2020 AAMA Annual Report

Page 1

2020

ANNUAL REPORT

Making a Difference For 50 Years – One Person at a Time


AAMA (ah’ ma) noun:

A sanctuary; a place where family members, infants to elderly, go to feel safe and be supported, especially during times of crisis, such as a pandemic. AAMA’s mission is to inspire and empower Latinos to pursue their potential and achieve success. Our efforts are focused in the areas of education, workforce readiness and leadership development. For more than 50 years, AAMA has been one of the most effective organizations in the state to help Latino families to become productive contributors. With the vision, leadership and support of our founders, our Board of Directors, volunteers, and our financial contributors, AAMA has created a long history of amazing achievements. And we are building on that legacy.

At AAMA, we’re helping Latinos to be amazing, each and every day. 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS 4

OUT GOING CHA IRMA N’S M ESSA G E

5

PRESIDENT & CEO ’S MES S A G E

6

GOING A BOVE A ND BEY OND

8

AAM A’S FISCA L YEA R IN REV I EW

10

WORK A ND LEA RN CENTER

12

C E LEBRATING HA LF A CENTURY T OGETHER

1 4 EDUCATI ON 16

HEA LTH A ND WELL- B EI N G

1 8 DONORS 20

FI NA NCI A L S UM M A RY

22

COLLA B OR ATI V E PA RTN E R SH I P S

23

DI RECTORS A ND EX ECU T I V E TEA M LEA DER S HI P

3


A MESSAGE FROM

THE OUTGOING CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dear Friends of AAMA, As we at AAMA celebrate our Golden Anniversary, we recount with gratitude the events that have made our cause a success for the past 50 years. The test of time has proven that our steadfast stake holders have truly helped to “make a difference, one person at a time.” We are very thankful to many who have helped make our mission at AAMA a reality. Founded by a group of community and business leaders in 1970, AAMA primarily helped teens who were using drugs and dropping out of school. In the past five decades, AAMA grew and expanded services, while keeping true to our mission. As needs of families and our community have changed over the years, our focus evolved to meet many new challenges as well. At the close of 2020, we helped nearly 10,000 individuals make it through an unprecedented pandemic through integrated programs in four locations in Houston and Laredo. The true spirit of AAMA was evident as many families looked to our organization for support. Our endurance is largely due to generous supporters, a dedicated board of directors and our staff, who make it possible to guide young people into responsible adulthood and be better prepared for life. We approach the future with enthusiasm and dedication to our work of inspiring and empowering Latinos. During the next 50 years we will come together – no matter how great the need – and strive to serve children and families who want to improve their circumstances. Regards,

4

Juan Alonso Chairman of the Board 2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


PRESIDENT & CEO’S MESSAGE AAMA Family, What a joy it is to work with an organization such as AAMA. The year 2020 – will be one that we will never forget. I am so proud of what we have accomplished at AAMA this past year – and as tough as 2020 has been – we should all be grateful for what we have. Our AAMA mission, vision, and traditions, center on family, providing excellent services, and serving Houston’s most vulnerable. I’m grateful for our employees and the hard work and dedication they have shown during this challenging year. This year’s annual report is dedicated to celebrating 50 years at AAMA. We celebrate our humble beginnings, our founders’ vision for a better future for our young people and their families. We celebrate the many members of our board of directors who have served at AAMA over the last 50 years – all focused on getting us to this point. We celebrate our wonderful staff – that works tirelessly to make it happen – every single day! This is a critical time for AAMA, for our city, for our country and the world. As we are gripped by the novel coronavirus (covid-19) pandemic, much of our country is suffering, not only from the health crisis presented by the pandemic, but also from the economic crisis that unfolded in 2020. In our city, we have seen unprecedented unemployment escalating quickly, and the many business establishments that are temporarily or permanently shuttered. Indeed, it is a stressful time. Through everything, our performance for 2019 and 2020 was strong, especially considering the reduction in operating income attributable to the pandemic. Even so, we ended in a strong financial position for 2019 and 2020 – with an exceptionally strong liquidity position. The investments made by AAMA in our staff and operations will pay dividends for many years to come, allowing us to continue our mission and vision into the future.

As we celebrate our 50th anniversary, there is much to be thankful for – and many people to thank. Let me first thank two special groups on behalf of all of us at AAMA - the magnificent, dedicated, and fearless health care professionals who day in and day out take care of all of us. I thank them for their efforts in bringing this virus under control with testing, medications, and vaccines. And second, our appreciation and admiration goes to all the essential personnel from teachers, first responders, to bus and truck drivers, from grocery store workers to frontline communication workers – there are simply too many to list, but heroes all. And finally, I must thank our AAMAzing staff - who are true warriors! We recognize that nothing happens without the support of our chairman of the board and our AAMAzing board of directors. Our board has performed fearlessly and flawlessly during these difficult times – all aligned with our love for AAMA. They have my deepest appreciation for all their continued support. We will get through this. And, when we do, you can count on AAMA being there for all those we honorably serve. Here’s to the next 50 years! Buena Fortuna!! - Saludos

Joe Jimenez President and CEO

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GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND

HOW WE MADE IT T H R O U G H T H E PA N D E M I C

AAMA WEBSITE

AAMA received increased traffic to the website in search of more information regarding George I. Sanchez Charter School and COVID-19. To meet that demand, a new GIS District page was created in July of 2020, as well as a parent resource page to provide information to the community.

TOTAL PAGE VIEWS

September 2019-August 2020: 201,672 6K 5K 4K

June 2020, we had the highest reach of users on the website totaling 5,709.

3K 2K 1K SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

Top Performing Pages: • AAMA Front Page • Student and Parent Resourses for COVID-19 • George I. Sanchez Charter School – New District Page

6

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JULY

AUG

User Information: Majority of our users are using a desktop versus a smart device. Devices used are mostly Apple products. Traffic flow is coming from Facebook.

• Staff Resources 2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


AN OVERVIEW OF SOCIAL MEDIA STATS

FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM AND TWITTER

September 2019-August 2020

Combined Followers

5,748

17.7% Increase from 2019

Average Engagement

181

22% Increase from 2019

AUDIENCE BY AGE AND GENDER Men

28% Women

72%

Age

13-17

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65+

Women

0.4%

9%

25%

23%

9%

3%

2%

Men

0.3%

5%

11%

6%

3%

1%

1%

Languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, French Cities: Houston, Pasadena, Pearland, San Antonio, Spring, Cypress, Channelview Devices Used: Smart Phone, Smart Device, Laptop, Desktop

KEEPING THE FAITH THROUGH A NEW WAY OF DOING THINGS • Virtual Graduations • Remote Learning • Website and Social Media Engagement • Newsletters, Communications and Marketing

2020 ANN UA L R EPO R T

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AAMA FISCAL YEAR 2019-2020 IN REVIEW AAMA forged ahead in response to growing and urgent needs. Staffing patterns strategically shifted to better position the agency for the next 50 years, by adding these new positions: Executive Director of School Operations, Chief Development Officer, Assistant Director of Prevention and Counseling, Grants and Fundraising Manager, Talent Coordinator, Childcare Director, and School Nurse.

FEB

The Alley Theater’s “Quixote Nuevo” cast visits AAMA’s Early Childhood Center to read to pre-k students

8

Adelante makes a smooth transition to serve students via Zoom classes

Sanchez Charter School Seniors attend “Quixote Nuevo” courtesy of the Alley Theater

Trafigura Trading Group raises $10,000 for families with small children

2019

SE PT

Mayoral Candidates Forum

MAR

AAMA selected for Little Free Library 100,000th Celebration and received 500 books

M AY

Facebook Live – Perseverance Through the Pandemic

Sanchez Charter School students accepted into the Genesys Works program for 2020/21

Grants received from UnidosUS for voters’ registration and Census 2020 participation efforts

Facebook Live – Helping our Seniors and Comcast helping our community


OCT

Immunization Day at AAMA (partnership with Senator Sylvia Garcia)

AP R

Campaign for Chromebooks for Sanchez Students - Goal reached - 500 computers!

Starbucks Coat Drive

DEC

Trafigura Foundation visits AAMA

Senior baskets fundraiser conducted for high school graduates

JUNE

2020 METRO and AAMA sign a Memorandum of Understanding to partner together

M AY

FEB

Trafigura donates 36 laptops, 10 desktops and two workstations to our Work and Learn program

Food Distribution held at AAMA partnering with YMCA, Brighter Bites, and Houston Food Bank

Prevention and Counseling offered Telehealth through HIPAA compliant platform as well as face-to-face appointments

J ULY

J ULY/ AUG

Food Distribution and Covid Testing

Virtual and Interactive Summer Program

Facebook Live– Census ‘20

Class of 2020 Virtual Graduation

$900,000 Donation from the Trafigura Foundation

Grab and Go meals offered on both Campuses

Be a Voter Campaign

George I. Sanchez Charter School Reopening Plan Voter registration offered on AAMA’s website

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SPOTLIGHT ON WORKFORCE READINESS –

WORK AND LEARN CENTER WORK AND LEARN CENTER DATA September 2019 – August 2020

47

Students

17 Males

30 Females

89% 10%

Latino

Black

4 1 O F 4 7 ( 8 7 %) ST U DENTS A CHIEVED TA RGETED OUTCOMES :

21

students gained employment

10

8

students enrolled in post-secondary education

4

students gained paid internships

8

students worked in the Enterprise 2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


SUCCESS STORY

April Hernandez The college application process can be tedious under the best of circumstances, but when living apart from your support network and not having the assistance of the only other person in the family with any college experience can become overwhelming. April Hernandez completed the 8-week Graphic Design training program at the Work and Learn Center and learned all she could from the extra resources and support the staff provides. She secured an internship that provided extra skill development and helped build her portfolio. Work and Learn staff helped her complete her college application which later turned into an acceptance. April is now enrolled in college and working a part-time job having benefitted from the support and services of AAMA Work and Learn Center.

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CELEBRATING A HALF CENTURY TOGETHER

1990

1970

AAMA purchased Houston Office Center, the former NASA office site, on Gulf Freeway

Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans founded

1994

1973

Prevention and Counseling programs began along the Texas/ Mexico border

George I. Sanchez School after school program began

1996

1976

State Board of Education named Sanchez High School as one of the state’s first Charter Schools

Drug prevention program began

1978

Casa de Esperanza – later named Casa Phoenix – opened

1987

The AAMA Adelante program for adults created

1999

New $4.2 million Multi-purpose Educational Center opened

1970s

1980s

1990s

Watergate. The Sexual Revolution. War in Vietnam, soaring divorce rates…Earmarks of the 70’s, a time when the spirit of prior times took unpredictable turns. As social forces reached places and people as they never had before, so did the newlyformed Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans.

For Houston, the 80’s were boom times, and then created a bust. Yet, amid the “me” decade and its conspicuous consumption, AAMA found volunteers willing to give their time, energy and hearts to youngsters from families where guidance and nonjudgmental, caring support was needed. By this time, the organization had grown to serving several hundred people.

The 90s was the last decade of wandering, when you could find your way home without a cell phone or GPS. But AAMA wasn’t wandering when they took on the challenge of establishing one of the original charter schools in Texas, naming it after Dr. George I. Sanchez. With that same intentionality they also built the new multi-purpose Education Center. Houston prospered again, inspiring AAMA dreams of meeting the needs of East End youth in even more impactful ways.

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2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


GUIDING CHILDREN INTO RESPONSIBLE ADULTHOOD, TIME AFTER TIME… Since 1970, AAMA (The Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans) has been a

beacon of light and hope in Houston and Laredo, TX. And we are continuing to build on that legacy.

2009

The $5 million AAMA Learning Center opened

2015

Sanchez Charter School opened a second location in Northside Houston

2018

AAMA awarded “Good Neighbor of the Year” from East End Chamber of Commerce

2012

NCLR, now UnidosUS, named AAMA the Affiliate of the Year

2019–20

AAMA opens the Work & Learn Center for opportunity youth, with a 3-year grant from Trafigura Foundation

2018–19

AAMA Sanchez Charter School receives CREST Counseling Excellence Award two years in a row

2019

2020-21

AAMA’s Prevention & Counseling awarded SAMHSA grants, total of $4.375 million in funding for years 2019–2024

AAMA prepares for 50th Anniversary and Illumine Celebration/Celebración de Iluminación

AAMA’s volunteer program records highest engagement ever with 917 volunteers

AAMA named UnidosUS Texas Regional Affiliate of the Year

2000s

2010s

It was the decade of big storms in the Gulf and displacement across the region, followed by the biggest recession the US has known since the early 20th century. As people across the nation made the best out of a challenging economy, AAMA too demonstrated resiliency, building and opening the new AAMA Learning Center. Houston became one of the most diverse cities in the US, with that diversity reflected in our students and staff.

As social media drew individuals into their own private lives, AAMA strengthened its community connections, being named the UnidosUS ‘Affiliate of the Year’ and East End Chamber’s ‘Good Neighbor of the Year.’ It was a prosperous decade with the construction of a second Sanchez campus, and more volunteer participation than ever. When Hurricane Harvey dumped more rainfall in two days than the city sees in a year, our spirits were not drenched we were inspired to do more than ever!

2020s Today, AAMA is stronger than ever, providing innovative programming and invaluable supports, such as the new Work and Learn Center for Disconnected Youth. We are gaining momentum as more and larger grants are secured. FUNdraisers such as Piñata Bash, AAMA Bowl and the resurrected AAMA golf tournament help make the future even brighter for young men and women in the eastern part of our city!

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EDUCATION ADELANTE ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM Adelante is AAMA’s Adult Education and Workforce Readiness Program that serves primarily Latino immigrants, English language adult learners who seek to either advance in their workplaces or enter a high wage/high demand career field. AAMA Adelante provides services such as ESL (English as Second Language), HSE (High School Equivalency) preparation courses in English and Spanish, workforce certifications, job readiness, college readiness, and healthy eating habits - even when the pandemic required the program to pivot to100% remote learning.

AEL (Adult Education Literacy) • 902 Students attended ESL and HSE classes. • 74% of students completed a level in classes of coursework.

Support Services Job Readiness and Career Readiness Adelante implements activities related to job readiness such as résumé writing, job applications, interview skills, and job search. One hundred sixty-five (165) HSE students explored career options and certification classes provided by partners from Texas Workforce Commission and Houston Community College. Comprando Rico y Sano (Unidos US) Adelante students participated in nutrition sessions and Zumba classes and can become nutrition promoters, learning new skills and earning stipends while they are helping their community change its nutrition habits. • 6 Students became promoters during the year. • 511 Students participated in health activities such as nutrition sessions, cooking demonstrations, grocery tours, and Zumba classes. • 50 Families benefited from the emergency relief funds provided through UnidosUS to supplement food needs.

• 79 Students received their HSE certificate

8 Weeks Workforce Certificate Adelante offered two bilingual certificate programs: Customer Service and Retail and Business Office Technology. • 25 Students from two cohorts completed the Customer Service and Retail certification class. • 87% passed their test and obtained their certificate issued by the NRF (The National Retail Foundation) • 6 Students from 1 cohort completed the Business Office Technology certification class.

SUCCESS STORY

Martha Ramirez Martha Ramirez is a 49-year-old mother of two boys who moved to the US from Mexico when her husband was offered a job. Martha knew minimal English and quickly became frustrated with being unable to communicate. She began working in a local school system in the Food Services Department where she not only improved her English but discovered a love for working with young children. She learned of the role of Para-Educator and wanted to apply to work alongside the teachers, but the position required a GED. A friend introduced Martha to AAMA Adelante. After taking several classes and with the support of her ESL instructor Mr. Navarrete, she passed the necessary tests. She got her High School Equivalency Diploma in October 2020. A month later, she applied, interviewed, and accepted a Para-Educator position at the school where she had been working. Martha enjoys working with children from first to fifth grade and says without AAMA’s assistance, she would not have the job satisfaction she has today.

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GEORGE I. SANCHEZ CHARTER SCHOOLS YEAR IN REVIEW

SUCCESS STORY

DECEMBER 2019 Sanchez Charter School awarded Bronze Award from School of Behavioral Health

Veronica

Giving up was not an option for Veronica. After giving birth in eighth grade and staying home to care for her baby, Veronica enrolled in high school. Though older and with more life experience than her peers, with the special support services at AAMA’s George I. Sanchez Charter School, Veronica was able to achieve her dream of high school graduation so she could provide a better life for her family.

FEBRUARY 2020 Social Emotional Support Recognition only charter school in Houston awarded MAY 2020 Sanchez Charter placed 1st and 2nd place in TCSAAL Science Olympiad

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 2019-2020

Grade

Pre-K

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

11th

12th

Total

GIS South

78

89

88

81

101

89

101

96

769

GIS North

N/A

56

53

53

60

45

N/A

N/A

267

2020 ANN UA L R EPO R T

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HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

PREVENTION AND COUNSELING PROGRAM SERVICES AAMA’s Health and Human Services Division (Prevention and Counseling Program) provides services to approximately 5,000 clients a year in its various treatment and outreach programs. AAMA’s adult outpatient program is the largest Hispanic treatment program in Texas, and was recognized as having the highest program completion rate of all state funded programs in Texas. PROGRAM SERVICES Adolescent and adult out-patient: AAMA is one of the largest providers of alcohol and substance use prevention and treatment in Texas for adolescents and adults. CSAP The mission of our work through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention is to improve behavioral health through evidence-based prevention approaches. HEI In collaboration with Texas Health and Human Services, our HIV Early Intervention Services provides case management for people with both HIV and substance use problems.

HIV infection that begins soon after diagnosis is made helps people with HIV live healthier and longer lives. Ideally, individuals with a new HIV diagnosis should be linked to care within three months. Youth aged 15-24 are the most likely to have late linkage or no care at all in the first year after diagnoses. MAP reduces the number of undiagnosed Texans and improves timely linkage to HIV care. HOPWA The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Program is the only federal program dedicated to the housing needs of people living with HIV/AIDS. It is dedicated to serving low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. Medicaid-Provided Services Substance Use Disorders (SUD) impact the lives of hundreds of thousands of Texans in the general population, including individuals who are enrolled in the Medicaid program. Nearly 12 percent of Medicaid beneficiaries over 18 have a SUD. Medicaid is increasingly playing a larger role in the reimbursement of substance use disorder services. While AAMA does not refuse services to those who have an inability to pay, we are required to seek payment through Medicaid for both adolescent and adult outpatient services as state funding is always the payor of last resort. Adolescents and adults may attend AAMA’s intensive outpatient substance use disorder programs in Houston and Laredo. Adults with Medicaid may also attend AAMA’s Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) program in Laredo.

Familia Adelante Through our Familia Adelante program, AAMA provides intervention services for the entire family with parents and children receiving services at the same time.   HIV Core/Client AAMA’s Minorities Action Program (MAP) provides Core HIV prevention to focus on community engagement, condom distribution and focused testing and linkage/re-engagement activities. Client-level HIV Prevention focuses on approved evidence-based behavioral interventions such as “Many Men Many Voices” (3MV) and AAMA’s grassroots evidence-based intervention “Y Ahora Que” (Now What). HIV Prevention executes strategies and actions to prevent the acquisition of HIV in populations with the greatest vulnerability to HIV. Treatment for

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2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


2019-2020 HIGHLIGHTS DECEMBER 2019 Concilio Hispano Libre passed accreditation audit JUNE 2020 Selena Center- Westcare partnership with Incarnate WordDr. Felix Ortiz JULY 2020 Medicaid accepted at Prevention and Counseling services

• In partnership with Houston Food Bank, AAMA hosted a monthly Drive Thru Food Distribution. Prevention and Counseling provided nutrition to over 200 families including those in our Ryan White Program. • HEI Overall Viral Suppression: 82% (18 out of 22) are virally suppressed as defined by a viral load of < 200. • As a community service, our HIV program offers HIV testing at popular bars and clubs. When a person gets a positive result at the on-site rapid test, they are invited to AAMA for a confirmatory test, results that are often devastating. Our Community Health Workers are with clients every step of the way, helping them access the medical resources and treatment they need, regardless of immigration or insurance status. • For the month of December, we billed Medicaid $5,429 on 22 clients. We received $5,110 in payments from Medicaid for the month of December.

SUCCESS STORY

M.

In late 2019, M. was coping with a very stressful life through daily use of marijuana and alcohol. His probation officer referred him to AAMA where he struggled to acknowledge how his dependence on substances was exacerbating his problems. He was chronically late or absent from work due to his substance use and struggled to maintain employment, deepening family, financial and legal problems. When he separated from his wife and moved back in with his parents, he lost contact with his children.

M. had a slow start in the treatment program at Prevention and Counseling, unable to stay sober long enough to advance to the next phase of treatment. With continued therapy, he slowly accepted his chemical dependence and was able to make decisions to better manage his life and stress. He has had the same job for five months and has graduated from the treatment program. He is catching up with child support and spending time with his children in addition to working a second job on the weekends.

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THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS * $25,000–$1,000,000+

A.R. “Tony” and Maria J. Sanchez Family Foundation

Silver Eagle Distributors Starbucks

Comcast

Trafigura Foundation

East End District

UnidosUS

JPMorgan Chase

Valero

Ryan White Cares Act

Wells Fargo

SAMHSA

$5,000–$24,999

Dollar General

RCP Global

Michele Leal and George Farah

Dana and Francisco Reyes

Greisi Family Foundation

Pete and Norma Sanchez

Houston First

Tom and Telisa Shead

Houston Foundation

Shell Oil Company

Daniel and Candy Lloyd

Texas Children’s Hospital

MEXCOR International $1,000–$4,999 Action Gypsum Supply

El Tiempo Cantina

METRO

Juan Alonso

Goya Foods

Christian Navarro

Ambassador Services

Joshua Grizzle

Navarro Insurance

Roderick E. Ankrum

Harris Health System

Terrance Ransfer

Rueben Cásarez

Benjamin Hernandez

Texans Foundation

Trung Doan

Institute of Hispanic Culture

The Cristina Project

James Dunn

McMurrey Investment Advisors LLC

Univision

Sidia Duron

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Villa Arcos Mexican Restaurant 2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


$500–$999 Imelda Acosta

Equitable Advisors

Joe Jimenez

The Templin Saloon

Gloria S Barrera

Oscar L. Garza

Debbie Ortiz

Michael Seuffert

Carlos Anguiano Richard E. Brown

Carlos Garcia Realty Todd Coutee

Lana Garcia

Paulette Gerukos

Manny and Maritza Gonzales

Angelina Hernandez

Brandon Kline Frederick Reimer

Carlos Fonseca Rivera Camilo E. Rojas III

Carrol Schueler

Greta M. Singleton Barbara Winston

Alfonso Rubio

$250–$499 Tristan Almada

Patrick Chu

Kathy Kremer

Gracie Saenz

Charles Askew

Carol Dimmett

Paula Mendoza

Barbara S. Willis

Hillary Jebbitt

Matt Rosas

$100–$249 D’Jomme Adia

Patrick Fitzgibbon

Daisy Morales

Angela Scott

Caroline Aspenson

Laura Garcia

Juan D. Morales

Marcela Segade

Andy Canales

Georgina German

Martha Navarro

Karthik Selvam

Robert Cardona

Niurka Gonzalez

Aldo Ochoa

Craig Smallbone

Veronica Chapa

Brian Hall

Dilip Patel

Edith Sorto

Cynthia Cisneros

Ben Hernandez

Andres Ramos, MD

Ann W. Stanbery

Lisbeth Cobio

Humana

David Rangel

Michael Tompkins

William Deforest

Mitchell B. Jacobs

Joe E. Resendez

Luis R. Torres-Hostos

Dalton C. DeHart

Tracy Janda

Kristin Reyes

Yolanda Troshko

Adriana Dibello

Keith Leung

Anastasia Rigoli

Blake VanSickle

Sarah A. Dunford

Vicki Luna

Desdamona Rios

Armando Walle

Giselle Easton

Angela Medina

Mary A. Rodriguez

Harriet Wasserstrum

Mark Eisenberg

Mireya Milian

Amanda Samples

Nora Yaguas

Julia P. Elizondo

Marcelle Mir

Rachel San

Terri Youngs

Rebecca Mir

Lisa Schott

*As of August 31, 2020

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FINANCIAL SUMMARY GROWTH IN REVENUES OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS

We serve the community $20M

through a wide array of

$19,856,442

$19M

programs and services.

$18M

AAMA does not turn anyone away for inability to pay.

$17,474,226

$17M $16,399,961

$16M $15M

We help those in need through

$14M

grants and donations.

$13M

$14,063,700 $13,934,174

2016

ASSETS

2017

2018

2019

2020

REVENUE

Total current assets

$7,639,068

Federal grants

$5,137,661

Total noncurrent assets

$7,709,169

Total Assets

$15,348,237

State, city, county and other school grants

$11,424,371

Fundraisers

$285,033

Contributions $68,118

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Property and rental income

$2,376,964

Other

$564,295 $19,856,442

Total current liabilities

$1,752,994

Total noncurrent liabilities

$6,223,310

Total Revenue

Total Liabilities

$7,976,304

EXPENDITURES

Net Assets

$7,371,933

Prevention/intervention programs

$824,371

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$15,348,237

Residential/outpatient services

$3,056,724

Sanchez charter school

$12,602,281

Adelante adult education

$575,349

Work and Learn

$376,752

Management and general

$2,186,718

Fundraising activities

$93,411

Total Expenditures

$19,715,606

Change In Net Assets

$140,836

Net Assets Beginning Of Year

$7,231,097

Net Assets End Of Year

$7,371,933

Year Ended August 31, 2020

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EXPENSES 1. 1 Program Expense

$17,435,477

2. 2 Management and General

$2,186,718

3. 3 Fundraising $93,411

Total Expenses

$19,715,606

PROGRAM EXPENDITURES 1. 1 Sanchez Schools

$12,602,281

2. 2 Residential/Outpatient $3,056,724 3. 3 Adelante Adult Education

$575,349

4. 4 Work and Learn

$376,752

5. 5 Prevention/Intervention $824,371 Total Program Expenditures

$17,435,477

THANK YOU!

As we look back on the unbelievable 2020 year, we reflect on challenges ahead, how our work together evolves and supporting our community in the coming years. We greatly appreciate and ask you to continue ensuring that dreams are within reach of every child and adult who walks through our doors, regardless of

their circumstances. Your support allows us to make a difference in the lives of youth and their families. Together, we are making a lasting impact. Thank you most sincerely for believing in the work that we do.

2020 ANN UA L R EPO R T

21


COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS

Open Door Mission Pillars Planned Parenthood Prairie View A&M University Prevent Blindness Texas Project GRAD Reebok re:MIND Depression and Bipolar Support

AHEC (Area Health Education Center) Alley Theatre 3 Amigos Paint, Body & Graphics Ashford United Methodist Church Avenue 360 Health and Wellness Baker Ripley Bank of America Barbara Bush Houston Literacy Foundation Baylor College of Medicine Bering Omega Community Services Bethany House BioLytical Laboratories Border Region MHMR Broken Walls Ministries California Institute for Integral Studies Catholic Charities Cenikor Change Happens Chase Chick-fil-A Childcare Council of Greater Houston Children’s Museum of Houston Christ the King Catholic Church CHRISTUS Health City of Houston City of Laredo Drug and Alcohol Commission City of Laredo Health Dept. Collaborative for Children Comcast Cable Corporation Communities in Schools Community Development Block Grant Community Family Centers Conn’s Home Plus Council on Recovery Crime Stoppers of Houston The Cristina Project CVS Health Depelchin Children’s Center Dora B. Lantrip Elementary Dress for Success El Centro de Corazon Elevare International Elim Church Envision 2morrow Exxon Eye Care for Kids/Su Optica Latina

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Familias Immigrantes y Estudiantes en la Lucha FitMix FLAS Gateway Community Health Center Genesys Works Gilead Goodwill Industries of Houston The Harris Center Harris County Adult Probation HEART (Heroin Addiction Response Team) HEB Hester House Houston A+ Challenge Houston Astros Baseball Club Houston Center for Literacy Houston Community College Houston Dynamo Charities Houston Food Bank Holocaust Museum Houston Houston Literacy Consortium Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Houston Police Department Houston Rockets Katine and Nechman, LLP Lakewood Church Laredo Food Bank Latino Commission of AIDS Legacy Community Health Lenox BBQ Little Free Library Lone Star Veterans Association The Lovett Center MAXIMUS Mayor’s Anti-Gang Task Force Memorial Hermann Healthcare System Mental Health America Mental Health of Greater Houston META Consultants METRO Mexican Institute of Greater Houston Mission Dei Anglican Church Molina Healthcare Montrose Center NAEYC Nameless Sound New Hope Housing, Inc.

Ryan White Program Council Office of Support San Jacinto Community College Santa Maria Hostel Save the Children SCAN (Serving Children and Adults in Need) SER-Jobs for Progress Patrick Schott Southern New Hampshire University Spurs Sports and Entertainment Starbucks Coffee Company Texans Foundation Texas Alcoholism Foundation, Inc. Texas A&M Agrilife Texas Charter School Association Texas Children’s Texas Counseling Association Texas Dept. of Family & Protective Services Texas Rising Star Texas Southern University The Texas House Toxicology Association Inc. Trafigura UH Charter School Undies for Everyone UnidosUS United Against Human Trafficking United Way Bright Beginnings University of Houston University of Houston – Clear Lake University of Houston – Downtown University of St. Thomas University of Texas Univision U.S. District Court Southern District of Texas UT Health UT Health McGovern Medical School Walgreens Webb County Community Coalition 2nd Ward Complete Communities Wells Fargo Wesley Community Center Westcare Women’s Fund The Woods Project YMCA of Greater Houston Youth Lead

2020 ANNU A L REP OR T


AAMA LEADERSHIP 2020 BOARD OF DIRECTORS BOARD CHAIR

Juan Alonso H-E-B

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR

SECRETARY

CHAIR-ELECT

Trung H. Doan

Arturo Michel

Benjamin Hernandez

Studio RED Architects

City of Houston

Human Age Digital

BOARD MEMBERS Cynthia Cisneros

Christian Navarro

Alfonso Rubio

Retired

Christian C. Navarro Law Office

Sendro Health Plans

John Gonzalez

Dr. Pamela A. Quiroz

Telisa Shead

Adrian Morales

Terrence Ransfer

Terri Youngs

Houston First

Starbucks

University of Houston

Amegy Bank

Metroclean

Comcast Cable

Benita Reyes Wells Fargo

EXECUTIVE TEAM PRESIDENT AND CEO

Joe Jimenez

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Jim Dunn

CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

DIRECTOR OF PREVENTION AND COUNSELING

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGY AND SUPPORT SERVICES

Debbie Ortiz

Patrick Rocha

2020 ANN UA L R EPO R T

Michael Seuffert

Carlos Anguiano

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AAMA PROGRAMS George I. Sanchez Charter Schools AAMA SANCHEZ CHARTER 6th - 12th grade 6001 Gulf Freeway, Building E, Houston, TX 77023 (713) 929-2300 SANCHEZ CHARTER NORTH 6th - 12th grade 215 E. Rittenhouse Street, Houston, TX 77076 (713) 742-0947 PRE K-3 AND PRE K-4, DAYCARE FACILITY 6001 Gulf Freeway, Building C6, Houston, TX 77023 (713) 926-1112

AAMA Adelante

AAMA Prevention and Counseling

ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 6001 Gulf Freeway, Building C3 Houston, TX 77023 (713) 929-2330

HOUSTON

LAREDO

Inpatient and Outpatient Services

Concilio Hispano Libre and Outpatient 1205 E. Hillside Rd. Laredo, TX 78041 (956) 728-0440

HIV and STI Prevention and Support Services Youth Prevention Services 204 Clifton St. Houston, TX 77023 (713) 926-9491

AAMA Work and Learn Center 6001 Gulf Freeway, Building C2 Houston, TX 77023 Telephone: 713-967-6700 Fax: 713-926-8035

AAMA.ORG

Celebrating 50 Years

2020

ANNUAL REPORT


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