Curriculum Standard

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Caring for Life Education Curriculum Standard

Humane Education for the Primary Sector


Through education we promote compassion for animals, kindness towards people and respect for the environment in China and throughout Asia. Our programmes include humane education in schools, veterinary training and consumer education and we work in cooperation with governments, universities and professionals. CopyrightŠACTAsia All rights reserved. Materials and text used in the production of this document can only be reproduced with the permission of the originator. www.actasia.org info@actasia.org


Caring for Life Education Curriculum Standard The concept of Humane Education Humane Education is a process that encourages an understanding of the need for compassion and respect for people, animals and the environment and recognizes the interdependence of all living things. Recommended definition: World Animal Net 1

Acknowledgements ACTAsia acknowledges with great appreciation the help and support from government officials, teachers and other educationalists in China which has enabled Caring for Life Education to be introduced to Primary Schools. Sincere thanks to international friends, colleagues and volunteers who have helped in various ways during the preparation stages of the course, for example by sharing resource materials, suggesting ideas for activities in the classroom, and so willingly sharing their own experiences, introducing humane education to Primary Schools in their own respective countries. Special thanks to Yazhi Luo and Cheng-Kian Wong the first teachers in China to pioneer Caring for Life Education in Primary Schools and to William Samuels, of City University of New York, USA, who analysed the research data for the Pilot Course and provided us with a detailed report of his scientific assessment and validation. The Caring for Life Education course was created by the ACTAsia Education department under the direction of Pei F. Su, Executive Director. The Caring for Life Education curriculum was designed and documented in two publications: Curriculum Framework and Guidelines and Curriculum Standard by Nick Leney, Education Management Consultant, UK and New Zealand.

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Foreword

Pei Feng Su, Chief Executive Officer, ACTAsia In 1996 I left my hometown and travelled to the US to study and then onto Europe to continue my postgraduate education at a university in the UK. It was a challenging time for me as my English language skills were not particularly good and the style of teaching was so different from China. For the first time in my life, I had to create my own work schedule and study independently away from the classroom. I had a tutor to refer to but I found it difficult to express my thoughts and queries as not only was I studying in an unfamiliar environment but was also experiencing a very different educational process to that I had known when studying in my own country. By the end of the course and with an M.A. in Social Policy & Animal Rights successfully achieved, I had become immersed in the comparisons and differences of education management in China and western countries. In China we focus on academic achievements and self-discipline, where only the highest score is acceptable. In my own early years of schooling, the fear of failure was ever present. In the UK, whilst academic achievements are important, the development of the student into a ‘well-rounded’ useful member of society, for many parents, is of more importance. In a typical western school, the environment tends to be aesthetically pleasing with colourful murals in classrooms with seating arrangements designed for student interaction. Spacious playing areas are located outside. Children from pre-school age are encouraged to reach their potential by independent thinking and are encouraged by their teachers to continuously expand on their individual thought process. Children are not considered to be failures if their academic ability is weak as perhaps they may have developed other talents e.g. practical skills such as talents in art, music or sport. Leisure time is as also considered to be as important as study. In my opinion, an ideal system could be a combination of both systems. Children do need discipline and structure; they do need to be encouraged to learn. However research shows that children flourish in schools when learning ‘by doing’, not simply by ‘being told’; schools where children can interact with other students and develop at their own pace with gentle but firm guidance, in a safe and happy environment. Children are the leaders of tomorrow and need to develop confidence, skills and knowledge to equip them to live useful lives in our rapidly changing and challenging world. Caring for Life Education curriculum for primary school children, is intended as a positive process for students and teachers and is based on ‘Learning to Live Together’. Through the innovative activities and lessons, teachers can help and encourage students to develop social skills such as empathy, compassion, respect and civic responsibility for greater harmony within their family unit, in schools and in the wider society.

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Contents

1. Caring for Life Education Curriculum 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Why does it Matter?

1 1 1

2. Course Pedagogy 2.1 The Teacher as a Role Model 2.2 Basic Principles 2.3 Starting Points 2.4 Inquiry Teaching 2.5 Learning Activities 2.6 Classroom Layout 2.7 Assessment

3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3. Pre-Curriculum Knowledge 3.1 The Learning Journey 3.2 Confirm Knowledge

10 10 11

4. Course Planning 4.1 Course Overview 4.2 Course Goals Know the World (K): Interdependence of all Living Things Sense the World (S): Empathy and Compassion Participate in the World (P): Civic Responsibilty 4.3 Conceptual Overview 4.4 Subject Learning Area Descriptions 4.5 Objectives Matrix 4.6 Objectives by Subject Learning Area A. The Web of Life B. Sentient Beings C. Care and Respect D. Interacting with Others E. Empathetic Choices 4.7 Objectives by Curriculum Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6

12 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 20 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 25 26 27 28

1. Alignment Charts

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2. Caring for Life: developed from UNESCO’s 4 Pillars of Learning

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3. Citations

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The Curriculum Framework and Guidelines document gives a general introduction to Caring for Life Education.


1. Caring for Life Education Curriculum 1.1 Introduction Caring for Life Education encourages independent, critical thinking, allowing individuals to evaluate and make informed choices through 5 learning areas and 3 recurring themes Know the World; Sense the World; Participate in the World. The goal of Humane Education is the development of a compassionate, fair, and environmentally sustainable society.

ACTAsia’s pioneering humane education program – Caring for Life (CLE) – was introduced into state schools in China during 2012. The course is the first humane education program to be consistently used in the Chinese primary school curriculum. Rigorous review combined with continual improvement allows the 2016 edition to offer a comprehensive and innovative moral education course for all primary school years. CLE is inspiring thousands to develop a sense of responsibility for the environment, and for the people and animals with whom we share the world.

1.2 Why does it matter? Research has shown that students who take part in Social Emotional Learning curriculums such as CLE display: • Feelings of empowerment and better coping mechanisms • Improvements in classroom behaviour • Better social skills • Reduced aggressive outbursts and bullying • Higher self-esteem and lower stress levels We believe that those qualities, in turn, nurture the well-being of our children. Later in life, these skills and values can translate into reduced rates of domestic violence, lower drug and alcohol abuse, better academic results and a more satisfying, compassionate lifestyle.

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The film ‘Together’ gives a complete overview of the 6 Years Caring for Life Education course. 2


2. Course Pedagogy 2.1 The Teacher as a role model Children at the primary age level are at their most vulnerable and impressionable. This is an age where attitudes and dispositions are formed. Children are in need of role models. An absence of strong, positive role models will hinder socialisation and learning in general. Caring for Life educators need to understand the influence they hold as role models. They are able to present experiential learning opportunities. Students become aware of their teachers’ approach to life and how they embody the values they are trying to pass on and explore. Theory and practice are unified and visible within authentic, natural contexts. Students ongoing observations of teachers’ conduct will be subject to critical appraisal. Credible teachers will characterise the learning lesson they deliver to their young students and in turn will encourage the adoption of their virtuous dispositions and ways of living.

Examples of qualities for a good role model.

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2.2 Basic principles CLE learning must be conducted within a climate of trust, cooperation and support. A safe learning environment will promote student interaction and sharing. The course explores values and requires participants to express opinions and consider those of others without fear of attracting negative feedback. It is recommended that teachers lead students in developing a humane classroom contract, unless these behaviours are already established within the class learning culture. Such contracts support broader behaviour management and the efficacy of the wider learning community. It is an excellent idea for students and teachers to co-create these cultural guidelines and then test them in discussion and group activities, amending them as necessary. Examples of desirable behaviour include not asking personal questions, respecting what people say and listening to others. Once established, contracts need to be revisited, maintained, and if necessary, amended as the group evolves. Contracts established in order to prepare for CLE are likely to be beneficial to all learning activities completed by the students. It is strongly recommended that contracts are agreed and written down for the student’s future reference. Discussion of reasons for each guideline is a valuable learning exercise and an ideal preparation for beginning CLE. Clear and prominent display reinforces the learning culture and encourages students to behave consistently well.

No printed word, nor spoken plea can teach young minds what they should be. Not all books on all the shelves – but what the teachers are themselves. 4

Rudyard Kipling 2


2.3 Starting points Students will have some existing understanding and beliefs relating to CLE issues (see pre-course knowledge). Teachers need to be aware of these starting points and should scaffold future learning from these baselines. Building on current student knowledge will promote relevant learning and crucially should allow the teacher to discover and correct any misunderstandings and misconceptions that can lead to prejudice. The Ladder of Inference helps teachers understand how students arrive at decisions and actions. Reality and facts are experienced and understood selectively based upon the students’ beliefs and prior experience. Interpretation relies upon pre-existing knowledge and eventually leads to the individual taking actions that seem right because they are based on what they believe. It is therefore crucial that students are presented with a truthful picture of reality (objective knowledge) and that existing prejudice does not affect how they select from reality (subjective feeling and judgement). The Ladder of Inference: from observation to action.

All knowledge is connected to all other knowledge, the fun is making the CONNECTIONS.

Arthur Aufderheide 3

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2.4 Inquiry teaching

Caring for Life Education: 5 Points of Illumination CLE is written to support Inquiry Teaching. The lesson plans and resources allow students (with teacher support) to develop valid inquiries and to co-create understanding through discussion and critical reflection. CLE requires the teachers to help students observe the world in which they work, communicate, learn, and live. Teachers should encourage reflection on these observations, in order to develop understanding and knowledge. A CLE Inquiry Cycle can be understood through 5 distinct points of learning. The cycle is initiated by opportunities for students to personally feel wonderment and awe. From this starting point, students will be motivated to observe, investigate and to construct their own understanding. By sharing their ideas and communicating their new understanding, students are guided to critical reflection and development of a deeper level of knowledge.

Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I LEARN. Benjamin Franklin 4

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2.5 Learning activities Each lesson of the course is carefully prepared to deliver a specific learning objective(s). Lessons are intended to develop a student inquiry and are resourced in order that teachers have access to quality assured learning materials.

Group Participation It is important that all students feel able to participate and contribute to CLE. Small groups support the co-creation of understanding and are used extensively throughout the course.

Active Learning Active learning engages and challenges children and young people’s thinking using real-life and imaginary situations. Students are able to share life experiences and talents in order to explore the issues and contexts of the lessons.

Reflection and Sharing Reflecting on learning achieved is an essential component of Inquiry. Students are asked to collate and share their findings. Teachers reflect with students on learning achieved and next steps in the learning journey.

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2.6 Classroom Layout Teachers need to optimise the learning impact of the resources available to them. Room layout is a key decision to be made. Unsuitable seating plans may prevent students from working effectively. A perfect room layout will depend on many variables – below are 3 examples of common room layouts.

Traditional layout > The room offers low opportunity for student interaction. A lack of space leads to the teacher dominating discourse and a limited range of learning styles. Caring for Life lessons are better suited to students interacting.

An improved layout > The room has opportunity for student interaction. Teachers may wish to rotate student seating to work in different groups and should ensure easy movement for themselves around the room. The choice to display student work is appropriate and motivating.

A specialist layout > The room has been arranged to support a teacher led discussion. This layout will be excellent for this activity but may not be appropriate to small group work or activities requiring students to write or draw.

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2.7 Assessment Assessment is an integral part of the teaching and learning process and investigates the extent to which course objectives are evidenced through student outcomes. Students need regular opportunity to identify and reflect on their learning. Teachers need to be clear about progress and the next steps required in each student’s learning journey.

Effective assessment in the CLE programme allows: • identification of the needs of an individual or the whole class. • a joining of the inquiry cycle. Reflection on learning encourages students to consider how new skills and knowledge can be put into action – a primary aim of CLE • students to gain formative feedback on their progress toward specific learning objectives

BASELINE ASSESSMENT

This is a necessary step for teachers to complete prior to beginning the teaching of CLE. This will help teachers to identify what is already known by students and therefore determine where to start. See Section 3

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessment is collected at the end of a unit of study. Summative assessment in CLE is important to track a student’s progress. It is however, important to recognize that the course objectives relate to everyday life and student understanding may advance rapidly making summative data quickly outdated.

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

These type of assessment activities begin through desired learning outcomes being shared with the students. Students must know and recognise desired outcomes and must be actively involved in the assessment process The purpose of Formative Assessment is to develop new understanding and to allow students (and teachers) to recognise their next steps in learning. Formative Assessment is regularly structured within the learning of CLE programme. These activities allow teachers to track progress of the students and include:

• Observations • Portfolios and student work • Question and Answers sessions Detailed assessment information is provided within the CLE Assessment Guide and Lesson Plans.

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3. Pre-curriculum knowledge 3.1 The learning journey Students will arrive at the primary classroom with a diverse range of pre-existing knowledge, skills, beliefs, and attitudes. Preschool learning will inevitably influence the child’s ability to access and absorb content and skills delivered during CLE lessons. How young students process and integrate new information in Year 1 will, in turn, affect how they think, apply, and create new knowledge throughout their schooling instead of create new knowledge later in the school. The 5 subject areas of CLE are each part of the whole area of knowledge. Students will need to spend considerable time piecing together fragments of learning and information they encounter. Students are likely to have missed key foundation knowledge and will not gain holistic understanding until gaps are filled. Teachers must ensure they know the starting point of each child in their class. CLE covers a number of areas that may be difficult to quickly assess and are frequently multifaceted and interconnected.

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3.2 Confirm knowledge We recommend that teachers confirm that students are ready to begin CLE. This decision relies upon a professional judgement and should include an assessment of each student’s grasp of the prerequisite knowledge and skills listed below.

A THE WEB OF LIFE Students beginning the course will be able to > differentiate between living and non-living things > list examples of things they need and identify who provides it

B SENTIENT BEINGS Students beginning the course will be able to distinguish > common types of creature categorising those living on land, sea and air > between manmade e.g. plastic and natural objects e.g. rock

C CARE AND RESPECT Students beginning the course will be able to > describe how they care for themselves > link personal well-being to care and resources received

D INTERACTING WITH OTHERS Students beginning the course will be able to > understand that their actions may impact upon others > list positive and/or negative behaviour when interacting with others

E EMPATHETIC CHOICES Students beginning the course will be able to > describe similarities and/or differences between individuals and/or families > list their individual traits and/or talents

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4. Course Planning 4.1 Course overview In the Caring for Life course students reflect on the nature and complexity of their existence, their place within society and the environment. They develop understanding and a sense of personal and social responsibility, they are empowered to take responsibility for themselves and contribute to the well-being of those around them, of their communities and their environments. The course gives knowledge of the world whilst supporting students to consider their emotional responses to the issues explored. Twinning the acquisition of knowledge with the maturation of emotional intelligence supports ethical choices. Students take advantage of day to day opportunities to participate and contribute within their local communities.

Learning objectives are aligned to 3 separate, but related, course themes: 1) Students will learn information allowing them to Know the World 2) Students will develop the emotional intelligence to Sense the World 3) Students will develop skills and dispositions to Participate in the World

Know the World (K)

Sense the World (S)

Participate (P)

• Facts • Knowledge • Concepts

• Positive dispositions • Values • Emotionally prepared

• Motivated to act • Informed to act • Skilled to act

Interdependence of Living Things

Empathy and Compassion

Civic and Social Participation

Providing accurate, clear information so that students have knowledge of the world and their place therein. Learning regarding the complex interactions of the Web of Life helps stimulate student curiosity and a desire for personal inquiry around and beyond their own local circumstances.

Instilling in students respect for others and feelings of care, empathy together with a sense of responsibility. This aspect relates closely to the development of emotional intelligence. Students feel motivated to participate in shaping a better world and to engage in a compassionate lifestyle.

Teaching ways of living and systems of thinking that empower students to make positive choices. Student are taught to seek opportunity for participation and to translate their own skills and values into action for the good of the communities they are active within.

Caring for Life Education is supportive of the ‘Learning to Live Together’ Pillar of Learning see Appendix 3. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO)

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4.2 Course goals

KNOW THE WORLD (K): Interdependence of all living things

Students will: K1 – learn that all things have innate identifying features, a purpose, a way of behaving within the Web of Life and are consequently unique and of value K2 – learn that the world can be observed and that evidence is important to future decisions but knowledge is incomplete and the world is highly complex K3 – learn that the world changes and that their own actions (and the actions of others) may change the world for better or worse

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SENSE THE WORLD (S): Empathy and compassion

Students will:

S1 – develop self-awareness of their own moods and the subsequent choices contingent on these. Develop improved self-control and conflict avoidance/resolution skills S2 – develop virtuous character traits including respect, resilience, curiousity and optimism S3 – perceive more accurately the emotions of others and respond to their needs appropriately

Experience, Sense and Feel the World

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PARTICIPATE IN THE WORLD (P): Civic responsibilty

Students will:

P1 – increase participation in civic, educational and social contexts and seek opportunities to help P2 – be better able to sustain positive and functional relationships in all aspects of life P3 – be better able to reflect on personal choices and the implications for their future participation

Conflict resolver

Action at home

Creative Cooperative

Action at school

Critical thinker Problem solver

Personal action

Participate in the World

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4.3 Conceptual overview Caring for Life involves 5 distinct areas of learning developed through a repeating spiraled curriculum. Each area is revisited throughout the 6-year course and receives an equal focus. Learning is integrated and supports delivery of the 3 curriculum themes and the associated 9 course goals.

Learning Areas

Curriculum Themes

A. The Web of Life B. Sentient Beings C. Care and Respect D. Interacting with Others E. Empathetic Choices

1. Know the World 2. Sense the World 3. Participate in the World

Caring for Life Curriculum – a progressive spiral of subject learning

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4.4 Subject Learning Area Descriptions

A. The Web of Life Our world is incredibly diverse and yet each branch of life remains united through a common interdependence. As living things, we must understand life as an infinitely complex series of connected cycles. The unit examines an individual’s responsibility for the environment and considers the costs and benefits of modern living and allows students to suggest and evaluate solutions.

B. Sentient Beings Most students have watched an animal and wondered as to its thoughts or behaviours. Though apparently simplistic, these questions are in reality highly complex and important to understanding our place and role within the natural world. The unit examines the feelings and needs of animals compared with the feelings and needs of humans. A theme of learning is to consider the emotional and physical well-being of different animals kept in captivity e.g. in zoos, circus, intensive farming.

C. Care and Respect Respect is important because it shows that one values another as an individual, and will consider the personal rights and dignity of that person. The unit promotes care and respect across cultures, nationalities and species. Students consider how they can best care for others. Students are provided knowledge on best care for different types of animals including endangered species and domestic pets.

D. Interacting with Others Through considering interactions with others the student develops understanding, skills, and attitudes that develop respectful, caring relationships with others. The unit examines a number of interactions commonly encountered. Students are asked to consider how they can ensure their own safety when interacting with common animals and insects. Exclusively human interactions are also considered through contexts of older people and those that live with a mental or physical disability.

E. Empathetic Choices Empathetic Choices are the result of a meaningful connection between body, mind, and spirit – and derive from interpretation of sensations, thoughts, and feelings. Empathy is a prerequisite of Emotional Intelligence. The unit emphasises the link between empathy and compassionate acts. Through ‘walking in the shoes of others’ students learn to understand how they can make a difference.

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4.5 Objectives matrix

The Web of Life

Sentient beings

Care and Respect

Interacting Empathetic with others choices

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7 A8 A9 A10 A11 A12

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10 B11 B12

C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 C11 C12

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10 D11 D12

See Page 20 See Page 21 See Page 21 See Page 22 See Page 22

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6

E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7 E8 E9 E10 E11 E12

See Page 23 See Page 24 See Page 25 See Page 26 See Page 27 See Page 28

Guide to reading the matrix 10 Objectives within each Curriculum level >>

Reading horizontally across the table identifies all the objectives covered at each level of the CLE curriculum. As each Level includes two objectives drawn from each of the five Subject Learning Areas a full year will involve completion of 10 units. The final column of the table provides a page reference for the location of these curriculum level objectives within this document.

12 Objectives within a Subject Learning Area >>

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Reading vertically down the table, the column identifies objectives covered within a single Subject Learning Area in the full six-year course. The final row of the table provides a page reference for the location of these objectives within this document. Objectives are coded with a letter in order to identify which of the 5 Subject Learning Areas they relate to and a number to indicate at what level of the curriculum they are to be taught. Each curriculum level has two objectives for each Subject Learning Area and therefore the six years of Primary education sees completion of 12 learning objectives for each of the Subjects.


The CLE programme has been designed around the 3 recurring themes of:

1. Knowing the World 2. Sensing the World 3. Participating in the World These themes and the associated nine course goals are realised through delivery of the objectives of each of the Subject Learning Areas. Each Subject Learning Area will contribute significantly to students understanding of each of the 3 themes. However, this contribution will vary according to the precise content of the area. Appendix 1: Alignment Charts provides a visual overview of the focus of each Subject Learning Area with respect to delivery of the Course themes.

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4.6 Objectives by subject learning area

A THE WEB OF LIFE Students will learn: A1 A2 A3 A4

to make connections between the shared needs of living things to identify one’s own position in the Web of Life understand how individual choices affect others understand that an interrelationship exists between all living creatures

Students will investigate: A5 habitats and what they provide to the species that live there. A6 the environment and how our choices may positively or negatively influence it

Students will learn: A7 w hat improves and harms their local, natural environments and about some of the ways that people can help or harm the natural world A8 that environmental problems are by nature a threat to all living things

Students will gain awareness: A9 of specific environmental threats to China and the wider world A10 of their personal responsibility (and ability) to protect the environment through their role as consumers and producers

Students will investigate and present: A11 a report describing an environmental issue and the impact on individual species or groups A12 a personal response to alleviate an environmental problem and identify those benefiting from the action

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B SENTIENT BEINGS Students will learn: B1 to explore the basic needs of animals, including humans B2 to identify an animal’s feelings through reference to evidence of that animals well-being B3 that all living things have basic needs and that some creatures suffer through all their needs not having been met B4 special capabilities evident in some animals and how behaviour evidences these feelings

Students will feel: B5 e mpathy and respect for the behaviour of small animals and better understand their needs and behaviours. B6 inspired by the diverse and fascinating abilities that animals and humans have B7 understanding that ‘different’ is not necessarily ‘inferior’.

Students will develop admiration and understanding: B8 of wild animal behaviour through reference to their species needs including stress responses of species with a negative public perception through reference to the remarkable abilities and behaviour of these species

Students will learn to revere and respect: B9 the capabilities of marine life and Insects B10 the diversity of different species in the natural world

Students will learn: B11 the special needs of farm animals and how a farmer should best meet these B12 to observe and interpret the behaviour of farm animals in order to better understand needs

C CARE AND RESPECT Students will learn: C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6

the varying basic needs of different species of pets that pet owners are responsible for ensuring that their pets needs are met (Good Ownership) to care for the needs of cats and how they could ensure the well-being of a pet cat. the differing needs of exotic pets and wild animals and why they are unsuitable for domestication to care about populations and overpopulation to describe the specific needs of small pets (rodents and fish) and how they could ensure the wellbeing of pets C7 to care about the environmental impact of their family and how this may be minimised C8 the needs of exotic pets and how difficult it is for these to be met in captivity

Students will celebrate: C9 the unique and diverse beliefs and philosophies of varied Asian cultures C10 the contributions of animals to their country’s history, society and culture

Students will research: C11 the benefits and challenges of a wide variety of professions focused around helping others C12 an endangered species, the threats to it and how they and others can help to save it 21

Caring for Life Education


D INTERACTING WITH OTHERS Students will learn: D1 D2 D3 D4 D5

strategies for interacting safely with dogs to manage personal interactions with dogs and plan for possible animal reactions to understand the motivations for specific canine behaviours of the disease rabies and how to identify animals that represent a high risk of infection to understand the motivations for specific feline behaviours and learn to respect and interact safely with them. D6 about insects and by learning about them to understand practical and safe interactions D7 to understand the benefits of working animals and how to, care and interact safely D8 about the special needs and capabilities of people different to themselves

Students will investigate: D9 urban wildlife and how to interact safely with common species in their region D10 how the needs of individuals change with age and how we can show respect to the elderly

Students will compare: D11 the quality of life enjoyed by wild animals held in captivity to those living wild in their native environments D12 the mutual benefits of animals and humans coexisting

E EMPATHETIC CHOICES Students will learn: E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6

to describe their own feelings and what makes them happy or sad to identify ways to be helpful and care for others know that it is wrong to tease or bully others because they are different to demonstrate respect for difference and communicate this to others that heroism is a mindset or behaviour possible for anyone to identify opportunities to pro-actively help others and to demonstrate heroic qualities

Students will advocate: E7 for the natural world and identify threats to its well-being E8 for actions to minimise social disadvantage and to understand causes of the issue

Students will explore: E9 the necessary conditions for productive lives and the constraints required on individual behaviour E10 the impact of disability on an individual’s life and challenges for the family

Students will hypothesise: E11 on the life challenges and experiences of a less fortunate child in the world E12 how stereotypes and judgmental behaviour limit their openness and receptivity to others

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4.7 Objectives by Curriculum Level .0 LEVEL 1

THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will learn:

A1 to make connections between the shared needs of living things A2 to identify one’s own position in the Web of Life

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will learn:

B1 to explore the basic needs of animals, including humans B2 to identify an animal’s feelings through reference to evidence of that animals wellbeing

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will learn:

C1 the varying basic needs of different species of pets C2 that pet owners are responsible for ensuring that their pets needs are met

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will learn:

D1 strategies for interacting safely with dogs D2 to manage personal interactions with dogs and plan for possible animal reactions

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will learn:

E1 to describe their own feelings and what makes them happy or sad E2 to identify ways to be helpful and care for others

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.0 LEVEL 2 THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will learn:

A3 to understand how individual choices affect others A4 to understand that an interrelationship exists between all living creatures

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will learn:

B3 that all living things have basic needs and that some creatures suffer through all their needs not having been met B4 special capabilities evident in some animals and how behaviour evidences these feelings

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will learn:

C3 to care for the needs of cats and how they could ensure the well-being of a pet cat C4 the differing needs of exotic pets and wild animals and why they are unsuitable for domestication

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will learn:

D3 to understand the motivations for specific canine behaviours D4 of the disease rabies and how to identify animals that represent a high risk of infection

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will learn:

E3 know that it is wrong to tease or bully others because they are different E4 to demonstrate respect for difference and communicate this to others

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LEVEL 3

THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will investigate:

A5 habitats and what they provide to the species that live there. A6 the environment and how our choices may positively or negatively influence it

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will feel:

B5 empathy and respect for the behaviour of small animals and better understand their needs and behaviours. B6 inspired by the diverse and fascinating abilities that animals and humans have and understanding that ‘different’ is not necessarily ‘inferior’.

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will learn:

C5 to care about populations and overpopulation C6 to describe the specific needs of small pets and how they could ensure the well-being of pets

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will learn:

D5 to understand the motivations for specific feline behaviours and learn to respect and interact safely with them. D6 about insects and by learning about them to understand practical and safe interactions

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will learn:

E5 that heroism is a mindset or behaviour possible for anyone E6 to identify opportunities to pro-actively help others and to demonstrate heroic qualities

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LEVEL 4

THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will learn:

A7 what improves and harms their local, natural environments and about some of the ways that people can help or harm the natural world A8 that environmental problems are by nature a threat to all living things

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will develop admiration and understanding:

B7 of wild animal behaviour through reference to their species needs including stress responses B8 of species with a negative public perception through reference to the remarkable abilities and behaviour of these species

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will learn:

C7 to care about the environmental impact of their family and how this may be minimised C8 of the needs of exotic pets and how difficult it is for these to be met in captivity

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will learn:

D7 to understand the benefits of working animals and how to care and interact safely with them D8 about the special needs and capabilities of people different to themselves

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will advocate:

E7 for the natural world and identify threats to its well-being E8 for actions to minimise social disadvantage and to understand causes of the issue

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LEVEL 5

THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will gain awareness:

A9 of specific environmental threats to China and the wider world A10 of their personal responsibility (and ability) to protect the environment through their role as consumers and producers.

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will learn to revere and respect:

B9 the capabilities of marine life and insects B10 the diversity of different species in the natural world

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will celebrate:

C9 the unique and diverse beliefs and philosophies of varied Asian cultures C10 the contributions of animals to their country’s history, society and culture

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will investigate:

D9 urban wildlife and how to interact safely with common species in their region D10 how the needs of individuals change with age and how we can show respect to the elderly

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will explore:

E9 the necessary conditions for productive lives and the constraints required on individual behaviour E10 the impact of disability on an individual’s life and challenges for the family

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Caring for Life Education


LEVEL 6

THE WEB OF LIFE (A)

Students will investigate and present:

A11 a report describing an environmental issue and the impact on individual species or groups A12 a personal response to alleviate an environmental problem and identify those benefiting from the action

SENTIENT BEINGS (B)

Students will learn:

B11 the special needs of farm animals and how a farmer should best meet these B12 to observe and interpret the behaviour of farm animals in order to better understand need

CARE AND RESPECT (C)

Students will research:

C11 the benefits and challenges of a wide variety of professions focused around helping others C12 an endangered species, the threats to it and how they and others can help to save it

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS (D)

Students will compare:

D11 the quality of life enjoyed by wild animals held in captivity to those living wild in their native environments D12 the mutual benefits of animals and humans coexisting

EMPATHETIC CHOICES (E)

Students will hypothesise:

E11 on the life challenges and experiences of a less fortunate child in the world E12 how stereotypes and judgmental behaviour limit their openness and receptivity to others

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Appendices

1. Alignment Charts Alignments charts are used to highlight how objectives of the subject learning areas develop and deliver overall course goals: Knowledge, Sensing, Participation These charts are indicative of the focus of each objective and are useful as a visual and impressionistic tool for illustrating an individual objectives’s relevance to each of the course goals. It is important to recognize that the construction of the alignment chart is a subjective process and the precise focus of each subject learning objective greatly depend upon the skill, emphasis and intent of the classroom teacher. These charts were developed by an ACTAsia education consultant and reflect their personal decisions on content and strategic delivery. Codes used in the charts relate to objectives listed in Sect. 4.

LEVEL 1

K1

KNOW K2

K3

S1

SENSE S2

S3

PARTICIPATE P3 P1 P2

A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 D1 D2 E1 E2

Caring for Life Education

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KNOW

SENSE

PARTICIPATE


LEVEL 2

K1

KNOW K2

K3

S1

SENSE S2

S1

SENSE S2

S3

PARTICIPATE P3 P1 P2

S3

PARTICIPATE P3 P1 P2

A3 A4 B3 B4 C3 C4 D3 D4 E3 E4

LEVEL 3

K1

KNOW K2

K3

A5 A6 B5 B6 C5 C6 D5 D6 E5 E6

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KNOW

SENSE

PARTICIPATE


LEVEL 4

K1

KNOW K2

K3

S1

SENSE S2

S1

SENSE S2

PARTICIPATE P3 P2

S3

P1

S3

PARTICIPATE P3 P1 P2

A7 A8 B7 B8 C7 C8 D7 D8 E7 E8

LEVEL 5

K1

KNOW K2

K3

A9 A10 B9 B10 C9 C10 D9 D10 E9 E10

Caring for Life Education

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KNOW

SENSE

PARTICIPATE


LEVEL 6

K1

KNOW K2

K3

S1

SENSE S2

S3

P1

PARTICIPATE P3 P2

A11 A12 B11 B12 C11 C12 D11 D12 E11 E12

Summary analysis Relative contribution toward course goals Each subject learning area makes a significant contribution to the three course goals. The Web of Life (A) is a content rich unit in order to impart knowledge and understanding of the interconnectedness of life. Empathetic Choices (E) is an important vehicle for the development of skills and attitudes required to participate and contribute.

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Curriculum Level Focus

CLE progressively challenges each student toward the development of new understanding, enhanced emotional intelligence and participation. The priority for younger students is the development of life knowledge and the maturing of emotional intellect. At this time considerable lesson focus is given to these twin objectives. Students will also be helped to develop foundation skills in participation. During the later years of Caring for Life, students are challenged to implement their knowledge and skills. The focus of Year 5 and 6 is to encourage individual inquiry and an investigation of key issues related to humane education. This is evident in the growth in size of the Participation segment of the pie charts from Level 1 through to 6.

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Caring for Life Education


Appendices

2. C aring for Life: developed from UNESCO’s 4 Pillars of Learning The ‘Four Pillars of Education’ are first recorded in a report for UNESCO by the International Commission on Education for the Twenty-First Century chaired by Jacques Delors4. The Pillars are:

1 Learning to Know 2 Learning to Do 3 Learning to Live Together 4 Learning to Be Each pillar underpins a facet of UNESCO’s vision of compulsory school education and lifelong learning achieved post school. UNESCO gives particular weight to education facilitating ‘Learning to Live Together’. This involves developing understanding of others through dialogue and contributes toward the development of empathy, respect, and appreciation. To understand others, young students must first be allowed to know themselves. Learning to live together necessitates an understanding of interdependence and from this an appreciation of common interest. Caring for Life Education: a foundation course in Learning to Live Together based on UNESCO’s 4 Pillars of Learning

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Caring for Life is fully concordant with the aims of ‘Learning to Live Together’ and interprets the intent in a broader sense to include all sentient beings. Early course modules assume the premise that to understand others, we must first know ourselves and the immediate environment we occupy. Young students are helped to recognize interdependence and to make sense of how they feel about the life experiences of other people and creatures. Older students are encouraged to consider shared purpose, and are supported to act on their values through group projects and personal choices.

Caring for Life seeks to connect knowledge and feelings with actions

Young people need humane education in order to:

Know about the World possess knowledge of the interconnected existence of all life forms.

Sense and experience the World have emotional intelligence and exercise compassion for suffering in all life forms.

Participate in the World make humane decisions and exercise Civic Responsibility.

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Caring for Life Education


Appendices

3. Citations 1 – WORLD ANIMAL NET (WAN) Founded in 1997 WAN is the world’s largest network of animal protection societies with over 3,000 affiliates in more than 100 countries. WAN has Special Consultative Status with the Economic & Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations. The definition of humane education is used in their publication – Model Animal Welfare Act (2014) http://worldanimal.net/our-programs/humane-education

2 – RUDYARD KIPLING – AUTHOR (1865 – 1936) Rudyard Kipling was a British writer, well known in the Western world for his works including the The Jungle Book (1894) and the poem If (1895). Further information can be seen here – http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/kip_fra.htm

3 – ARTHUR AUFDERHEIDE – PATHOLOGIST (1922 – 2013) Arthur Aufderheide was a US doctor who led a distinguished career as a pathologist. He became best known for his investigations of disease within ancient civilisations. Further information can be seen here – www.timeshighereducation.com/news/people/arthur-c-aufderheide-1922-2013/2006741.article

4 – BENJAMIN FRANKLIN – POLITICIAN (1706 – 1790) Benjamin Franklin is best known as a Founding Father of the United States of America. His achievements were many and he is remembered as a highly influential figure in the development of American society. Further information can be seen here – http://www.ushistory.org/franklin/info/

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Caring for Life Education Curriculum Framework & Guidelines was sponsored by: Lee Foundation, Singapore. Greenbaum Foundation, USA. One Voice, France. Life Conservationist Association, Taiwan. British Consulate - General Shanghai, China Betty Amsden OAM, Australia

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Caring for Life Education


CopyrightŠACTAsia All rights reserved. Materials and text used in the production of this document can only be reproduced with the permission of the originator.

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www.actasia.org info@actasia.org 22.09.2016