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A A R O N

T E V E S

The Portfolio of Architecture


0 0 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T h e L i b r a r y A s c e n d 002............................................Urban Ecology 003......................................Liturgy of the Hours 004..............................................Studio North 005...........................Discovery Through Drawing 006...........................Portugal:Material Practices 0 0 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I s l a n d H o u s e s


001

THE LIBRARY ASCEND Spring 2017 The goal of this project is to imagine a vision of the 21st century Library. As students we were challenged to consider the library as more than a place of research and reference, but a “hub� of knowledge across digital and printed media, and a collective place for the assembly of education.


001 The design process began with detailed research and analysis on the site. This site played adjacent to the Providence River, in a point considered to be a threshold between three districts of Providence, the Jewelry District, College Hill, and Downtown. Colleges and universities such as Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design are expanding to include parts of their campus in new areas beyond College Hill. The placement of this library can act as a facilitator to students as they transition between parts of the city for classes, while also bringing educational opportunities for collaboration. The architecture itself is designed so that the lowest floor aligns with the grid of the downtown district the library is placed within. The top floor is aligned with College Hill across the river, placing the library as a key for turning and uniting two neighborhoods, both symbolically and literally. [ 1 ] Concept model of the twised ramps. [ 2 ] Varaitions of study models for ramps. [ 3 ] Site analysis. THE LIBRARY ASCEND

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001 Following the idea of a “twisting” structure and spatial sequence, the program was organized first off with the book stacks placed on a continuous ramp, which wraps around the main body like a ribbon. From the ramp, you can exit and enter into the core, which holds the rest of the library programs. From this ramp system, smaller and larger “nooks” are created in the negative spaces where the structure and the shelves twist and turn. These extra nooks are inhabited by individual desks and chairs for reading and studying. [ 4 ] Floor Plans.

THE LIBRARY ASCEND


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The core of the library holds all of the major spaces of the library, including a double height reading room, special collections, meeting rooms, classrooms and office spaces. The special collections books are housed in another ramping room, staggered with the main circulation ramp. The special collections stacks are visible, but protected behind windows for only library access. The top floor reading room is the center place of the library, adaptable to everyday use or special events, and is lit though a large natural skylight on the ceiling. By placing the main reading room at the top of the library, it is revealed as the final part of an experience, the highest point of the ascension in the library. [ 5 ] North Section. [ 6 ] East Section.

THE LIBRARY ASCEND


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[ 7 ] Section Model. [ 8 ] Exploded Axonemetic Diagram.

THE LIBRARY ASCEND

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URBAN ECOLOGY Fall 2017


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This project is a vision for the neighborhood of Olneyville, Providence. Olneyville, once the industrial center of Rhode Island, is a community that has fallen into decay since Rhode Island’s economy moved away from the textiles and metal smithing industry. My main goal is to reorient the community around a natural river on the site, once used to power the old mills, but this time by using natural means and ecological necessities to design artificial interventions on the site. In this project, both the ground and living spaces are equally considered, as the ecology works in parallel to the places of dwelling, while also promoting housing that can create a place for a community to thrive for generations.

[ 1 ] Site demographic study. [ 2 ] Early massing models.

URBAN ECOLOGY


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002 To make the river the most important part of the site, I first redesigned the land around the river, by pulling the earth up from the river, softening the river’s edge and creating a series of small hills on the site with the excess land (these small hills guide runoff from surrounding the site). All of the mass of earth I removed was returned to the site, simply reshaping to provide a more healthy ecology. From there, the insertion of dwellings started by considering everything I construct as a field, or forest of baring walls which placed on a grid don’t prevent the land from moving naturally, but rather hold their place as the land evolves and shapes around them. This ground strategy also distinguishes public spaces and private spaces, as housing retains to a linear grid, while public spaces take the form of circle pathways and courts carved between the hills, which signify inclusion and social spaces. In addition, these pathways guide the drainage from the housing and structures, all placed on top of the hills. [ 3 ] Ground-Level Plan.

URBAN ECOLOGY


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002 Every unit is designed with windows on both sides, promoting natural ventilation and maximizing natural lighting in the spaces. Between every set of units are shared vertical green houses. These green houses can be opened at the top to act as a chimney and ventilate the units in the summer, or can be closed up and opened to the units, using natural heat gain to help warm the units. In addition, these units are the places for the exposed tanks of the living machine, for filtering the water from the complex, and which act as a deeply integrated system. These spaces also become an ecological necessity which creates a social condition, these shared spaces build more interaction between neighbors.

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[ 4 ] Roof Plan [ 5 + 6 ] Three Bedroom Apartments (3rd and 4th floor) [ 7 ] Two Bedroom Apartments (2nd floor) [ 8 ] Studio Apartments (1st Floor) [ 9 ] Basement Plan [ 10 + 11 ] Unit Perspectives and Assembly [ 12 ] Section URBAN ECOLOGY

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003

LITURGY OF THE HOURS Fall 2016 The following is my work from The Making of Design Principles, the very first architectural studio course at RISD. This program is designed to start from the abstract and for each student to develop their own design principles as they realize an architectural space. This iteration of the course began with staying the phenomena of dropping ink into water. From this, I became interested in the spatial effect of ink as it completely consumes the water, and how light can still filter though the space creating structures of diffused light. These ideas were explored through several mediums including charcoal drawing, physical modeling, and digital computation. [ 1 ] A combination frame from a digital animation of ink study. [ 2 ] Line drawing based on ink studies.


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003 In turn, the spatial study of ink and the study of an iterative daily prayer made an excellent companionship. Though an iterative design process, the final building resulted as a spacious yet intimate building which uses elements of repetition in its structure which are adapted to continuous grain which runs down to the land. [ 3 ] Diagram, Liturgy of the Hours [ 4 ] Plan [ 5 ] Section

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003 The series of openings between the lateral pieces of the structure filter the light and cast multiple shadow conditions onto the space throughout the day, while also creating a cohesive transitions between interior and exterior spaces. [ 6 ] Diagram. [ 7 ] Site model. [ 8 ] Threshold model.

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LITURGY OF THE HOURS

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004

STUDIO NORTH Summer 2017 Studio North is a design build conducted every summer in Norwich, Vermont for ten architectural students under the guidance of award winning architects Keith Moskow and Robert Linn. For summer 2017, our group of students developed a design for a wood burning Sauna which was built on a trailer so it could be moved between the lakes and ponds in the mountains of Vermont—with the experience of the hot sauna and cold swim in mind for the user. The added benefit of constructing the Sauna on a trailer is creating minimum disturbance to the landscapes—a structure with no permanent foundation. The Sauna was completely designed and constructed by the students in the course of just one week.

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[ 1 + 3 ] Finished Sauna. [ 2 ] Sketch.

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The overall concept of the Sauna was to think of it as dark cave, with the wooden structure creating a “nest” around the sauna itself which had to have no openings to the outside. After exiting the Sauna, there is a transitionary space, which is semiopaque, a place for either changing as well as functioning as a small greenhouse. This transitionary space can also light up in the night time, giving the Sauna the nickname of the “lantern”. The structure is traditionally framed by 2x4 pine, the interior is cedar boards, and the exterior is cladded in cedar shingles. [ 4 ] Process images. [ 5 ] Exploded axonemetic diagram.

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005

D I S C OV E RY T H RO U G H D R AW I N G Spring 2017 Architectural analysis is an intense drafting course taught in the second semester of RISD’s architectural program. Every student is assigned a significant work of architecture, which must be hand drafted and digitally modeled. A process in which we completely deconstruct the work and then reassemble it, in order to build our own understanding that project’s architectural logic. The building I analyzed was the Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, University of São Paulo (FAU-USP), designed by Brazilian architects João Vilanova Artigas and Carlos Cascaldi. [ 1 ] Section oblique.


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005 Completed in 1961, the São Paulo’s School of Architecture is a significant part of the architectural history of Brazil and all of the South America. The project is completely concrete, monolithic in size, and evokes a temple like presence as one approaches the building. The interior is defined by a huge central atrium, surrounded by the studios and classroom spaces on the exterior walls. This building was the first to view the school as a place of openness, freedom, gathering, protest, and performance; something which a shared space such as this should hold. I analyzed the building as an assemblage of many parts, all working collectively with each other, and how a unified space can create a dynamic, and enriching learning environment.

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[ 2 ] Exploded axonometric [ 3 ] Interior of João Batista Vilanova Artigas’ School of Architecture and Urbanism at the University of São Paulo, 1969. [ 4 ] “Worm’s eye” detail. [ 5 ] Elemental render.

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006

ISLAND HOUSE III Fall 2014 This is the third in a series of projects from my time in the Martha’s Vineyard Regional high School Architecture department, all focusing on houses for the island. Island House III takes and contemporary approach to isalnd living, separating the living quarters with the private quarters. The construction is still sourced from traditional materials such wooden framing and cedar

shingles, but the form is long and low, and sits on small pillars above the ground. This gives the house a visual appearance of floating and lightness, while also avoiding a foundation which has a high risk of flooding in the hurricane season. The minimal profile of the home integrates it better into wide landscapes of the New England coast line, keeping an uninterrupted sense of place in the home.


007

PORTUGAL: M AT E R I A L PRACTICES Winter 2018 PART ONE: TRAVEL JOURNAL AND PHOTGRAPHY This winter, I took part in a month long study abroad course which traveled through the cities and countyside of Portugal. While traveling, my primary research concerened the social, symbolic, and infrastructural involments of nature, its influence on Architecture though the coutnry. This page is an experpt from the final book I created based on my travels and research.

SYMBOLS OF FAITH: BOM JESUS AND THE CHURC OF SANTA MARIA Nature is used in many ways to symbolically frame belief a spiritually. In the city of Braga, one of Portugal’s most frequentl is the Bom Jesus Church and grounds. Here, there is an interwo faith, nature and the sense to create a place of worship. The tem of a steep mountain. Water acts like a silk thread through this distant spots, running down the mountain the pilgrim ascend smallest of the details and reflects the sun wherever it can. The Jesus can be experienced like a narrative, which is already a com as the Catholic faith is based upon the Bible, a complicated nar Another religious project, again by Alvero Siza fram way. The Santa Maria Church de Canaveses designed by Álv elegant and symbolic way of framing nature. Its windows on are low, and therefore only align with the buildings across the site. Yet, as one sits or kneels, the windows now appear higher perfectly frame the mountains beyond the city. Its symbolic spiritual “Mountain of God” as well as a stunning visual conditio natural work and makes it part of the architecture within.


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and faith and promote ly visited pilgrimage site, oven connection between mple is built on the side s project, glimmering in ds up. It highlights the entire structure of Bom mmon thread of religion, rrative in itself. mes nature in a different varo Siza Vieira has an the sides of the church e street, a typical earthly than eye level, and thus looking up to a higher, on, and takes the outside

THE VIEW: SINTRA AND SERRALVES MUSEUM OF ART Architects find inspiration everywhere, and “the view” is something which exists in layering natures own context over itself. In other words, nature frames nature so frequently. This in turn, makes an architectural condition, often without even the most minimal involvement of constructed structures. Sintra’s green houses situated in unique places in the woods act as framing devices in duel days. The tropical plants on the interior play off the lush forests of the exteriors, yet they are in such close proximity, as a viewer it really demonstrates the natural differences between these types of species of plants and trees. Porto’s Serralves Museum of Art and its surround grounds bring Portugal’s most complex ways of viewing nature. On the grounds there are a series of recently added Pavilions, all designed by young architects which hold temporary exhibits and frame the site in unique ways. One in particular, design by depA architects, is a completely glass box placed on top of one of the many ponds on the site. Every surface is glass and the shape is incredibly geometric. The effect that happens here in relationship to nature is stunning: the mirrored box itself blends in with all the trees on the site and at first is very hard to see, but the reflection of the box in the pond catches the sky, and therefore just the reflection of the box in the pond is seen, and it appears like a sharp cut right through the natural scene.


007 PART TWO: FINAL PROJECT: TIMESCAPE A collaboration with Daphne Do (RISD, BA, furniture ‘20) This work is about human relationship with nature and material. A Padrão is a large stone cross inscribed with the coat of arms of Portugal that was placed as part of a land claim by numerous Portuguese explorers during the Age of Discovery. There has always been a part of humans with a desire to control nature, to gain power over the world, to view it in a “God-like” perspective. This installation was placed on a site in transition, an old apartment complex that has broken down and is overgrown with grasses and moss. It is no longer accessible to humans the way it used to be since a small asphalt road has been laid down next to it and the ruins of the complex building are behind a wall of stone. This site itself proves the opposite of the orginal Padrão, as here, in a dense urban environment nature has reclaimed this patch from man. The material of the Totum is cork, connecting to Portugal’s relationship with the land. Cork comes from a tree native to Portugal which is continously harvested year by year in the country. Overall, we aimed to capture the history in Portugal between man’s relationship with land through time and the ongoing struggle humankind faces in its place with nature. P O R T U G A L : M AT E R I A L P R AT I C E S


Thank


k you.

AJT | Portfolio | March 2018  
AJT | Portfolio | March 2018  
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