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OSH FACULTY ORIENTATION HANDBOOK 2012/2013


_Toc316913620 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................. - 7 -  HISTORY ......................................................................................................... - 8 -  MISSION .......................................................................................................... - 8 -  VISION ............................................................................................................. - 8 -  CORE VALUES ............................................................................................... - 8 -  AAS ORGANIZATION ..................................................................................... - 9 -  THE AAS SCHOOL BOARD ................................................................................................................. - 9 -  BOARD POLICY ..................................................................................................................................... - 9 -  FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION .................................................................................................. - 9 -  SUPPORT STAFF .................................................................................................................................... - 9 -  STUDENT BODY ..................................................................................................................................... - 9 -  ACCREDITING BODIES ..................................................................................................................... - 10 - 

FACILITIES ................................................................................................... - 10 - THE SCHOOLS ............................................................................................. - 10 -  Elementary School .................................................................................................................................. - 10 -  Middle School ......................................................................................................................................... - 10 -  High School ............................................................................................................................................. - 11 -  Professional Development ...................................................................................................................... - 11 -  School Calendar ...................................................................................................................................... - 11 -  School Hours ........................................................................................................................................... - 12 -  Housing Arrangements .......................................................................................................................... - 12 -  Faculty Dress Code ................................................................................................................................. - 12 - 

PREPARATIONS FOR YOUR MOVE TO MOSCOW ................................... - 13 - Where to find Information..................................................................................................................... - 13 -  First Contact ........................................................................................................................................... - 13 - 

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Travel Documents/Passports ................................................................................................................. - 13 - Other Documentation ............................................................................................................................. - 14 -  Airline Tickets......................................................................................................................................... - 14 -  Packing & Shipping ................................................................................................................................ - 15 -  What to Bring/What to Leave Behind .................................................................................................. - 16 -  Household Necessities ............................................................................................................................. - 16 -  Basic Necessities ...................................................................................................................................... - 18 -  Clothing Necessities ................................................................................................................................ - 19 -  Clothes For Children .............................................................................................................................. - 19 -  Other Clothing & Special Items ............................................................................................................ - 19 -  Electronics ............................................................................................................................................... - 20 -  Leave Behind........................................................................................................................................... - 20 -  What to bring in your luggage?............................................................................................................. - 21 - 

HAND LUGGAGE OR CARRY-ON LUGGAGE ............................................ - 21 - CHECKED LUGGAGE .................................................................................. - 22 -  Notes from teachers ................................................................................................................................ - 22 - 

BRINGING PETS........................................................................................... - 23 - LIVING IN MOSCOW .................................................................................... - 24 -  Accommodation ...................................................................................................................................... - 24 -  Gruzinsky Pereulok ”Gruz” ................................................................................................................ - 25 -  Rublovskoye Shosse “Ruby” ............................................................................................................... - 26 -  Kutuzovsky Prospekt ........................................................................................................................... - 27 - 

ORIENTATION PROGRAM........................................................................... - 27 - GETTING AROUND ...................................................................................... - 28 -  Metro, Buses, Trolleys, and Trams ....................................................................................................... - 28 -  The Metro ................................................................................................................................................ - 28 -  Buses, Trams and Trolleys..................................................................................................................... - 28 -  Monthly passes ........................................................................................................................................ - 29 -  Official Taxis: ......................................................................................................................................... - 29 - 

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School transportation service ................................................................................................................ - 30 - Getting your own car.............................................................................................................................. - 30 -  Driver’s license........................................................................................................................................ - 30 -  Purchasing a vehicle ............................................................................................................................... - 30 -  Road Rules .............................................................................................................................................. - 31 -  What to expect from your embassy? ..................................................................................................... - 32 - 

MONEY MATTERS ....................................................................................... - 33 - Salary Payments ..................................................................................................................................... - 33 -  Banking Advice for Canadians .............................................................................................................. - 33 -  From RBC Centura's Website: ............................................................................................................. - 34 - 

LOANS .......................................................................................................... - 35 - Exchanging money.................................................................................................................................. - 35 -  Obtaining Cash Dollars .......................................................................................................................... - 35 -  Security .................................................................................................................................................... - 36 -  Crime in Moscow ................................................................................................................................ - 36 -  Militiamen ........................................................................................................................................... - 36 -  Residential Security Tips ..................................................................................................................... - 37 -  Medical Matters ...................................................................................................................................... - 38 -  Medical Check Up ............................................................................................................................... - 38 -  Medical Insurance ................................................................................................................................ - 38 -  Medical Services in Moscow ............................................................................................................... - 38 -  Medical Evacuation ............................................................................................................................. - 38 -  Communication....................................................................................................................................... - 40 -  Telephones ........................................................................................................................................... - 40 -  Faxes .................................................................................................................................................... - 40 -  E-Mail .................................................................................................................................................. - 41 -  Mail Matters ........................................................................................................................................... - 42 - 

MOSCOW GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................... - 45 - Moscow- The Capital of Russia ............................................................................................................. - 45 -  Moscow History ...................................................................................................................................... - 45 -  Moscow Weather .................................................................................................................................... - 46 -  Moscow Time .......................................................................................................................................... - 46 -  Shopping in Moscow............................................................................................................................... - 46 -  Food Stores .......................................................................................................................................... - 46 -  Moscow Markets ................................................................................................................................. - 47 - 

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Other Stores ......................................................................................................................................... - 47 - Restaurants........................................................................................................................................... - 47 -  Bookstores ............................................................................................................................................... - 48 -  Recommended Reading.......................................................................................................................... - 48 -  Pet care .................................................................................................................................................... - 49 -  Kennels ................................................................................................................................................ - 49 -  Veterinary Clinics ................................................................................................................................ - 49 -  Pet Food ............................................................................................................................................... - 50 -  Going out with the Kids ......................................................................................................................... - 51 -  Kids in Moscow ................................................................................................................................... - 51 -  Fun Places to See ................................................................................................................................. - 51 -  Kid Friendly Restaurants ..................................................................................................................... - 51 -  Russia Links ............................................................................................................................................ - 54 -  Internet ................................................................................................................................................. - 54 -  Embassy Web Sites.............................................................................................................................. - 54 -  Conversion .............................................................................................................................................. - 56 -  Russian Language................................................................................................................................... - 56 - 

APPENDIX A COST OF LIVING ................................................................. - 57 -  APPENDIX B  MOSCOW METRO MAP ...................................................... - 59 -  APPENDIX C MIGRATION CARD SAMPLE ............................................... - 60 -  APPENDIX D. RUSSIAN ALPHABET (CYRILLIC) ...................................... - 61 - 

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Introduction This “Faculty Orientation Handbook� is intended to be a starting point for the preparations of your move to Moscow, and as is by no means an exhaustive reference guide. The first part of this document is focused on the Anglo-American School of Moscow, the second part emphasizes your preparations for the move to Moscow, and the last section will focus on living in Moscow. Updates and revisions to this handbook will be posted via the AAS email system and on the new hire website. You may find this document helpful even after your move and we advise you to keep it in an accessible location. The Anglo-American School welcomes you to Moscow!

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HISTORY The Anglo-American School of Moscow was founded in 1949. The school is an independent, non-profit, coeducational day school for the children of the American, British and Canadian diplomats in Moscow, and for all other diplomatic and business community families who want an English-language international education. MISSION AAS empowers each student to   

Respect self and others Love learning, and Contribute as a globally aware citizen

in order to achieve individual academic and holistic excellence. VISION We inspire student learning…    

Through a dynamic and caring environment With innovative and effective instructional strategies In collaborative relationships and By using the current, relevant technologies, and the rich resources of our diverse community.

CORE VALUES Core values are the essential and enduring tenets of AAS - the small set of guiding principles that have a profound impact on how everyone at AAS thinks and acts. They are the soul of AAS - the values that guide all actions. AAS believes equally in the value of        

Making decisions based on the students’ best interests. Developing the whole child. Supporting student success through community partnerships. Delivering a challenging and inquiry-based curriculum in an engaging manner. Reviewing curriculum via a reflective and dynamic process. Respecting self and others. Providing an emotionally and physically safe environment where people want to come each day. Providing students an international perspective in order to prepare them for future challenges and contributions. --8--


AAS Organization THE AAS SCHOOL BOARD The Anglo-American School Board consists of two voting members appointed by the American Chief of Mission; two voting members appointed by the British Chief of Mission; one voting member appointed by the Canadian Chief of Mission; one to three voting members elected by the Board (at least one of these must be a national of a country not represented by an appointed member of the Board) and one voting member, elected by the Board, from nominations forwarded by the parents' and teachers' organization (School Charter 1992). In addition to the School Charter, there is a comprehensive set of by-laws governing the arrangements and operation of the Board. BOARD POLICY The complete Board Policy Manual is located on the school website in the ‘download center.’ Board Policy is reviewed and updated on a routine basis. FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION The director of the school is an American educator whose guidance of the school reflects an awareness of the broad academic requirements of the state and independent elementary, middle and high schools in the countries of the governing embassies. The director is assisted by an administrative team. Principals manage the day-to-day operation of each division. The faculty consists of qualified teachers recruited primarily in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, and from among the resident American, British, Canadian and other communities in Moscow (Charter 1992). SUPPORT STAFF Over 150 support staff contribute to the daily operations of the school. Type of Support Staff Teaching Assistants

Security Guards Office Staff Drivers School Maintenance IT Apartment Maintenance Aquatics Health Office

Number of Employees 43

42 36 9 9 6 5 5 2

Notes Grade

# of Assistants per Classroom

PreK3

2

PreK – Grade 1 Grade 2 – Grade 5

1 0.5 (1 shared between 2 classes)

Swim instructors / Life guards One doctor and one registered nurse

STUDENT BODY The student body comprises 1270+ students from Pre-Kindergarten(3) through grade 12, representing over 60 nations. The Elementary School consists of Pre-Kindergarten(3) through grade five. The Middle School includes grades six through eight. The High

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School includes grades nine through twelve. ACCREDITING BODIES AAS is accredited by Council of International Schools (CIS), New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO).

Facilities A purpose-built campus, located between a forest and a canal, was opened in August 2000. Instruction is extended through access to the Internet throughout the School. Facilities include 4 computer laboratories, 8 science laboratories, 5 art rooms, 6 music rooms, 2 black box theaters, 2 extensive libraries, 3 large gymnasia, 3 playing fields and 3 tennis courts, 2 dining rooms (one equipped with a stage), an aerobics/dance studio, 2 exercise rooms and a large recess space where an ice rink is set up in the winter. A multi-purpose auditorium/theater for 629 people and a 25 meter L-shaped swimming pool opened in the fall of 2007.

The Schools Elementary School The Elementary School is a place to discover and learn that excitement and education are inseparable partners. At AAS we strive to challenge our students’ natural intellectual curiosity and enthusiasm for learning. We encourage our students to share their individual passions, while being open to the interests and experiences of others. In the Elementary School, we follow the International Baccalaureate Organization Primary Years Program (PYP), which is designed for students between the ages of 3 and 12 years. It is an international, trans-disciplinary program designed to foster the development of the whole child: academic, social, physical, emotional and cultural. Students in the Elementary School follow a balanced curriculum that ensures a solid grounding in the basic skills of language arts, science, mathematics and social studies, while fostering enjoyment and participation in the arts, promoting active and healthy lifestyles and developing thoughtful young people. Elementary School also includes foreign language, computer skills, art, music and physical education. Six trans-disciplinary themes provide the framework for the exploration of knowledge through structured inquiry. Our students explore subject areas through these themes, often in ways that transcend conventional subject boundaries. In the process, they develop an understanding of important concepts, acquire essential skills, develop particular attitudes and learn to take socially responsible action. Middle School The Middle School is a time of transition and transformation. To assist students in successfully crossing the bridge from childhood to young adulthood, the Middle School offers a wide range of exploratory and experiential opportunities, both social and academic. AAS provides a wide range of inclusive activities that encourage student involvement in the life and conditions of the school, and at the same time foster personal responsibility. The Middle School is committed to the international community at large, placing value on cross-cultural experiences and promoting respect for all individuals. Its program is designed to provide the best environment and opportunities for students to

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identify their own areas of success, to increase their competencies and to continue to define who they are, what they are capable of and what role they see themselves playing in a global society. The Middle School curriculum ensures a solid grounding in the basic skills of English language, science, mathematics and social studies. World language (Russian, Spanish or French is offered), computer skills, art, music, drama and physical education also are included. Additionally, the school attempts to take full advantage of the rich cultural offerings of Moscow and its environs. High School The High School program opens a door to the world, while preparing students for university. High School students follow a clearly defined, integrated curriculum that relies on an effective use of technology to equip students to face the challenges of living, working and learning in the new millennium. The High School believes a safe, supportive environment continues to be essential to developing the sense of well being and personal responsibility that is critical to successful learning. The expansion of problem solving, critical thinking and analytical skills empowers students to deal with an increasingly complex, interdependent world. The High School recognizes that global citizenship, tolerance and empathy are best learned in an international school setting and strongly encourage active involvement in activities and relationships that promote the appreciation of diverse backgrounds and cultures. The High School strives to meet the needs of the student population within an international environment and to provide artistic, athletic, service and multicultural opportunities leading to lifelong learning. In addition to meeting the AAS High School Diploma requirements, students are offered the opportunity to earn an International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Because AAS follows the IB curriculum in Grades 11 and 12, students can choose to take external exams in one or more subjects at the end of grade 12. For more information on the International Baccalaureate program, go to www.ibo.org Counselors offer college and career guidance, as well as academic and personal counseling.

Professional Development AAS encourages teachers to develop new skills and to keep abreast of developments in their field. AAS allocates $1500 per annum to each teacher, to be used to pursue graduate studies and attend educational conferences and seminars that have direct correlation to their specific assignment(s). After two years of full-time service at AAS, an AAS faculty member is eligible to apply for a Professional Development Grant.

School Calendar The School year at AAS consists of 188 school days. There are 188 faculty contract days and 180 student-contact days. Some positions with stipends may stipulate additional days. The school calendar is adopted by the Board on a two-year cycle. The school calendars for the next two years can be found on the school’s website at www.aas.ru and on the new hire web site.

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School Hours Teachers at AAS are contracted to be present and prepared for work from 8:00 am until 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, in addition to actively participating in required meetings and activities. All grades have a late start time for students on Wednesdays. Classes begin at 9:15 am to allow faculty time for planning and collaboration from 8:00 – 9:10.

Housing Arrangements The school provides furnished housing, through the sponsoring embassies, to all Overseas Hires. These apartments are located in official diplomatic apartment buildings offered through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This does not mean that the housing always corresponds with the sponsoring embassy. If you are sponsored by the British Embassy you may well be living in an apartment sponsored by the American or Canadian Embassy. You will find more information about the school’s housing, the areas where the accommodation is located etc. in the section of this handbook on “Living in Moscow.” Details and policies about housing are contained in the Housing Policies and Procedures handbook, located on the new hire web site, download center section. The password for this section is given to you upon hiring. Updated yearly, it will be available electronically on the First Class network and a hard copy will be in your apartment upon arrival.

Faculty Dress Code In general, it is expected that the staff will dress in a professional manner. It is understood however, that at times it may be necessary to alter one's normal professional dress due to requirements dictated by student activities or weather. The guideline is “Smart Casual.” Jeans are not considered to be professional dress. Dress code during orientation week is relaxed and jeans or shorts are OK.

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Preparations for your move to Moscow Once you have signed a contract with AAS, it is time to start your preparations for a move to Moscow. Where to find Information When you sign a binding letter of intent with AAS you will be given the password to our new hire web site. The new hire web site includes very important information, forms and materials necessary for your review and attention. Some of the contents are listed below.          

An Overview of AAS: Power Point Presentations and videos This Orientation Handbook Curriculum Documents Salary Scales & Benefits Handbooks: Faculty, Professional Development, Housing Housing slide shows and videos Instructions for installing and using our email program “First Class” Medical check-up form Medical insurance application form Direct deposit form

First Contact The Human Resources Director will contact you initially using the email address or contact information you provided upon hiring. In May, an AAS email account will be established in your name. The school currently uses an email system called First Class. The IT department will create a First Class account for you that allows you to access the school wide e-mailing and calendaring system. Your e-mail address will be firstname.lastname@aas.ru

Travel Documents/Passports All non-Russian nationals traveling to Moscow must have a visa for entry to the country and for exit of the country. The visa process may take between six - ten weeks, during which time you will be without your passport, which may impact your summer travel plans, depending on various factors. Faculty are required to obtain passports, visas and any other documents necessary for entry into Russia. Human Resources will assist you in this process. Please ensure that your passport is valid for 2 or more years from August 2012, before submitting it for your visa. If your passport will expire before August, 2014, please contact hr@aas.ru. If you do not currently hold a passport, you must immediately apply for one using EXPEDITED services. Obtaining or renewing a U.S. passport can take several months, UK and Canadian processing times vary. Soon after signing your letter of intent, Human Resources will provide you with a visa Application Packet containing all relevant information and procedures for obtaining your

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visa. Instructions differ for US, UK and Canadian citizens. The visa application packets and the instructions will also be published in the First Class folder for New Hires and are located on the new hire web site. Please be aware that the visa instructions published on Russian consulate or tourist agency websites may not correspond with the visa instructions we have provided to you. You should follow the instructions supplied by AAS. If in doubt, you can contact Erica Holt Fursova, the Human Resources Director, at hr@aas.ru. You can obtain additional information about your sponsoring embassies in Moscow, using the following contact details: Embassy of the United States: http://moscow.usembassy.gov/ Embassy of Great Britain: http://ukinrussia.fco.gov.uk/en Embassy of Canada: http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/canadaeuropa/russia/menu-en.asp Upon arrival to Moscow you will complete a migration card. If arriving at SVO airport, you complete the form. It is automatically generated for you if arriving at DME airport. This small white card is stamped by an immigration officer. One part is taken by the immigration officer at your point of entry. You will need to keep the second part with your passport at all times, and hand it in to the immigration officer when you leave the country again. A sample of the migration card can be found in Appendix C.

Other Documentation Included on the new hire website, and in the First Class system, you will find the following forms: 1. Medical Form for Physical Exam (required for employee + any embassysponsored adult dependent) 2. Direct Deposit form – which is essential for timely payment of your first salary 3. Medical Insurance form- insurance will be effective August 1, 2012 only if your form is completed and returned in a timely manner. Please complete and return these forms (submission by email is preferred) prior to your arrival to Moscow. Human Resources Office The Anglo-American School c/o The American Embassy Itainen Puistotie 14 Box M Helsinki FINLAND 00140 Email: hr@aas.ru

Airline Tickets The school will provide you (and any authorized dependents) with a one-way economy class ticket from your “Home of Record” (HOR) to Moscow. Tickets will be purchased with the least number of stops available, and sometimes round-trip tickets are purchased if that option is more economical. We will purchase the ticket(s) and mail them to you or provide e-ticket(s).

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If you wish to depart from a city other than your designated home of record, the school will make the necessary arrangements, and you will be responsible for paying the difference if the fare is higher. Multiple-destination tickets and extended layovers to include summer holiday plans are not permitted. Credit or payment is not given if departing from a city other than the HOR and the fare is less expensive than from the HOR. Please notify the AAS Human Resources Director as soon as possible if you plan to depart from a city other than your home of record/departure city as stated on your Personal Information Form. You can email at hr@aas.ru or fax this information to +7 (495) 231-4475.

Packing & Shipping Your personal possessions are an important part of your world when you arrive in Moscow. To the packer they represent yet one more shipment; to you they make adjusting to life in Moscow easier. You should ensure that all items are properly inventoried, packed, and signed off, as no one else will have the same motivation as you. AAS contracts with an international moving company, Corstjens, www.corstjens.com. The contracted moving company may use subcontractors depending on the point of origination of your shipment. However, these subcontractors are not always able to answer your detailed questions; Corstjens will be responsible for your shipment at all times during the move. You must work through the company contracted by AAS. The school arranges for shipping and does not reimburse teachers directly. Your contract will specify an allowance of cubic meters to ship. The school pays for the cost of shipping this cubic meter allowance from your home of record. If the shipment exceeds the cubic meters and/or if the shipment originates form a location other than your home of record and is more expensive, you are responsible for any additional costs. Faculty are charged any shipping costs in excess of those provided by AAS’ shipment allowance. HR will communicate with you well in advance should your shipment be over the contracted allowance. Please check your contract for the appropriate shipping allowance. One cubic meter (1m³) is approximately equal to 100 kg or 221 lb. Local shipping agents in the USA often refer to the shipment weight for allowances, however, you are allowed a shipment maximum based on cubic meters, regardless of weight. To avoid any confusion regarding your shipping allowances, please contact hr@aas.ru if you have any questions before your shipment is packed. We recommend you follow the advice listed below to avoid unexpected charges: 

The packers will pack everything for you. If you pre-pack, you may find that they repack your goods anyway. Talk to the packers in advance. In planning what to take, make allowances for the considerable bulk added by packing materials and wooden crates. As they pack, the packers will make basic notes as to what is in the carton or box, but you should take more detailed notes, and possibly digital photographs if you are bringing valuable items/furniture (this is not recommended).

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The school will pay an insurance premium in accordance with your contract. To ensure that the cost of your insurance premium will be covered by the School, confirm the cost being charged with the moving company. You may, however, choose to increase your insurance premium at your own expense. Be certain that you understand the system to avoid misunderstanding. It is advised that you obtain a written agreement and read the fine print. You MUST complete your shipping insurance form before your shipment leaves or your belongings will not be insured.

If you are bringing a valuable antique or a similar precious item, or items of cultural value you need to make special arrangements to insure and pack them. It is advisable to take pictures of any such items before they are packed, to prove that they were already in your possession before your move to Russia. AAS recommends that you leave such items behind at your home of record. Russian Customs has very strict regulations on items of cultural value.

Packing food items – some Russian Customs regulations are shown below:  Restrictions: o Max of two liters of alcohol allowed for export / import without paying duty o Tobacco – max of 50 cigar/200 cigarettes allowed for export / import without paying duty 

Prohibitions: o Food, medicine, detergents, jewelries (allowed for transportation In hand carry only), weapons of all descriptions, ammunition, o Explosives, drug and psychotropic substances, poisonous and o Powerful medicines and substances, radioactive materials etc. Are Not allowed to be shipped as unaccompanied luggage (both export/import)

Please keep in mind that Russian customs regulations are subject to frequent change. Corstjens will keep you updated about such changes. Do not hesitate to contact Corstjens for any additional information. This customs information is only a guideline. Corstjens is not liable for any changes made to customs laws which are not mentioned on this document. If you need clarification on any questions, instruct the packers to communicate with the overseas contractor listed in your shipping instructions. Get all answers in writing and put them in your folder. Please feel free to contact the moving company directly, or AAS Human Resources hr@aas.ru with your questions.

What to Bring/What to Leave Behind Household Necessities Your apartment is furnished (beds, couches, chairs, tables, shelves, mirrors, major appliances (refrigerator, washer, dryer, microwave, stove) etc. but not stocked with all of the household items you will need. We recommend leaving most of your furniture at your home of record. Some building entryways, stairwells and elevators may not be able

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to accommodate extra-large or over-size furniture. Please email hr@aas.ru or contact the housing committee chairperson before including oversized furniture in your shipment. You will have window coverings (usually blinds) in the bedrooms only. AAS does provide a welcome kit which includes the basic minimum items to hold you over until your shipment arrives. For a visual, please see the new hire web site for a photograph of the welcome kit items. Items include: BEDDING: sheets pillowcases pillows blankets \ comforters TOWELS: bath towels hand towels tea towel COOKWARE: saucepans frying pan kettle dinner plates salad plates cereal bowls mugs glasses

CUTLERY: spoons forks knives tea spoons bread knife vegetable knife wooden spoon can opener cork screw OTHER: pot holders clothes hangers vegetable peeler cutting board ladles garbage bin salt & pepper shakers

Most people ship their kitchen and household goods, but now almost all items can be purchased. There are several IKEA ® stores1, and the prices are generally comparable or just slightly more than stores in North America and the U.K. There is also a "big box" home supply store chain called OBI ®2 (similar to Home Depot) that carries tools and household items. Appliance stores for TV’s, electronics, small appliances, and phones are numerous3. You may want to bring your ironing board. Ironing boards are available here but can be expensive. Minimal linens and the like are provided by AAS, and you can buy more for a reasonable price at one of the several local stores like IKEA, although you may find them more expensive than in your home country. Therefore it may be advisable to bring bath linens, queen-size bed linens. If you are a family, please be sure to email/check the size beds that will be in your apartment. You may also want to bring pillows if you have favorites that you can’t live without, or if you like to decorate in a certain style. Shipping your personal belongings by air as unaccompanied luggage is not recommended because of the difficulties involved with customs clearance and the complicated process of retrieving unaccompanied luggage from the airport warehouse and will not be paid by AAS. Appliances are 220 volts. Unless you bring a transformer, you may simply want to buy your 220V appliances here. Most appliances are available here, although some may be difficult to find. 1

www.IKEA.com www.obi.ru 3 www.mvideo.ru or http://www.tehnosila.ru/ (in Russian) 2

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See http://appliances.safeshopper.com/index.htm?966) as one possible source of 220V appliances in the United States. 

Ovens are gas ovens and you may want to bring an oven thermometer to help you when cooking. Ovens and refrigerators are smaller than in North America.

Basic Necessities  

   

spare passport size photos (for visas when you travel, for your work card (kartochka), embassy cards, etc.- bring at least 10) prescription medications (a year's supply) – You can contact the medical clinics in Moscow before you leave to see if they have what you need. Note that some people have to pay a “co-pay” in their country, and here there is no co-pay4. If you plan ahead with your doctor/pharmacist, once your AETNA insurance policy takes effect (generally August 1 if you provide the documents to AAS in a timely manner), you can get a years’ supply before you leave for Moscow. See the insurance section of this document for additional medical information. ATM cards - more than one is helpful - the school has two ATM machines (one is a Citibank, and the other is ABM Amro bank). They both disperse USD$ and Russian Rubles. Personal checks/cheques (helpful for those who have memberships at the U.S. embassy). Personal checks/cheques can, in some circumstances and emergencies, be cashed by the school At least one credit card (Mastercard or Visa) and debit card. American Express is also accepted in someplaces. International driver's license (if you are American, the U.S. Embassy facilitates getting a Russian driver's license. You will only need your state license to get this.) Camera travel books - the library has a great collection of travel books - (a Lonely Planet Moscow and a Lonely Planet Russia/Belarus are good to have at home – get the newest edition(s) transformer(s) and adaptor(s) (if you are bringing appliances/gadgets that aren’t 220V) Irons, alarm clocks and appliances that generate a lot of heat are not good with transformers. You can get transformers at local stores but it may be easier to find them before coming. We recommend bringing several. European Plug shape: This website may also be helpful: www.enjoy-europe.com/hte/chap11/electric.htm a car seat, and a stroller for your infant/toddler. Quality varies and care seats can be expensive here. There is a huge variety of strollers and prams in Moscow, although expensive ($100-$500).

4

To contact one of the pharmacies, email Svetlana Shikunova, Chief pharmacist , International SOS Clinic, svetlana.shikunova@internationalsos.com

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Clothing Necessities Several large, western-type shopping malls5 have opened in Moscow in the past three years. Western style clothing is available in Moscow6 in all sizes and all qualities. Prices, however, tend to be higher than in North America or the U.K., so most staff members prefer to purchase essentials in their home country. You might want to bring:   

       

adequate socks, underwear, underwear, bras, stockings rain gear warm winter (down) coat or Gore Tex and a fleece (you will want a long down one, or a sheepskin one. You can buy both here, but they may be cheaper where you live. Garments should be suitable for temperatures which can drop below -30C. Suppliers to consider are LL Bean, REI, Land’s End, MEC, etc. snow pants good winter boots (non-skid, lined and waterproof) thermal undergarments (only needed for extended outdoors hikes/activities) gloves, hats, mittens, scarves good walking shoes a semi-formal outfit (for formal or a special events) Semi-formal wear is very expensive in Moscow. summer clothes slippers

* It is generally warm in the school and can be very warm in the apartments. Clothes For Children 

     

ice skates (required for winter PE classes up to Grade 10 (for younger children boottype skates). Skates are easily available here, reasonably priced, and the AAS PTO holds a “skate swap/sale” yearly snow boots snowsuit or jacket and snow pants (needed by end of October) indoor shoes (indoor/outdoor policy at school requires 2 pairs in warmer season) warm tights and thermal underwear hat, mitts/gloves and scarves (bring extras as kids often misplace them) black shorts for PE (PE shirts and shorts, as well as sweat pants, are available for sale in the PTO shop) *mark your child’s name in their outer clothing

Other Clothing & Special Items You may want to include the following in your shipment, but you can also buy them here: skates and cross-country skis (they sell the boot type here, and they are readily available and reasonably priced) 

roller blades & safety gear

5

http://www.megamall.ru/mega2/en/ or www.stockmann.ru/portal/english/department_stores or http://www.europeyskiy.ru/ 6 http://www.sportmaster.ru/files/pdf_aw07/AktivOtdix_wear.pdf or http://www.arp.ru/about.html or http://www.metro-cc.ru/index.jsp;jsessionid=68433988AC2A7F4778D2E7134C134EB5?lng=en

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       

a bicycle & helmet (the helmet is not compulsory, but a good idea, and not always easy to get in Moscow) cross country skis clothes hangers (you can get them here but they aren’t always cheap) a toolbox SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) light. Moscow is dark from late November to January. (and light from May to September!) Vitamins, especially vitamin D (St. John’s Wort is great for dealing with a shortage of light in the winter) fabric softener sheets good quality Ziploc bags (various sizes)

Electronics Multi-system televisions and DVDs are available, videos you buy here may not work in an American player. Multi-system TVs and DVDs are cheaper to buy here. Russia is on a different system from the US, Canada and Great Britain. DVDs, plasma televisions and all of the latest electronics are widely available in Russia. Multi-system/region-code free DVD players are readily available for purchase. If you are used to slow cookers and crock pots you may want to bring them, since they are not widely available. Many people find an oven thermometer is good to bring as the ovens in the apartments are gas-ovens. The school recommends against bringing 110 volt appliances, even though some may work through transformers. Do not bring a plug in alarm clock, since they do not work through transformers. There are a few “appliances markets” in and around Moscow, the most famous of which is Gorbushka, where you can get all these things from a variety of manufacturers. The school will organize shopping trips during your first week in Moscow. Leave Behind   

110 volt Hair dryer & appliances Electric Clock radios/alarm clocks (you may want to bring a battery operated one or purchase a 220 volt in advance Iron

Don’t pack the following items, unless you are particular or already have items you love. These are all available in Moscow.  

Wastebaskets Space saving items/stackable containers

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What to bring in your luggage? Once you receive your airline ticket, faculty are responsible for checking with the airlines and knowing the current baggage requirements, limitations and restrictions. Baggage limits and requirements vary by airline, country, and are frequently updated or changed.

HAND LUGGAGE OR CARRY-ON LUGGAGE 

Passport and visa for all family members moving to Moscow

At least six (6) spare passport size photos for each family member

Special medications – if you or anyone in your family needs them, and a copy of prescriptions to be filled.

Currency: around $500 (in US currency) per adult, maximum, remember you will also be receiving a substantial settling in allowance in cash. Bills need to be new or almost. However, many establishments take credit cards and ATM machines are plentiful. There are even ATMs in the school. Dollars are easily converted into rubles upon arrival, at the airport and in the many “obmen valuti” (exchange offices) in the city. US Dollars are used on the American Embassy compound.

Electronics such as cameras, laptops, ipod

ATM Card. It is absolutely necessary to have at least one ATM card, and preferably two not linked accounts. Please make sure that you check with your bank whether your ATM card will work in Russia. The school’s ATM works on the MasterCard or Cirrus network.

US Citizens are advised to bring a supply of checks for Embassy Services, the commissary etc.

A MasterCard or Visa is recommended because of their wide acceptance. However, be advised that statements arrive late as our mail is slow. AAS recommends setting up online banking service to pay bills. Do this ahead of time and update it regularly.

Jewelry

At least a few days’ supply of clothes for each family member should your luggage not arrive on the same flight. It is unusual, but luggage has arrived two days to one week late for the unlucky new hire. Include a sweater/windbreaker, but also short sleeves, as August can be hot or cool… the weather is unpredictable!

Customs Declarations: Rare or expensive jewelry, antiques and art works carried with you into Russia must be declared. You will receive a declaration form in the plane before arrival and must go through the red Customs line and have this form stamped. This is uncommon, however. Upon entry to the Russian Federation all foreign currency over $3,000 must be declared. AAS recommends against carrying large amounts of cash. Violations of currency rules are serious offences under Russian law.

Basic list of contents of your checked luggage and a copy of your shipment inventory (or scan and email these to yourself)

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A valid driver's license or an international driver's license (if possible). It is advisable to obtain a Russian driver’s license if you wish to drive. Your Embassy may provide assistance in obtaining one.

CHECKED LUGGAGE 

Call your airline to determine your baggage allowance. AAS does not pay for extra baggage charges.

It is advisable to bring or email yourself a detailed inventory of the contents of each shipment for checking your shipment when it arrives. Take digital photos to boost your memory.

Sufficient clothing through October. Sea freight usually takes 6 to 10 weeks after your pack out date, but unusual delays of up to 4 months have been experienced (rare, this hasn’t occurred for several years). Therefore sufficient clothing, suitable for cold weather, should be brought in the accompanied luggage to prepare for that possibility. Pack an emergency supply with you in your hand luggage in case your suitcase should fail to arrive on the same plane. It will be helpful to pack one “good” outfit for Parent Open House and evening wear for the fall social events you may wish to attend.

You may wish to pack specialized teaching materials, but the variety and quality of resources available to you often makes this unnecessary. If you are in doubt, ask the new teacher orientation team or your mentor first- we import many school supplies and resources from the U.S. and U.K.

The Middle School and High School have extended field trips. You may want to contact your principal to get up to date information about the timing of these trips and to inquire if you need to pack anything specifically for those trips. Notes from teachers “The key advice, in my mind is that you can get anything here for daily life but there might be a particular brand name that might be unavailable. For specific items of interest it is best they check with their orientation buddy.” “I initially found spices and herbs hard to find especially Oriental ones. Also plug adapters for using plugs form UK or North America here.” “If you layover in Europe for a few days on your way from North America, beware that baggage limits change from 1 or 2 x 23kg to 1 x 20kg and you will need to pay extra money to bring your suitcases.” “I do a lot of cooking and baking, and shipped a lot of goods that I knew would travel well and would not risk spoiling (chocolate chips, baking soda7, baking powder, cocoa,

7

Baking soda and cocoa are readily available in Moscow. Chocolate Chips are NOT, although good quality chocolate is easy to find. Baking Powder is available but can be hard to find- best to bring several cans. US Embassy sponsored faculty can purchase these products at the embassy commissary if you are an AECA member.

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sundried tomatoes, etc.). Not having access to the US commissary, I can’t always get this stuff here.

Bringing Pets Notify AAS Human Resources, hr@aas.ru right away if you plan to bring a pet. Pets must have a reserved space on the airlines and the number of animals per flight is limited. Advance planning is necessary. Pets can be brought into Russia as long as you have a certificate of good health for the animal from a vet in your home country. You must also have a letter from an authorized vet (i.e. anyone with a veterinary qualification) certified within 48 hours, calculated from your arrival time in Moscow, that the pet is fit to travel and contains no contagious diseases. Airlines have numerous restrictions on bring pets, including airport (air) temperatures at the departure and destination. (If it is extremely hot or cold, your pet can not fly on that day) The airline will determine whether the animal will travel in the passenger cabin or in the luggage compartment. You must provide information to AAS about the type of kennel you have for the pet (soft or hard), the exact dimensions of the kennel, and the combined weight of the animal together with the kennel. For more information on importing pets to Russia, please also refer to: http://www.expat.ru/s_relocation.php or http://www.moscowanimals.org/advice/import.html Check with the Russian Consulate, airline or health department to find out whether a special form or stamp is required and where to obtain them. There are no quarantine laws in Russia. As long as all documents concerning vaccines and the pet’s health are in order you should not encounter difficulties when bringing an animal into the country. You can find plenty of wonderful pets for adoption here. More information about bringing pets can be found on the Recruiting & Orientation flash drive and on the new hire web site.

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Living in Moscow Accommodation The school provides housing through the sponsoring embassies, to all Overseas Hires (OSH) in buildings operated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The three main locations in Moscow for the apartments are: 1. Gruzinsky Pereulok “Gruz” 2. Rublovskoye Shosse “Ruby” 3. Kutuzovsky Prospekt “Kutz” The school strives to be consistent. Your personal style and tastes are not factors in furnishing the apartments or in the decision about which apartment will be your home away from home. Apartments vary in size and condition. AAS does its best to assign the apartments to everyone’s satisfaction, but we are limited in the availability of apartments and other constraints. The apartments are maintained by the school. The standard of furnishings in each apartment may vary somewhat, but all apartments contain furniture, carpeting or wood floors, blinds (in bedrooms only), refrigerator, stove, washer, dryer (if desired), transformers, vacuum cleaner and a microwave. Dishwashers are not provided. Every apartment has at least one queen-sized bed. Children’s beds are usually twin-sized. Due to the central radiant heating in Moscow, apartments tend to be very warm and dry in winter. The school can provide up to two humidifiers as needed. The Housing Committee was formed in 2005 and includes both faculty and administrator members. The Housing Policies and Practices handbook is located on the Orientation flash drive and on the new hire web site. The handbook also contains descriptions of each location and important information including the process for assigning new housing. The Director makes the final decision on all housing assignments. Regardless of the housing complex you are assigned, commonalities include:  Shuttle to and from school is available for a subsidized fee  Guarded access to apartments  School paid parking space for one (1) vehicle per family, based on availability  Walking access to grocery stores  Well maintained standard embassy apartments  Apartments vary in size and condition.  The apartments are maintained by the school.  Typical Russian style architecture  Western lifestyle furnishings  Décor is not provided- we provide the ‘canvas’- you decorate!

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Gruzinsky Pereulok ”Gruz” This brick building has a total of 9 floors and was constructed in the 1960’s. Apartments Below are some pictures from one of the apartments at Gruzinsky Pereulok. Gruzinsky is located in the city center, close to one of the main thoroughfares Tverskaya, a street leading to Red Square and lined with shops.

Bed Room

Kitchen

Living Room The apartments at Gruzinsky house some couples and families, but mostly singles due to apartment size. Nearest Metro The nearest metro station to Gruzinsky is Belorusskaya, on the Ring and green lines. It is about a five to ten minutes walk. Shopping Near metro station Belorusskaya there is a market, with fresh fruits, vegetables etc. In the neighborhood there are quite a lot of “Produktis” (small stores where basic goods are sold), kiosks (very small stands on the sidewalk where drinks and some basic foods are sold), and there are two modern and well stocked supermarkets. Restaurants There are a number of good restaurants and cafes near Belorusskaya/Gruzinsky, especially at the square in front of Belorusskaya Station. Among others there are Yakitoria (Japanese), a Chinese restaurant called Silk, an Italian restaurant/pizzeria Il Patio, and German restaurant Vremya Est. There is also an American style diner called The Starlight Diner within walking distance.

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Rublovskoye Shosse “Ruby” This concrete-panel (very typical in Moscow) building has a total of 17 floors and was constructed in the 1960’s. We do not have apartments on the first floor here. Due to the size of the apartments at Ruby, we only house families at this location. Apartments Below are some pictures from one of the apartments at Rublovskoye shosse. They are close to a lovely park. Families living here use their car or the school sponsored shuttle to get to school. Most families living here own a car.

Kitchen

Living Room

Bed Room Nearest Metro The nearest metro to Rublovsky is Molodyozhnaya. Teachers may also use metro Kuntsevskaya. Both of these metro stations are a fifteen minute walk away. Shopping The most conveniently located supermarkets are Perekryostok, Sedmoi Continent and Auchan, but they are not really in walking distance. There are some “Produktis” and kiosks closer, where you can get basic necessities. A large mall, “Evropark” opened in 2005. The mall includes an Auchan grocery store, movie theatres, indoor kids’ entertainment center “EvroPark,” grocery stores, pharmacies, dry cleaning and more. Restaurants Il Patio is just down the road (2 km). Rosticks chicken shop, McDonalds, Saborro are all in the Ram Store complex just down the road. A Japanese and an Indian restaurant are

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located in a in new shopping complex near the metro, and there is a Georgian restaurant about 1.5km walk away.

Kutuzovsky Prospekt These brick buildings have 12 floors each and were constructed in the 1960’s. There are three separate apartment complexes at this location. Apartments Below are pictures from an apartment at Kutuzovsky Prospekt. These apartments are located near a busy street. There is an outside play area for children.

Bath Room

Living Room

Bed Room

Nearest Metro The nearest metro is Kievskaya. Three metro lines intersect here. This metro station is about a fifteen minute walk from the apartment building. Shopping Along Kutuzovsky prospect there are three supermarkets and a very complete market. A new mall, the largest inner city mall in the world, opened in 2006 near the metro station. In addition to shopping, the mall contains a bowling complex, movie theatres and restaurants. Restaurants In the neighborhood around Kutuzovsky there are a pizzeria, a sushi restaurant and several others, including a Yolki-Palki (basic Russian food at reasonable prices). Also it is quite easy to take the metro and go to one of the many restaurants in the city center and the nearest shopping mall has a food court and restaurants.

Orientation Program After your arrival in Moscow there will be an orientation program for all new teachers. One to three days after your arrival, you will be required to register with your embassy. In order to do so, please ensure that you bring the following items in your carry-on luggage: passport, visa, and 6 passport size photographs. The first week you will be taken in groups around Moscow, to several stores like IKEA, Aushan, and to several social functions to get to know your colleagues.

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The second week you will be joined by returning teachers for workshops and meetings to prepare for the opening of school as well as getting to know the school and the community. American Embassy sponsored teachers will be issued badges allowing them access to the US Embassy compound. The Orientation team will provide you with a detailed program and calendar later in the year.

Getting Around Metro, Buses, Trolleys, and Trams When traveling in Moscow you have a huge range of options if you want to use the public transport system. There are the metro, buses, trams and trains (electrichka), and the service that they provide is both efficient and cheap. All public transport runs on time (apart from the traffic delays for busses) and is very frequent – there are also very few changes to the timetable. If you have children under seven, they can travel free throughout the public transport system, although this may not be advisable during rush hour when it gets extremely crowded. The Metro This is a very reliable way to get around Moscow. You can identify a metro station by a large, red letter ‘M’ outside the station. Trains run between 05:30 and 01:00 and in order to access the system you use a magnetic ticket or a pass that you have to show as you pass through a turnstile. This ticket can be bought at all metro station ticket offices and will be priced according to the number of rides that you want to pay for in advance. Tickets are available for one, two, five, or ten rides. Passes are available for up to 60 rides/month, an unlimited number of rides pass costs about $60 for one month. One year, unlimited metro rides passes are about $200.00 As of December, 2011, one ride costs about 28 rubles, the equivalent of about $0.86. A pass for 10 rides costs approximately 280 rubles, the equivalent of about $10.00. Trains run at intervals of two to four minutes during normal times and one to two minutes during rush hours. Every station has a police post, a first-aid station and telephones both local and international. Transfer points close at 01:00, so watch the time or you might get stuck in the middle of the night. For a metro map see Appendix B Buses, Trams and Trolleys All of these are nearly as efficient as the metro. Stops can be identified by a yellow board and the letter ‘A’. It is easiest to buy tickets for buses, trams and trolleys either from metro stations or alternatively from a kiosk on the street. They have signs that say, “Specialny Proezdnye Billeti” (Специальные Проездние Билеты). It is also possible to buy tickets from the driver when boarding. The driver will announce each upcoming stop and all the fares cost the same irrespective of how far you are going. As of January, 2012one ride costs approximately35 rubles. There are no transfers and there are no return tickets – you

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have to buy separate singles from the bus/trolley/tram driver. Passes for five, ten, or twenty rides are available from special kiosks, usually located near the entrance or exits to metro stations. Buses, trams and trolleys run between 05:30 to 01:00. Monthly passes The "Unified City Transport Pass" (edinyy bilet) about $50-60/month, it is limited to 70 rides in the metro and unlimited rides for other modes of transport. If you buy an edinyy bilet once a month, you may travel on any form of transportation (i.e. electrichka trains, buses, trams, and trolleys). These are generally not costeffective, unless you plan to travel frequently around the city. Taxis These can be hailed in the street. Taxis are not always metered so the fare may have to be negotiated before you leave. Expect to pay between 100 and 500 Rubles for a journey. There are a variety of taxis in Moscow, both official and unofficial (private cars). AAS does not recommend hailing unofficial taxis. The safest thing to do is book ahead. Taxis can be ordered for a single ride, for several hours or for the whole day. Other than the usual “yellow taxi” that is best ordered as they are not common in Moscow, flagging down a taxi means flagging down any private driver willing to drive you for a fee. If you decide to go with this option, be sure keep the following in mind:    

Negotiate the fee up front. Do not enter a taxi which already contains another passenger. If it is at night, women traveling alone should consider whether there is an alternative form of transport that might be less risky. If your Russian is limited, try to have the full address of your destination written down in Russian. Moscow is a big city with many streets. Referring to the metro station nearest to you destination usually helps.

Official Taxis: Several official taxi companies operate in Moscow. English speaking taxi dispatchers are not always available. Central Taxi Service Address: Novaya Pl. 10 Tel: 927-0000, 923-8052 Taxi Blues Address: Profsoyuznaya Ul., 27, korp. 1 Tel: 128-9477/5957 Taxi Service Address: Tverskaya Ul., 3/5 Tel: 203-0247, 248-2665

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Tel: +7 (495) 03 0247 Daily 09:00-21:-00 Taxi service dispatched by radio: Watson, International Automobile Club (mezhdunarodnyy avtomobilnyy klub) Tel: +7 (495) 181 9284 or +7 (495) 181 9228 Tel: +7 (495) 928 7665 or +7 (495) 928 7666 Tel: +7 (495) 928 7660 (Dispatcher) 24 hour service, foreign cars School transportation service The school runs a free shuttle for employees to and from the closest metro station/s, currently Sokol and Aeroport. The schedule is published on the AAS web site and on the First Class email system under the “AAS News” file. An updated schedule will be provided the school year. AAS also provides a subsidized transportation service between school and the three apartment blocks. Transportation runs according to a time schedule that is established at the beginning of the school year depending on the number of subscribers. Costs for this service are shared between the teachers and the school. All information about the subsidized shuttle service will be provided at the orientation, and is also available on the First Class system, AAS Forms, under the transportation folder. Getting your own car Driver’s license You are highly recommended to obtain an international driver’s license before you leave your home country. It can be used until your Russian license is processed. Consult with your sponsoring embassy to obtain a Russian driver’s license. Be aware that the process may take several weeks. Purchasing a vehicle For overseas hire teachers, the school does not generally provide assistance with the logistics of purchasing a car if you decide one is necessary. Used cars are often available for sale by diplomats and other technical embassy staff who plan to depart Moscow. These are usually advertised on the First Class Email system under the “Staff Lounge/For Sale” folder, as well as in the embassy newsletters and bulletin boards. Please note that transferring registration when both parties are not in Moscow is very difficult, and you may not buy a car before you arrive. You must have completed passport registration process with your sponsoring embassy upon your arrival in order to register the vehicle. The passport registration process can take several weeks, depending on the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs processing times. New cars are available from various auto dealers. You must also have completed passport registration with your sponsoring embassy upon your arrival in order to purchase and register a new vehicle.

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Buying a car can be time-consuming and it is impossible to accomplish all required tasks in one day. You will work with your sponsoring embassy for insurance and registration. Expect the entire process to take several weeks, and you may need to use personal leave time to complete the process if it cannot be done outside school hours. a) Faculty may obtain an interest-free loan from the school to purchase a car. The amount borrowed can to be repaid over the period of your contract. b) Once your car has been purchased, your sponsoring embassy will help you get the new license plates, and a new technical (inspection) license. Then it is available for you to pick up. However, you should set aside a day to arrange for an insurance policy. Third-party liability insurance is obligatory when owning a car in Russia and must be purchased through a specified insurance company in Moscow. The rules for purchasing cars are different for each embassy and sometimes change. Upon arrival, please check with your Embassy’s contact person. The School provides limited assistance in recommending vehicles and dealers. You can visit a few dealers and a bilingual school driver will accompany groups of teachers. The school can make payment directly to the dealer for new vehicles. However, you must make all arrangements for delivery, registration, and insurance on your own and with your sponsoring embassy. Road Rules The official speed limit in Russia is 60 kph/37 mph in the city; 90 kph/56 mph in unpopulated areas and 120 kph/72 mph on open highways. At intersections, the vehicle on the right has the right of way. The blue and white traffic arrows over the lanes of major thoroughfares indicate turns and no-turns. Although the Russians are notorious for not wearing their seatbelts, you should as it is the law (and of course it gives you a fighting chance of surviving an auto accident!). City roads contain many unmarked hazards: pot holes, missing manhole covers, excavations and more. Between October and March, you have to drive with either ‘all season radials’ or studded tires. Russian drivers drive very fast and take incredible risks. Any expatriates on the road should always drive defensively because of this and be aware that there are many traffic cops on Moscow’s streets. You wouldn’t do it anyway, but drunk-driving is severely punished. You may not turn right on a red light. You may not turn left at most major intersections. You must drive past the intersection until you see a U-turn sign, double back and then make a right turn where you previously wanted to turn left. It takes getting used to, but becomes manageable after awhile. Usually, you may not turn left or right at an intersection unless there is a sign or traffic light indicating you may make this maneuver. Often there are green turn arrows, but even if the arrow is green you still must yield to traffic. Flashing your headlights is the accepted way of getting the attention of another driver or pedestrians. Muscovites do not use their horn very often, and drivers change lanes indiscriminately.

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If you are involved in an accident, you may not move your car until a traffic policeman arrives to take measurements and write a report. Notify the AAS Security Coordinator immediately. You must also notify your insurance company and your embassy’s motorpool section. For car repairs there are a few good known mechanics within the community. Spare parts can take longer to get for some foreign made cars (depends on the make, model and year), but are easy and plentiful for Russian and newer cars of all makes. When parking, it is advisable to stick to well lit, busy streets or paid lots to help avoid vandalism and theft. Your diplomatic apartment building has a guarded parking lot. Pedestrians’ rights are not respected in Moscow. Cars do generally not stop for pedestrians, and sometimes even drive on the sidewalk. When crossing the street it is advisable to always cross the street using the underground or above ground pedestrian bridges” perehod.” (indicated by a blue sign with a man walking down steps). Never stop and stand in the middle of the street to try and cross it, even though you will see many Russians doing this. During orientation, you will have the opportunity to “practice” different forms of transportation.

What to expect from your embassy? Faculty sponsored by the USA Embassy can join the American Embassy Community Association (AECA) for a minimal fee. An additional fee allows use of the sports facilities and pool at the embassy compound. The general membership fee allows access to the hairdresser, drycleaner, video rental, transportation office and more. The commissary – available only to American Embassy sponsored teachers - offers American products, some of which are not otherwise available in Moscow. Faculty are not allowed to purchase cigarettes or alcohol in the commissary. The AECA policies and procedures are available upon your arrival. The British Embassy allows visitors only by prior appointment or invitation. Canadian Embassy sponsored teachers can visit the Canadian Embassy, although advance notice may be necessary. The embassy has a bar and occasionally organizes social events.

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Money Matters All cash transactions conducted on the Russian economy must be in rubles. However, many stores and restaurants will accept credit cards. VISA and MasterCard are accepted in larger stores. Personal checks are unknown in the Russian economy and are never accepted by businesses in Russia. If you plan to travel outside of the Moscow metropolitan area, you should take cash with you, as ATM availability may be limited. For the most part you’ll spend cash in Moscow. You’ll obtain US Dollars from an ATM and exchange them or get Rubles from an ATM. As said, many modern stores and restaurants do except credit cards (except for tips). The school strongly recommends against the “casual” use of credit cards that is common in the States and elsewhere. There is too much fraud here to do that. Use cash except for large purchases and restrict your use of ATM machines to a few trusted locations. Your colleagues will be able to point you to them. Salary Payments All overseas hires receive their salary by wire or ACH payments, at either an American bank or a British bank. The salary will be quoted in US Dollars, but may be paid in US Dollars or Sterling regardless of passport or nationality. Salaries may be wired to Canadian or other banks accepting US Dollars or Sterling. Payments of salaries in British Pounds are calculated from the official dollar salary scale using the current exchange rate at the time of processing the salaries. Therefore the pound value of the salary will be liable to variations on a monthly basis. Your salary will be paid according to the payment schedule that will be published later in the year in the First Class Conference “Welcome to AAS”, and according to the information you provided to the Business Office on the Direct Deposit Form. Banking Advice for Canadians AAS distributes payroll by wire transfer in either US dollars or GB pounds. You must allow plenty of time and contact your bank(s) before arriving in Moscow. In some instances, it may be necessary for you to open a second, U.S. dollar account depending on your residency and other factors. You will be paid either in US dollars or Pounds sterling and your monthly salary will be send via wire transfer to the bank of your choice. An RBC Royal Embassy Checking Account is ONE of your options. It has it advantages and disadvantages. A RBC representative provided AAS with the following information: A Royal Embassy Account with RBC Centura can be opened either online or at any RBC branch in Canada. You DO NOT need to have a US address to open a Royal Embassy Account. You need to deposit an initial $100 to open the account. There is no monthly fee for the first 3 months, and thereafter, it is $3.95 US a month if your balance falls below $700 USD.

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Features of the account include: Unlimited transfers - between RBC Royal Bank and RBC Centura Deposit U.S. or Canadian dollar checks Free Embassy Style Checks Free ATM Card Unlimited check writing privileges Free online Bill payment There is a $15.00 fee for each wire transfer of your salary. You are allowed 2 free ATM withdrawals a month; additional ATM withdrawals per month are $4.00 each. From RBC Centura's Website: Do I need to be an RBC Royal Bank customer to enroll in Royal Embassy Services? Yes, this account package is designed exclusively for RBC Royal Bank customers with personal accounts. RBC Centura offers you an easy, convenient way to enjoy cross-border banking between your existing RBC Royal Bank personal account in Canada and your RBC Centura account in the U.S. What is the minimum deposit to open an account? The minimum deposit to open a Royal Embassy Checking account is $100.00. How do I know if Royal Embassy Services is right for me? Royal Embassy Services may be an ideal banking solution if you spend extended periods of time in the U.S., whether for personal, business or study purposes. It may also be suitable if you have specific U.S. based financial needs such as regular fund transfers to the States, or U.S. bill payment requirements. How can I apply for Royal Embassy Services? To apply for Royal Embassy Services, you can call 1-866-743-8545, stop by an RBC Centura Banking Center, or visit www.royalbank.com/centura for additional information. Questions? - Contact RBC Centura between 7am and 11pm (EST) 7 days a week by calling 1-800-769-2553. http://www.rbcroyalbank.com/RBC:R5jWk471JsUAK8BSgBQ/usbanking/index.html http://www.rbcroyalbank.com/RBC:R5jWk471JsUAK8BSgBQ/usbanking/contact-us.html http://www.rbccentura.com/personal/snowbirds/royalembassy.html

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Loans AAS provides overseas hired teachers with short-term interest-free loan for emergency purposes, buying a car, etc. The terms for these loans are available from the Business Office (business.office@aas.ru). Exchanging money Local exchange points (called ‘Obmens’) are conveniently located throughout Moscow and the rest of Russia. Both US Dollars and Euros are easily exchanged. ALWAYS carefully count the rubles you receive before leaving the counter. Rate of Exchange - is constantly changing; throughout 2011 and 2012 rates ranged between 27 - 33 rubles per U.S. dollar. Current rates of exchange can be found at: http://www.oanda.com/convert/classic The AAS cashier cannot exchange currencies. Obtaining Cash Dollars

 

   

Cash is readily available. ATMs are located throughout the city, although one should that dispense either dollars or rubles. Be cautious and do not use an ATM machine that is located externally on a building or on the street/in the pedestrian underground walkways. Only use ATMs located inside banks or other reputable places. Advances on American Express are obtainable from ATMs at Sberbank for a service fee. Bringing American Express Traveler’s cheques is not recommended. There are two ATMs in the school that dispenses dollars and rublesCitibank and RBS. The U.S. Embassy commissary allows checks above the amount of purchase. The embassy also has several Citibank ATMs.

Be cautious when using your ATM or credit cards and always keep your receipts and monitor your accounts/statements.

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Security Crime in Moscow For a city the size of Moscow the crime situation is not abnormal. Common sense that would apply in any large city should be used here. The acts of violence you read about are rarely random, but are targeted towards specific people. There are regular occurrences of race-related crime. The following general crime prevention measures are recommended.  Walk in well-lit areas. Avoid back streets and alleys. Be alert when using underground pedestrian walkways (be especially wary of gypsies begging). Travel with a companion, especially at night.  Carry handbags or backpacks in a secure manner. Place wallets in zippered or inside pockets.  Be wary of con artists, distractions, and diversions.  Be careful when you use ATMs, and preferably use ATMs that are located inside a bank. Avoid ATMs located on the external wall of any building including a bank.  Security briefings are provided to AAS staff with the support of the sponsoring Embassies.  AAS also employs a Security Officer, who manages the guard staff and supports the school in all security matters. Any questions you may have may be directed to: security@aas.ru. In the event of an emergency, please contact the Security Officer, 790-2677 or the AAS security hotline, 231-4489.

Militiamen In the event you are stopped or detained by militia, identify yourself as being affiliated with the embassy (US, UK, or Canadian) and show your light green “service card,” which will be issued to you by your embassy soon after arrival in Moscow or St. Petersburg. Answer reasonable questions, but do not make any admissions (i.e. - in a car accident, do not volunteer that you were at fault). Ask to be released. Do not sign anything. If they refuse to release you within a reasonable period, demand your right to telephone your embassy or the AAS Security Officer. Carry your “service card” and the embassy’s phone number with you at all times. British Embassy:

+7 495 956 7200 Outside working hours and on public holidays there is a consular emergency service +7 495 956 7298.

American Embassy: + 7 495 728 5025 After 6:00 p.m. and on public holidays +7 495 728 5025 Canadian:

+ 7-495 925-6000

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Residential Security Tips Diplomatic housing is generally very safe but one should always use common sense. Do not open your door to unidentified persons. Use the viewer. Instruct domestic help never to admit unannounced and unidentified persons. Instruct all family members not to admit service or maintenance personnel unless they are expected and well identified. The men employed by the school to repair things are totally trustworthy, have undergone background checks, and are employees of AAS. They will execute repairs during the school day, leaving you a note saying they have been in your apartment and what they have done. The school has copies of all apartment keys.

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Medical Matters Medical Check Up Before coming to Moscow, faculty and authorized adult dependents must have a thorough medical check-up. The form for the examining physician to complete is on the AAS new hire web site and is also available from Human Resources. AAS does not require a dental check-up but it may be advisable to have this done before you come to Moscow. Children who will be attending AAS as students must also have a mandatory medical form and immunization record completed. The form is available on the AAS web site in the Admissions section. Copies of optical prescriptions should be brought as well as a spare pair of eye glasses or contact lenses. Glasses and lenses are easily available in Moscow and reasonably priced. Should prescription items be required regularly, arrange to bring them or have them sent, or have copies of prescriptions with you. It is advisable to know your blood type.

Medical Insurance The Anglo-American School offers a comprehensive insurance program through to all full-time expatriate faculty and their eligible dependents (unmarried children who are under 19 years of age or under age 23 who attend school on a regular basis) who are not eligible for coverage by another employer. Coverage includes dental and vision coverage. If a teacher wishes to extend the insurance to cover a spouse or dependent who is not eligible for school paid insurance, he or she will be charged the additional cost of coverage. Coverage for employees begins on August 1st. Each employee will receive a packet and membership cards with detailed information about the plan including what is covered and how to submit a claim form. The AAS insurance program provides worldwide medical coverage. Employees may visit the medical facilities of their choice in Moscow or abroad. Several of the Moscow clinics have direct billing service. At the new hire orientation in August, you will be given detailed information about claims, deductibles and all information. In addition, our insurance brokers visit the school each fall to meet with you and answer any questions.

Medical Services in Moscow There are several modern, western-style clinics in Moscow that provide medical and dental care with English speaking doctors. The Faculty Handbook contains more information about your medical service provider choices in Moscow. When you visit the clinic(s) for the first time, you may be required to complete a guarantee form allowing the clinic to charge their credit card if the service is not paid by the insurance carrier. This is an accepted practice in Russia. Contact the HR office for more information.

Medical Evacuation - - 38 - -


Medical evacuation & emergency services are provided through the school’s insurance provider. The Director must be notified when a medical evacuation becomes a necessity. The Director, Director of Finance & Operations, or the Human Resources Manager will assist with arrangements.

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Communication Telephones Phone lines both within Moscow and outside the city are relatively efficient. At times lines are not 100% clear or there may be a few strange noises or static on the line. To make an international phone call here is the procedure: o Dial 8, wait for a dial tone and then dial 10, followed by the required country code and number. Country codes: North America is 1, UK is 44. Local calls to and from your apartment are free. Phone lines in Moscow require pulse dial. The school provides you with a phone; do not bring your own. Internet service is high-speed, broadband and provided by AAS, provided you comply with the internet use agreement and do not download excessively large files. If you want to have an answering machine or cordless phone they are easily available for purchase in Moscow. Most teachers do buy a mobile phone as well, which is recommended. Service is provided via the school to Beeline, one of the major operators in Russia, which offers AAS employees a preferred rate plan. Charges are deducted from your payroll monthly. It is possible to sign up for this subscription offered through the school at the Business presentation during the Orientation period. Mobile phones purchased in the United States may not work in Russia. You can see a sample of the variety and cost of a cell phone at: http://www.msk.beeline.ru/phones/phones.wbp. or http://market.yandex.ru/guru.xml?CMD=-RR=9,0,0,0-VIS=160-CAT_ID=160043-EXC=1PG=10&hid=91491 Phone calling cards for international calls are also available at the school. Currently the rate using these cards is 4 cents/minute to North America (landline phones) and 6 cents/minute to the U.K. You can call a “toll free” number from outside the U.S. You will hear a message stating the call is not toll free from outside the U.S. and that you will be charged international dialing rates. If you stay on the line the call will connect. Many teachers use Skype to communicate.

Faxes Staff may receive incoming faxes and use the fax to send faxes for a minimal charge which will be deducted from your payroll. There is a log book by each fax where you should log your outgoing faxes. The main fax numbers for the school are: Elementary School Middle School High School Business Office Human Resources Director’s Office

7-495-231-4472 7-495-231-4473 7-495-231-4474 7-495-728-5111 7-495-231-4475 7-495-231-4471

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E-Mail Most teachers find that emailing is the most efficient and inexpensive way to stay in touch with friends and family. You will be provided with an email address at the school. Your email address will be firstname.lastname@aas.ru Home internet service is provided free of charge8.

8

Extreme amounts of downloading will result in a charge. Specific information will be provided at Orientation.

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Mail Matters AAS Mail Services Outgoing Mail to North America  AAS sends an overnight express envelope of mail to the United States approximately once every three weeks. This envelope is opened upon arrival in the U.S. and all mail is placed into the U.S. Postal System. Staff may include letter mail up to a maximum of 2 ounces per letter. No packages or envelopes of more than 2 ounces are accepted. This mail is inspected by Russian Customs before leaving the country and prohibited items include: cash, video and cassette tapes, and CD’s. Including such items can jeopardize your fellow teachers’ mail and result in penalties to the school. 

Mail addressed to U.S. addresses should be sent using U.S. First Class stamps. Postage stamps are available for purchase in the Administrative Office from the Business Office Secretary or at the self-service mailing center (also located in the Administrative Office).

Mail to Canada can be sent by using U.S. stamps, at international rates. Rates are posted at the mailing center in the Administrative Office.

Outgoing Mail to Europe & Other Countries  Russian Postal System Faculty may use the Russian mail system for outgoing international mail to Europe, Asian and continents other than North America. AAS provides Russian stamps for purchase. Employees may choose to use the Russian Postal System for outgoing and incoming mail. Russian mail is generally reliable. Mail will be subject to customs inspection. Arrival times vary, but usually takes 2-4 weeks to North America. The school’s mailing address is Ulitisa Beregovaya 1 Moscow, Russia 125367

Embassy Sponsored Mailing Services AAS is most fortunate to have the support of all three sponsoring embassies. When it is comes to receiving mail, the three embassies continue to advocate on behalf of AAS foreign hire teachers to their specific governments to make sure that mail service exists via the embassies. Our high level of embassy-supported mail service is somewhat unique in the international school community. For all foreign hire teachers to continue to enjoy this level of service, it is critical that the privilege not be misused. Embassy sponsored mailing services are available only for over-seas hired teachers. Even though the British, Canadians, and Americans are the best of friends, that comes to an abrupt halt when it comes to sharing mail service. If you are an American, do not attempt to use the British or Canadian mail service. If you are British, do not attempt to

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use the American or Canadian mail services. If you are Canadian, do not attempt to use the American or British mail service. British Embassy Sponsored Teachers ??? Has this been changed to reflect new rules? Mail from the UK The address is: "your name," Anglo-American School of Moscow c/o CES Holdings Limited Audenshaw Manchester M34 5EX Only flat letters/cards and magazines/brochures can be sent - of any size strictly no enclosures that are not paper or card. Credit cards, cheque books, registered and recorded letters will be accepted and forwarded, but this is at your own risk Any envelope with anything inside other than paper or card will not be forwarded. This is because we will be bringing this in through a courier service. If scans reveal other contents in any of the envelopes the whole package will either be turned back at the border as it would not meet the documented description as letters/documentation, or it will all be subjected to lengthy customs examination. Mail to the UK Mail may be posted from the school administrative office, but please do not write any senders address on the back of the envelope. Any letter with a senders address on it will be returned to you to put it in a new envelope. This is because we are continuing to use the British Embassy postal services for post back to UK. Canadian Embassy Sponsored Teachers The Canadian Embassy grants Canadian overseas hire teachers use of the diplomatic bag. Only letters may be sent from Moscow. No stamps are needed for outgoing mail. Packages of restricted size, from a maximum of 4 designated sources, may be received. The weight of the packages received throughout the year must not total more than 55 kg. Magazine subscriptions are not allowed. Please do not send mail for others as this may result in loss of privileges. Before arriving in Moscow, Canadian teachers should send a letter containing the full addresses of their 4 designated sources to: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Attention: Distribution Services Section, Moscow, (SBG) P.O. Box 500 Ottawa, Ontario K1N 8T7 (This is also your Canadian mailing address for parcels)

- - 43 - -


Your address for letters is: Your name Anglo-American School P. O. Box 500 (MOSCOW) Station A Ottawa, Ontario K1N 8T7

American Embassy Sponsored Teachers American Overseas hire teachers may receive letters (business and personal) through the American Embassy in Helsinki. Packages and parcels relating to school business may also be received, please have the sender mark “Educational Materials.� Personal packages should not be sent to the Helsinki address. Once a week a truck will leave Helsinki for Moscow. It usually takes approximately 4 weeks for mail to go from the U.S. to Moscow. Sometimes longer delays do occur. Your mailing address while in Moscow is: Your Name c/o American Embassy Itainen Puistotie 14 Box M -AAS Helsinki, Finland 00140

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Moscow General Information Moscow offers a wide range of cultural and historical attractions as well as the opportunity to learn first hand about Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Moscow- The Capital of Russia "Moscow is neither Europe nor Asia: it is Russia - and it is Russia's heart." Marquis de Custine, 1839. "Maska ava", as the ancient Finnish people, the Maris, called a mother bear, may be the apocryphal origin of the name "Moscow"; but few can doubt that Moscow is the mother city of Russia. One of the world's largest cities, Moscow has more than 12 million inhabitants representing over one hundred nationalities. It is the capital of a country spanning 11 time zones. The city itself is very vast: 1035 sq km (405 sq mi). Moscow has all the advantages and disadvantages that any large city has. There is a wide variety of sports facilities, theaters, movie theaters (although not so many showing English movies), art galleries, restaurants and clubs, and shops. Public transport is very well organized and safe. Moscow is the capital of a changing society. Russia is rapidly developing ties with ‘the West’, and is a very modern place; however, there is also an enormous amount of poverty. The disparity in living circumstances of Muscovites can be quite shocking and as harsh as seen in any capital in a developing country especially because of the overwhelming presence of richness and wealth.

Moscow History The city was founded officially in 1147 by Prince Yuri the Long-Armed (Yuri Dolgoruki) the Prince of Suzdal, although there were earlier settlements dating from the 11th century. During Tatar rule, Moscow was no longer the capital. In the 15th century, Moscow became the capital of the Russian State under Ivan the Great and remained so until the beginning of the 18th century when Czar Peter the Great moved the capital to St. Petersburg. In 1918, after the Revolution, Moscow again became the capital of Russia. In 1997 Moscow celebrated its 850 anniversary. Every year “Moscow days” are celebrated with festivities and fireworks in the first weekend of September. With the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Moscow has been in a constant state of change, not only politically but also socially and economically. In the early 90’s many businesses opened their doors and the number of restaurants, bars, clubs and western shops increased significantly. The ruble crisis in 1998 caused a set back in this development but now that the economy has more or less stabilized Moscow is changing in full gear. Recent years have shown strong economic growth, and major investments by oil companies and others.

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Moscow Weather The seasons in Moscow are similar to those of most Northern Hemisphere countries across Europe and North America. Summers can experience temperatures of up to +30C (86 F), however, this lasts only for a short time. The average summer temperature is in the 20’s (70 F). Winters are generally cold. The months of November to February average temperatures ranging from 0C (32 F) to -20C (-4 F), sometimes it can hit -25 C (-13 F) or -30 C (-22F) for a short time. Temperatures are generally colder outside the city. Although the temperatures are low, Moscow experiences low humidity and therefore, it is not as unpleasant at -15C (5 F) as you may think. There are a few frosts and snowfall is generally light but accumulates throughout the winter. If you dress well, (warm boots, hat, and coat), the low temperatures are not difficult to deal with, as the internal heating in Moscow buildings is generally very warm. Long underwear is needed only when outside for long periods of time. The hardest part of the Moscow winter is that days are short and overcast, making for gray days. Much of Russia's history has been determined by its weather. It is beneficial to be mindful of the forecast.

Moscow Time +9 hours Eastern Standard Time (8:00 a.m. in D.C. is 4:00 p.m. in Moscow) +4 hours Greenwich Mean Time in winter (8:00 a.m. in London is 11:00 a.m. in Moscow in winter) +3 hours European Mean Time (8:00 a.m. in Budapest is 10:00 a.m. in Moscow)

Shopping in Moscow Remember, Moscow is a "Rubles only" town. Many department stores have a ruble exchange kiosk inside. Most western stores accept credit cards.

Food Stores Supermarkets Supermarkets have sprung up all over town. There are far too many to discuss separately, but they include German, Dutch, Swiss, French, Swedish, Italian, Turkish, and Finnish supermarkets. They carry fresh, frozen and canned fruit and vegetables, cheeses, meat, fish, dry goods and a wide range of gourmet items. Prices can be high, but so is the quality and most items are available all year long. It is a wonder to see such items as avocado, starfruit, smoked oysters, and basmati rice as everyday items in a

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grocery store. A wholesale kosher grocery store opened recently to service several new kosher restaurants. Generally you can find everything on your grocery list, but you probably will have to visit a few of the supermarkets to do so. Moscow Markets Rinok is a uniquely Russian market. There are both indoor and outdoor rinoks selling a variety of goods from individual vendors at stalls. There are several clothing markets which also sell baskets, knitted ware, souvenirs, and a variety of home-crafted goods. Rinoks are good places to purchase food items such as fruits, vegetables, honey, cheese, milk, legumes, rice, nuts, eggs, etc. Bring your own plastic bags for carrying your purchases, egg cartons and jars with lids for honey, sour cream, pickles. Rinoks are generally open daily from 0800-1800. They tend to be very crowded on weekends. Watch your handbags and keep a vigilant eye on the weighing scales as you would in any market. Rinoks are much cheaper than the joint venture markets. It is best to wash fresh produce (especially produce bought from rinoks) thoroughly. The water in Moscow is drinkable but most foreigners prefer to drink bottled water or order large bottles and dispensers from a company called Nestle, who will deliver to your apartment. A favorite rinok among the expat crowd is Izmailova (the souvenir and crafts market).

Other Stores New stores offering consumer goods, particularly electronics, hardware, and clothing (designer shops as well as brand name stores like Reebok, Nike and Benetton), are springing up daily in Moscow. In general, there are now hundreds of stores in all parts of the city. It is fun to walk in these and explore.

Restaurants There are far too many restaurants to list here. One can choose from a wide variety of cuisine- American, Chinese, Indian, Russian/Georgian or Italian cuisine. There are even a couple of companies that deliver pizza and submarine sandwiches to your home. In terms of price range, restaurants start at fast food costs of McDonalds and Pizza Hut and go to very elegant, very expensive restaurants. It is a safe bet to expect to pay double what you do in the North America when dining out. Waiters don’t rush you, so expect longer serving times in restaurants (fast food is quick). Food will be served as it is cooked and ready, so it’s not considered rude to begin eating when only your main course arrives! For good listings of restaurants see The Moscow Times: http://www.themoscowtimes.com/guides/dining/eng/ or the expat site: http://www.expat.ru/restaurantguide.php or

en.restoran.ru

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Bookstores The AAS Library has a huge selection of books, periodicals and movies. There are also PTO-sponsored book swaps each year. English Books, located at 18 Ulitsa Kuznetsky Most, Metro Teatralnaya, has a good selection of English-language fiction and nonfiction books in hardback and paperback, including guides of Russia and Moscow. Many faculty have found it useful to have a Kindle 3G. Some stores with English-language book sections are: Dom Knigi, 26 Ulitsa Novy Arbat, Metro Arbatskaya Press Point Bookstore/Park Place, 113/1 Leninsky Prospect Book Berry, 17 Nikitsky Bulvar, Metro Arbatskaya (and in Mega Mall)

Recommended Reading There are many guidebooks on Moscow and Russia in English. The most recent editions of Fodor's, Frommer's, Lonely Planet and Nagel's are good sources of information. Below is a list of interesting books one might want to look at; Among the Russians by Colin Thubron (The author traveled 10,000 in Western Russia in the 1980s. These are his impressions, presented in a well written and interesting manner. This book has gotten excellent reviews and is published in the United States under the title Where Nights Are Longest). The Russians by Hedrick Smith (Written during the Soviet times. Gives a good feeling for the Russian character) The New Russians by Hedrick Smith (Post-Communist Russia) Land of the Firebird by Suzanne Massie (Considered one of the best sources on the Russian culture.) Life in Russia by Michael Binyon Moscow, Moscow by Christopher Hope Russia; Broken Idols, Solemn Dreams by David Shipler Russka by Edward Rutherford (A fictional book covering several families from prehistoric times to the present.) Lenin’s Tomb by David Remnick(Pulitzer Prize winning book by a journalist for the Washington Post who was stationed in Russia for several years. Considered the definitive work on the fall of communism). He has recently written a sequel called Resurrection. The File on The Last Czar by Edward Radzinsky (Written by the man who discovered the bones of the Czar and his family. The author got the first access to the secret government files and personal journals on what happened to all these people. Very interesting reading.)

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Echoes of a Native Land: Two Centuries of a Russian Village by Serge Schmemann. (Recently published book by a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist for The New York Times who was stationed in Russia for many years and is of Russian descent. This book traces 200 years of the lives of the people who lived in the village where his mother’s family lived. An interesting way to see how much Russia did - and didn’t - change over the years). Cracks in the Iron Closet by David Tuller. This book is of interest for gays and lesbians. Natasha’s Dance by Orlando Figes. This book offers a cultural history of Russia, "Renowned historian Figes summons the myriad elements that formed Russian culture and held it together. Beginning in the 18th century with the building of St. Petersburg and culminating with the Soviet regime, Figes examines how writers, artists, and musicians grappled with the idea of Russia itself. "

Pet care Kennels Pet Hotel Tel: +7 (495) 377 8897 Zooservice Tel: +7 (495) 111 8115 Tel: +7 (495) 124 7135 Sonia Tel: +7 (495) 315 6860 Mukhtar Pushkinsky region (15 km from the Ring road) Tel: +7 (495) 993 5194 Veterinary Clinics Center Veterinary Clinic 11 Tsvetnoi Bulvar, Str. 1 Moscow, 103051 Tel & Fax: +7 (495) 921 6376] Western-style clinic with full facilities and shop Eurovet Tel: +7 (495) 212 4773 Western trained vets American Vet Center Animal Home Service 13 Novinskiy Bulvar Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 252 2972 24-hour house calls

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English speaking vets: Yuri & Valeria at 200-03-88 (home) or 8-2-906-25-10 (mobile) Pet Food Many brands of animal food, like Eukanuba, Science Diet, NutriMax, are available in Moscow, although it is very expensive. There is a warehouse in Southern Moscow where the food is cheaper. If you buy a lot at one time they will deliver to your home. Pet Shops are abundant. They are called Zoomagazin, and sell almost everything you could need for your pet. The best Pet shop is on Leningradsky Prospect on the way to school. Most major supermarkets like Aushan, Ramstore, METRO Cash & Carry and 7th Continent, also sell pet food of various sorts and quality. The USA Embassy Commissary also sells some brands of pet food.

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Going out with the Kids Kids in Moscow Russians love children. Don’t be surprised if a Russian grandmother (babushka) comes up to you to either admire your child, or to lecture you on not dressing him/her properly, or ask you why he isn’t wearing a hat! If you have a child with you, the Russians will send you to the head of the line, give up their seat for you on public transportation, hold doors for you and even carry or lift your stroller if necessary. They coddle and spoil their children, knowing that life here is very hard and they will have to face it soon enough. Despite spoiling their children with love, Russian children are extremely well disciplined. Taking their child out is a treat and a luxury, and their children are absolutely expected to behave in public. Russians rarely take their children out to eat in restaurants. Going to McDonalds for a happy meal is special. They do take them to the zoo, theater, museums, parks, on daily walks no matter what the weather, and to local playgrounds. There are restaurants that cater to children (as listed), but most do not. Russians generally believe that children are best left at home with a relative in the evening. There is quite a bit to do with your kids in Moscow, and the options are expanding all the time. There are children’s performances of the ballet and symphony, puppet theaters, animal theaters, museums, indoor play centers, bowling, horseback riding, parks, and the zoo. Some of the parks are wonderfully laid out for a family day of bike riding or roller blading. During the summer, it is fun to take a river cruise. In Moscow, you often have to get back to basics to entertain your children. A walk in the Botanical Gardens, or a picnic on the grounds of one of the magnificent estates around the city, for instance. The Russians, most admirably, know how to enjoy the simple things in life without always having to rely on special entertainment, equipment, computers or television.

Fun Places to See For a complete listing of children’s clubs, play centers, theaters, etc. check out the Expat’s Site Children section http://www.expat.ru/placeschild.php

Kid Friendly Restaurants If you are not in the mood for another “Big Mac,” try one of these restaurants that should please mom and dad and the little one! American Bar and Grill 2/1 1st Tverskaya Yamskaya Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 251 7999 Metro Mayakovskya Open: 24 hours Credit cards: V, MC, DC, AE] Good American and Mexican dishes that can’t fail to keep the kids happy

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The Starlite Diner Cafe 16 Bolshaya Sadovaya Ulitsa Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 290 9683 Metro Mayakovskaya Open: 24 hours Credit cards: V, MC, AE Fun American diner with an extensive menu for adult and kids The Starlite Diner Cafe 9 Korovy Val Ulitsa Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 959 8919 Metro Oktyaberskaya Open: MB: 24 hours Credit cards: V, MC, AE Fun American diner with an extensive menu for adult and kids TGI Friday’s 18/2 Tverskaya Ulitsa Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 200 3921 Metro Pushkinskaya Open: Noon to 1 am Credit cards: V, MC, DC, AE Burgers, fajitas and chicken wings, according to the familiar formula TGI Friday’s 1 Leninsky Prospekt Moscow Tel: + 7 (495) 238 3200 Metro Oktyabrskaya Open: Noon to 1 am Credit cards: V, MC, DC, AE Burgers, fajitas and chicken wings, according to the familiar formula en.restoran.ru

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Yolki-Palki 11 Novy Arbat Ulitsa Moscow Tel: +7 (495) 291 6888 Metro Arbatskaya Open: 11 am to 11 pm Credit cards: None Simple but excellent Russian food; service is good and they offer a kid’s menu - 11 locations around town

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Russia Links Internet The internet is one of the best ways to get information before and after your arrival. AAS provides broadband internet service in your apartment. The following web sites might be useful when you first arrive. Please notify hr@aas.ru if the link is no longer valid. Embassy Web Sites USA http://moscow.usembassy.gov/ http://www.state.gov/p/eur/ci/rs/

UK http://ukinrussia.fco.gov.uk/en/

Canadian http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/russia-russie/index.aspx?lang=eng&view=d

News http://www.themoscowtimes.com The Moscow Times Online (Daily English-language newspaper) http://english.mn.ru/english/ http://www.cdi.org/russia/johnson/default.cfm (Johnson’s Russia List) www.russiajournal.com/ (The Russia Journal Online ) General Information http://www.livinginmoscow.ru/ http://www.infoservices.com/moscow/index.html All kinds of information on Moscow http://www.waytorussia.net www.expat.ru Information about expatriate living in Moscow http://www.typmoscow.com/ (all the information you could possibly need) www.moscow-guide.ru (Official city tourist site) Museum, gallery, theatre, and other cultural information http://www.go-magazine.ru/ Entertainment guide

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Maps http://www.eatlas.ru/english/default.htm http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&cou ntry=RU&addtohistory=&city=moscow http://www.infoservices.com/moscow/map/ http://moscow-en.nakarte.ru/? (A Moscow city map)

http://engl.mosmetro.ru/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_Metro http://engl.mosmetro.ru/pages/page_0.php?id_page=8

Travel, Webcams http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations/europe/moscow/ (Lonely Planet Tourist Information on Moscow http://travel.yahoo.com/p/travelguide/191501791 (Yahoo travel information on Russia and Moscow) http://www.paratype.com/camera/camera.asp (web cam) http://www.moscow.orc.ru/ (web cam) http://jos.schmitz.vinden.nl/Rusland/fotosmoskou.htm (photo gallery) http://moscow.start4all.com/ (all kinds of Moscow links, gathered on one page) http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/5day.shtml?world=0058&links (BBC weather forecast) http://www.online-translator.com/translator.asp?lang=en (a translation site)

Emergency Telephone Numbers Fire Police Ambulance Emergency gas service Moscow Information Time inquiry Pharmaceutical information Crisis Center (English Speaking) International SOS 24 Hour Service

Tel: 01 Tel: 02 Tel: 03 Tel: 04 Tel: 09 Tel: 100 Tel: +7 (495) 926 0561 Tel: +7 (495) 244 3449 Tel: +7 (495) 937 6450 Tel: +7 (495) 937 6477

Road Service (Angel)

Tel: +7 (495) 747 0022 Tel: +7 (495) 747 0022

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Tel: +7 (495) 747 0020 Lost Children Lost property (Moscow Metro) Lost property (Moscow Transport) Lost documents Lost American Express cards Lost Visa, MC, Diner’s Club, JCB

Tel: +7 (495) 401 9982 Tel: +7 (495) 222 2085 Tel: +7 (495) 923 8753 Tel: +7 (495) 200 9957 Tel: +7 (495) 955 9001 Tel: +7 (495) 955 9900 Tel: +7 (495) 956 3556 Tel: +7 (495) 234 1831

Conversion Russia uses the metric system. For conversions you can go to http://www.sciencemadesimple.net/conversions.html The www.expat.ru “survival guide” section also has conversion charts for clothing sizes, common cooking units and temperature.

Russian Language One of the main challenges for foreigners in Russia is the language. It is uncommon to find Russians who speak English in Moscow. While there are a few, learning a few of the essentials can dynamically improve your experience upon arrival. AAS provides staff with the option to participate in on-site Russian language lessons, taught by a fellow AAS employee. Some of the class audio files and resources can be found here http://sharepoint.aas.ru/sites/russian/SitePages/Home.aspx In the orientation period AAS will have some flashcards prepared for you that can assist you in shopping for the basics. It is advisable to bring a phrasebook. Making the effort and taking the time to learn the Cyrillic alphabet and some basic Russian will greatly enhance your experience here. See appendix D for the Cyrillic alphabet.

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Appendix A

Cost of Living

Item Rent

Cost(s) Included in your benefits package $ 45-60/month, depending on package Free $30-$50/month

Cable service Tap water Bottled water service Electricity

Maid Nanny (full time)

Included in your benefits package Included in your benefits package Local land-line calls included/paid by AAS.International calls to Europe: $ 0.50 - $ 0.80/minute, to US $0.50 $1.70/minute Local calls range from 6 cents/minute to 20 cents/minute. Data plan available for $10-15 per month. $10/hour and up $1,000 -$1,500 /month

Driver

$1000 and up/month

Car Gasoline for car

$3000 (Russian), $4000 and up for a foreign made older diplomatic plate car $50 /week and up

Insurance for car

$350 -$500 a year

Groceries

$150 - $500 a week

Restaurants

$30 - $ 100+ per person

Gas for cooking Phone

Cell phone

Notes Housing provided by school http://ktv.ru/?newlang=english

http://www.nestle-purelife.ru/en/

Calling cards are widely available with discounted rates. (to North America land-line phones, about 5 cents/ minute). Cards are available for purchase from the AAS cashier and in kiosks throughout the city. International calls from cell phone not advised as they are very expensive!

depending on live-in or out, and additional services such as cleaning, cooking, laundry Varies widely. Many AAS students/parents have drivers, not the norm for staff. Cars must be purchased after physical arrival in Russia. Currently 29 - 35 rubles/liter, depending on grade For basic liability, depends on engine capacity of vehicle Varies dramatically according to family size, personal preference, where and how you shop. There are shops and gourmet boutiques that cater to the wealthy and expats, usually located in the center of the city, that are very expensive. There are hypermarkets that carry a huge variety of products that are reasonably priced, and “rynoks� are usually even cheaper. Some fruits, vegetables (i.e. mangos, artichokes) can be expensive out of season. Varies dramatically. Generally

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Entertainment

$30 - $100.00 + per event

Public transport

$ 20 - $ 60/month

restaurants are rated as being expensive in Moscow. Bolshoi Theater is more expensive. Unfortunately prices are increasing, but the number of events is also increasing Varies according to type of transport, frequency of ridership (monthly passes available)

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Appendix B

Moscow Metro Map

- - 59 - -


Appendix C Migration Card Sample

- - 60 - -


Appendix D. Russian Alphabet (Cyrillic)

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Orientation Handbook 2012  

New Hire Orientation Handbook 2012

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