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to work with, I can go with that challenge. Tell me about the different approaches and different media you apply to your art. What are your favorite tools and techniques? I’m driven by experimentation and play, from colored pencils to industrial paints. I call myself a maximalist because I employ so many techniques, materials and styles to my work. I like to mix drawing and collage, with representational and abstract painting. So much of my process is about integrating these different layers, which I am constantly building up and then sanding. I’m into making my own collage materials—digitally manipulating my own photographs and then collaging with them, then cutting apart what I’ve made, and re-collaging it onto a final surface: three-level collage. Also, I work on multiple pieces at the same time and at different levels of completion, because that allows me to come into my studio and be messy or very refined. You use layers to great effect in your work. Tell me about the decision to layer. I like to create other worlds and tell the stories within the layers. The smaller narratives embedded in the layers bring more depth to the overall narrative. I can put in more content when I can put in more depth. I like to play with transparency—the parts of the past we can see from the present. The parts of the present we can see from the past. The past is with us, visible or invisible. Things are more complete when put into context. How has your art evolved through the years in media, in theme, in other ways? Has exposure to new tools or techniques changed your work? Yes, exploring new media has played a significant role in the evolution of my work. In carving stone, I’ve found a new response to form by working reductively and in 3-dimensions. In 44

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(from top) Illuminated, 100, mixed media on wood panel, 12x12” 2014; Searching for True North, 2015, acrylic on paper, 48x68; Resurfacing, 2015, mixed media on wood panels, 36x24”

textile design, I worked with palettes I wouldn’t have traditionally embraced. The interface I use for textile design has influenced my square paintings. Medieval illuminated manuscripts influenced a series of paintings with integrated text and the end product for that series became a book. Who are your favorite artists? What do you think you have learned from them? Do you see their influence in your work? All the great painters are great teachers, particularly in terms of how their paintings are constructed and different artists stand out at different times for me—Gerhardt Richter is an all time favorite. I love the atmospheric quality of his paintings—and his exploration of different styles over the years. Ross Bleckner for his symbolic language and how he captures depth. Kiki Smith for her exploration of the human condition and nature. I love graffiti and street art. I’m influenced by the layers of paint, paper and grit that I see there. My favorite street artist is Swoon. I find myself to be very influenced by music these days because it can be so transportive, and I want to transport my viewers to other worlds. I would love to create a painting that moved people in the way a Bjork song moves me. Do you have a sense of purpose in your art? My purpose is connection. I look to nature for my model. Its ecosystems and balance epitomize what I’m trying to achieve. It mirrors the different stages of life’s journey. I want to find the non-dualistic worldview, to express the cascading effect—that everything influences everything else.

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

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