Page 1

Building Performance Institute, Inc. BPI Standards

BPI-1100-T-2012

Home Energy Auditing Standard

1

Raising the Bar in Building Performance Contracting

July 27, 2012


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Notice BPI standards, bulletins and other technical publications are designed to serve the public interest through eliminating misunderstandings between manufacturers, service providers and purchasers, facilitating interchangeability and improvement of products and services, and assisting the purchaser in selecting and obtaining, with minimum delay, the proper product or service for his or her particular need. Existence of such standards, bulletins and other technical publications shall not in any respect preclude any entity affiliated with BPI (or not) from manufacturing or selling products or services not conforming to such standards, bulletins or other technical publications, nor shall the existence of such standards, bulletins and other technical publications preclude their voluntary use by those unaffiliated with BPI, whether the standard is to be used either domestically or internationally. Standards, bulletins and other technical publications are adopted by BPI in accordance with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) patent policy. By such action, BPI does not assume any liability to any patent owner, nor does it assume any obligation whatever to parties adopting the standard, bulletin or other technical publication. This standard does not purport to address all safety problems associated with its use or all applicable regulatory requirements. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations before its use.

Š 2012 Building Performance Institute, Inc. – All Rights Reserved.


Building Performance Institute, Inc. Types of Standards The Building Performance Institute, Inc. (BPI) develops technical standards, certifications, accreditations, and related technical documents (e.g., Guidelines, Bulletins, Standard Work Specifications) to support the safe and effective improvement of energy performance in existing residential buildings (including multi-family). These elements reside within a family of related types where they build on each other. The structure of BPI Standards is made up of six distinct types: Materials Standards, Material Test Methods, Installation Standards, Application Standards, Standard Practices and Standard Specifications. The following overview provides a description of each of these types, and how they relate to each other in order to create a comprehensive and unified structure. Materials Standards are perhaps the easiest member of the family to understand. They define the performance requirements of particular materials. Material standards include methods of testing to confirm acceptability, as well as establishing the performance characteristics of materials under specific conditions. A material standard would be applicable to the manufacturers of the materials and would include all requirements that a manufacturer shall meet. A material standard includes requirements for material labeling and requirements for the documentation that a manufacturer would need to provide. Material Test Method Standards are used to outline the process to conduct a standardized test to determine the performance of a material. Test methods are normally for laboratories and do not include performance requirements. (That is, test methods do not dictate how well a material shall perform, but simply how to test for its level of performance.) An example of a test method is the BPI standard on the air retarder properties of loose fill insulation. In a test method standard, the outcome would be a test report. Installation Standards provide requirements for the installation of a specific material or product and are limited to that particular material or product. The installation standards are applicable no matter where the material would be installed and no matter what function the material is intended to provide. For example, loose fill fibrous insulation ALWAYS needs proper setup of the equipment to ensure that the fibers are adequately separated as they are being delivered. This is achieved by machine settings, length and configuration of hose, nozzle size and other factors that are covered in the installation standard. Installation standards cover everything that is needed for proper installation of the material, which may include health and safety requirements for the installer, other workers and occupants. Application Standards are requirements for a specific function and would reference material standards and installation standards. For BPI application standards, the function will be identified along with all the materials that could provide that function for a specific location in a building. As an example, if you developed a Building Insulation Application standard, the standard would be broken down by location. In the location of attic floors, it would then lay out all of the requirements to provide the function of thermal insulation at that location. The Building Insulation Application standard would require that the attic floor be prepared before the installation of the thermal insulation. Preparation would include confirming that: i


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

the attic floor is air sealed,

the proper amount of attic ventilation is provided in the correct locations,

the electrical wiring is appropriate,

the appropriate shielding is in place for heat emitting devices so that they do not come in contact with the insulation.

After all the items required for attic preparation have been met, then the installation of the insulation would commence using material that meets the material standard and it would be installed in accordance for the installation standard for that material. Standard Practice Standards provide requirements for conducting a procedure normally done outside of a laboratory. An example of a standard practice is ASTM E 779, which specifies how a blower door test is conducted, but does not specify how tight a building should be. In a standard practice, the outcome would be a report. Standard Specification Standards outline performance requirements and references other standards as to how you would confirm that the specification requirements have been met. As an example, an air tightness specification for a home or building would specify a maximum air leakage rate, and reference ASTM E 779 for how to measure it. Material Test Method Standard

Material Standard

Material Test Method Standard Material Material Test Method Standard Material Test Method Standard

Test Method Standard

Application Standard Installation Standard

Material Standard Application Standard

Project Specifications

Installation Standard

Material Standard Application Standard Installation Standard

Standard Practice

Standard Practice


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Table of Contents Introduction (Informative) ........................................................................................................... 2 1. Scope ........................................................................................................................... 3 2. General Energy Audit Requirements ............................................................................ 3 3. Health and Safety Related Requirements ..................................................................... 3 4. Disclosure and Ethics ................................................................................................... 4 5. Cost-Benefit Analysis.................................................................................................... 4 6. Prioritizing Recommendations ...................................................................................... 5 7. Combustion Appliance Testing ..................................................................................... 5 8. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation ................................................................................. 7 9. Moisture Control ........................................................................................................... 8 10. Building Enclosure Performance................................................................................... 8 11. Heating and Cooling (HVAC) Efficiency ........................................................................ 9 12. Baseload Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation ................................................. 10 Annex A BPI Home Energy Audit Standard-Referenced Documents (Normative) .....................11 Annex B Terms and Acronyms (Normative) ..............................................................................13 Annex C BPI Accreditation Policies and Procedures (Informative) ............................................14


Introduction (Informative) The Building Performance Institute, Inc. (BPI) publishes standards for the existing residential building retrofit industry. This Home Energy Auditing Standard is the basis for BPI’s Energy Auditor Certification and provides requirements for the energy-auditing profession. The goal of this standard is to direct the energy auditor to develop a comprehensive list of measures which lead to wholebuilding, science-based energy improvements to existing detached single-family dwellings and townhouses. This standard shall be used in conjunction with other BPI Standards, which outline in detail how an energy auditor shall meet the requirements noted.

2


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

1. Scope This standard practice defines the minimum criteria for conducting a building-science-based evaluation of existing detached single-family dwellings and townhouses that have independent mechanical systems for each dwelling unit (heating, cooling, water heating, and ventilation); direct access to outdoors for each dwelling unit; and were designed to have continuous party walls with no penetrations to adjacent units, with such party walls extending from ground to roof where the dwelling unit is attached to one or more adjacent single-family dwelling units.

The evaluation will address energy usage, and limited aspects of building durability and occupant health and safety. The evaluation will provide a comprehensive scope of work to improve the home and will include a cost-benefit analysis.

2. General Energy Audit Requirements Energy audits shall be based on building science principles and include the use of appropriate equipment in diagnosing opportunities for improving energy efficiency and minimizing health and safety hazards. All energy audits shall include the following: 2.1 A review with the occupant(s), if available, about any concerns they may have related to the performance of their home. 2.2 Immediate disclosure to occupant(s) if any emergency or urgent health and safety hazard or situation is present in the home. 2.3 A report that meets the requirements laid out in this standard. All energy audit reports shall include the following: 2.4 Information on energy programs, incentives, regulations and energy costs relevant to prioritized recommendations for improving the home. 2.5 When energy-consumption records are available, a baseline energy use analysis. 2.6 A comprehensive set of specific energy efficiency and health and safety measures, warranted by the site-specific circumstances, that provides advice to clients on reduction strategies.

3. Health and Safety Related Requirements The energy audit shall: 3.1 Include a test of all combustion appliances in accordance with Section 7 of this standard. 3.2 Evaluate ventilation requirements in accordance with Section 8 of this standard. 3.3 Identify signs of moisture problems in accordance with Section 9 of this standard. All energy audit reports shall include the specific information needed to implement, maintain and/or improve existing levels of health and safety in the home. Additionally, the energy audit report shall identify ways to mitigate identified health and safety hazards. The energy audit report shall: 3


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

3.4 Identify existing health and safety hazards and hazards that may develop when the improvement measures are installed and specify preventative measures for each situation. 3.5 Inform customers about identified and potential fire, structural, health and safety hazards related to energy systems and any retrofit work recommended in the audit report. 3.6 Specify that any known or suspected lead, asbestos, or mold be addressed only by workers who are qualified and following appropriate containment, cleaning and/or abatement procedures. 3.7 Inform customers about potential radon risk. Recommend radon testing in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines, unless an EPA guidelines-compliant radonmitigation system is already in place. 3.8 Specify that identified electrical hazards, which may hinder planned energy conservation measures (ECMs), are mitigated prior to or in parallel with ECMs.

4. Disclosure and Ethics The energy audit report shall provide clear and accurate information to customers about ECMs and health and safety improvements. The energy audit report shall: 4.1 Disclose any current or potential conflicts of interest of the auditor. 4.2 Disclose any products and services that the auditor or his/her company provides in addition to energy auditing. 4.3 Communicate the cost-effectiveness and feasibility of the recommended ECMs, based on modeling, utility-bill history or typical usage and energy cost for similar homes in the area. 4.4 Communicate the importance of each recommended health and safety improvement. 4.5 Include a list of one or more qualified contractors who perform diagnostic testing and the retrofit work listed in the workscope.

5. Cost-Benefit Analysis The energy audit shall: 5.1 Include a customized cost-benefit analysis of a comprehensive package of ECMs, using one of the following three methods for cost-benefit analysis: 5.1.1

Computer analysis using qualified energy audit software in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Program Notice 05-5.

5.1.2

Computer analysis, using building energy simulation software that shall at a minimum meet the following requirements:

1) Pass the software verification tests listed in Section 4.2.1 of Procedures for Certifying Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credits – RESNET Publication No. 06-001, Nov 7, 2011. 2) Be capable of reporting energy consumption separately, by fuel type, for the following end uses at a minimum: space heating, space cooling, water heating, lighting, and other appliances. 4


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

5.1.3

A priority list set up as described in DOE WPN 01-4. The priority list shall include both seasonal and baseload ECMs and shall identify the type of housing covered by the priority list. (See Annex A.)

5.2 When energy-consumption records are available, the audit shall include an analysis of energy consumption records (at least 12 months) to validate estimates of energy savings from the installed ECMs. The energy audit report shall include: 5.3 A tabular summary of the energy consumption records analyzed. 5.4 The results of the customized cost-benefit analysis of comprehensive package of ECMs performed in accordance with item 5.1.

6. Prioritizing Recommendations The energy audit shall include the following requirements: 6.1 Interview with customers to understand their priorities and goals for home improvements. The energy audit report shall include recommendations detailing proposed ECMs. These recommendations shall be based on an evaluation of the whole house according to the requirements of this standard and the objectives of the customer. The recommendations shall not be based primarily on a specific product line, services of a contractor, or convenience. The objective of the recommendations is to optimize home performance cost-effectively, while maintaining or improving health and safety and satisfying customer objectives. The energy audit report shall include: 6.2 A prioritized list of health and safety improvements noting their urgency and importance based on health impacts. 6.3 A prioritized list of ECMs, building repairs and renovation work recommended according to customer objectives and cost-effectiveness. 6.4 Results of diagnostic testing including a brief description of the diagnostic testing and its purpose. 6.5 Recommendation for verification (such as diagnostic testing) after ECMs are complete.

7. Combustion Appliance Testing The energy audit shall include inspection of combustion systems for safety problems. Specifically the energy audit shall: 7.1 Test for gas leakage at connections of natural gas and propane piping systems. 7.2 Identify and communicate situations that require health and safety remediation, following Section 7 — such as a gas leak or actionable levels of ambient carbon monoxide — clearly and immediately to the customer and recommend solutions to mitigate the problem. 7.3 Inspect for oil leakage in oil-fired heating and water-heating systems.

5


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

7.4 Inspect combustion venting systems for damage, leaks, disconnections, inadequate slope and other safety hazards. 7.5 Include combustion appliance zone (CAZ) pressure tests, carbon monoxide (CO) tests and spillage tests on all combustion appliances venting into atmospheric chimneys, including fanassisted gas appliances. 7.6 If the outlet of the exhaust is accessible, include a CO test on all sealed-combustion and powervented appliances (without atmospheric chimneys). 7.7 Test gas ovens and unvented appliances for CO. 7.8 Inspect solid fuel burning appliances for safe operation and efficiency. The energy audit report shall specify remediation of conditions specified by this standard, and shall specify that post-retrofit combustion appliance testing be conducted. The energy audit report shall also: 7.9

Specify repair for combustible gas leaks and replacement for hazardous or damaged gas connectors.

7.10 Specify repair for oil leaks and replacement for hazardous or damaged components. 7.11 Specify repair or replacement for any safety hazard or damage in the combustion venting systems. 7.12 If ambient CO reaches actionable levels during the energy audit, specify measures to mitigate high ambient CO level. 7.13 If a combustion appliance spillage reaches actionable level, specify measures to mitigate spillage. 7.14 If CO in undiluted flue gases of vented combustion appliances is more than actionable levels, specify service to reduce CO. 7.15 For oil-fired appliances, if smoke test is more than actionable levels, specify a clean and tune. 7.16 For sealed-combustion and power-vented appliances, if CO is more than actionable levels, specify service to reduce CO. 7.17 For gas range burners, specify a clean and tune if the flame has any discoloration, flame impingement, or an irregular pattern or if burners are visibly dirty, corroded or bent. 7.18 Recommend smoke alarms for homes, per local code, or, at a minimum one per floor level. 7.19 Recommend CO monitors/alarms in homes with combustion appliances or attached garages, per local code, or, at a minimum one per floor level. 7.20 Recommend final combustion testing at project completion to ensure compliance with the above standards. 7.21 Recommend removal of any unvented heaters or appliances used as a secondary heating source. Any measures that reduce the air exchange rate in the building shall not be recommended if an unvented heater remains in place. 7.22 When a recommendation to replace atmospherically-vented combustion equipment is made, and when cost-effective, the audit report shall recommend replacement with sealed6


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

combustion, direct-vented, or power-vented equipment (or non-combustion equipment, such as a heat pump), which is ENERGY STAR-labeled. 7.23 Recommend replacement of solid fuel burning appliances with UL-listed and EPA-certified appliances if the existing appliance is not UL-listed or has signs of structural failure.

8. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation The energy audit shall include inspection of air infiltration sources, air barriers and ventilation. Specifically the energy audit shall: 8.1

Identify sources of indoor air pollution for customers.

8.2

Determine whether the exhaust fans and clothes dryers vent to outdoors.

8.3

For houses with an attached garage, test to confirm that an effective air barrier exists or specify sealing of air leaks between the garage and house in the energy audit report.

8.4

Calculate mechanical ventilation requirements using the approach in ASHRAE 62.2 – 2010 Standard, Section 4.

8.5 Test local (spot) ventilation for kitchens and bathrooms according to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 – 2010, Section 5. 8.6 The following exceptions can reduce or eliminate the need to install a whole-building ventilation system. 8.6.1

Whole-building ventilation systems aren’t required for homes without mechanical cooling in International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Zones 1 and 2 or for homes that are conditioned for less than 876 hours per year. These exceptions all require that the local jurisdictional authority determines that windows are an acceptable method of ventilation (ASHRAE Standard 62.2 – 2010, Section 4.1).

8.6.2

An infiltration credit may be applied to reduce whole-building mechanical ventilation requirement. The credit may be determined using ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010, Section 4.1.3, if the building enclosure has been tested with a blower door. When the infiltration credit is larger than the nominal fan size specified in 8.4, a whole-building mechanical ventilation system is not required.

The energy audit report shall specify improvements as required to reduce pollution sources and to provide adequate ventilation as follows: 8.7

Recommend the removal of indoor air pollutants or implementation of source control measures.

8.8

Recommend sealing of air handler units and ducts that are located in an attached garage.

8.9

Recommend that all kitchen and bath ventilation exhaust directly to the outside, and at levels that meet or exceed ANSI/ASHRAE 62.2-2010.

8.10 Recommend tested whole building ventilation rates meet or exceed ANSI/ASHRAE 62.2-2010. 8.11 Recommend all dryers exhaust to the outside.

7


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

8.12 Recommend air sealing known infiltration pathways between any attached garage and house.

9. Moisture Control Excessive moisture contributes to mold, indoor air pollution, and building durability problems. The energy audit shall include an inspection of each home for moisture problems. The energy audit shall: 9.1 Inspect for evidence of exterior water intrusion, such as roof leaks, foundation leaks, and ground-water intrusion. 9.2 Inspect for evidence of damage caused by interior water sources, such as plumbing leaks or condensation on piping or ductwork. 9.3 Inspect for effects of water damage on buildings, such as structural damage, mold, mildew, efflorescence, and stains. 9.4 Identify existing vapor retarders, flashing, gutters or other moisture-control strategies. The energy audit report shall specify measures for prevention and remediation of excessive moisture. The energy audit report shall: 9.5 Specify measures to prevent moisture problems or mitigate identified moisture problems, as applicable. 9.6 Specify that prior to any remediation of an identified moisture problem, any building material to be disturbed that is suspected to contain asbestos or lead must be tested for such hazards. The handling of any known or assumed asbestos- or lead-containing material must be done following all local, state and federal laws and regulations, including EPA and OSHA.

10.

Building Enclosure Performance

The energy audit shall include an evaluation of the performance of the building enclosure and include recommendations for upgrades as appropriate according to Sections 5 and 6. The energy audit shall: 10.1 Evaluate the envelope insulation level and performance. 10.2 Evaluate the air-leakage of the building enclosure, as determined by a blower door test. Prework blower-door testing may be deferred if it is specified as part of the energy audit report. 10.3 Evaluate window performance and fit by testing operation. 10.4 Evaluate the feasibility and energy savings of shading and solar-reflectance retrofits for the roof and/or wall. The audit report shall include: 10.5 The air-leakage rate of the building enclosure, as determined by a blower door test. When building enclosure air sealing is specified, a blower-door test when work is completed or as part of the final inspection shall be specified. 10.6 Recommendation that enclosure air-sealing work should be done prior to or at the same time as the insulation work.

8


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

10.7 Estimation of R-values of the opaque building materials used to define the boundaries of the conditioned space. Recommendation of insulation retrofits when cost effective and feasible. 10.8 Estimation of U-factors and solar heat gain coefficients (SHGCs) of windows, doors and skylights. 10.8.1

Evaluation of the feasibility and energy savings for window treatments, interior and exterior.

10.8.2

Evaluation of window improvements in thermal resistance and/or exterior shading devices. 10.9 Evaluation of the feasibility and energy savings of shading and solar-reflectance retrofits for the roof and/or walls.

11.

Heating and Cooling (HVAC) Efficiency

The energy audit shall include an evaluation of the performance of the building mechanical systems and the report shall recommend upgrades as appropriate according to Sections 5 and 6 of this standard. The energy audit shall: 11.1

Evaluate furnace performance and efficiency.

11.2

Evaluate air-conditioning and heat-pump performance and efficiency.

11.3

Evaluate duct performance, including filter effectiveness and duct sizing.

11.4

Evaluate ducts outside the conditioned space by visual inspection and test for tightness by one of the following. Pre-work duct testing may be deferred and specified as part of the workscope. 11.4.1

Quantitative testing using a duct pressurization device or whole house pressurization/depressurization (e.g., Delta Q.)

11.4.2

Qualitative testing using a pressure-pan, smoke generation device or equivalent method. Conduct this evaluation with a blower door.

11.5

For ducts fully inside the thermal boundary, perform a visual inspection, looking for leaks in the duct system and recommend sealing when there is a comfort issue or when duct leakage contributes to Combustion Appliance Zone (CAZ) issues.

11.6

Evaluate duct location and R-value; evaluate feasibility and energy savings of retrofit duct insulation.

11.7

Evaluate evaporative-cooler performance and efficiency.

11.8

Evaluate boiler performance and efficiency.

11.9

Evaluate steam-heating distribution performance.

11.10 Evaluate hot-water space-heating distribution performance. 11.11 Evaluate water heating and hot-water distribution performance. 11.12 Evaluate the feasibility and energy savings of HVAC equipment replacement. The energy audit report shall include: 11.13 Specification, when duct sealing is included as an ECM, that one of the approved diagnostic tests be performed when work is completed or as part of the final inspection.

9


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

11.14 Results of any HVAC equipment and distribution performance testing conducted and evaluation, including cost-effective ECMs. 11.15 Recommendation that when HVAC equipment is specified to be replaced, the installation of the replacement systems should comply with Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) 5 QI HVAC Quality Installation Specification. 11.16 Specification that any equipment not replaced as part of the workscope be repaired or remediated as required.

12.

Baseload Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation

The energy audit shall include the establishment of baseload energy uses. The energy audit report shall recommend upgrades as appropriate, according to Sections 5 and 6. The energy audit shall include an evaluation of: 12.1

Refrigerator and freezer energy consumption.

12.2

Lighting efficiency, controls and efficient alternatives.

12.3

Clothes dryer vents (restrictions, lint build-up or indoor termination, and appropriate venting materials).

12.4

Pool and spa energy consumption and conservation strategies.

12.5

The efficiency of other major baseload energy users.

12.6

Installation of renewable energy systems or other on-site electricity generation.

12.7

Water usage of toilets, shower heads, faucets, and clothes washers.

12.8

Advise the customer about behavioral changes that may reduce energy or water consumption including: 12.8.1

Plug loads and associated electricity costs.

12.8.2

When energy-consumption records are available, calculated baseload energy consumption with space conditioning energy usage disaggregated from baseload energy usage. A comparison with energy use to similar homes in the region, when data is available.

12.8.3

Value of water efficiency or conserving strategies.

12.8.4

Value of turning off lights, televisions and other loads when not in use.

The energy audit report shall: 12.9

Include a recommendation, based on Section 12, of: 12.9.1

12.9.2

Appropriate replacements for existing appliances and recommendations for removing appliances from service when more energy efficient alternatives are available.

Water-efficiency or conservation products and technologies.

10


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Annex A Normative BPI Home Energy Audit Standard-Referenced Documents Item

Date

Relevant BPI-1100-T Section

ANSI/ACCA 5 QI-2010, HVAC Quality Installation Specification

2010

11.15

ANSI/ASTM E779-10, Standard Test Measure for Determining Air 2010 Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization

Insert in 10.2

ANSI Standard Z223.1-2002, Annex H, Recommended Procedure 2002 for Safety Inspection of an Existing Appliance Installation

Insert in 7.6

ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor 2010 Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.9, 8.10

BPI Building Analyst Professional Standard

2005

All Sections

BPI Envelope Professional Standard

2010

All Sections

BPI Heating Professional

2007

All Sections

BPI Air Conditioning and Heat Pump Professional

2003

All Sections

BPI-2400-S Standardized Qualification of Whole House Energy Savings Estimates

2012

Section 5.1.2

U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Program Notice 01-4

2000

5.1.3

U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Program Notice 05-5

2005

5.1.1

EPA Guidelines for Radon Testing International Energy Conservation Code National Fuel Gas Code or International Fuel Gas Code

3.7 2006 8.6.1, 10.7. (compare component Rvalues to those specified in IECC) 2012

Insert in 7.2 (procedure for testing gas or propane leakage in piping systems)

11


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Documents can be ordered from the following: ACCA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America 2800 Shirlington Road, Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22206 (703) 575-4477 www.acca.org

ANSI: American National Standards Institute 1899 L Street, NW 11th Floor Washington, DC, 20036 www.ansi.org

ASHRAE: American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E. Atlanta, GA 30329 (404) 636-8400 www.ashrae.org

ASTM International: American Society for Testing and Materials 100 Barr Harbour Drive, P.O. Box C700 West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959 (610) 832-9585 www.atsm.org

BPI: Building Performance Institute, Inc. 107 Hermes Road Malta, NY 12020 (877) 274-1274 www.bpi.org

CGSB: Canadian General Standards Board 6B1, Place du Portage, Phase III 11 Laurier Street Gatineau, QuĂŠbec K1A 0S5 (819) 956-1586 www.pwgsc.gc.ca/cgsb

International Energy Conservation Code: International Code Council 500 New Jersey Avenue, NW, 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20001 [P] 1-888-ICC-SAFE (422-7233) www.iccsafe.org

ANSI Standards Z223.1-2002; National Fuel Gas Code: National Fire Protection Association 1 Batterymarch Park Quincy, Massachusetts USA 02169-7471 (617) 770-3000 www.nfpa.org

12


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Annex B Normative Terms and Acronyms ACCA – Air Conditioning Contractors of America ACH – Air changes per hour ANSI – American National Standards Institute ASHRAE – American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers BPI – Building Performance Institute, Inc. CAZ – Combustion appliance zone CFM – Cubic feet per minute CO – Carbon monoxide Home – A place of residence IECC – International Energy Conservation Code EA – Energy auditing ECM – Energy Conservation Measure EPA – United States Environmental Protection Agency OSHA – Occupational Safety & Health Administration PV – Photovoltaic SHGC – Solar heat gain coefficient WRT – With reference to

13


BPI-1100-T-2012 Home Energy Auditing Standard

Annex C (Informative) BPI Accreditation Policies and Procedures Refer to BPI Accreditation Policies and Procedures v.2010.5

14

Bpi 1100 t 2012 home energy auditing standard 7 27 12  

BPI energy audit standards courtesy of Nantucket Building Science.