such interventions. When is the moment in which the society may be trusted and when does it need to be controlled?


FUNCTION SEQUENCING

creation create and show

atelier spaces, workshops, printing houses, exhibition spaces, museum

congregation meet and discuss

plot 3

sports fields, courtyards, gyms, discussion clubs, cafes, galleries, restaurants

plot 2 communication see and be seen

radio, TV, media facilities, monuments, characteristic points, loggias

9 // Framing protest

plot 1


RESEARCH: ANALYSIS NETWORK OF PROTEST The selection of public spaces used by local citizens for protesting was based on observation, articles, short movies, media reports and historical photographs.

4 6

The mapping of types of public buildings allows

5

to highlight the relations between public spaces and adjacent institutions. The quantitative survey aims to measure Strasbourg capacities for hosting mass protests. The 2

map is divided into the grid, easily translatable into the amount of people 1

who could potentially fit inside, according to a

3 2

Public building types

3

Organisation Education University Culture Church Media Military Law

1

European Union Administration Goverment

Private interest

PUBLIC SPACE AS A TERRITORY OF MUTUAL CONTROL

Institutional interest

In accordance with Habermas’ theory, public spac

Public interest

understood as an arena of mutual control betwee

Private people with

10 // Framing protest

access to public life

(understood as private people entering the public

Place de Haguenau

Place de la République

and any organisation holding power (may it be a s area: 32.200 sqm

area: 14.200 sqm safe capacity: 28.400 critical capacity: 56.000

safe capacity: 64.400

organisation, a public person, etc.). Public space is critical capacity: 128.800

Private people with

of constant control. In a perfect world, a private in

restricted access to

constrained to the private realm, as well as a state

public life

is only expressed within state realm. Ideally, public

Representativess of

regulated by the government only to such extent t Anti-Erdoga

not constrain expression, free speech, freedom of a

the state

2 - a “safe” crowd

2,5-3 - a de

etc. On the other hand, citizens are expected to c

imposed Place Broglie rules. As a result, public space is an area o

Flexible borders Regular borders Strong borders

area: 13.600 sqm struggle over the territory, which allows for recognit safe capacity: 27.200

Place de Bordeaux

maximum capacity: 54.400

certain group in public space.

area: 82.100 sqm safe capacity: 164.200 critical capacity: 328.400

Place de la Gare

Place Kléber

area: 13.500 sqm safe capacity: 27.000 critical capacity: 54.000

area: 10.800 sqm safe capacity: 21.600 maxinum capaticy: 43.200 Regular crowd: below 1 person / 1sqm


RESEARCH: SPECULATION BODY DURING PROTEST Experiencing space through body and body through space - acknowledging the body’s constant relation with the surrounding becomes “the key to a revolt against modernity’s straightjacket.” Lefebvre states that “the whole of (social) space proceeds from the body”. It ceases to be an abstract idea, but a very corporeal, material entity. It is a body that perceives the space first (through senses), and through our bodies we become social.

kissing Body gaze

looking around

According to Lefebvre, one of the ways of freeing ourselves from the spectacle, is the defamiliarisation of perception, which has to be realised through erasing any mediation from our cognition. Experiencing space through body and body through space - acknowledging the body’s constant relation with the surrounding becomes “the key to a revolt against modernity’s straightjacket.” Lefebvre states that “the whole of (social) space proceeds from the body” (p.405). It ceases to be an abstract idea, but a very corporeal, material entity. It is a body that perceives the space first (through senses), and through our bodies we become social. While a body provides connection, any mediation leads to disconnection (Friedman and van Ingen, p. 94)

shouting piggyback carrying

withstanding the noise

pulling up

carrying banners

looking up

clapping

throwing items

carrying banners keeping your arms up

During the French Revolution in 1789, body was still used as a shield. At that point, the society was still fighting for the right for the actual, corporeal attendance in public life. Barricades would be built100 notmonly as 1000amterritorial mark, but also to protect the vulnerable body, which was put in life-threatening danger. Almost two hundred years later, 1968 protests brought about a subversive use of body. In the shadow of a post-war trauma, it could also be seen as a society healing process, attempting to blur the memory of disintegrated, bleeding bodies. Following Debord’s call for arms asserting that through body one can escape the spectacle and be free from the imposed schemata, the body was understood as a means of liberating the society. Sensory cognition supposedly would break the fourth wall and provide access to “reality”. Hence, 1968 brought almost the carnivalesque use of the body. Almost literally applying the notion of liberation from imposed limitations and restrictions of a society, young people would engage publicly in very physical actions, eating, drinking, kissing, making love - which are intrinsically human, but became marginalised by the society. That was the way of being extremely physical, but without being hurt.

waving

100 m

elbowing your way through

throwing items

keeping straight

writing & graffiti

throwing items keeping the balance

grabbing

pushing people away

climbing falling

leaning against something shock absorption standing walking

bending down

jumping

dancing

head

upper body

lying

n

hips

running crouching falling

adjusting to the tectonics hand

elbow

climbing

arm

kicking standing on your toes

4 legs

knee

standing

feeling the ground

foot

People appropriating architecture

Slope / ramp / inclination

Architecture imposing rules

Smooth/ solid surface

Bumpy surface

Stairs

Elevation

Submersion

Greek democracy (oligarchy?)

Absolute monarchy

A greek polis was divided into koine (common)banquets and oikos (private) realms. The public sphere (agora) was Campagne des

constituted by common discussion (lexis) and action (praxis). However, the access was only restricted to the the most acclaimed citizens, whose status was constituted based on personal wealth (private realm).

ce can be

Vertical element

Monument

French The access to public revolution life is granted to the majority of citizens - it has lost its social exclusivity (it is bad?). Modern democracy

Conflicts restricted to the private sphere enter the public sphere, as well as the institutional interest prevails over public interest.

en a society space)

state, an

Resting / standing / observing

Fast walking / biking / skating

Slow walking

Blank wall

Transparent wall

Fence

Zone marking

Resting / sitting/ restricting movement

Resting / sitting / restricting movement

Orientation, to be passed by / omitted

Narrowing

Widening

Disassemblable surface

Greenery

Less importance

More importance

Temporality

Relax, view framing

Commemorating, orientation

s the area

nterest is

e interest

Canopy

that it does an manifestation

10 October 2015 assembly,

ense walking crowd

Anti-GCO manifestation 30 September 2017

3-3,5 - a dense queueing crowd

comply with No access, fast walking

of constant

tion of a

4-4,7 - a dense standing crowd

Watching, slow walking

Zone marking, no access

Absolute monarchy Public sphere, understood as a separate realm distinguished from a prive realm, is non-existent in the feudal society. The superior creates a public representation, which is elevated to the public status, yet is not inclusive to other members of the society.

Shelter, resting

Campagne des banquets - France, 1847/8 The governmental restriction on political gatherings and demonstrations was circumvented by the idea of private political meetings, which served as a way to still provide the regime with a popular criticism

| Drawings depict power struggle in different historical times and political systems.

Nazi assembly 1944

Dense (but safe) crowd: 2 people/ 1sqm

Je suis Charlie 11 January 2015

Very dense crowd: 4 people/ 1sqm

11 // Framing protest

c space is


PLOT 1: COMMUNICATION

underground plan

street level plan

12 // Framing protest

longisection

cross section


PLOT 2: CREATION

street level plan

longisection

cross section

13 // Framing protest

underground plan


PLOT 3: CONGREGATION

underground plan

street level plan

14 // Framing protest

longisection

cross section


APPROPRIATION OF SPACES In its very core, the project assumes dual use of the

appropriation and provoke creative uses during festivals,

spaces. As an important street in everyday life, it needs

celebrations, manifestations or gatherings. Last but not

to provide friendly and beautiful environment for its

least, in order to be able to host thousands of people, it

residents on a daily basis. On the other hand, due to

has to be sufficiently resilient and durable.

15 // Framing protest

its crucial location, it is important for it to be prone to


STRUCTURAL MODULES MODULAR STRUCTURE The design creates the infrastructure for protest. Hence, it proposes modular structures, which due to their variety can fit into irregularities of context and can be easily replicated, recreated and expanded.

underground structure: prefabricated

above ground structure: columns made

concrete modules

of welded laser-cut plates of steel

paving with the addition of thermal insulation (soil level thinner than 70 cm)

paving without thermal insulation (soil level thicker than 70 cm)

5 cm 15 cm

dark-pink stained concrete paving tiles laid on permeable joint material bedding course (sand)

15 cm

thermal insulation (expanded clay aggregate)

5 cm 15 cm

16 // Framing protest

dark-pink stained concrete paving tiles laid on permeable joint material bedding course (sand) aggregate base

aggregate base

30 cm

street lamps: welde

filtering layer (geotextile mat) insulating waterproof course slip mat reinforced concrete prefabricate

30 cm

5 cm 15 cm 15 cm

filtering layer (geotextile mat) insulating waterproof course slip mat reinforced concrete prefabricate 30 cm

15 cm 85 cm

levelling layer (anti-dust painted concrete) waterproof concrete foundation slab

GROUND VS. UNDEGROUND RELATION


CONCRETE DETAILS

2 3

section through the column of the concrete structure

ed laser-cut plates of

intermediary structure: steel tubes

steel 1

linear air intakes

paving adjusted to road traffic

concrete paving tiles laid on permeable joint material bedding course (sand) crushed stone (subbase) water filtering layer

sprinklers

linear LED-lighting

the ceiling the highest part of smoke outtakes in linear air and

aggregate base filtering layer (geotextile mat) insulating waterproof course slip mat reinforced concrete prefabricate

telecomuunication pipes gas pipes water pipes

section through the vault of the concrete structure

sewage

3

-0,8 m freezing level

bottom-up view of the ceiling vaults -3,5 m average water table level

CONCRETE DETAILS 1. Grouting - cast concrete which fills the gaps between vaults 2. Pre-fabricated module sprinklers linear airconcrete and smoke outtakes in

the highest part of 3. Fiber concrete grouting to to fill in the gap between the ceiling

jet grouting column under the existing foundations

columnsl the internal surface of the column is coarse to 1:25

linear air intakes

enhance concrete adhesion

linear LED-lighting

17 // Framing protest

storm drainage


THEORY: CROWD AND PUBLIC SPHERE This is the excerpt from the

Crowd as a New Protagonist

essay “Embodied Protest: An Antidore to Mediated Presence” written during the theory seminar as part of the graduation studio at TU Delft, tutored by Filip Geerts, 09.2017-01.2018 3 Baudelaire, Ch., Crowds 4 Ziada, H., ‘To See (Like) a Crowd’, Architectural Histories, vol. 3, no. 1, https://journal.eahn.org/ articles/10.5334/ah.co/, (accessed 19 December 2017).

“It is not given to every man to take a bath of multitude; enjoying a crowd is an art; and only he can relish a debauch of vitality at the expense of the human species, on whom, in his cradle, a fairy has bestowed the love of masks and masquerading, the hate of home, and the passion for roaming.” 3

The early 19th century brings about the unprecedentedly fast development of urban culture. Growing density of human settlements and urbanisation creates a new collective protagonist - the crowd. The new concept enters the awareness of city dwellers - being in the crowd, experiencing the constant presence of other people around. Baudelaire’s poem “Crowds” calls enjoying a crowd an art, “a bath of multitude”, “a debauch of vitaly at the expense of the human species”. Losing oneself in a crowd is the 19th century equivalent of Wordsworthian “sublime” - the uncanny power of nature. Urban landscape shaped by a collective force of people becomes a new human habitat.

18 // Framing protest

Traditional depiction of a crowd uses panoramic top-view projection. Abraham Bosse’s depiction of Thomas Hobbes’s “Leviathan” compares a crowd to the legendary sea creature4. The juxtaposition of Leviathan - the symbol of all evil and a humanity - in Hobbes’s understanding maintaining peace only due to social contract - depicts a crowd almost as a force of nature. Similarly, the same tradition of crowd depiction was used in picturing Nazi assemblies in the 1930s, aimed at emphasising the force of the crowd as one, homogeneous entity. However, growing individualisation shifted the representation towards more immersive depictions, using first person perspective. For example, in the post-revolutionary Russia, the crowd gained human traits. Posters would show zoomed in human parts, e.g. faces, hands, torsos, introducing human body in more detail. Thus a crowd becomes more heterogeneous, obtains emotional value, apart from being the shapeless mass of similar entities. Its substance, a human body, is brought to the fore. Such transformation results in the creation of spaces in the city which are occupied by crowds - a public sphere. The moment when the crowd ceases to be just an indifferent mass of people and gains causative power is when relations between individuals are formed and it starts to exercise a collective aim. One of these moments appears during protest as the moment of collective contestation.

Development of the Public Sphere

The novelty of publicness as it was conceived in the 19th century lies in the opportunities of participation and direct


influence on the space, which was not within reach of previous city dwellers. In order to impose the specific gaze of the public space, Jurgen Habermas’s definition will be treated as a starting point for the enquiry. It defines public sphere as a mediatory zone between the state and the society5. Political control is subordinated to the democratic demand. Public activities can be understood as a constant struggle of influence over public realm between the authorities, understood as rule imposing agents and the society – private people undertaking endeavours in public space.

5

Such conception of public space is a very novel attitude. During monarchic times, crowd cheering the king did not have the same power it has now. A crowd cheering a king was not a powerful public gathering, but rather a collection of extras ith no real influence on king’s proceedings6. Similarly, famously democratic Athenian Agora was in fact an oligarchic public sphere - unaccessible to women or slaves. Habermas suggests to see the 18th century French liberal bourgeois sphere as the ideal realisation of publicness, where inequalities are temporarily put aside in order for everyone to be engaged in a rational, non-exclusive and disinterested debate about the public good.7 However, subsequent inclusion of the society members who might have been more disadvantaged than the others and would require public sphere to seek for the realisation of their own private needs, put an end to the liberal public sphere.8 What is more, the emergence of media led to diffusion of press and propaganda.

6

The Public Sphere: An Encyclopedia Article, “New German Critique, No. 3 (Autumn, 1974), pp.49-55, http://www. jstor.org/stable/487737, accessed 30 October 2017. p.50

Ibid., p. 50. 7 Ibid., p. 53. 8 Habermas, J. Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1991, p. xii. 9 Crawford, M. Contesting the Public Realm: Struggles over Public Space in Los Angeles. “Journal of Architectural Education”, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Sep., 1995), p. 5 10 Ibid., p. 4. 11 Ibid., p. 5.

//

19 // Framing protest

Instead of talking about the Habermasian destruction of the public sphere or Sennettian “fall of public man” and applying outworn and outdated definitions to a modern society, Margaret Crawford9 claims it would be more productive to broaden the definition of public and make a shift from its understanding as a unitary, internally-coherent entity towards the explanation as a polyphony of voices, which does not exclude conflicting interests. The term she advocates, introduced by Nancy Fraser - counterpublics - describes spaces formed as a response to restricted access to publicness imposed by a dominant social layer. Depending on the historical situation, the excluded group would be different, e.g. heathens, women, children, slaves, the poor, immigrants, etc. In fact, Fraser argues, there was not a single point in history when there was one united public.10 Public has always been constructed out of multiplicity of smaller agents, constantly rearranged and reinterpreted. Counterpublics are “often sites of struggle and contestation, help to overturn it [the normative space]”.11 Insurgence, protests, countermovements, riots, public struggles over important issues are the inherent element of the public, if we adopt the new, more heterogeneous definition, which accepts the existence of contradictory opinions as the essence of the new public space. (...)

Habermas, J. et al.,


SKILLS ACQUIRED INSPIRATIONS

// alternative methods and analysis Design created as ordering of architectural solutions observed during a survey // covering the gap between research and design Translation of abstract ideograms into real life architectural solutions

Fun Palace // Cedric Price Jussieu – Two Libraries // OMA The Open City // Richard Sennett


// URBAN BLOCK EXCAVATION

A public building which plays with Prague-specific tendency to constant reworking of urban tissue within urban block limits, by adding passages, theatres, retail spaces, etc. hidden inside the seemingly monolithic mass of builidngs. The functions inside are not clearly defined, but suggested by diverse spatial solutions (attractors), which favour certain uses over another.

21

| Street facade


SITE OF EXCEPTION Prague, Na Florenci, next to Praha Masarykovo

Density. Prague developed within a very small area

Nádraží

restricted by the city walls until the 19th century, when

TU Delft // “Prague: Site of

industry entered the city. Until then, the urban tissue of

Exception”, Architecture & Public Building Studio

Prague was densified, transformed and intensified. As a

04-06.2017

result, public life happens not only in a street, but also

tutors: Susanne Komossa,

excavates the internal space enveloped by a strictly

Sien van Dam

defined urban block.

architectural design // architectural and material detailing

Excavation. The idea of the project is to explore the idea of excavation of the urban block. The building creates a passage through a dense urban tissue, operating on many levels, attracting into its internal spaces. Excavated space unveils gradually, offering insights into the building. The urban palace consists of two types of spaces: solid areas of a defined function and voids, which create in-between spaces. The excavated space gives the hierarchy, yet offers flexibility to adjust the internal arrangement according to user’s needs.

Attractors organising space. In the research process, led to the creation of the catalogue of elements, points, areas, lines – encouraging public activities. Attractors are 22 // City block excavation

distributed along the internal passage to provide constant guidance and diversify the path. The way they are used organises movement patterns through the buildings (sitting, walking, running, standing).


DESIGN METHOD: ATTRACTORS Attractors give the structure, but

Intermediary spaces

instead of creating the grid, they

Spaces open for interactions and activities

Gates & entrances

generate intensities. They organise the space by creating focal points of the building, such as,

Vestibule

meeting places, orientation zones, relax areas. They lead through

Narrowing and lowering

Displays

Market

Spectacle

Gathering & chance interactions

Framed entrance

Covered entrance

Hidden entrance

Paving

Greenery

the building, provoking diverse reactions, e.g. novel way of looking at familiar things (defamiliarisation), framing the view, creating curiosity,

Permeable border line

provoking non-standard paths of movement, causing interaction.

Permeable corner

Internal greenery

External greenery

Green ceiling

Roofing

Corners

Transforming

Rough (pavement)

Soft (wood, carpet)

Stairs & slopes

For example, inclined surfaces introduce level differences, which of view, create the feeling of an

Removed

Cobblestone corner

Added corner Zoning

Semi-transparent glasstiles Terracotta

TransOpaque parent ceiling glassDirectional “carpet”

audience and a stage. They also

Rest area

Amphitheatre

Catalogue of attractors

encourage alternative bodily positions, such as lying, which makes

Wallpaper

Paving

an inclined floor a desired space forCobblestoneCobblestone a rest. Low ceiling, in turn, suggests

Transition area

Cobblestone Cobblestone

Walls tiles tiles Zoning Terracotta Zoning Terracotta

Zoning Terracotta tiles Zoning Terracotta tiles

Cobblestone

Terracotta Zoning tiles

DirectionalDirectional Wallpaper “carpet” “carpet” Wallpaper DirectionalDirectional Wallpaper Wallpaper “carpet” “carpet” Directional Wallpaper Green wall “carpet”

more individualised space, which

Roofing & Wrapping and Wrapping and indirect lightning

Accumulation Accumulation

foldingand foldingand Wrapping Accumulation Wrapping Accumulation Wrapping Ceiling folding folding

Roofing &Wrapping Wrapping and Roofing &and indirect lightning folding indirect lightning folding Roofing & Roofing & indirect lightning indirect lightning Roofing & indirect lightning

Accumulation Accumulation

Green wallGreen wall

hosts quiet activities. High ceiling, in

Green wallGreen wall Green wall Ivy

“Carpet”

Doormat

contrast, marks a more collective space which fosters interactions. Granite

Ivy

Ivy

Ivy

Ivy Sgraffito

Ivy “Carpet” “Carpet” Doormat Doormat

Sgraffito Sgraffito

“Carpet” “Carpet” Doormat Doormat

Sgraffito Sgraffito Sgraffito

“Carpet” Doormat

Paving Granite

Granite

Granite

Granite

Zoning

Internal

Carpet

Soft

Opaque

Transition

Amassed

Examples of material realisations of attractors

Granite

Design sketches: spaces created by spatial ordering attractors

23 // Urban block excavation

due to providing a variety of points


ATTRACTOR ORDERING Ceiling transformations

Audience

Added

and stage

corner

Narrowing

Narrowing Elevated elements Transparent corner

Transparent

Narrowing

partitions Auditorium

Internal greenery

Exhibition area

Workshops

Exhibition area

Multifunctional auditorium

Restaurant Retail

the ver

s

rail

O

Retail and

24 // Urban block excavation

restaurants

A

pla

tfo r

Retail and restaurants

m

of

Ma

sar

Na yko vo N

ad

Concert halls

raz

iS

Flo r

enc i

tat i

on Music cafeteria


SECTION

Opera aperta - sketches of possible interior arrangement

APPROPRIATION

25 // Urban block excavation

Section through the audience


INTERNAL PASSAGE A passage through the solid building serves both as an internal communication within the building, creating an internal communication loop, and a shortcut through the long urban block leading to the train station’s platform (groundfloor exit) and over the rails to the other side of the track (first floor exit). These paths intersect and collide in vital areas, which are emphasises as such architecturally (e.g. with a piazzetta).

retail

retail

retail

retail

26 // Urban block excavation

restaurant

retail

Site plan


+1200 Second floor plan

-800 Basement plan

+1600 Top floor plan

27 // Urban block excavation

+600 First floor plan

//


THEORY: DESIGN AS OPERA APERTA This is the excerpt from the thesis “Open-ended Public Space” written during “Theory Thesis” seminar at TU Delft, tutored by Taufan ter Weel., 02-06.2017 1 Eco, U. The Open Work. Harvard University Press, 1989 2 Eco, U. The Open Work, p.xii 3 Ibid. p. 23 4 Colomina, B. „Introduction: On Architecture, Production and Reproduction”. Architecture Reproduction. Princeton Architectural Press, 1988. 5 Ingarden, R. O poznawaniu dzieła literackiego. Wydawnictwo Zakł. Nar. im. Ossolińskich., Lwów, 1937. 6 Eco, U. The Open Work, p.viii. 7 Sennett, R. The Open City. https://www.richardsennett. com/site/senn/ UploadedResources/The%20

28 // Urban block excavation

Open%20City.pdf Accessed

Opera aperta

Although it is quite a recent idea in architecture and urbanism, it has long been an important issue in other disciplines, such as literature, visual arts, or music. Umberto Eco wrote about openness in works of art1. His idea of “the open work” emphasises the importance of a recipient in the process of decoding. The author, no matter how precise he is, can never fully predict the expected reception of his work, as every work of art has undefined spaces which get filled in by the audience. As a result of that, a reader partially becomes a writer just as art lover becomes a painter. Open works proposes a way of literary work analysis which acknowledges multiplicity of possible readings, i.e. its polysemic character. Eco’s innovatory approach gives the creative agency also to the hands of a recipient, not only an author. As a result, a work of art is seen not as a closed entity, but as a set of slightly defined guidelines, which can lead a recipient through a work of art, but do not impose any concrete readings. The open work offers the combination of “the degree of openness, the degree of information, the degree of ambiguity, and the degree of contravention of conventions in a work2. As a result, open work is never determined, but it is more “a work in progress”3. Also Beatriz Colomina comments upon this shift of focus. In her introduction to “Architecture Reproduction”4 she offers a parabole, referring to the myth of Minotaur. According to a Greek legend, Daedalus was the architect of the labyrinth, but it was Ariadne who found a way through it and decoded it. By being a conscious recipient, she contributed to the reinterpretation of this building, thus became a creator herself. Roman Ingarden calls this process “concretisation”5. Each work of art contains blank spaces, which have not been prescribed by an author. In the act of reception, an indefinite work becomes concrete, finished differently in each reading, depending on individual background. Eco’s opera aperta underlines “the element of multiplicity, plurality, or polysemy in art”6 and focuses on a process between a reader and a text, or, in the case of architecture, between a user and an architect.

20 Feb 2017.

(...)

8

Structure of openness

Sennett, R. (2010) The public realm. http://www. richardsennett.com/site/ senn/templates/general2. aspx?pageid=16&cc=gb. Accessed 20 April 2017

By accumulating complexity, Sennett7 means opening up the boundaries, to allow exchange of energies with the environment. To provide better understanding of openness, Sennett comments extensively on the distinction between the notion of border and boundary. He understands boundary as a limit, which heavily articulates the territory it encloses, excluding any unpredicted activities. Border, in contrast, marks the area of higher interactivity, due to being the meeting point of heterogeneous agents and conditions. Linking back to


Deleuze and Guattari’s terms, boundary is a territorialising agent, pushing an assemblage towards the stratum, while border dissolves the boundaries, by creating the zones of the exchange of energies.9

9

Border area, in Deleuzian approach, will be understood as a zone of intensity, where “intensive differences are productive”9 . Interactions between heterogeneous entities cause conflicts, which are productive and may let to the emergence of spontaneous development. In contrast, homogeneity is seen as unproductive, because similar elements seem just consolidate each other’s properties instead of challenging the existing order. Homogeneity builds up coherence and leads to sublimation of the system, while heterogeneity continuously disrupts and rearranges, which opens new ways of interpretation. In “The Uses of Disorder”, Richard Sennett claims that “certain kinds of disorder need to be increased in city life”10. It seems that this may be done by the means of opening up the structure in order to make it able to adjust to changing conditions and to create unpredictable outcome. But does it mean lack of structure whatsoever?

10

Commenting upon Deleuzian ontology, DeLanda strictly points to the fact that the space of “possible outcomes is greatly constrained, or in other words, it has structure”11. It is not hierarchically structured, but it has elements that organise its heterogeneity. Open-ended space operates not on linear or grid solutions, but it is created more like a “field for unpredictable interaction.”12 Deleuzian space is explained by the metaphors of field, areas and zones. Another organising elements are attractors that act as point, local interventions, radially creating zones of intensity. Also Eco mentions point interventions as a complexity-organising force, while talking about Brecht’s theories on drama: “we shall see that dramatic action is conceived as the problematic exposition of specific point of tension (...), which does not seek to influence the audience, but rather to offer a series of facts to be observed, employing the device of “defamiliarization”13. All these interventions aim to built upon the idea of a permeable border, dissolving clearly defined borders of totality. Such novel understanding of the structure of the space may be a really inspiring way to designing, because it allows to introduce unconventional solutions. The notion of structure of openness seems a key to developing the new skill – a design for complexity.

12

Extensive and Intensive, Actual and virtual. p.80.

Sennet, R. The Uses of Disorder: Personal Identity and City Life. W.W. Norton & Company, 1992, p.17. 11 De Landa, Manuel. “Space: Extensive and Intensive, Actual and Virtual.” Deleuze and Space, edited by Ian Buchanan, I, Gregg Lambert, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2005, p.82.

Ibid., p.83. 13 Eco, U. The Open Work, p.11

29 // Urban block excavation

//

DeLanda, Space:


SKILLS ACQUIRED

// big scale thinking Understanding of how certain interventions influence the environment on the world scale // future scenario creation Development of cause-and-effect reasoning and creation of coherent storyline

INSPIRATIONS

“Fifteen Million Merits” // Black Mirror (S01E02) “Understanding virtual reality: Interface, application, and design.” // Sherman W, Craig A. Cubism (& its relation to theory of relativity)


// OPTIMUM VIRTUAL WORLD

31

31 //

A mixed-reality world, which acknowledges the simultaneous presence of the real and the virtual and allows for seamless transitions between these realms.


50:50 MANIFESTO TU Delft // “What If, Future World Scenarios” The Why

Future city is a collage of reality and virtuality. It manip-

Factory Studio

ulates reality in order to accomodate virtuality. Real el-

09.2016-01.2017

ements are kept, moved, removed, replaced, copied,

tutors: Winy Maas, Tihamer

pasted, duplicated, multiplied, contracted, expanded.

Salij, Diana Ibáñez López, Stavros Gargaretas

Virtual elements are overlaid onto the existing urban

mapping // creating

tissue. The flow of people continuously moves between

future scenarios // research//

reality, mediated reality and virtuality. How virtual can we go? Where is the desirable balance? How to design a world which acknowledges the simultaneous existence of different realms and allows for seamless transitions between them? 1. 100% reality is not possible in a human world. People have always created virtual worlds (dance, music, storytelling, books). 2. 100% virtuality is not possible if we still want to call ourselves human (we cannot exist without the physical aspect). The new generation born in virtuality would know no precedents, the world would cease to develop creatively. 3. Virtuality cannot replace reality, it can only be extend or complement reality. 4. The boundary between virtuality and reality must

32 // Optimum virtual world

be explicit. There must be a possibility of free choice regarding the realm we want to participate in. 5. To keep body-mind-soul integrity intact, any movement carried out in a virtual world must be also carried out by a body.


VIRTUALISATION OF A DIALY ROUTINE work leisure personal hygiene sleep

EVOLUTION OF ACTIVITIES

socialising travelling healthcare eating clothing

sport learning distribution shopping toilet

100% virtuality

50 50

100% reality

Future

Now

TRAVELLING

BODILY NEEDS

PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS

adrenaline

relaxing meeting new people and visiting new places knowledge and curiosity

virtual holidays in a virtual place

virtual reality virtual holidays in a projection of a real place

virtualised reality

virtual representation of the museum lying in a real sunbed on a virtual beach

"virtual tours" of hotels and resorts.

augmented virtuality

diminished reality filtering out unwanted content

mediated reality

exploring city by accessing its all historical layers

interactive virtual tourist guide

interactive city map

audio guide GPS

amplified reality

reality

google street view

watching pictures reading books

Now

Future

33 // Optimum virtual world

real-time translator

augmented reality


BUILDING SCALE Type 1 - Reality (toilet, kitchen, storage, bedroom) Type 2 - Mixed reality The virtuality is mapped onto reality, hence the virtual size matches the real size (bedrooms, living rooms, dining rooms, office cubicles) technologies used: climate imitation, material mapping, telepresence

Type 3 - Virtual reality The virtual size is not constrained by its real size technologies used: treadmill floor, climate imitation, wind imitation, humidity imitation

23.30 PM - 7.30 AM Sleep

7.45-8 AM Food preparation

2m2

0m2

4m2

0m2

9 AM-5 PM Work

8.20-9 AM Coffee with a friend

9m2

34 // Optimum virtual world

8-8.20 AM Breakfast

9m2

1.02 PM Small talk with a boss

1.10 PM Small talk with a friend

INDIVIDUAL SCALE

0m2

1 PM Walk through the office

9m2 200m2

9m2 200m2

9m2

9m2 200m2

6-7 PM Afternoon exercise in a park

9m2 200m2

9m2 400 m2


CITY SCALE Future city is a collage of reality and virtuality. It manipulates reality in order to accomodate virtuality. Real elements are kept, moved, removed, replaced, copied, pasted, duplicated, multiplied. Virtual elements are overlaid onto the existing urban tissue. The flow of people continuously moves between reality, mediated reality and virtuality. You choose in which

35 // Optimum virtual world

realm you want to find yourself.


VR WORLD PAVILLION Virtual world is an inherent part of human civilisation. We communicate with it through the interface. With the development of virtual reality technology, the interface gained third dimension and is getting more immersive. The more we use interfaces, the more accustomed to them we are. Interface becomes the lenses through which we observe the world. Is full virtuality possible? How would the real world look like? If everybody can create his own environment, how does it influence our perception? Will we be ever able to tell the reality from the virtuality? Can our senses be fooled? The pavilion has the ability of providing diverse environments for max. 2 people staying inside. It is

reality

done by the means of visual immersion and thermal immersion. The lamelas rotate constantly so as to adjust to each of two people in the pavilion. Their field of view (constant 124 degrees) is predicted on the basis of their head movements. By pressing a button on the remote control, the visitors can choose between reality and virtuality. The air curtain activates and cuts off the influence of external weather. The heating is producing more and more hot enviroment. Thermal immersion appears. The floor is insulated with extruded polystyrene foam, the roof and the lamelas are covered with two-layer ETFE cushions.

36 // Optimum virtual world

virtual reality


TECHNICAL DETAILS

Construction phasing

Details of the columns

Model of the rotating column Roof structure 1. Primary beam, engineered wood,100x200mm 2. Edge beam ,100x200 mm

2 1 3a

3

3b

3. Air curtain with heating of up to 4m range. Creating a wide curtain of 3 streams blocking the inflow of the external cold air. 3a. Air intake 3b. Directional vane 4. 2-layer ETFE cushion - h:250mm

Foundation 7

6

1. Support foot steel plate ø450mm bolted to the foundation 2. Joining steel plate 260x210 mm 3. Anchor bolts 5. Insulation: Extruded polystyrene

5

4

3

2

foam 200 mm 1

8

6. Space reserved for the installation of rotating system for the lamelas 7. Primary floor beam, engineered wood 100x200 mm 8. Prefabricated reinforced concrete foundation plate

37 // Optimum virtual world

4. Waterproof OSB plate15 mm

//


THEORY: VR AND THE PERIL OF DISCONNECTION This is the excerpt from the

Abstract: Our brains have a distinctive ability of producing fully imaginary

thesis “VR and the Peril

realms, which we can access either through imagination or through interfaces.

of Disconnection” written

Virtual Reality - the newest of them - allows us to become a part of fully

during the extracurricular

immersive 3D worlds where both environments and agents are a simulation. This

seminar “Critical

unprecedented situation, where a boundary between the real and the virtual

Reflection on Technology”

is blurred, elicits multiple concerns. The confusion over contradictory input can

at TU Delft, tutored by Dr.

lead to various disorders, the most serious of them being depersonalisation-

Pieter Vermaas, 09.2016-

derealisation disorder (DPDR). By adding virtual bodies as intermediaries in

01.2017

perception, VR modifies the manner of external input reception and loosens the connection between mind and body. The opportunity of adopting multiple

1 Sherman W, Craig A. “Chapter 1: Introduction to Virtual Reality”. Understanding virtual reality: Interface, application, and design. California: Morgan Kaufmann, 2002, p. 5-37. 2 Heim, M. “From Interface to Cyberspace”. The Metaphysics of Virtual Reality. Oxford University Press, 1993, p. 72-81.

identities in VR looks like threat to the feeling of our internal completeness.

Interface becomes cyberspace

The biggest progress in interface design is observable within the field of visual interfaces1. Once we look closer at the timeline of interfaces, the tendency towards higher level of representational realism is evident. Parietal art, followed by painting, was the first figurative depiction of reality that we can directly access. (...) The breakthrough came with the invention of perspective, which created pretty accurate illusion of a 3-dimensional world on 2-dimensional canvas. Another big step forward came with the invention of a camera, which made photorealistic reproduction of the world possible. To fully reflect the accuracy of our visual experiences, we needed to capture their embeddedness in time. Motion pictures and movies did it by creating the possibility of depicting the change of visual imagery over time. VR crowns these explorations, because it can produce 3D reality which exists in a timeframe. (...) Most interfaces translate 3D world onto 2D canvas to create real-life feeling of space. VR creates 3D space, it does not have a restricted field of view and can be freely explored from a firstperson perspective. Feedback received from simulated world introduces the element of interaction. (...)

Short term disorders

A blurred boundary triggers confusion as to whether the input comes from reality or virtuality. Our body and brain are not very proficient in processing contradictory information. This results in a variety of post-VR syndromes already observed by those who went through immersive experience. A minor consequence is a so-called cybersickness (VR sickness),

// Optimum virtual world

38 // Optimum virtual world

Deconstruction of a model of communication2 (fig.1) into prime factors allows to understand the difference between VR and any previous medium. Before, due to 2D experience, a viewer was always external to the message. In VR, interface transforms into 3D cyberspace, which encompasses the viewer as the part of the message. Such model puts a viewer into unprecedented position. The barrier of the fourth wall is abolished (...) A boundary between reality and simulation is disappearing.


sympthomised similarly to motion sickness, namely by nauseous feelings, dizziness, apathy, upset stomach. In contrast, cybersickness does not result from motion-induced causes, but appears when the effect of movement is imposed over a stationary body. Confused body does not know which data it should process and it ends up disoriented3. Another cause is unnatural perception offered by current VR technology, characterised by e.g. insufficient refresh rate, unnatural viewing angle, or no possibility of choosing a focal point. But these problems will diminish with the development of technology, which clearly aims for fully realistic projection capable of reflecting the way people see the world.

Han, K. Et al. “Effects of Different Types of 3D Rest Frames on Reducing Cybersickness in a Virtual Environment.” i-Perception, vol. 2, no. 8, 1 October 2011, http://journals.sagepub. com/doi/abs/10.1068/ic861. Acc. 27 February 2017. 4 “Depersonalization-

What will increase, however, is confusion over the interpretation of contradictory input. The more credible virtuality looks, the more real it seems. Once the feeling of attachment to the virtual world is established, it creates detachment from reality. Depersonalisation-derealisation disorder (DPDR)4 describes three main syndromes: derealisation - detachment from the real surroundings, depersonification - diminished identification with your own self and disembodiment – decreased emotional and sensory reactivity. Derealisation and depersonification were examined in 2006 by Frederick Aardema, Sophie Cote and Kieron O’Connor at the University of Montreal5. The study showed that there is indeed ground for claiming that virtual immersion loosens connection with reality and triggers feeling of confusion. Higher post-immersive level of detachment was observed consistently within the whole group, but particular vulnerability seemed to be manifested by people with greater innate tendencies towards falling into absorbing, immersive experiences. When asked about the possible causes of such post-VR detachment, Kathrine Jáuregui-Renaud blames it on a mismatch between input provided by VR-set and stimuli received by another sensory receptors6. So the reasons seem to be analogous to those of cybersickness, yet affect our psyche. While derealisation deals with our capability of clearheaded perception of the external world, depersonification and disembodiment describe problems which appear internally within individuals. When we feel disconnected from ourselves, we may lose the feeling of internal completeness. Identity is a very vulnerable concept and too many factors can easily disrupt the clear picture of ourselves. Optimists may say that we will always be able to tell reality from fiction, especially when it comes to our own body. It seems impossible not to recognise your own hand that you have been looking at your whole life, not to mention your face, whose faults you have examined already for much too long. (...)

derealization disorder.” Mayo Clinic, 24 May 2014, http://www.mayoclinic. org/diseases-conditions/ depersonalizationderealizationdisorder/ basics/definition/con20033401. Acc. on 26 February 2017. 5 Aardema, F. Et al. “Effects of virtual reality on presence and dissociative experience.” CyberPsychology & Behaviour, vol. 6, April 2005, p. 332-339, https:// www.researchgate.net/ publication/278206370_ Effects_of_virtual_reality_ on_presence_ and_ dissociative_experience. Acc. 20 February 2017. 6 Jáuregui-Renaud, K. “Vestibular Function and Depersonalization/ Derealization Symptoms.” Multisensory research, vol. 28, July 2015, p. 637-651, https://www.researchgate. net/publication/282623240_ Vestibular_Function_ and_Depersonaliza tionDerealization_

//

Symptoms. Accessed 3 March 2017.

39 // Optimum virtual world

Long term disorder

// Optimum virtual world

3


SKILLS ACQUIRED INSPIRATIONS

// modern interpretation of traditional architecure Reinterpretation of elements, such as, roof ridges, windows’ proportions, dormers, colours, non-uniformity // alternative ways of cohabitation Investigation of cohousing rules and their transferability to Polish culture of living

Danish cohousing culture


// COHOUSING

41

Single family row houses built within the principles of cohousing, located in Ksiazenice, a small town located 25 kilometres from Warsaw.


COHOUSING RULES Książenice, near Warszawa Warsaw University of Technology // Bachelor BSc Graduation Studio 03-09.2015 tutor: Piotr Hardecki urban design // architectural design // policy designing

The notion of “cohousing”, coined by Charles Durett and Kathryn McComant, is a compound of the phrase “community housing”, denoting an group of people wanting to live together, forming an intentional community. The foundation of such housing estate is always fully initiated by the members of the community. Seven rules of cohousing are: no ideology, participation in design and construction, space generating interactions, a common house, joint management, no hierarchy, financial autonomy.

The main focus of the design process are shared facilities and a common garden, which provide enough space for interactions between future residents. The buildings adjacent to the main square hold commercial spaces accessible both to the members of cohousing community and to the public, i.e. a gym, shops, a workshop, a café and office spaces. The “Common House” is the bonding element of the whole development. It holds a meeting room, where residents can gather for regular meetings. The building is a part of a future central square, hence the need to recreate the character of a provincial small-town market

42 // Cohousing

square. The project presents both formal and functional references to Polish architecture of traditional market squares i.e. roof ridges parallel to the street, vertical proportions of windows, dormers, lively facade colors.


URBAN DESIGN

Repeatable units with no services

8 5

7 9

6

4

1

3 2

Common house

Facilities available to everyone

Repeatable units with ground floor services

Facilities accessible mainly to the members of the cohousing community

1. Gym 2. Bike service

6. Glass house and vegetable garden on the terrace

3. Office space for rent

7. Common boiler house

4. Cafe and patisserie (using products grown in a glass

8. Bike and stroller shed

house and vegetable garden)

9. Kitchen with a dining room and a game room

43 // Cohousing

5. Retail space for rent


RESIDENTIAL SIDE

Customisable and repeatable houses The northern part of the development is filled by customisable and repeatable houses with flexible interior design. 160 sqm houses are suitable for the families of 2 to 5 members, while 175 sqm provides enough living space for the families of 6 members or

44 // Cohousing

multigenerational households.


PUBLIC SQUARE SIDE

Houses with commercial premises on the ground floor The plot is adjacent to the newly designed central square of the town of KsiÄ…Ĺźenice. The buildings forming the southern and western frontage hold commercial spaces on

45 // Cohousing

the ground floor. They are accessible through arcades.


TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

46 // Cohousing

Ground floor plan

First floor plan

Broken out section


REPEATABLE & CUSTOMISABLE PLANS

First floor arangements

47 // Cohousing

Ground floor arangements


TECHINCAL DRAWINGS

A community gym: ground floor plan

An apartment: first floor plan

Section Detail of a gutter hidden in a fiber cement cladding finish 1. Fiber cement cladding for roofing and facades laid on wood substructure 2. Front panel 3. Phenolic foam between the gutter and the front panel 4. Stainless steel cover 5. Gutter 6. Gutter hook

48 // Cohousing

7. Gutter board 8. OSB board 9. Downpipe 10. Distancing channel bar which allows mounting thermal insulation without thermal bridges 11. Wooden wall plate mounted to reinforced concrete tie beam


Common house: ground floor plan

Common house: first floor plan

Bike service: ground floor plan

Offices for rent and an apartment: first floor plan

Retail space: ground floor plan

Apartment: first floor plan

//

49 // Cohousing

COMMERCIAL GROUND FLOOR


SKILLS ACQUIRED INSPIRATIONS

// concise presentation of a concept Simple and straightforward presentation of the idea, which makes it easier to process during competition assessment // modular structures Investigation of possibilities of modular structures in residential architecture

Emergent structures, e.g. termite “cathedral� mound or snowflakes Japanese metabolism


// GENERATION Y HOUSING ESTATE

| Top view axonometry

A concept of a modern, future-oriented housing estate for young people of the generation Y. The project fosters mobility and flexibility of the inhabitants, enabling the modification of a structure, which comes with ever-changing uses of the space.

51

51 //

|A sneak peak into the interior


EMERGENCE Wieruszowska St, Poznań

The canonical attitude towards urban design assumes

Builder 4Young Architects,

the creation of a top-bottom order, where the final

competition project 10.2015 2nd Prize (1st was not awarded); publication in Polish trade magazine

outcome of the project is known in advance. The alternative approach, the emergent urbanism, creates a bottom-up order, which means that the final design

Builder

is conceived as a sum of numerous individual entities

In cooperation with

which interact together and form a logically complex

Michał Strupiński investigation of the concept of emergence in architecture // development of the social aspect of the project // functional schemata //

final form. In other words, it is people themselves who create their own habitat within the rules of a spontaneous order. The outcome reflects the conditions which influenced the concept.

urban and architectural design // floor plans //

Assemblages are the wholes whose properties emerge from the interactions between parts. Assemblage can be defined as energy which keeps heterogeneous elements together. Coherence is not a sine qua non condition for the existence of an assemblage. Elements can be detached, modified and removed, constant change is an inherent feature. They interact and amplify each other. New properties arise in the process of emergence, in which interac-

52 // Generation Y Housing Estate

tions between two entities produce the outcome that is more than just the sum of the features of particular agents. In this sense, such construct is not reducible to individual agencies, but should be understood in terms of interlinked activities, that interact and produce novel, often unpredictable outcomes.


DEVELOPMENT STAGES Phase 1 // The buildings begin to

Architects first need to create the

form the frontage. Offices and

framework of a future estate. They

commercial spaces are the main

carry out numerous analyses of

facilities, residential function is

the surroundings, the impact on

auxiliary.

the environment, the profile of possible future residents etc. Then they create a simple grid, which will later serve as an outline for future buildings, roads, pavements, greenery etc. The residents fill out the meticulously designed questionnaires, which allow the architects to know the needs of people they design for.

Phase 2 // The frontage has

Later in the process, we see an

been formed. The percentage of

architect as a holistic moderator.

dwellings increases, compared to

He collects people’s “wishes”, gives

offices, shops etc.

them the form of an individual flat, an office, or a commercial property and combine them into buildings like LEGO bricks.

Phase 3 // New houses are added to form blocks and interior private yards. Dwellings form the majority of

Construction density

new developments.

Building height

Phase 4 // New residential blocks its final state of densification. Noise intensity

Commercial spaces and offices area

53 // Generation Y Housing Estate

appear and the settlement reaches


54 // Generation Y Housing Estate


55 // Generation Y Housing Estate


EXEMPLARY PLANS

Ground floor plan

56 // Generation Y Housing Estate

Retail spaces

First floor plan


Second floor plan

Third floor plan

//

57 // Generation Y Housing Estate

Greenery


// LEGO HUB Lego Headquarters, Billund, Denmark. Postcompetition design development. Developed during internship in C.F.Møller Aarhus, Denmark, 0206.2016

I was the part of the C.F. Møller’s team developing the design for new LEGO Hub in Billund, Denmark. Planned within the flexible workspace ideology, it will offer diverse work places within a whole spectrum of privacy, starting from individual work rooms, ending with conference areas assigned within open space. Enriching the typology of an office building, C.F. Møller’s design assumed a multifunctional edifice, offering auxiliary facilities, such as an employee hotel, a restaurant, a gym and a spa, a stage with an audience, rehearsal rooms, party rooms, realising a new, comfortable working environment of the future.

cone atrium

internal staircase

external staircase

internal staircase

external staircase

internal staircase

external staircase

overlapping atrium

58 // LEGO Hub

simple atrium

ATRIUM VARIATIONS


//

59 // LEGO Hub

VERTICAL CORES VARIATIONS


// SALTHOLMSGADE COMPETITION Dwelling, Saltholmsgade, Aarhus. Competition entry. Developed during the internship in C.F.Møller Aarhus, Denmark, 06-

60 // Saltholmsgade Competition

07.2016

The competition task assumed the creation of a diverse housing estate, consisting of a typical multifamily housing from the most urban side and row housing from the more private, park area. I contributed to the works on the main street facade and then designed split-level row houses.


ROW HOUSING CONCEPT

House without terraces

House with terraces

Kt. 11,00

Kt. 9,50

Kt. 8,00

Kt. 6,50

Kt. 5,00

Kt. 3,50

Kt. 2,00

Kt. 2,00

Kt. 11,00

4300

Kt. 8,00

Kt. 5,00

Kt. 2,00

5400

5400

4300 5400

10800

3100

4900

5400

3000

4900

-1.50 +4.50

3000 1800

10800

1800

1800

4900 3000

2110

+1,5 bedrooms +3,0 master 1800 bedroom

+4,5 living room 3000

Kt. 9,50

Kt. 6,50

4900

Kt. 3,50

0 m kitchen

+6,0 terrace

//

61 // Saltholmsgade Competition

2710

3000

+3.00

5400

4900

1800

4140

+1.50

3000

3000

3000

10800

2980

-1,5 m living room

1800

3000

3000

1800

+3.00

1800

+6.00

3000 1800

+0.00

1800

+3.00

3100

+0.00 +6.00

10800

4140

10800

10800

4140

1800

4900

+1.50

+4.50

-1.50

6090

4900

4900

6090

+1.50

1800

+0.00

1800

2110

4000 4900 2980

2980

-1.50

3100

2710

2110

4000

3000 1800

4900

1800

2710


// DWELLINGS IN WROCLAW Dwelling in Wroclaw, Commission.

Working as an architectural assistant in Estudio Lamela, I was part of the team developing a building permit phase of the residential estate in Wroclaw.

Developed with Estudio Lamela team, Warsaw, Poland, 06-12.2016

section

detail of the drainage

62 // Dweliings in Wroclaw

detail of the terrace

detail of the attic


//

63 // Dweliings in Wroclaw

ground floor plan


// ARCHITECTURAL TRANSLATIONS Exercise“Architectural Translations” seminar led by Alper Semih Alkan within the Public Building

64 // Architectural translations

Studio, 01-07.2017

PUZZLE

The seminar inquired the relationship between the representational (an image) and tectonic (a physical construct) codes in architecture. The exercise’s aim was to recode three projects realising one common theme and to depict these themes in an alternative representational form.


The story consists of 25 tiles, which can be rearranged according to the marks suggested within the margins. Resolve the puzzle to unveil the

observation observation observation tower, balconies, observation tower, balconies, information information screens screens observation

stationary stationary standing, lying, standing, sitting lying, sitting

open activities collective activities open collective group activities, group activities, conference open collective activitiesconference rooms, rooms, workshops groupworkshops activities, conference

transport transport car, publiccar, transport, public transport, transport car, public transport, helicopter, helicopter, boat boat

Fun Palace, Centre Pompidou and Jussieu Library

self-movement self-movement self-movement running, walking, jumping running, walking, running, jumping walking, jumping

hence they should be decoded and discovered

closedclosed individual closed individual activities individualactivities activities individual work, library, work, library, individual individual work, library, reading rooms reading rooms reading rooms auditorium

auditoriumauditoriumconcert, theatre, opera, lecture, cinema concert, theatre, opera, concert, theatre, opera, lecture, cinema lecture, cinema exhibition area museum, happening

area exhibition exhibition area museum, happening museum, happening restaurant cafeteria, food court

restaurant restaurant cafeteria, cafeteria, food courtfood court

helicopter, boat

lifts

lifts

lifts

escalators and moving pavements

escalators escalators and moving and moving pavementspavements

whole story.

are fun buildings designed to provide leisure, in an entertaining way. Conceived to promote individual, multiple viewpoints, they are what recipients want them to be. Interactions between visitors are meant to produce novel, unpredictable outcome every time. Designed to provoke fluctuations and movement, they become containers for activities.

| Centre Pompidou: Vertical axis of activities

ACTIVITY RECODING //

65 // Architectural translations

rooms, workshops

stationary standing, lying, sitting

| Fun Palace: Vertical axis of activities

observation tower, balconies, information screens


BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B B B B B B B B B B B B BB BB BB BB B B B B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB BBBB A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A

INDEPENDENT PERIODICAL OF THE FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT TU DELFT

B

03

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

66 // Graphic design

// GRAPHIC DESIGN

Issue 03 2017/8 the back cover designed by co-editor Matthew Cook

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A

INDEPENDENT PERIODICAL OF THE FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT TU DELFT

B

05

Issue 05 2017/18


B

Are you inquisitive and engaged with our faculty? Do you want to develop your writing skills? Are you looking for a part-time job to combine with your studies?

Bnieuws is looking for passionate Bachelor and Master students who want to strengthen our editorial team. Interested? Send us your CV and a short article of 500 words on the topic: My worst/best day at the faculty before 12th March 2018, 20.00 to bnieuws-bk@tudelft.nl.

Symposium promotional poster

cover of the group research booklet “Ground, Things and Representation: Strasbourg�

Post-symposium booklet cover

//

67 // Graphic design

Call for Applications poster


ada.jaskowiec@gmail.com

Thank you.

(0048) 664703911 Ada Jaśkowiec

//

Portfolio 2018  
Portfolio 2018  
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