Page 1

DECEMBER 2016

ACI

World Report

News and events from the voice of the world’s airports

Mumbai International Airport The gateway to India ~ Page 8

ACI World 800 Rue du Square Victoria Suite 1810, PO Box 302 Montreal, Quebec H4Z 1G8, Canada Tel: +1 514 373 1200 Fax: +1 514 373 1201 www.aci.aero

Working together to optimize airport capacity utilization - Page 4 ICAO's Aerodrome Design and Operations Panel approves important amendments to Annex 14 - Page 12 Infographic Policy Brief: Airport ownership, economic regulation and financial performance - Page 24


Airports Council International Click on the map to visit an ACI regional website

ACI North America

ACI EUROPE

ACI Africa

ACI Asia-Pacific

ACI Latin America–Caribbean

Follow us on social media:

Contact us at:

ACI World

800 Rue du Square Victoria Suite 1810, PO Box 302 Montreal, Quebec H4Z 1G8, Canada Tel: +1 514 373 1200 Fax: +1 514 373 1201 www.aci.aero

2

DECEMBER 2016


CONTENTS

ACI World Report • December 2016 Message from Angela Gittens

Airport Service Quality

4 Working together to optimize airport

32 Salt Lake City International Airport makes

ACI Sound Bites

36 ACI Global Training photo gallery

6 Quotes from ACI's Regional Heads

44 Interview series: Celebrating the 10th

capacity utilization

Mumbai International Airport

customer service more accessible

anniversary of ACI's Airport Service Quality programme

8 At the height of growth

ACI Africa

Safety

50 First ACI Africa Safety Awards presented to

12 ICAO's Aerodrome Design and Operations

Panel approves important amendments to Annex 14

16 ACI participates in the update of the Aerodrome Design Manual Part 3: Pavements

Security

18 A busy week in aviation security calendar 22 Best practice for screening of insulin pumps Economics

24 Infographic Policy Brief : Airport ownership, economic regulation and financial performance

African airports

ACI Asia-Pacific

54 ACI Asia-Pacific Small and Emerging

Airports Seminar successfully concluded in Siem Reap

ACI Latin America-Caribbean

58 Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of ACI

Latin America and Caribbean at the 2016 Regional Annual Assembly, Conference and Exhibition

World Business Partners

60 ACI welcomes new World Business Partners 64 Regional World Business Partner contacts

Facilitation & IT

28 ICAO's Traveller Identification Programme Symposium

30 Airport Beacons Recommended Practice now available

Editors

Brent Taylor Manager, Digital Marketing and Communications btaylor@aci.aero

Sabrina Guerrieri Manager, Communications sguerrieri@aci.aero

Angelika Joachimowicz Assistant Manager, Communications ajoachimowicz@aci.aero ACI WORLD REPORT

3


Message from Angela Gittens Director General, ACI World Working together to optimize airport capacity utilization into consideration the application of local rules to respond to the specificities of each airport. We can all appreciate that airport infrastructure is a limited resource yet airport operators have historically had little or no influence on the decision-making with respect to slot allocations.

Dear Colleagues, The growth of air transport has led to increased congestion both at airports and in the airspace. As reported in the latest ACI World Airport Traffic Forecast 2016–2040, traffic growth will exacerbate the current level of congestion at several airports. This is especially the case for emerging markets, such as those in Latin America and Asia-Pacific, where an increasing number of airports will experience capacity challenges similar to their competitors in Europe and North America. Worldwide, around 300 airports are directly affected by airport coordination, meaning that a slot allocation process needs to be imposed or voluntarily applied. It is in the best interest of airport operators and the communities they serve to promote efficiency in the allocation and use of the capacity that they build, maintain and operate, taking 4

DECEMBER 2016

In 2015, ACI started a new initiative to represent at the World level the interest of airports in this regard by urging States to facilitate more effective engagement by all stakeholders, including airport operators, to improve industry guidance on slot allocation that takes national interests and drivers of economic benefit into account, such as accommodating new entrants to drive trade and tourism. The first stepping stone of our new initiative was laid when the ACI World Governing Board established an Expert Group on Slots (EGS) to gather knowledge and pursue cooperation with slot coordinators and their association— the Worldwide Airport Coordinators Group. The EGS is composed of experts nominated by ACI Regions and meets twice a year, coinciding with the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) bi-annual Slot Conference. The EGS’ first meeting in June 2015 led to the development of a Policy Paper and Resolution that were passed at the 25th meeting of the ACI World General


Assembly on 1 September 2015 in Panama City, Panama. The Resolution resolved to: urge stakeholders to accept ACI and its member airport operators’ involvement in slot allocation policy and guidelines; recognise airport operators as significant players in local rules for slot allocation to suit the needs of the individual airport and its users; seek amendment of the definition of a slot; and promote transparency and efficiency in slot allocation processes and practices worldwide, as well as consider new allocation methods. The efforts of the EGS were brought to the 39th Session of the ICAO Triennial Assembly this past September/October. The Assembly elected the Council of 36 States, approved ICAO’s budget for 2017–2019 and set the international regulatory framework for civil aviation by approving a series of resolutions. One of these was a joint paper made by ACI and IATA to conduct a strategic review of the Worldwide Slot Guidelines. As well, ACI put forth a

Working Paper (231) with an additional recommendation for a panel to evaluate the potential benefits of alternative capacity allocation methods for airport slots. The Assembly also agreed that the process must ensure transparency, certainty, consistency, fairness and non-discrimination, as well as remain globally harmonized. The next EGS meeting will take place in February 2017 in San Francisco, USA. ACI looks forward to working collaboratively with IATA, other industry stakeholders and States to develop a more effective slot allocation process which will contribute to achieving a more sustainable industry.

Angela Gittens Director General ACI World

ACI WORLD REPORT

5


QUOTES FROM ACI’s REGIONAL HEADS

ACI Sound Bites “I congratulate President-Elect Trump on his election to be our next president. I appreciate his recognition that improving infrastructure should be a top priority for the United States. A modernized infrastructure promotes economic growth and secures our position as leaders in the global marketplace. It is imperative that we address the more than $75 billion in airport infrastructure needs to meet the growing demands of passengers and keep our industry from falling behind. US airports alone contribute more than $1.1 trillion to the global economy and support nearly 10 million jobs. Airports stand ready to work with the new administration and the new Congress to modernize our nation’s airport infrastructure, provide effective security and enhance the overall travel experience.” ~ Kevin Burke, President and CEO, ACI North America

“As part of the 25th ACI Africa General Assembly, ACI Africa recognized members with the presentation of the first ever Safety Awards. Paying tribute to excellence and professionalism in the management of aerodrome safety, ACI Africa celebrated the successes of its members, and we look forward to continuing the Safety Awards in the coming years.” ~ Ali Tounsi, Secretary General, ACI Africa

“2016 marked the 25th Anniversary of the only global organization that represents the collective interests of the world’s airports and that promotes professional excellence in airport management and operations. ACI contributes to a safe, secure, sustainable and economically viable air transport system. Over the last 25 years, the airport industry in Latin America and the Caribbean have seen widespread transformations marked by the processes of airport concessions. The participation of private capital, particularly in recent years, has enabled States to modernize and expand their infrastructure capacity to sustain the growth of passenger and cargo traffic.” ~ Javier Martinez, Director General, ACI Latin America-Caribbean

“Whether we like it or not, governments in Europe are neither interested nor able to invest in large airport infrastructure these days. They expect us to do the job ourselves, or leverage private investment to do so. This means that Europe’s airports have become businesses in their own right. Nearly half of the airports in the EU now have private shareholders, up from just 23% back in 2010. This business transformation has allowed large- and medium-sized airports to keep investing in modernizing and developing their facilities, thereby boosting airport capacity, quality and connectivity—all this without weighting on national budgets, and ultimately taxpayers.” ~ Augustin de Romanet, President of ACI EUROPE and President & CEO of Groupe ADP

“The complexity of aviation security has been intensely debated and analyzed since the terrorist attacks at Brussels and Istanbul-Atatürk airports. To further advance the debate—its function, its challenges and boundaries, its regulatory and wider social implications—the Security & Crisis Management Special Summit held in Brussels last month, presented by ACI EUROPE and our region, provided the perfect platform for this occasion. As well, we spared no effort on improving our members’ aviation security through the APEX in Security programme with the completion of pilot reviews at Denpasar and Balikpapan airports in Indonesia in November.” ~ Patti Chau, Regional Director, ACI Asia-Pacific 6

DECEMBER 2016


Save

15

%

on 2017 courses


MUMBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Mumbai International Airport: At the height of growth By Rajeev Jain, Chief Executive Officer, Mumbai International Airport Mumbai is the financial and commercial capital of India, contributing more than 6% to India’s GDP. With the growing business and tourism opportunities in the region, Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport (CSIA), located in Mumbai, is the gateway to India. It is the second-busiest airport in South Asia and handles an impressive 18.6% of all air traffic in India. Despite being the most operationally challenged city airport in the world, efforts have been made to enhance the passenger experience at CSIA by providing stateof-the art facilities. In fact, CSIA was ranked the number one airport globally in the 25–40 million passengers per year category by ACI’s Airport Service Quality (ASQ) programme this year—proof positive that passenger satisfaction is high at CSIA. Mumbai International Airport Pvt Ltd (MIAL), the operator of CSIA, has always focused on its vision “to be one of the

world’s best airports,” and to be “the pride of Mumbai” by consistently delighting its customers. Key statistics In FY 2015–16, CSIA welcomed 41.67 million passengers, representing growth of 13.7% compared to the previous year. Mumbai’s strategic location makes CSIA an ideal airport to connect passengers from East to West or from North to South, including a huge catchment area covering Western, Central and Southern India. CSIA has 29 catchment airports within a 45- to 150-minute flying time. With some 190 flights daily, CSIA facilitated the transfer of 9.12 million passengers in FY 2015–16, representing growth of 10% compared to the previous year. CSIA currently has an extensive network which takes passengers to over 88 domestic

The new integrated Terminal 2 at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport in Mumbai. 8

DECEMBER 2016


MUMBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

and international destinations. Moreover, the airport has the scope to provide non-stop connectivity to major regions of the world, including Asian destinations such as China, the Philippines and Indonesia; Australia; North America; and Europe. The table below illustrates the traffic potential from Mumbai and its catchment to target unserved/underserved international markets:

Countries

Average pax per day from Mumbai and its catchment area

% growth rate compared to previous year

Current non-stop daily flights from Mumbai

USA

10,373

7%

2 / Day

Australia

1,495

15%

Canada

1,055

7%

China

983

11%

Indonesia

796

18%

South Africa

609

13%

CIS countries

507

3%

Philippines

313

18%

Spain

298

30%

Finland*

290

27%

*traffic numbers based on earlier operations between Finland and Mumbai, findings by Mumbai Airport International Airport

Leveraging strong airline partnerships New airlines that have confirmed their plans to commence operations from Mumbai in the weeks and months to come include RwandAir, connecting Mumbai to Kigali and Guangzhou effective December, 2016 (subject to timely government approvals), and Brussels Airlines, connecting Mumbai to Brussels effective March, 2017. Mega Maldives also plans to launch non-stop service between Mumbai and Malé in the coming months. Air Canada has likewise confirmed its plans to operate nonstop operations between Mumbai and Toronto. Moreover, Air China has reinstated flights between Mumbai and Beijing effective this winter. To encourage new routes, CSIA has waived landing charges for the period of one year for airlines commencing new direct routes. In addition to these exciting new developments, CSIA has always been a tourist-friendly airport. In fact, the airport won the National Tourism Award 2014–15 in its category, acknowledging CSIA’s contribution towards the promotion of tourism in the state of Maharashtra and throughout India at large. ACI WORLD REPORT

9


MUMBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

In FY 2015–16, CSIA welcomed 41.67 million passengers, representing growth of 13.7% compared to the previous year. ---------------------The new integrated Terminal 2 at CSIA CSIA is receiving accolades from all over the world for setting its own benchmark in its recent terminal infrastructure upgrade. The state-of-the art new integrated Terminal 2 (T2) caters to both international and domestic carriers. In addition, T2 offers enhanced facilities and reduced connecting time for passengers. With improved terminal infrastructure, the declared International to International Minimum Connecting Time (MCT) has been successfully reduced from 75 minutes to 60 minutes, and the airport also expects to reduce declared MCT for Domestic to International and International to Domestic connections. T2 enriches the passenger experience and creates an environment of hassle-free travel by offering innovative and world class facilities and services, including Pranaam GVK Guest Service, a common lounge concept for first and business class passengers, the Niranta airport transit hotel and lounge, and Hotel Taj Santacruz, located within the vicinity of the domestic terminal. T2 is also home to Jaya He, India’s largest public art programme 10

DECEMBER 2016

CSIA’s catchment area; Mumbai’s strategic location makes CSIA an ideal airport to connect passengers from East to West or from North to South.


MUMBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport’s T2 enriches the passenger experience and creates an environment of hassle-free travel by offering innovative and world class facilities and services. ---------------containing over 7,000 pieces of art from every corner of India. The impressive space is spread out over a 3-kilometer long stretch across all four levels of the terminal. A commitment to environmental sustainability Sustainability has been the cornerstone of all projects undertaken at CSIA, and the airport is quick to note that the various green initiatives it has implemented have helped in strengthening its core business functions. Being an environmentally sensitive organization, a series of measures have helped in bringing down the airport’s carbon emissions. Although CSIA is a brown field airport located in the heart of the city, MIAL enrolled voluntarily in ACI’s Airport Carbon Accreditation programme and is currently accredited at Level 3 Optimization. In sync with the Government of India’s ambitious target of having 100 GW of solar power generation capacity by 2022, CSIA successfully implemented solar panels spread across five different locations at the T2 and Cargo terminals. The panels, which generate 1060 kWp, representing 1% of the airport’s total energy requirements for a

year, have been strategically positioned on the rooftops of the buildings for optimum utilization of space at the airport. CSIA’s implementation of new technology is also focused on offering a superlative passenger experience. In line with the airport’s vision of becoming a smart airport, MIAL was the first airport operator in the country to introduce Common Use Self Service baggage tag service. In addition to this, the operator has introduced India’s first ever indoor navigation app featuring augmented reality in T2. The focus at CSIA continues to be maintaining and improving operational efficiency, while at the same time providing an unparalleled passenger experience. The iconic design features of the brand new T2—both beautiful and functional—are exemplary of this commitment. Indeed, traveling through CSIA evokes the distinct spirit of India: forward-thinking while still paying homage to its past and, perhaps most importantly, ready to embrace growth and progress. --------------For more information on Mumbai International Airport, visit www.csia.in. ACI WORLD REPORT

11


SAFETY

ICAO’s Aerodrome Design and Operations Panel approves important amendment to Annex 14 By David Gamper, Won-Soon Park and Prisca Nkolo, Safety and Technical Department, ACI World The second full meeting of the ICAO Aerodrome Design and Operations Panel (ADOP)—formerly the Aerodromes Panel— was held in Montreal from 7 to 11 November. It was attended by 46 participants from sixteen countries and six international organizations including ACI, with new members from Singapore, Switzerland, South Africa and the US. Proposed amendments to Annex 14 and guidance material were discussed. The panel received progress reports on the assigned tasks since the last panel meeting in February 2015. A very significant proposed amendment to Annex 14 was discussed which concerns

12

DECEMBER 2016

the revision of the parameters governing aerodrome reference codes and the resulting design specifications. Using a performance based approach that includes safety data and scientific studies, the proposal would make wingspan the unique parameter for the aerodrome reference code letter. Outer main gear wheel span (OMGWS) would be considered separately when relevant such as for runway width. A study of aircraft design has indicated that the maximum OMGWS that needs to be allowed for is 15 m. As a result, the recommended runway width applying to 9–15 m OMGWS would become a minimum of 45 m, whereas ICAO currently recommends a minimum 60 m width for


SAFETY

ACI congratulates the retiring Rapporteurs of the Airport Pavement Expert Group, Mr. Serge Le Cunff (France), and of the Aerodrome Design Working Group, Mr. George Legarreta (USA). -----------------Code F (14–16 m OMGWS or 65–80 m wingspan). Some other significant changes in minimum dimensions are: Runway shoulder width: 7.5 m of paved shoulder for Codes D, E and F; for Code F airplanes with four engines, a further 7.5 m unpaved shoulder should be prepared to resist jet blast and FOD ingestion

earlier in Europe. It should bring benefits to all parts of the industry as it will improve airport capacity and efficiency. Firstly, the proposed amendment would give the possibility to ease certification of aerodromes which are non-compliant by a few meters and avoid very costly runway or taxiway relocation, with savings in the billions of dollars per aerodrome.

Beneficial to the industry

Secondly, aerodrome operators would be able to accept large aircraft operations within existing infrastructure or with fewer major modifications, thus reducing the cost of new capacity. In terms of runways, a 60 m wide runway costs approximately 20% more to build than a 45 m wide runway with 15 m paved shoulders. For taxiways, large aerodromes can have as much as 50 km or more of taxiways, and the reduced pavement width will produce proportionate savings. Annual maintenance costs—which as a rule of thumb are around 1% of construction costs—are also expected to be reduced proportionately to reductions in the area of paved surfaces.

The package would enter into effect at the end of 2018, but may be introduced

Thirdly, airlines unable to operate larger airplanes at some airports due to regulatory

Runway strip width: 140 m instead of 150 m half width for Codes 3 and 4 instrument runways (the most common case for ACI members) Runway-taxiway separation: 180 m instead of 190 m for Codes 3 and 4 instrument runways for Code F, with the same reduction of 10 m in the separations for Codes C, D and E. Taxiway width: 23 m instead of 25 m for aircraft from 9 to 15 m OMGWS.

ACI WORLD REPORT

13


SAFETY

restrictions would have greater opportunities to deploy their fleet and therefore open new routes. Fourthly, aerodrome operators would be able to reduce operational restrictions such as designated taxi routes for large aircraft, which can save taxi time and increase capacity. Task forces and working groups In related news, the OLS task force is developing a new concept for Obstacle Limitation Surfaces using aircraft approach speed categories instead of the aeroplane reference field length. This concept shows promise and should both ensure consistency with aircraft capabilities and improve airport efficiency. It will be matured and then socialized. The Friction Task Force (FTF) proposed amendments to ICAO guidance on assessment and reporting of runway surface conditions to facilitate the introduction of a globally-harmonized reporting format in 2020. It will be familiarized to stakeholders through training programmes and workshops provided by ICAO in cooperation with ACI. Various working groups were assigned the task of updating or developing guidance material. One significant achievement is the revision of the Aerodrome Design Manual Part 3 - Pavements, which is completed and ready for publication. The AirportCollaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) Working Group has now completed a draft manual to be published by the end of this year. Guidance material has also been produced on Autonomous Runway Incursion Warning Systems (ARIWS) for the Aerodrome Design Manual Part 4 - Visual Aids , to complement the new provisions introduced this year in the new edition of Annex 14. On ground handling, a task force is working on a draft ICAO manual. They presented the structure of the document, which was accepted by the panel. The Visual Aids Working Group (VAWG) 14

DECEMBER 2016

has been working on four tasks: visual aids for day/night and all weather operations; surface management, including prevention of runway incursions; use of LED technology in visual aids; and RVR inconsistency. The Heliport design working group (HDWG) also proposed an amendment to Annex 14, Vol II, mostly related to physical characteristics. Impact assessment and guidance material to support those changes are expected in 2017. The RFF working group is working closely with the Flight Operations Panel on a proposal for rescue and fire-fighting provisions for general aviation and all cargo aerodromes in Annex 14, Vol I, with completion expected during the fourth quarter of 2017. The PANS-Aerodromes Part 1 is now applicable, and Part 2 should be released in 2018. Due to the importance of operational issues, it was decided that the PANSAerodromes study group (PASG) would become a working group under the panel and be responsible for developing all operations-related material for aerodromes, not just the PANS. The progress of other ongoing work was reviewed, including taxiway naming conventions, airport master planning and aircraft arresting systems.The consistent work done by all the working groups, with ACI support, will significantly contribute to improving safety and efficiency at airports. *Note: this report is an interpretation of the proceedings of the ADOP and does not indicate that any of these proposals have been approved by ICAO. ----------For more information on ACI’s work in airport safety, visit http://www.aci.aero/ safety.


NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE!

Safety Management Systems

HANDBOOK First Edition 2016

For more information, please visit www.aci.aero/publications.


SAFETY

ACI participates in the update of the Aerodrome Design Manual Part 3: Pavements By Prisca Nkolo, Assistant Manager, Airport Safety, ACI World ACI World has contributed to the update of the second edition of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) DOC 9157 Part 3 - Pavements, originally released in 1983. The document, known more generally as the Aerodrome Design Manual (ADM) Part 3, was in urgent need of revision to include new developments in the pavement industry that have transpired since its first publication. ICAO recognized the importance of updating such guidance and assigned the task to the ICAO Airport Pavement Expert Group (APEG),

previously known as the Pavement Subgroup (PSG). Since 2014, the group has been working hard to develop a comprehensive and up-to-date document. They finally achieved this task during their last meeting in September 2016 in Washington D.C. We particularly acknowledge the work of Jo Lary (Pavement Consultants Inc), World Business Partner representative on the World Safety and Technical Standing Committee, who represented ACI on the

(from left)ICAO Airport Pavement Expert Group members: Alice Krol,Prisca Nkolo,David Brill, Doug Johnson, MichaĂŤl Broutin, Cyril Fabre, Yonglian Ding, Serge Le-Cunff and John Cook. 16

DECEMBER 2016


SAFETY

PSG and contributed actively to the work on behalf of ACI. Major revisions One significant change in the updated version of the ADM Part 3 is the replacement of the current ACN calculation Fortran code by a link to the new software, called ICAO-ACN 1.0, which facilitates the calculation. The link can be found at http://www.icao.int/ safety/airnavigation/Pages/aga.aspx. The updated document will also include a new chapter on structural criteria for unpaved surfaces. This section only deals with unpaved shoulders, RESAs and graded strips, while unpaved runways are not addressed. Such areas of an aerodrome may not be paved but are still expected to support the occasional passage of an aircraft. The material provided is to be used as general guidance on how to design them. Best practices for States have been revised in the manual, and France, Russia, the UK and the US provided their current practices for regulating overload operations. Pavement design and evaluation techniques from France, the UK, and the US have also been updated and direct links to related documentation have been inserted.

pavements now based on linear elastic and finite element analyses. New ACN numbers, computed with the new calculation method, may require reassessments of airport PCNs. Because there is no prescribed guidance from ICAO on PCN calculation, the APEG is currently working on a basic procedure based on linear elastic analysis. The PCN procedure will also describe the steps to make the traffic mix equivalent to an aircraft using the Cumulative Damage Factor (CDF) concept. The new ACN-PCN method would be applicable in 2020, with a suitable transition period. The APEG will organize workshops and training for the airport community for this significant change in the way pavement strength is evaluated and reported. ----------For more information on ACI’s work in airport safety, visit http://www.aci.aero/ safety.

Future developments The current ACN calculation procedure is based on obsolete pavement design methods, namely the CBR method for flexible pavements and PCA method for rigid pavements. Thus, the APEG is developing a new ACN-PCN methodology to better address aircraft traffic trends using the latest design methods for ACI WORLD REPORT

17


SECURITY

A busy week in the aviation security calendar By Nina Brooks, Head, Security, ACI World The 25th annual AVSEC World conference took place from 25–27 October 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, bringing together key industry and regulatory stakeholders to discuss challenges and work together to find solutions. Prior to the start of the conference, the ACI World Security Standing Committee met alongside the ACI Regional Asia-Pacific Security Committee, discussing strategy for key issues such as landside security, and actively developing policies for ACI’s Policy Handbook. The AVSEC World conference kicked off with a welcome addresses from the principals from the International Civil Aviation Association (ICAO), the International Air Transport

Association (IATA) and ACI. Issues such as security culture, intelligence and information sharing, and the need for a new global security plan were highlighted. Angela Gittens, Director General of ACI World, identified the need for greater collaboration, improved training and the implementation of a security culture throughout the airport environment. Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO, called aviation security “a topic of critical importance—not just to our industry, but to the world.” Dr. Fang Liu, Secretary General of ICAO, pointed out that the UN Security Council Resolution 2309 highlights nations’ responsibility to safeguard aviation against terrorist attacks and to ensure that international standards keep pace with rapidly evolving threats.

The ACI World Security Standing Committee, with observers from the ACI Asia Pacific Regional Aviation Security Committee 18

DECEMBER 2016


SECURITY

Moving into the keynote speeches, Henrick Hololei, Director General of DG MOVE, noted that no country and no region should be left behind, in line with ICAO’s motto. YB Dato’ Sri Tiong Lai, Malaysia’s Minister of Transport, highlighted the need for collaboration, saying that “as air passenger traffic rises, so must our vigilance. Safety and security are all the more important with the rise in terrorism and cyber threats. It is our responsibility and duty in the aviation security community to work together to implement the necessary standards of security and ensure they are upheld.” Day two started with an in-depth look at landside security, including different perspectives on how it can be managed and possible solutions. Alexis Long from Heathrow Airport advocated a practical approach, saying that “we don’t work for freedom to live like prisoners.” A panel on integrated risk management followed, with Mike Woodall from IATA

identifying the need to support others in the security community. “We need to give them the tools and confidence to start creating timely, evidence-based risk assessments that can be reviewed, managed and implemented,” he said. Moving into the dual tracks of day two, the whole spectrum of security was discussed, including considerations for physical security, technology, building and process design, intelligence and risk management. Panel participants and presenters from airports included security experts from Aeroports de Paris, Adelaide Airport, Changi Airport and Copenhagen. The Capacity Building Panel looked at the need to improve security in developing countries and some of the programmes that are available for providing assistance. Jennifer Sullivan from Toronto Pearson International Airport identified the need to “think big, act small,” highlighting that everyone has a role to play.

(from left) Alexandre de Juniac, Director General and CEO, IATA; Dr. Fang Liu, Secretary General, ICAO; and Angela Gittens, Director General, ACI speaking at a press conference at AVSEC. ACI WORLD REPORT

19


SECURITY

Speakers on the Landside Security Panel reflect on the events of March 2016 in Brussels.

The ACI team celebrates a successful conference. --------------The conference concluded with a set of workshops that enabled participants to leave with knowledge that they can implement in their own environment, with workshops on the topics of Security in Airport Design, Smart Security and Cyber Security. The week was rounded off by a lively two-day meeting of the Smart Security Management Group, who shared experiences with new checkpoint technologies and processes, in addition to planning for future trials and developments. ------------For more information on ACI’s work in airport security, visit www.aci.aero/security.

Alan Tan from Changi Airport and current Chair of the World Security Standing Committee speaks about the use of CT equipment for screening. 20

DECEMBER 2016


2015 ACI Airport Key Performance Indicators

EXCEL DATASET AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

Geographic region Economic grouping

Airport size (i.e., <1 million passengers to >40 million passengers)

(e.g., advanced economies, emerging and developing economies, BRICS, etc.)

Ownership Regulatory model

(i.e., public, private, public-private partnership)

Global indicators for over 800 airports, representing 71% of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passenger traffic www.aci.aero/Publications/New-Releases or +1 514-373-1243


SECURITY

Best practice for screening of insulin pumps By Nina Brooks, Head, Security, ACI World As today’s security screening professionals work tirelessly to keep the travelling public safe, there is, on occasion, some confusion and variation of practices globally around the screening of insulin pumps at airport security checkpoints. In this article, we look at the issue, and suggest how airports can help. Brief introduction to the insulin pump An insulin pump is a small battery-operated device that delivers precise doses of rapidacting insulin 24 hours a day to closely match a body’s needs. The insulin pump has a compartment that holds a reservoir that is filled with insulin which is then infused into the body through tubing and a cannula inserted under the skin. The insulin pump must be constantly attached as disconnection causes blood sugars to rise and hyperglycaemia or ketoacidosis can rapidly develop, which can quickly become a life-threatening emergency. Insulin pumps and airport security Hospitals and insulin pump manufacturers advise that the electromagnetic radiation used by x-ray screening for carry-on or checked luggage and full-body airport scanners may interfere with the motors of insulin pumps, resulting in a potential impact on insulin delivery. As a result, these sources suggest that passen-

gers with insulin pumps should be subject to alternative security screening (for example, via pat down or explosive trace detection methods). However, diabetes organizations, experts and affected passengers report that airport security officers are often unaware that passengers should not be asked to remove their insulin pump for screening, nor should pumps be subjected to x-ray screening or full-body scanners. This applies both to insulin pumps worn on the body or spares carried in hand baggage. Regulation Some countries have provision in regulation for dealing with medical aids, which allow for alternative screening methods such as a hand search or trace detection. However, procedures are not always well understood or implemented. The Airport Operators Association in the UK has advised passengers to notify security personnel at the screening point of any medical screening requirements and ensure that they carry medical confirmation from their practitioner so that screening may be undertaken accordingly. Next steps ACI World will bring this issue to the next Aviation Security Panel in 2017, requesting that it is highlighted to regulators and included in guidance material. In the meantime, we would ask that airports review their procedures with regard to the screening of medical equipment and ensure that screeners are well informed. -------------For more information on ACI’s work in airport security, visit www.aci.aero/security.

22

DECEMBER 2016


WORKING TOGETHER TO ENHANCE AIRPORT OPERATIONAL SAFETY

APEX in Safety is the industry leading peer review process to help drive improvements at your airport website: www.aci.aero/apex â&#x20AC;¢ email: apexsafety@aci.aero


ECONOMICS

24

DECEMBER 2016


ECONOMICS

ACI WORLD REPORT

25


2015 ACI Airport Economics Report

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE NOW! GLOBAL INDICATORS

REPRESENTING 71% OF THE WORLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PASSENGER TRAFFIC

Relevant statistics. Superior decision-making. Better airports.

ANALYSES FOR OVER 800 AIRPORTS

In-depth analysis of air transport demand across the globe and in key emerging markets Industry revenues (aeronautical and non-aeronautical) by source, costs (operating and capital) and their evolution over time

www.aci.aero/Publications/New-Releases or +1 514-373-1243


AVA I L A B L E F O R PU R C H AS E N OW

ACI Annual World Airport Traffic

DATASET 2015 Data from over 2,300 airports in more than 160 countries

EXCEL VERSION The ACI Annual World Airport Traffic dataset covers airport traffic statistics for the 2015 and 2014 calendar years for over 2,300 airports in more than 160 countries, by three thematic areas: passengers, cargo (freight and mail) and aircraft movements. Data is presented by airport, city, country and region; furthermore, individual airport entries give international and domestic terminal breakdowns. CALL +1-514-373-1243 OR VISIT WWW.ACI.AERO/PUBLICATIONS TO PLACE YOUR ORDER TODAY.


FACILITATION AND IT

ICAO’s Traveller Identification Programme Symposium By Jean-Sébastien Pard, Manager, Facilitation and IT, ACI World The 12th Traveller Identification Programme (TRIP) Symposium on machine readable travel documents (MRTDs) and traveller identification management took place at the ICAO Montréal Headquarters from 15 to 17 November 2016. The symposium specifically addressed the need for States to further enhance the integrity of the passport issuance process and promote robust identification management in order to maximize border security and facilitation benefits. At this event, speakers and facilitation experts, policy makers, practitioners and researchers, many from relevant working groups of ICAO, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and other international organizations, provided useful insights and best practices

28

DECEMBER 2016

towards combating fraudulent activities, verification of identity against breeder documents and how to benefit from the diversity of technical innovations supporting aviation security. The ICAO TRIP strategy is closely linked with five elements of traveller identification and the border control inspection process. These elements, as ICAO states, are: • Evidence of identity – credible evidence of identity, involving the tracing, linkage and verification of identity against breeder documents to ensure the authenticity of identity; • MRTDs – the design and manufacture of standardized MRTDs, including ePassports, that comply with ICAO specifications;


FACILITATION AND IT

• Document issuance and control – processes and protocols for document issuance by appropriate authorities to authorized holders, and controls to prevent theft, tampering and loss; • Inspection systems and tools – inspection systems and tools for the efficient and secure reading and verification of MRTDs, including use of the ICAO Public Key Directory (PKD); and • Interoperable applications – globally interoperable applications and protocols that provide for timely, secure and reliable linkage of MRTDs and their holders to available and relevant data in the course of inspection operations.

(from left) Ines Treno, Media and Press Officer, Vision Box; Antoine Rostworowski, Director, Airport Customer Experience and Technology, ACI World; Alex Gerdts, Regional Director, Vision Box; and, JeanSebastien Pard, Manager, Facilitation and IT, ACI World. ------------An industry exhibition complemented the symposium and featured a wide range of products and services related to biometric identification, travel document security applications and border inspection systems. During the symposium, participants also had the chance to interact with suppliers and experts to discuss the latest available traveller identification technologies during solution-oriented workshops. -----------------

Antoine Rostworowski, Director, Airport Customer Experience and Technology and Jean-Sebastien Pard, Manager, Facilitation and IT of ACI World are shown the latest innovations offered by exhibitor SICPA, a global provider of secured identification, traceability and authentication solutions and services.

To find out more about the ICAO TRIP, click here. For information on ACI’s work in airport IT, visit www.aci.aero/airport-it. For information on ACI’s work in airport facilitation, visit www.aci.aero/facilitation. ACI WORLD REPORT

29


FACILITATION AND IT

Airport Beacons Recommended Practice now available Serge Yonke Nguewo, Senior Manager, Facilitation and IT, ACI World ACI World is pleased to announce that the Airport Beacons Recommended Practice (RP) is now available. This comprehensive document, a joint initiative in collaboration with IATA and several other organizations, is accessible at www.aci.aero/airport-it-documentation. Many airports across the globe have deployed beacons and use them today for a variety of reasons, largely because they offer an enhanced or more personalized user experience. Beacons transmit a low-power signal that can be picked up by nearby Bluetooth-enabled mobile devices, including smartphones. Beacons themselves don’t collect data; they broadcast short-range

signals that can be detected by apps on mobile devices in close proximity to the beacon. Beacons positioned near an airport security checkpoint, for example, might trigger an airline app to display a boarding pass. A beacon next to a painting in a museum might signal the museum’s app to show information about the artist. Retail store beacons can help users locate products or indicate on-sale items. Given that beacon technology will continue to evolve, the Airport Beacons RP will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis. A task force composed of permanent members will be established to continuously review the RP document. The next logical step will be to setup the Beacons Registry in order to offer a standardized way to manage information related to airports’ implementation of this exciting new technology. More information on ACI’s activity with regard to the Beacons Registry will appear in a future World Report edition. -----------------------To download the Airport Beacons RP, click here. For more information on ACI’s work in airport IT, visit http://www.aci.aero/airport-it.

30

DECEMBER 2016


Airport Operations Diploma Programme

The Programme is exclusively available ONLINE

TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF AIRPORT PROFESSIONALS Did You Know? The Airport Operations Diploma Programme provides airport professionals with a broad understanding of airside operations, terminal and landside operations and business operations in order to empower them with the knowledge to successfully address the operational and business needs of 21st century airports.

Programme Structure The Programme consists of three self-paced online courses: Airside Operations â&#x20AC;˘ Terminal and Landside Operations â&#x20AC;˘ Airport Business Operations Candidates must successfully complete all three online courses within a three-year time frame.

To register for the Airport Operations Diploma Programme visit www.olc.aero or contact enrolments@olc.aero For more information on ACI Global Training visit www.aci.aero/training or contact training@aci.aero


TRAINING

Salt Lake City International Airport makes customer service more accessible Salt Lake City (SLC) International Airport welcomed veterans from across the United States in June this year for the 36th National Veterans Wheelchair Games (NVWG).

Veterans participating in the Games educate newly disabled veterans on what is possible, and those witnessing the events realize that limitations are only state of mind.

Co-presented by the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Paralyzed Veterans of America, the NVWG is a rehabilitation and wheelchair sports programme empowering Veterans to live more active and healthy lives through wheelchair sports and recreation.

The customer service challenge

Each summer, veterans from across the United States travel to a new community hosting the NVWG and compete in 18 wheelchair sporting events while providing encouragement and mentoring for new veterans.

Gary Bilbrey, C.M, Airport Operations Manager responsible for Terminal and Landside Operations, turned to Airports Council Internationalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online Learning Center to provide timely refresher training to his already highly-trained staff.

The customer service challenge for SLC International Airport was to make the arrival and departure of more than 600 wheelchair athletes and their support crews as seamless as possible.

Volunteers ready to welcome National Veterans Wheelchair Games athletes 32

DECEMBER 2016


TRAINING

“The SLC Airport spent 10 months bringing together all of our tenants to plan for the NVWG,” Bilbrey said. “The Disability Sensitivity Training module proved to be beneficial for all airport employees and provided customers with the assurance that Salt Lake City has an accessible airport.” Fifty-one staff members were enrolled in the online Disability Sensitivity Training module, which was developed in partnership with Open Doors Organization out of Chicago. Staff members were enrolled in the online course in May, providing timely training prior to the arrival of the veterans in late June. The training reminded staff of critical customer service elements when working with passengers with disabilities and reduced mobility. A host of benefits The online programme allowed all 51 staff to be trained in a very short period of time and in a cost-effective manner. The training could be rolled out quickly and easily just before the games to provide a mechanism to refresh and refocus staff at the right time. A key benefit from the course was the statistics provided by Open Doors Organization on the number of people in the United States with disabilities that travel. The 2015 survey commissioned by Open Doors Organization on the general travel habits and patterns of American adults (18 years and older) with disabilities found the following: • About 70 percent of adults with disabilities (26 million people) travel at least once in a two-year period.

double, or approximately $34.6 billion per annum. The feedback “The disability sensitivity training we underwent was eye-opening in many ways,” said James Udall, Terminal/Landside Operations Supervisor. “It helped me gain a better understanding of how people with disabilities go about their daily lives and how I can ensure their needs at the airport are met. It also helped me to learn how to better interact with persons with disabilities in a respectful manner. “Because of the training, I am better prepared to assist the public and identify any problems before they occur,” Udall added. The ACI Online Learning Centre would like to thank Gary Bilbrey of SLC International Airport for taking the time and effort to develop and share this article. More information SLC International Airport is operated and managed by the Salt Lake City Department of Airports, a department of Salt Lake City Corporation, and currently serves more than 22 million passengers per year. For more information, visit www.slcairport. com. The Online Learning Centre was established by Airports Council International to provide online training services to the global airport industry. For more information regarding any of the programmes mentioned in this case study, or to learn more about the Online Learning Centre, visit www.olc.aero or contact enrolments@olc.aero.

• They spend $17.3 billion on travel, which is up from $13.6 billion in 2002. • Most adults with disabilities travel with one or more adult family members, friends or companions, meaning that the actual economic impact is estimated to be at least ACI WORLD REPORT

33


The leading airport management and operations training provider

Get Connected. Join the network of ACI graduates from over 1,800 member airports in 173 countries.

Member airports thatrepresent are ACI training centresCentres or venues. The above airport codes ACI Training or venues.

Better education. Better professionals. Better airports. Contact us today!

Please visit us at

training@aci.aero

www.aci.aero/global-training

ACCREDITED TRAINING INSTITUTE


AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

ACI World Airport Traffic Forecasts (WATF) 2016â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2040

Short-, medium- and long-term forecasts of air transport demand

The WATF is disseminated in a standard EXCEL format. Aggregate airport traffic figures are presented for total passengers (international and domestic), air cargo volumes (in metric tonnes) and aircraft movements. Both absolute figures and compounded annual growth rates are presented over three time horizons which include short-, medium- and long-term over the 2016â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2040 period. In addition to global forecasts, regional forecasts are presented for Asia-Pacific, Africa, Europe, Latin America-Caribbean, Middle East and North America. Airport traffic forecasts are also presented for major markets which consist of individualized national projections for over 90 countries.

CALL +1-514-373-1243 OR VISIT WWW.ACI.AERO/PUBLICATIONS TO PLACE YOUR ORDER TODAY.


TRAINING

ACI Global Training photo gallery

Airport Collaborative Decision Making, 3–7 October 2016 in Athens, Greece

Airport Communications and Public Relations, 3–7 October 2016 in San Francisco, CA, USA

GSN 3: Emergency Planning and Crisis Management, 9–13 October 2016 in Amman, Jordan

Capacity Enhancement and Resource Planning, 10–12 October 2016 in Bucharest, Romania

ACI-ICAO Aerodrome Certification, 10–14 October 2016 in Montego Bay, Jamaica

Aerodrome Safeguarding, 11–13 October 2016 in Abu Dhabi, UAE

36

DECEMBER 2016


TRAINING

ACI Global Training photo gallery

ACI-ICAO Airport User Charges, 17–21 October 2016 in Montreal, Canada

Airport Master Planning, 24–28 October 2016 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

Evaluación Y Gestión De Riesgos De Seguridad Operacional, 25–27 October 2016 in Panama City, Panama

Capacity Enhancement and Resource Planning, 26–28 October 2016 in Incheon, South Korea

Airport Master Planning, 24–28 October 2016 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

Accident and Incident Investigation, 30 October–1 November 2016 in Doha, Qatar ACI WORLD REPORT

37


TRAINING

ACI Global Training photo gallery

GSN 4: Working with ICAO Annex 14, 30 Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3 November 2016 in Amman, Jordan -------------

Basic Airfield Operations, 30 Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 November 2016 in Montego bay, Jamaica -------------

Course categories We have multiple training offerings in the following course categories:

In-house training ACI Global Training also provides training exclusively for your airport. Courses can be selected from the current curriculum or be designed to meet the needs of your airport staff. For more information, contact us today at training@aci.aero. --------------------For more information on ACI Global Training, visit www.aci.aero/global-training.

38

DECEMBER 2016


Global Safety Network (GSN) Diploma Programme Do you have the right competencies to be an airport safety professional?

Advance your career with the GSN Diploma Programme! •

GSN 1 - Safety Management Systems

GSN 4 - Working with Annex 14

GSN 2 - Airside Safety and Operations

GSN 5 - Advanced Safety Management Systems

GSN 3 - Emergency Planning and Crisis Management

GSN 6 - Aerodrome Auditing and Compliance

To find out more information, please contact us at: training@aci.aero

+1 514-373-1200

http://www.aci.aero/Global-Training

The leading airport management and operations education provider


TRAINING

ACI Global Training feature courses Online - Airport Environmental Management*

This course investigates the principles of sustainable development and environmental management. It covers the key environmental impacts associated with airport operations and growth, the benefits gained from effective environmental management and the essential elements of implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) at your airport Read More...

Dates

Location

Member/WBP price

Non-member price

6 February - 17 March 2017

Montreal, Quebec

US$1,680

US$2,500

GSN 5 - Advanced Safety Management Systems

This course takes an in depth look at Safety Management Systems (SMS) by describing the requirements and composition of an SMS. It also explains how to implement and improve Safety Management through Safety Monitoring, Training and Documentation. Read More...

Dates

Location

Member/WBP price

Non-member price

20—24 February 2017

Dublin, Ireland

US$1,680

US$2,500

Airport Safety Management Systems (SMS) Implementation*

This course provides participants with the necessary knowledge and skills to plan, develop, and implement a Safety Management System (SMS) and ensure on-going compliance with the ICAO Safety SARPs. Read More...

Dates

Location

Member/WBP price

Non-member price

20—24 February 2017

Dublin, Ireland

US$1,680

US$2,500

Airport Master Planning

Consistent with the objectives and orientations set out in the airport’s Business Plan, the course emphasizes the opportunities available to enhance airport capacity in a cost-effective, timely, and sustainable manner. Read More...

Dates 20—24 February 2017

Location Incheon, South Korea

Member/WBP price

Non-member price

US$1,500

US$2,170

*This course can be taken as an elective for the Airport Management Professional Accreditation Programme.

Website: www.aci.aero/training • Email: training@aci.aero • Phone: +1 514 373 1200 40

DECEMBER 2016


AMPAP AMPAPAMPAP AM

AMPAP

The Hallmark of Excellence in Airport Management

Premier Sponsor

Media Partner

AMPAP Administrator

Register now for 2017!

www.iap.aero

ATS Incheon, Rep. of Korea

March 6 to 10, 2017 Hosted by Incheon Airport Avia�on Academy/IIAC

ATS Split, Croatia

April 10 to 14, 2017 Hosted by Split Airport

Other destinations to follow

AMPAP acronym The Global Airport Management Professional Accreditation Programme (AMPAP) is a strategic initiative of ACI and ICAO. The primary focus is to develop airport managers through a six-course curriculum that covers all functional areas of the airport business in key areas. AMPAP encourages participants to share best managerial practices in an interactive, cross cultural environment while establishing a global network of contacts.


TRAINING

ACI Global Training 2017 calendar January 2017–March 2017 Africa 20–24 March 2017 27–29 March 2017

GSN 6 - Aerodrome Auditing and Compliance Understanding Annex 14

Johannesburg Johannesburg

Asia Pacific 6–10 Feb. 2017 12-14 March 2017

Behavioral Analysis: Pax Screening and Insider Threat Management Passengers with Reduced Mobilities (PRM) Workshop

Incheon Abu Dhabi

13-17 March 2017

Developing Customer Service Culture at Airports*

Delhi

Europe 9–13 Jan. 2017

Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM)

Riga

30 Jan.–3 Feb. 2017

GSN 5 - Advanced Safety Management Systems

Athens

6–10 Feb. 2017

GSN 2 - Airside Safety and Operations

Riga

Latin America 1–3 March 2017

Accident and Incident Investigation

Montego Bay

North America 6 Feb –17 March 2017 27 Feb –3 March 2017 20–24 March 2017

Online - Airport Environmental Management* GSN 3 - Emergency Planning and Crisis Management Airline Managements for Airport Professionals*

Montreal San Francisco San Francisco

Website: www.aci.aero/training • Email: training@aci.aero • Phone: +1 514 373 1200 42

DECEMBER 2016


Find out why the world’s best airports are part of the Airport Service Quality programme CMN FEZ OUD

RNB

JNB MBA NBO DRW TSV UTN TAM

BMA GRX

MEL NTL BLQ

ITM

MLA AMS GOJ MMX AMD CKG TRV UTN RBA

JNB

NRT ICN JAIRGN MLA RIX YYZ IKA BKK PPT

DUR PVG GYE SAP TPE BGI NAS

ZRH

GVA GIG YWG

BOS IND TFS

IBZ GLA

JAX

PPT REP LYS LLA POS

SHE LOP ICN

TLV

VCP OVD BMA

WLG

SXF

NGO

ZAZ PDL MOL

KKN VGO CAN CMH

BOM

YHZ

YTZ BNA TFN

CIA EVE AER

ABZ SVX CNX BLQ

CGQ HAK

KUL

TOS CDG

ELS MCT TPA YLW DEN DME CGQ BPN MRU YYT TRD

PLM DUR EBB

LPA

PIT YMM

ICN RAK LAX

PNR TSV

FUE VBY

TPA

CLE

FAO JAI

DGO ABZ

LIS OTP

BOO

LED NAS

AUS

DXB

BOH LPL EDI MLN

AMM

PNA SOU

ACE VDE

KRS KRK FNC OPO

YQM DUS

YQM DEN

DEL PEN

ALC

UIO

COK LGK MLE

LGK MAD

DOH

VCE SYD

HYD

THR MUC MAA OLB

YYZ REU BOM CHC PNH GAU

HKG

OSL IST

FLL SLP PUJ

MRS IST

SJO

SPC

GYE

AUS CUR

BGO ZAG LIN FRA MXP

SLL PWM NCE

SCQ

RUH

CCU CTP NRT

BLR TXL ORK OHD EIN AES

DEL

BNE NKG

MLE TPE

DUB CPH

SJO MAN ZRH

OPO

REX MSP STL KNO

OOL PKU ITM GMP

BUD KEF MXP

GMP BCN

FCO TAO TNG ADL SXR DPS

CVG YLW

DTW ZIH

TSN

GOT KZN

KUF AGP

EAS UME

MTY RUH

KHN MZTTRC ELP PEK SINYYJ

ATL EMA

GRO VBY

KEF

YEG BIO

MBJ

GOT

AUH

YQB

FRA

CUL

MBJ YQB POP GRR

SKP

MAH

DFW AER BAH

IND

YUL

VLC YQR LHR SLP

LED SAT

SDQ

TXL

YOW

LGW SMF

SVG SHA

MJV

SVO AKL

CMN KKN

Excellent customer service, excellent airports For more information on how to join the ASQ network, contact the ASQ team: + 1 514 373 1200

aciasq@aci.aero

http://www.aci.aero/ Airport-Service-Quality

@ACI_ASQ

*Airport code sizes are based upon Director General’s Roll of Excellence inductees and ASQ Award winners since 2006 ** The ASQ Awards are provided based upon the top three mean scores on overall satisfaction from the ASQ Survey


AIRPORT SERVICE QUALITY

Interview series: Celebrating the 10th anniversary of ACI’s Airport Service Quality programme By Sevda Fevzi, Manager, ASQ Strategic Marketing, ACI World This year, ACI’s Airport Service Quality (ASQ) programme celebrates its 10th anniversary. As we blow out our birthday candles, we will be featuring interviews from a host of airports that have been part of the ACI ASQ global network within the past decade. Through firsthand interviews published in the ACI World Report, we will be highlighting what ASQ means to each airport, as well as how the programme has contributed to customer service excellence and increased satisfaction amongst travellers.

How and why did your airport join ASQ?

The final interview in our 2016 series features Singapore Changi Airport’s (SIN) Senior Vice President, Passenger Experience and Airport Operations Management, Albert Lim.

How has your airport directly benefitted from ASQ?

At Singapore Changi Airport, passengers are at the heart of what we do. This has been our raison d’être since welcoming our first passengers in 1981. The successful ACI ASQ programme, with its comprehensive framework to gather invaluable passenger insights as well as international benchmarking opportunities with the world’s leading airports, attracted us to participate actively.

Beyond service, we want to create a unique travel experience that is personalized, stress-free and positively

Key facts about Singapore Changi Airport

Albert Lim, Senior Vice President, Passenger Experience and Airport Operations Management, Singapore Changi Airport 44

DECEMBER 2016

• Opened in 1981 • Airport code: SIN • Welcomed 55 million passengers in 2015 • Number of employees: 50,000 • Did you know? Singapore Changi has the world’s first butterfly garden in an airport, home to more than 1,000 butterflies and a 6 m tall grotto/ waterfall. Changi Airport also has one of the largest Facebook fan bases among airports, with more than 1.5 million fans.


AIRPORT SERVICE QUALITY

Singapore Changi Airport surprising at Changi Airport. These key elements are our guiding beacons in driving excellence in the airport together with our airport partners. Our participation in the ASQ programme allows us to listen to the voices of our passengers regarding their experiences at Changi Airport and identify areas for improvement so as to ensure that we are constantly in tune with our passengersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; growing expectations. Has your airport implemented any changes and/or improvements because of ASQ? Certainly, yes! Through the monthly ASQ surveys, we have greatly benefitted from evaluation of the individual scores and verbatim feedback provided by our passengers across various key touchpoints. We can then identify areas where we have missed the mark and jointly develop service improvement initiatives together with our airport partners.

What is the best thing about being part of the ASQ airport network? Air travel can be a stressful and tiring experience for most passengers. I am thus heartened to see the passion and commitment of the ASQ airport community constantly striving to improve the service level and enhance the passenger experience for the benefit of our passengers. We have learned much from the cross sharing of best practices and successful case studies through the regular ASQ Forums and publications. What are your wish list destinations for future ASQ Forums? Cairo and Rio de Janeiro. ----------For more information on the ACI ASQ programme, visit http://www.aci.aero/asq. ACI WORLD REPORT

45


EVENTS & CONFERENCES

ACI events calendar January 2017–May 2017 ACI-NA Risk Management Conference • 11–13 January 2017 • Los Angeles, CA, USA ACI-NA CEO Forum and Winter Board of Directors Meeting • 8–10 February 2017 • Scottsdale, AZ, USA ACI Annual Airport Economics & Finance Conference & Exhibition • 20–22 March 2017 • London, United Kingdom ACI-NA/AAAE Washington Legislative Conference • 21–22 March 2017 • Washington, DC, USA ACI-NA Airports@Work Conference • 27–30 March 2017 • Las Vegas, NV, USA ACI-NA/AAAE Airport Board & Commissioners Conference • 2–4 April 2017 • Greenville, SC, USA ACI EUROPE Airport Commercial & Retail Conference & Exhibition • 3–5 April 2017 • Nice, France ACI Asia-Pacific Regional Assembly, Conference & Exhibition • 10–12 April 2017 • Doha, Qatar

ACI-NA Legal Affairs Spring Conference • 3–6 May 2017 • Amelia Island, FL, USA ACI EUROPE Regional Airports Conference & Exhibition • 15–17 May 2017 • Cork, Ireland ICAO/ACI Wildlife Strike Hazard Reduction Symposium • 16–18 May 2017 • Montreal, QC, Canada ACI-NA/ACC/AGC Airport Construction Strategy Summit • 23–24 May 2017 • Los Angeles, CA, USA ACI-NA/A4A Deicing Management Conference • 23–24 May 2017 • Arlington, VA, USA ACI-NA Cargo Conference • 4–6 June 2017 • Orlando, FL, USA ACI-NA Jumpstart Air Service Development Program w/ small Airports committee meeting • 5–7 June 2017 • Providence, RI, USA 27th ACI Europe General Assembly, Congress and Exhibition • 12–14 June 2017 • Paris, France

ACI-NA Business of Airports Conference • 10–12 April 2017 • Palm Springs, CA, USA ----------------------------------------For a full listing of ACI events, please visit www.aci.aero/events. 46

DECEMBER 2016


Join us in London at the world’s premier airport economics forum Presented in partnership by:

ACI World ACI EUROPE ACI Asia-Pacific Supporting Organisation:

RADISSON BLU PORTMAN HOTEL, LONDON

20 – 22 MARCH 2017 Gala Dinner sponsor:

Diamond sponsor:

Gold sponsor:

Organiser:

Media partners

Incorporating the 3rd ACI-World Bank Annual Aviation Symposium

SAVE THE DATE! EVENT HIGHLIGHTS: • over 250 delegates • from over 140 different organisations • from over 50 different countries

For further information visit – www.aci-economics.com


12th ACI Asia-Pacific Regional Assembly Conference & Exhibition

SAVE THE DATE April 10-12, 2017 Doha, Qatar

Organizer

ASIA-PACIFIC

For further inquiries www.-aci-asiapac.aero | events@aci-asiapacific.aero

Host


ADVANCE YOUR AIRPORT CAREER

Join the airport leaders of tomorrow by enrolling in our premier leadership programmes 1. ACI-Concordia Airport Executive Leadership Programme (AELP) 2. Global ACI-ICAO Airport Management Professional Accreditation Programme (AMPAP) 3. Airport Leadership Workshop (ALW) To find out more details, please contact us at: Email: training@aci.aero Tel: +1-514-373-1200 For additional course information, visit us at: www.aci.aero/Global-Training


ACI AFRICA

First ACI Africa Safety Awards presented to African airports By Ali Tounsi, Secretary General, ACI Africa ACI Africa recently presented the inaugural edition of its Safety Awards during the Gala Dinner ceremony of the 25th ACI Africa Annual General Assembly, held in the beautiful city of Maputo in Mozambique.

Komla, President, ACI Africa; and Ali Tounsi, Secretary General, ACI Africa. The proud recipients are as follows:

The awards were conceived by ACI Africa to recognize excellence and professionalism in the management of aerodrome safety and enable airport members to celebrate their successes in this vital aspect of airport operation. The awards were presented by Angela Gittens, Director General, ACI World; Pascal

Best improvement in airport safety: Aéroport International Félix-Houphouët-Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast 50

DECEMBER 2016


ACI AFRICA

Best improvement following an APEX review: Gnassingbé Eyadéma International Airport, Lomé,Togo ACI WORLD REPORT

51


AFRICA

Best Airport in Africa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Runner-up: Cape Town International Airport, Cape Town, South Africa 52

DECEMBER 2016


AFRICA

Best Airport in Africa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Winner: Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam International Airport, Plaine Magnien, Mauritius -------------------------------------------------

ACI WORLD REPORT

53


ACI ASIA-PACIFIC

ACI Asia-Pacific Small and Emerging Airports Seminar successfully concluded in Siem Reap By Yulim Lee, Manager, Events, ACI Asia-Pacific Hosted by Cambodia Airports, the 2016 ACI Asia-Pacific Small and Emerging Airports Seminar recently concluded in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The seminar was well attended with over 190 aviation executives from across the Asia-Pacific region, representing airport operators, regulators and service providers from the airport industry.

ACI Asia-Pacific, delivered their opening remarks and warmly welcomed the delegates. Mr. Arun Mishra, Regional Director of ICAO’s Asia & Pacific Office, delivered the Keynote Address, titled “Challenges and opportunities of small and emerging airports.” He also highlighted ICAO’s plans and programmes in support of the “No country left behind” initiative.

The event was officially kicked off on 25 October 2016. H.E. Mao Havannall, Secretary of State, Secretariat of Civil Aviation; Mr. Eric Delobel, CEO of Cambodia Airports, VINCI Airports; and Mrs. Patti Chau, Regional Director of

Patti Chau thanked the host and sponsors for their generous support and hospitality. “Airports today are no longer confined within the role of infrastructure providers. Sustainable growth requires airports to constantly upgrade facilities and invest

(from left) Mr. Eric Delobel, Mrs. Patti Chau, H.E. Mao Havannall and Mr. Arun Mishra 54

DECEMBER 2016


ACI ASIA-PACIFIC

in modern infrastructure, continuously enhance customer service in order to create the best airport experience possible and work closely with concession partners to maximize business potential. Airports, big or small, have the important role of bringing in travelers by marketing the destination together with their airline partners, tourism operators and local governments to drive economic growth. “At ACI Asia-Pacific, we define small airports as airports with annual passenger throughput of 5 million or less,” Chau continued. “About 85% of airports in this region can be classified as small airports. At ACI, we value each and every airport member no matter their size. All airports serve a key role in the transportation of people and goods.” “Being host of this seminar is a recognition of the fruitful partnership between the Royal Government of Cambodia and Cambodia Airports, resulting in outstanding achievements over the last 20 years,” added Eric Delobel. “Traffic growth has averaged 10% yearly, the airports in

Phnom Penh, Siem Reap and Sihanoukville have been entirely extended and revamped and Cambodia has joined the league of a global tourism destination. Publicprivate partnership is a model that has successfully stood the test of time and we believe that it has plenty of room to further deliver.” During the two-day seminar, the following issues were discussed: • Master plan on ASEAN connectivity: “One vision, one identity, one community” • Community assistance • Risk management and business continuity • Airport expansion while maintaining normal operation • Seasonality in tourism • Thinking out of the box: Innovative ways to enhance revenues at small and emerging airports • Airport privatization and financing infrastructural development The seminar was officially closed on 26 October. Representing the host, Mr. Nicolas

The Gala Dinner, sponsored by Dufry, was held on 25 October at the Thommanon Temple. ACI WORLD REPORT

55


ACI ASIA-PACIFIC

Nicolas Notebaert, CEO of VINCI Concessions and Chairman of VINCI Airports, thanked the delegates as he delivered his closing remarks. ----------Notebaert, CEO of VINCI Concessions and Chairman of VINCI Airports, thanked the delegates for attending the Small and Emerging Airports Seminar. “I would like to extend my appreciation to ACI Asia-Pacific for the opportunity entrusted to us of co-organizing this event,” said Mr. Notebaert. “The way people travel is drastically changing and airports, particularly small and emerging ones, need to have a good understanding of these new trends, and be even smarter, more innovative and more efficient than larger airports in the way they address them. As a top five global player operating 35 airports of very different sizes in six countries, VINCI Airports is fully part of that general trend and we are very thankful to all our partners for exchanging 56

DECEMBER 2016

(from left) Mr. Eric Delobel, CEO of Cambodia Airports and H.E. Mao Havannall, Secretary of State, Secretariat of Civil Aviation ----------their experiences and best practices with us over the past two days.” The Small and Emerging Airports seminar is held annually and covers a wide range of topics focusing on the challenges and opportunities related to operating a small and emerging airport in the AsiaPacific region. For further information on assistance available for your airport, please feel free to contact the ACI Asia-Pacific Regional Office. ---------For more information on ACI Asia-Pacific, visit www.aci-asiapac.aero. For a listing of 2017 ACI events, click here.


2017 THE GLOBAL AIRPORT COMMERCIAL REVENUES CONFERENCE 25-27 October 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Bangkok, Thailand

Hosted by

Organised by

-

For more information please email Sarah@MoodieDavittReport.com


ACI LATIN AMERICA

Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of ACI Latin America and Caribbean at the 2016 Regional Annual Assembly, Conference and Exhibition By Francisco Medela, Industry Affairs Manager, ACI-LAC The 2016 ACI-Latin America and Caribbean (ACI-LAC) Annual Assembly, Conference and Exhibition, kindly hosted by Inframerica, celebrated the organization’s 25th Anniversary under the theme “25 years of Airport Management: innovation and changes, the challenge for the future.” The event concluded successfully on 10 November with an attendance of over 350 delegates from 35 countries. The two-day conference provided delegates with the opportunity to deliberate on issues of interest to airports. Day 1 began with the official opening of the conference, where attendees heard from Rodrigo Rollemberg, Governor of Brasilia; Maurício Quintella Lessa, Minister, Transport and

Civil Aviation of Brazil; Tarcísio Gomes de Freitas, Secretary of Project Coordination, Programme of Investment Partnerships of the Presidency of Brazil; Martín Eurnekian, Vice President, Corporación América; and Héctor Navarrete, President, ACI-LAC. The opening session was followed by Rogerio Coimbra, Secretary of Regulatory Policy, Civil Aviation Secretariat, who provided an overview of Brazilian airport concessions. The concluding sessions included CEO insights on the future challenges and opportunities of the aviation industry in Brazil; collaboration and integration among industry organizations as a key factor for

Official opening: (from left) Martín Eurnekian, Vice President, Corporación América; Maurício Quintella Lessa, Minister, Transport and Civil Aviation of Brazil; Rodrigo Rollemberg, Governor of Brasilia; Héctor Navarrete, President, ACI-LAC; and Tarcísio Gomes de Freitas, Secretary of Project Coordination, Programme of Investment Partnerships 58

DECEMBER 2016


ACI LATIN AMERICA

the development of the aviation industry; concessions contracts from the perspective of regulators and operators; and airport infrastructure financing. The second day included sessions focused on enhancing capacity beyond infrastructure; facilitation challenges facing security threats; and airport commercial trends. The event ended with the handover and closing ceremony, with Inframerica passing hosting duties of the 2017 ACI-LAC Annual Assembly, Conference and Exhibition to AERIS, concessionaire of Juan Santamaría International Airport in San José, Costa Rica. “2016 marked the 25th Anniversary of the only global organization that represents the collective interests of the world’s airports and that promotes professional excellence in airport management and operations. ACI contributes to a safe, secure, sustainable and economically viable air transport system,” said Javier Martinez,

The new ACI-LAC Governing Board at the 25th ACI LAC Annual Assembly. ----------Director General, ACI-LAC. “Over the last 25 years, the airport industry in Latin America and the Caribbean has seen large transformations marked by the processes of airport concessions” New ACI-LAC leadership elected Eurnekian was elected as the President of ACI-LAC by a unanimous vote by Regional Board members. He praised the previous President Navarrete for his commitment to the organization and his leadership over the last years. The new ACI-LAC Governing Board now includes Andrew O'Brian from Corporación Quiport as First Vice President; Ezequiel Barrenechea from Aeropuertos Andinos del Perú as Second Vice President; Fernando Bosque from Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico as Third Vice President; and Evans Avendaño from Aeropuertos del Perú as Treasurer.

Exhibition opening: (from left) Martín Eurnekian, Vice President, Corporación América; Héctor Navarrete, President, ACI-LAC; Angela Gittens, Director General ACI World; and Javier Martinez, Director General, ACI-LAC.

“It is a great honour that my colleagues from Latin America and the Caribbean have elected me to represent them,” stated Eurnekian. “Today airports have a central role in the development of countries in economic, social and environmental matters. Our mission as airport operators is to continue working on the modernization of infrastructure, increasing safety levels and incorporating new and better services.” ACI WORLD REPORT

59


WORLD BUSINESS PARTNERS

ACI welcomes new World Business Partners Krankikom Region: Europe Level: Silver Address: Schifferstrasse 200, 47059 Duisburg, Germany Website: www.krankikom.de Contact: Frank Reisewitz, Head of Business Development Email: frank.reisewitz@krankikom.de Phone: 0049 151 656 34 709 Krankikom brings 20 years of experience in Marketing Services and Digital Transformation within the Aviation Industry. Our expertise lies in the development of strategies and the application of web and mobile technologies to digitalize business processes for marketing and commercial purposes, passenger engagement and loyalty, PR, communication and knowledge transfer.

PIXYS SAS Region: Europe Level: Silver Small Business Address: 4 Rue du Port aux Vins, 92150 Suresnes, France Website: www.pixys.com Contact: Pierre Bertiaux, Chairman Email: contact@pixys.fr Phone: 0033 1 46 25 0280 PIXYS designs Control Rooms and Operations Control Centers for airports, homeland security, defense, and transportation. PIXYS is also the exclusive integrator of AgiWare Tops®, bringing contextual computing and assisted operations to airport operations centers. Major airport customers include ADP, Genève Aéroport, Aéroports de Lyon and Aéroports de Nice.

60

DECEMBER 2016


WORLD BUSINESS PARTNERS

BLIP Systems Region: Europe Level: Gold Address: Haekken 2, 9310 Vodskov, Denmark Website: www.blipsystems.com Contact: Peter Knudsen, CEO Email: sales@blipsystems.com Phone: 0045 98 25 82 00 BLIP Systems is a leading provider of data analytic tools to transform passenger flows into value. From queue and flow management to advanced capacity forecasting, the BlipTrack solution provides airports with insights to improve operations on the day, effectively plan staffing resources and at the same time improve non-aeronautical revenues while maintaining a high level of passenger service.

Everbridge Region: Europe Level: Gold Affiliate Address: Kingsbury House, 6 Sheet Street, SL4 1BG Windsor, UK Website: www.everbridge.com Contact: Michael Cardarelli, Director Transportation practice Email: michael.cardarelli@everbridge.com Phone: 00440800 035 0081 Everbridge provides crisis communications and situational awareness technology to more than 100 airports and airlines, including 24 of the 25 largest airports in North America, the largest airlines in the world and aviation clients in 200+ countries, helping them to be better prepared, make better decisions and respond more quickly.

ACI WORLD REPORT

61


WORLD BUSINESS PARTNERS

Safe Bag S.p.A Region: Europe Level: Silver Address: Via Olona 183G, 21013 Gallarate, Italy Website: www.safe-bag.com Contact: Alessandro Notari, CEO Email: david.debach@safe-bag.com Phone: 0039 0331777154 Safe Bag is the European leader and the most innovative provider of baggage protection services. Safe Bag is also the only company in the industry listed on the Stock Exchange. Safe Bag operates in 22 airports and 60 shops worldwide, and offers the widest value proposition in the industry (baggage protection, tracking, money-back guarantee, baggage storage and delivery, sales of travel goods, calling cards, travel assistance and more).

CI² Aviation Region: North America Level: Airport Related Business Address: 9 Dunwoody Park, Suite 104, Dunwoody, GA 30338 Website: www.ci2.com Contact: Michael Baylis, CEO Email: mbaylis@ci2.com Phone: (770) 425-2267 CI² Aviation is a dynamic, full-range aviation facility management, information technology, engineering, administrative consulting and staffing services organization committed to excellence. Our team is driven by a strategic vision and includes globally certified professionals with a reputation for consistently providing sustained, high-quality performance that far exceeds industry standards.

62

DECEMBER 2016


WORLD BUSINESS PARTNERS

GE Aviation Region: North America Level: Silver Address: 400 West 15th Street, Suite 1200, Austin, TX 787701 Website: www.ge.com Contact: Jerry Fagerhaug, Sr. Technical Sales Director Email: jerry.fagerhaug@ge.com Phone: (612) 308-4456 GE Aviation, an operating unit of GE, is a leading provider of jet and turboprop engines, components and integrated systems for commercial, military, business and general aviation aircraft and has a global service network to support these offerings. GE Aviation recorded revenues of US$20 billion in 2012. Headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio USA, GE Aviation employs about 40,000 people and operates manufacturing, overhaul and repair facilities worldwide. About 25,000 jet engines from GE and its partner companies (CFM International and The Engine Alliance) are in airline service. An aircraft powered by GE or CFM engines takes flight every 2 seconds.

S&P Global Ratings Region: North America Level: Silver Address: 2225 Franklin Street, 15th Floor, Boston, MA 02110-2804 Website: https://www.spglobal.com Contact: Kurt Forsgren, Managing Director Email: kurt.forsgren@spglobal.com Phone: (617) 530-8308 S&P Global Inc. (prior to April 2016 McGraw Hill Financial, Inc., and prior to 2013 McGraw Hill Companies) is a publicly traded American corporation headquartered in New York City. Its primary areas of business are financial information and analytics. S&P Global Inc. is the parent company of Standard & Poor's, S&P Global Market Intelligence and S&P Global Platts, and is the majority owner of the S&P Dow Jones Indices joint venture.

ACI WORLD REPORT

63


WORLD BUSINESS PARTNERS

Regional World Business Partner contacts The WBP programme provides a unique platform for you to interact in a dynamic aviation industry, building a network of new contacts and exploring new business opportunities. Membership will strengthen your companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position in the aviation industry, provide you with access to business leaders and decision makers, as well as give you the opportunity to help develop and promote the standards and policies governing airports today. ACI WBP AFR Contact: Ali Tounsi Email: atounsi@aci-africa.aero Website: www.aci-africa.aero ACI WBP ASIA-PAC Contact: Vincent Wong Email: vincent@aci-asiapac.aero, wbp@aci-asiapac.aero Website: www.aci-asiapac.aero ACI WBP EUR Contact: Yulia Plyusnina Email: Yulia.Plyusnina@aci-europe.org Website: www.aci-europe.org ACI WBP LAC Contact: Javier Martinez Email: jmartinez@aci-lac.aero Website: www.aci-lac.aero ACI WBP NA Contact: Veronica Gerson Email: vgerson@aci-na.org Website: www.aci-na.org

64

DECEMBER 2016


Airport Excellence

Safety Assessor Training Programme Apply today! The Airport Excellence (APEX) in Safety Programme along with ACI Global Training has launched the APEX Safety Assessor Training Programme (SATP). The objectives of the initiative is to: • Improve competency levels; • develop expertise for future assessor participation in the APEX in Safety Programme; and, • provide free on-the-job training to safety experts.

This initiative will be carried out through capacity building, leading to the creation and/ or enhancement of expertise in airport safety and regulatory compliance, mentorship and network growth, the enhancement of airport safety levels and promotion of airport excellence.

More information and admission requirements: For more information on the APEX SATP, as well as admission requirements, please download our reference document.

Course listing: For a list of courses that are part of the APEX SATP, please download our course programme. Mandatory training course fees for successful candidates of DNA countries will be fully subsidized by ACI.

Participation forms: APEX SATP letter of commitment APEX SATP application form Please submit participation forms to apexsafety@aci.aero.

Questions: For any questions on the APEX SATP, please email apexsafety@aci.aero.


> Airport World 5, 2016 Now available online

The magazine of the Airports Council International

In this issue In the spotlight: Safety & Security Airport profile: Sydney Events: ACI World Assembly Plus: Land development & Customer service

View the full magazine online Follow us on:

Published by:

www.airport-world.com

ACI World Report - December 2016  
ACI World Report - December 2016