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off the party barge. The bar lights were turned off as we finished our drinks, boarded the dinghy in the cool, night breeze to return to the Solstice. Day Three • GPS familiarization, charting, ship duties to ready the boat • The boat race

The next morning, Paul pulled out the maps from down below and brought them into the sundrenched cockpit to share his route plan and teach Tom and I about the local waters and some of his knowledge about charting. We also received brief instruction on the use of the GPS systems onboard. Tom and I were now working as a team to tie down the dinghy, secure the portholes, manage the sheets,

and ready the boat for the day ahead. Each day Paul expected us to learn, adapt, and put into practical application the lessons and skills he shared. He was gradually handing over more of the boat’s duties to us and guided us only when needed. Paul is both a respected sailor and skillful teacher. After checking the weather and charting the course, Paul put Tom on the tiller to take charge of the boat and get us on our way. Today would be the longest day of sailing yet as our Captain decided on the destination of Leverick Bay, BVI. On this day, the winds were even more brisk and the waves even bigger. Inside the protected waters of the Drake Channel, waves were being whipped up to heights easily exceeding five feet. We sailed most of the day with the hull pounding against the water. At one point, a catamaran came alongside us along the same tack (or course). What happens when to sailboats come alongside on the FEB/MAR 2016 31

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

ÉCLAT INTERNATIONAL - Feb/Mar 2016 Issue  

The Broad Museum in Los Angeles Art Basel Miami Beach Sailing in the Caribbean

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