2022 Election Guide

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VOTE! ON OR BEFORE NOVEMBER 8

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AMENDMENTS EXPLAINED CANDIDATE Q&As PARTY PLATFORM QUIZ


MATT DRUZBA An Independent for U.S. Congress and Vermont "A great alternative candidate for Republicans & Democrats. A strong candidate for Independent & Swing voters"

 MY PLATFORM • • • • • •

Women’s Rights Climate Change Support for the 2nd Amendment The right to keep and bear arms Common Sense Gun Control An individual’s right to personal reproductive autonomy Equal rights for all regardless of race, ethnicity, class, religion, belief, sex, gender, language, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, health Criminal Justice Reform

• • • •

• • • •

Victim’s Rights Offender Accountability Thorough and competent pandemic strategy Immigration Reform (I have a new, bold and far-reaching long-term plan) Smaller Government/Tax Cuts Mental Health Reform Military/Veteran Suicide Prevention Modern, trim, competent, robust, strategic, and effective U.S. Military

 MY PLEDGE •

I will remain Independent, vote my conscience, speak my truth, and not be beholden to any political party, PAC or special interest group. I will work tirelessly for the people of Vermont and the United States of America. I will actively, fully and soundly support any qualified and capable woman candidate or nominee, regardless of party affiliation, for the office of the President of the United States in the 2024 General Election cycle. I will surround myself with knowledgeable people in order to understand the facts and make the best decisions possible for the people of Vermont. When voting for or supporting legislation, I will always prioritize what’s best for Vermonters particularly with respect to women’s rights, the disabled and climate change.

I will work in a positive and nonpartisan manner with anyone in congress, regardless of their political party affiliation or special interest, to create and/or support good legislation. I will be a “Principled Leader”, vote my conscience, maintain proper ethics, good moral judgement, and have the courage to speak the truth - regardless of any personal consequences. I will be open minded regarding any proposed legislation from anyone in congress, regardless of political party or special interest group. I will not barrage the community with campaign lawn signs and repetitive, oversized mailings that only exacerbate the climate crisis.

I am a left-leaning Independent and Moderate with conservative undertones Small business owner, entrepreneur, executive, military officer veteran, college graduate, single father of three, widower and community volunteer

Find our more about Matt at

mattd4vt.com

Scan this QR code to make a donation to

MATT DRUZBA FOR CONGRESS

PAID FOR MATT DRUZBA FOR CONGRESS

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Time to Choose BY C ATH Y R E S ME R • cathy@sevendaysvt.com

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hen the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June and made it possible for states to ban abortion, many American women who had taken their reproductive rights for granted were shocked and outraged. But abortion rights activists have been sounding the alarm about this possibility for some time. Their warnings grew louder in 2016, when then-Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) refused to consider then-president Barack Obama’s Supreme Court pick 10 months before the election, on the grounds that the American people should decide the composition of the court. McConnell rolled the dice and won: With his help, the winner of that election, president Donald Trump, went on to appoint three conservative justices to the court, all of whom joined the majority in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization,, which overturned Roe v. Wade. Abortion rights supporters in Vermont did what they could to prepare for this scenario. In 2019, the Vermont legislature introduced a proposed amendment to the state constitution that would protect “personal reproductive autonomy” for all Vermonters. On November 8, voters will decide whether to adopt the measure, known as Proposal 5, or Article 22. Vermont is one of three states where voters are considering such amendments; Michigan and California are the others. The nation will be watching the outcome — and the potential impact the issue has on congressional races. Proposal 5 is one of two constitutional amendments on the ballot this fall; Kevin McCallum explains them both in “Lasting Changes” on page 6 of this guide. It’s not often that Vermonters consider constitutional changes. As McCallum notes in his piece, most recent amendments have involved administrative matters. Not so with this question about reproductive rights. Paul Gillies, a Montpelier attorney and expert in Vermont constitutional history, put it in perspective: “This is not tinkering — it’s moving us into big, fundamental questions that ought to be settled by voters

through a constitutional amendment,” he told McCallum. If you’ve got strong opinions about abortion, this is your chance to express them. You should also read up on the candidates competing to join Vermont’s congressional delegation. This issue could very well come up in Congress; there’s already been talk of a possible federal ban on abortion. Having reproductive rights protected in

Vermont’s constitution would put state officials in a stronger legal position to fight such a potential ban in the courts. To participate in this election, you have to be registered to vote in Vermont. If you’re eligible but aren’t yet registered, find out how to fix that in “Make Your Mark” on page 7. Vermont residents who are already registered should be getting a ballot in the mail any day now.

Once you fill it out, you can drop it in the mail or bring it to your town clerk before the end of the last business day before the election. Or bring your ballot with you to the polls on November 8. Then you’ll get an “I voted” sticker — this fall’s hottest fashion accessory, for sure — to show you’ve done your part to keep our democracy going.

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Elephant, Donkey, Moose A primer on Vermont’s major political parties BY C ATH Y R E S ME R • cathy@sevendaysvt.com

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REPUBLICANS

Newcomers to Vermont might be surprised to learn that it was a reliably “red” state for more than 100 years — Republicans dominated the legislature, the governor’s office and the congressional delegation starting in the mid-1800s. That changed around the time when Democrat Phil Hoff eked out a 1,300-vote victory in the 1962 governor’s race. Since then, the state has switched colors. The Republicans have fielded a few popular statewide officeholders — Jim Jeffords was a Republican senator until he famously left the party in 2001; Jim Douglas served as treasurer, then governor from 2003 to 2011; Phil Scott has held the governor’s seat since 2017. But Vermont’s pro-choice gov signed meaningful gun control legislation in 2018, has ridden his motorcycle in LGBTQ pride parades and declined to support president Donald Trump, which means he’s often at odds with many of the rank and file in his own party. The GOP seems to be struggling to recruit new statewide leaders. Political gadfly and perennial candidate H. Brooke 4

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TIM NEWCOMB

ermont has a national reputation as a reliably “blue” — aka Democratic — state, but the reality on the ground is more complicated. For example, the state’s best-known politician, the yuuuugely popular Sen. Bernie Sanders, ran for president as a Democrat. But the Bern is actually an independent: That’s how he’s identified himself since he became mayor of Burlington in 1981. Just to complicate things: The Progressive Party grew up around and claimed Sanders, but he has never run for office with a “P” next to his name. Independents of all stripes are a staple of Vermont’s political scene, as you’ll see in this guide. A few of this year’s crop of candidates for legislative and statewide office are running under the Libertarian or Green Mountain Party banners. But most pols are representing one of Vermont’s three major parties: Republicans, Democrats and Progressives. This is a quick-and-dirty guide for voters who haven’t been paying close attention to Vermont politics.

Newcomers to Vermont might be surprised to learn that it was a reliably “red” state for more than 100 years. Paige is the GOP choice for both secretary of state and treasurer. Paige actually won the Republican primaries for auditor and attorney general, too — but stepped aside to let Richard “Rick” Morton and Michael Tagliavia take his place in those races. Liam Madden, the Republican nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives, said he didn’t want the party’s nomination, though he ended up accepting it; in the event he comes out on top in November, he doesn’t plan on caucusing with other House Republicans. As a result, the state party is not officially supporting his candidacy. It’s not supporting Ericka Redic, Madden’s Libertarian opponent, either. She ran in the Republican primary and lost to Madden, and the party doesn’t back failed primary candidates. In other words, the “R” label in Vermont might not mean what you think, beyond a preference for lower taxes and less governmental regulation. If you don’t know much about the candidates, check out their websites or watch a debate before filling in the oval.

PROGRESSIVES

Though Bernie Sanders, who calls himself a democratic socialist, never officially joined Vermont’s Progressive Party, the Progs trace their roots to his historic tenure as mayor of Burlington. According to its website, this self-described “people-powered party” to the left of the Democrats sees itself as “independent of the two corporate-owned parties.” It aims to promote “economic, social and environmental justice” and seeks elimination of “our society’s deeply rooted racism and white privilege,” as well as nuclear weapons. Burlington was, and is, its stronghold, hence the nickname “the People’s Republic of Burlington.” The party controlled the mayor’s office for most of the ’80s, ’90s and ’00s. Democrat Miro Weinberger won in 2012 and broke the streak, but Progressives currently hold five of 12 seats on the city council. In 2021, the Prog candidate for mayor, then-city council president Max Tracy, came within 129 votes of unseating Weinberger.

Starting from that Burlington base, the Progs established a statewide party apparatus in 2000. In 2002, Anthony Pollina ran for lieutenant governor as a Progressive and won 25 percent of the vote, “the largest percentage of any third party candidate for statewide office in the country at the time,” the party website notes. Pollina later became a Progressive state senator from Washington County. But like many of his fellow Progressives, Pollina sought the endorsement of both Progressives and the “corporate-owned” Democrats. Indeed, nearly all of the Progressive candidates on this fall’s ballot carry that dual endorsement. The order of the letters is significant; the first one signals the candidate’s primary party allegiance. Come November, Auditor Doug Hoffer, who has a D/P next to his name, is running for his sixth term; former lieutenant governor David Zuckerman hopes to reclaim his lite-gov seat with a P/D label; and D/P Brenda Siegel is challenging Phil Scott in the governor’s race.

DEMOCRATS

Dems are currently Vermont’s dominant party. In the last legislative session, they held 21 of 30 seats in the state senate, not counting the hybrid pols. The party held 92 of 150 House seats as well as the statewide offices of lieutenant governor, treasurer, attorney general and auditor, not to mention two of the three congressional seats. The third belongs to Sanders. The Dems’ party platform doesn’t look all that different from the one drafted by their Progressive frenemies. Its core commitments are to equity, prosperity for all, environmental justice, health care for all, justice and community safety, public education, and democracy, in that order. But there’s a moderate, mainstream wing of the party and a more progressive-leaning faction. The primary race for U.S. House between Lt. Gov. Molly Gray and Senate President Pro Tem Becca Balint revealed the distinction. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and former Democratic governors Madeleine Kunin and Howard Dean backed Gray, while Balint drew support from Sanders. Still, Balint’s got just one party affiliation next to her name: Democrat. m


QUIZ: WHICH PARTY PLATFORM IS IT FROM? Can you identify which party claims the following statements as part of its platform? All selections are taken verbatim from the websites of Vermont’s Democratic, Progressive and Republican parties.

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The ______________ Party stands in solidarity with all of those who are oppressed and state our belief in the beauty of all life. Our party remains fully committed to ensuring freedom for all; fighting for the right of all Vermonters to achieve their full potential, unrestrained by unnecessary government intervention. Will proactively work to eliminate institutionalized racism in our workforce, government, and law enforcement, and personal racial bias in ourselves. The ______________ Party recognizes that systemic and institutional racism exists throughout our state and affirms that Black Lives Matter. We acknowledge past and present inequities in our party, our state, and our country, and strive to dismantle the systems of oppression that continue to marginalize valued members of our community.

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We believe in doing everything in our power to address, mitigate, and even reverse human induced climate change.

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Eliminate the use of non-essential single-use plastics and regulate unnecessary wasteful practices that litter our rivers and other natural waterways.

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We support environmentally and economically responsible efforts to lower the cost of energy for every Vermont citizen and business. Sound energy policy demands a careful balance between the economy, environment and competitive rates to foster economic growth and financial stability.

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Vermont ______________ cherish our proud history of providing safe and healthy communities. To these ends, we support: care for vulnerable children, the elderly, the sick, the poor, and those unable to care for themselves. It is the responsibility of government to respect, protect and fulfill the human rights of every person. Roll back the regressive Republican tax cuts for the very wealthy and large corporations. Pass measures that address the corrosive effect of excessive wealth. We believe Vermont needs a progressive tax system where wealthier Vermonters pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than low to moderate income Vermonters. We believe in reducing our reliance on property and other regressive taxes.

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Emphasize vaccination as an essential element of disease prevention and care.

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We support respect for the individual rights of all people regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, ability, religion, socioeconomic status, political affiliation or vaccination status.

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ANSWERS: 1. Republican, 2. Progressive, 3. Democratic, 4. Progressive, 5. Democratic, 6. Republican, 7. Republican, 8. Progressive, 9. Democratic, 10. Progressive, 11. Democratic, 12. Republican.


Lasting Changes

Revisions to Vermont’s constitution — dealing with slavery and abortion — are on the ballot this fall B Y K E V I N MCCAL L UM • kevin@sevendaysvt.com ANDREW MULHEARN

Who’s for it:

The measure enjoyed wide, tripartisan support in the legislature both in the 2019 session and the 2022 session. The Vermont Racial Justice Alliance and Vermont Interfaith Action campaigned for it under the motto “Abolish Slavery Vermont.” A committee formed to support the measure won’t have to report its spending until a month before the election. Supporters call the revision an important move toward combating systemic racism. When he approved putting the amendment on the ballot, Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican, spoke in favor of it: “Vermont is proud to have been the first state in the

Vermont voters have approved just two amendments in the last 20 years.

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ermont’s constitution is the foundation upon which state government rests. It’s difficult to change — by design. The process takes years, and both the legislature and the governor have to sign off before amendments appear on the ballot. Vermont voters have approved just two amendments in the last 20 years, according to John Bloomer Jr., secretary of the Senate. This year, they’ll consider two more: One clarifies the language related to slavery, and the other guarantees the right to have an abortion. Here’s an overview of the two proposals — what they mean, who’s for and against them, and how they got on the ballot in the first place. The seemingly random numbers attached to them reflect the order in which they were introduced during the legislative session.

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PROPOSAL 2 What it does:

This amendment would revise and simplify the constitution’s language about slavery and indentured servitude.

Why it’s on the ballot:

Vermont was technically a republic when it became the first state to ban slavery in its 1777 constitution. But that ban was arguably a partial one. After declaring in its first lines that “all persons are born equally free and independent,” the founding document goes on to create an exception for the then-widespread practice of indentured servitude. It currently decrees that “no person born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person as a servant, slave or apprentice” after reaching the age of

21 “unless bound by the person’s own consent … or bound by law for the payment of debts, damages, fines, costs, or the like.” This was an effort by the state’s founders to allow indentured servitude — which some viewed as mutually beneficial — while restricting abuses by limiting the duration of such arrangements, according to Peter Teachout, a constitutional law professor at Vermont Law and Graduate School. In 1865, when the Thirteenth Amendment outlawed slavery nationwide for anything other than conviction for a crime, the state and federal constitutions arguably were in conflict. The Vermont constitution seemed to still allow forms of slavery before the age of 21 or under certain financial situations. Proposal 2 would clarify this by replacing the exemption with the simple declaration that “slavery and indentured servitude in any form are prohibited.”

Union to outlaw slavery in its constitution, but this proposal to clarify the antiquated language is meaningful as well,” he said in a press release. “We have come a long way since those words were originally written, but we know there is much more work to do.” While presenting the bill on the House floor, Rep. Hal Colston (D-Winooski) called the change “simple and clear, yet powerful and profound.” Some constitutional scholars like Teachout questioned whether the change was necessary, arguing the existing language has always been understood as an overall ban against slavery. But Colston said it’s important to remove any ambiguity on the issue. “My truth, as a descendant of enslaved Africans, is that this current language gives the appearance that there may be an exception for the existence of slavery and indentured servitude,” he said. “Language is powerful, and the truth shall set us free.”


How it will appear on the ballot: PROPOSAL 2

To see if the voters will amend the Vermont Constitution by amending Article 1 of Chapter 1 to read: “Article 1. [All persons born free; their natural rights; slavery and indentured servitude prohibited] That all persons are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent, and unalienable rights, amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety; therefore no person born in this country, or brought from over sea, ought to be holden by law, to serve any person as a servant, slave or apprentice, after arriving to the age of twenty-one years, unless bound by the person’s own consent, after arriving to such age, or bound by law for the payment of debts, damages, fines, costs, or the like slavery and indentured servitude in any form are prohibited.” YES/NO

Who’s against it:

Just three Republican representatives voted against the measure in the legislature. No political organizations have been established to raise or spend money against it.

MAKE YOUR MARK How, when and where to vote this fall B Y CAT HY R ESMER cathy@sevendaysvt.com If you’re a U.S. citizen and Vermont resident 18 years old or older, you have the right — and the responsibility — to vote in the November 8 election. Democracy is like a big group project. Don’t be the person who sits in the back and complains but doesn’t actually do any work!

Luckily, Vermont makes it easy to cast a ballot. Here are a few things to know as you prepare to do your civic duty:

PROPOSAL 5

become one of just a handful of states that have extended constitutional protection to abortion rights.

What it does:

Who’s for it:

This amendment, also commonly known as Article 22, specifies that all individuals have a right to “personal reproductive autonomy” that cannot be “denied or infringed unless justified by a compelling State interest achieved by the least restrictive means.”

Why it’s on the ballot:

Advocates for “reproductive liberty” started the process to amend Vermont’s constitution years ago, concerned that an increasingly conservative Supreme Court could overturn Roe v. Wade. The court’s June ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization leaves it to the states to decide whether to restrict access to abortion. There seems little risk of that in Vermont currently. Still, abortion activists believe adding language to the constitution to protect reproductive rights is a vital bulwark against their potential erosion. They contend that having reproductive rights protected in Vermont’s constitution would give state officials a stronger foundation from which to fight a possible federal ban on abortion in the courts. “The right to reproductive liberty is central to the exercise of personal autonomy and involves decisions people should be able to make free from compulsion of the State,” reads the bill passed by lawmakers. If the proposal passes, Vermont will

You have to register to vote to get a ballot. Since 2016, all Vermont drivers eligible to vote have been automatically registered when getting or renewing a driver’s license. Check to see if you’re already on the state’s voter checklist by entering your name and birthdate at olvr.vermont.gov. If you’re not yet registered, you can complete the task one of four ways: Register online at olvr.vermont.gov; call 1-800-439-VOTE; visit your city or town clerk’s office; fill out a voter registration form anytime before Election Day or at the polls. You don’t have to live here for a certain amount of time before being eligible to vote. As long as you’re a U.S. citizen, age 18 or older, count Vermont as your primary residence and take the voter’s oath, you’re good to go. Looking at you, college students. As long as you’re not also registered in

The measure has strong support in Vermont’s largely Democratic legislature, and from the state’s Republican governor. Planned Parenthood of Northern New England formed a political action committee called Vermont for Reproductive Liberty to fight for it. The group has raised $568,000 to support the campaign for the amendment. In August, it transferred most of its funds — $372,000 — to a new, related committee, Vermont for Reproductive Liberty Ballot Committee. It did so to distinguish the work of the committee, which supports a specific ballot measure, from the PAC, which is able to support political candidates, explained Lucy Leriche, president of the new committee. “Voters have the opportunity to make a direct policy decision about what kind of rules we will or will not tolerate for abortion and regulating reproductive health care in Vermont,” Leriche said.

Who’s against it:

In 2021, a total of 41 Republican legislators voted against advancing the amendment to voters. And groups aligned with the Montpelier-based Vermont Right to Life Committee formed a PAC called Vermonters for Good Government to oppose it. The effort had raised $235,000 as of the end of August. The committee argues that the

How it will appear on the ballot: PROPOSAL 5

To see if the voters will amend the Vermont Constitution by adding Article 22 to read: “Article 22. [Personal reproductive liberty] That an individual’s right to personal reproductive autonomy is central to the liberty and dignity to determine one’s own life course and shall not be denied or infringed unless justified by a compelling State interest achieved by the least restrictive means.” YES/NO new language is vague and broader than people realize and will do more than merely protect abortion rights. The group suggests the wording would extend undefined reproductive rights to men and children — rights that risk superseding parental rights, said Sharon Toborg, treasurer of the committee. LASTING CHANGES

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your home state, you can register and vote here. Remember: You can only vote once. Convicted felons and current inmates can vote in Vermont. Your criminal record has no bearing on your ability to vote here. If you’re already registered, you’ll get a ballot in the mail. This fall, Vermont is sending ballots to every active voter on the state checklist. Town clerks were required to start mailing them on Monday, September 26. Once you’ve filled out or “voted” the ballot, you can put it in the mail, bring it to the town clerk’s office or bring it with you to the polls on November 8. If you choose to vote by mail, be sure you follow the instructions. If you don’t, your ballot could be discarded.

If you return your ballot far enough in advance, and you’ve made a mistake that disqualifies your ballot, you can fix it. The clerk will let you know that your ballot is defective within three days of receiving it, and you’ll have an opportunity to correct it. Another reason to get it in early! If you choose to vote in person, the polls are open on Tuesday, November 8. Find your polling place and the hours it’s open by logging into mvp. vermont.gov, which will give you the location and allow you to view a sample ballot. You can also call your town clerk and ask.

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Lasting Changes « P.7 She said the amendment would also protect third-trimester abortions, which she said polls show most people do not support. “Do Vermonters really think a viable, unborn child should not have legal protection and that the state has no role in providing that?” Toborg asked. Leriche explained that extending reproductive rights to “individuals,” instead of just protecting abortion access for women, reflects the fact that men and women have roles in reproduction. The amendment could, for example, protect a man’s right to a vasectomy, she said. Suggesting the amendment would protect late-term abortions or erode parents’ rights are “scare tactics” used by the anti-abortion foes, Leriche said. Even though they are legal, no elective third-trimester abortions are performed in Vermont, Leriche said. Toborg counters that it is impossible to know the impact of the amendment, since the meaning of the terms “individual” and “reproductive liberty” would be left up to the courts to decide.

MAKING AMENDMENTS: REVISING VERMONT’S CONSTITUTION Changing the moral and legal framework of the state is serious business, and lawmakers have intentionally set the bar very high. “Amending the constitution is a careful process reflecting that the document is so fundamental that you shouldn’t change it too quickly,” said Paul Gillies, a Montpelier attorney and expert in Vermont constitutional history. The sober task was originally considered so consequential that the masses couldn’t be trusted with it. Changes were originally left up to a Council of Censors. That body was abolished in 1870 in favor of a statewide vote. “It was decided that if this was the people’s document, the people ought to have a say about it,” Gillies said. Even so, lawmakers have kept a tight rein on the process, first limiting any amendments to once every 10 years, then shortening that period to four years in 1974. Lawmakers also closely control what kinds of constitutional questions can be put before voters. The Senate must first approve any proposed constitutional change by a two-thirds majority. Then it must also win the assent of a majority

of the House of Representatives. It must also receive the approval of a fresh batch of lawmakers the following biennium. Such hurdles make successful amendments relatively rare. Vermont’s constitution is the shortest in the nation and the least amended, Gillies said. In the last 20 years, the document has been successfully tweaked only twice, according to John Bloomer, the Senate secretary. In 2002, voters approved removing the requirement that judges retire by age 70. Freed from that constitutional stricture, the following year, the legislature upped the mandatory retirement age to 90, the highest in the nation. Then, in 2010, voters approved a change allowing 17-year-olds to vote in primaries as long as they would turn 18 by the date of the general election. Such changes, while important, were largely fine-tuning the mechanics of how the state is run. This year, however, the proposals deal with the core guiding principles of the state. “We’re starting to fool with the firmament,” Gillies said. “This is not tinkering — it’s moving us into big, fundamental questions that ought to be settled by voters through a constitutional amendment.” K.M.

This year the proposals deal with the core guiding principles of the state. Who’s funding the campaigns for and against it:

Organizations for both sides have benefited from large donors, both inside and outside the state. The bulk of the donations raised by Vermonters for Good Government have come from three sources: $100,000 from Burlington conservative super PAC funder Lenore Broughton, $50,000 from Republican donor and Stowe resident Carol Breuer, and $50,000 from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington. Large donors to the Vermont for Reproductive Liberty PAC included $283,000 from the national Planned Parenthood Action Fund, $112,000 from the ACLU and $27,800 from something called the Sixteen Thirty Fund, a Washington, D.C.-based dark money group that spends heavily to support progressive political causes. m

VOTE DAVID ZUCKERMAN PROGRESSIVE / DEMOCRAT FOR LT. GOVERNOR

YES ON ARTICLE 22, Reproductive Liberty Amendment • YES ON PROP 2, Ban Slavery Amendment ENDORSED BY SEN. BERNIE SANDERS

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Candidates for U.S. Senator

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hen Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) announced his impending retirement last year, it started a scramble for Vermont’s first open U.S. Senate seat in 16 years. The following candidates are seeking to serve a six-year term in the Senate, the deliberative body that decides the fate of all sorts of legislation, approves treaties with other nations and confirms presidential nominees, including cabinet secretaries and Supreme Court justices. The 100-member Senate is currently evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats, whose number includes independents Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Sen. Angus King (I-Maine). In the case of a 50-50 tie, Vice President Kamala Harris, the president of the Senate, provides the tie-breaking vote. With that in mind, here are the candidates on the ballot this fall. All of the answers to these questions were provided by the candidates. Independents Mark Coester, Natasha Diamondstone-Kohout and Dawn Marie Ellis will also appear on the ballot but did not respond to our candidate questionnaire. m Information and photos were provided by the candidates.

Voting by mail?

Vermont will mail ballots to all registered voters for the November 8 election. If you vote by mail, be sure to follow the instructions.

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SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

Stephen Duke

Cris Ericson

What will be your top priority in office?

What will be your top priority in office?

Age: 67 Town of residence: East Calais Occupation: Retired postal worker Party affiliation: Independent Website: None

Work to overturn Biden’s order to shut down 40 percent of U.S. oil and gas production. It is the major cause of the doubling of fuel and food prices. Because of it, low- and fixedincome Vermonters will be strapped trying to eat and heat this winter.

How would you address political polarization in the Senate?

They need to address it; it’s their creation. I’m for pro-American policy, which helps all of us, and I will work with both parties to improve America. What’s happening now, I can’t support. We are all suffering from BidenDemocrat policy.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

Limiting malpractice suits. Today every hospital room and operating room can be taped. If a suit is filed, they go to the cloud and pull the video. If there is negligence on the doctor or the hospital, it will show up. Mediation can take place, or the suit is dismissed.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Yes! All elected officials should have their holdings put into a blind trust to be returned when they leave office.

Age: 70 Town of residence: Chester Occupation: Artist Party affiliation: Independent Website: Politics2022.org

I want to sponsor a bill to stop modern slavery. We pay tax dollars to the IRS, then the U.S. Congress votes to give billions of dollars in subsidies to big corporations that use our money to make profits for themselves. Where is our share?

How would you address political polarization in the Senate?

Depending on which side might be short one person to become the majority party in control of the U.S. Senate, I would offer to switch from independent and go over to their side if, and only if, they would vote to make me U.S. Senate majority leader.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

We must end subsidies and instead offer corporations tax dollars only on terms of “ROI,” return on investment, a share of profits made. We need our share for health care costs and other programs like fuel assistance, low-income housing, food stamps, glasses, dental care, prescription drugs, etc.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office?

Yes. Members of Congress should be banned from trading stocks. They are sitting on a gold mine of confidential information.

Gerald Malloy

Age: 60 Town of residence: Perkinsville Occupation: Retired Army officer/ businessman Party affiliation: Republican Website: DeployMalloy.com

What will be your top priority in office?

The economy. Vermont families are suffering under recession/40-year-high inflation. Make no mistake, this is the fault of Washington. My career-politician opponent has repeatedly voted for the massive overspending causing our economic woes and America’s crushing $31 trillion debt. It is time for change, a better future.

How would you address political polarization in the Senate?

Leadership and performance. Solving problems, not just talking about them or creating them. I am running to represent all Vermonters, not just a select few. This is why I give my personal phone number to any voter who requests it. Work together as Americans to solve issues facing our country.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

First, make more health care costs tax-deductible. Second, allow Americans to buy insurance across state lines to increase the number of cheaper options. Third, increase price transparency so that Americans know the cost of a hospital item or service before receiving it. Fourth, reduce government influence and promote open-market competition.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office?

Yes. Vermonters have negative perceptions of congressmen about insider trading, becoming multimillionaires. I will serve Vermonters to eliminate misconduct perceptions.


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Kerry Raheb

Age: 54 Town of residence: Bennington Occupation: Entrepreneur Party affiliation: Independent Website: KerryRaheb.com

What will be your top priority in office?

Inflation/economy, energy crisis, crime/law and order, border crisis, immigration, illegal drugs, childcare, parental rights, education, term limits, government spending.

How would you address political polarization in the Senate?

This is one of the reasons why I am running as an independent. Congress mainly votes down party lines, which is a problem for America. Only bipartisan legislation should pass.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

Congress should start by prohibiting pharmaceutical companies from advertising prescription drugs direct to consumers. Only the U.S. and New Zealand allow this. Big Pharma spends nearly $7 billion annually on advertising. They could take that money to help cut drug costs.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? I have 20-plus years in investment banking. I support prohibiting members of Congress, including immediate family members, from trading stocks.

9/23/22 12:42 PM

RUTLAND’S CHOICE

A seventh generation Rutland County Vermonter, Remington’s connection to our communities and her experience in business, non-profits and government make her the best choice for State Senate.

Peter Welch

REMINGTONFORVT.COM

Age: 75 Town of residence: Norwich Occupation: Current U.S. Representative from Vermont Party affiliation: Democrat Website: WelchforVermont.com

What will be your top priority in office?

Protecting our democracy and defending voting rights so we can address the challenges facing Vermonters: the climate crisis, reproductive freedom and individual rights, and the affordability crisis. In the Senate, I will do everything I can to support policies that help working Vermonters and protect our democracy.

How would you address political polarization in the Senate?

It starts with the Vermont way, where we work together to find solutions for shared problems. I have always sought common ground and have a long record to back it up: on broadband, energy efficiency and burn pits legislation. I’ll continue to bring this approach to D.C. in the Senate.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

I recently helped pass legislation that will cut the skyrocketing cost of drugs by allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, which finally loosens Big Pharma’s grip on drug prices. This will begin to lower costs for working families. I am also a strong supporter of Medicare for All.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Yes, I strongly support the STOCK Act and the Ban Conflicted Trading Act, which would ban members from trading individual stocks.

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Vermont Conservation Voters wants YOU to VOTE!

Vermont Conservation Voters’ mission is to protect the environment and promote health, while advancing social,economic, and racial justice, and strengthening our democracy. Your voice matters in ensuring a bright future for all Vermonters. Learn more at VermontConservationVoters.com Paid for by Vermont Conservation Voters, PO Box 744, Montpelier, VT 05601 VG4T-VtConservationVoters092822.indd 1

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Candidates for Representative to Congress

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ermont’s sole seat in the 435-member U.S. House of Representatives has no incumbent seeking reelection this year for the first time since 2006. Whoever wins this two-year term will have the opportunity to propose and vote on federal legislation and serve on committees, including those charged with government oversight. These are the candidates competing for your vote. m Information and photos were provided by the candidates.

Becca Balint

Age: 54 Town of residence: Brattleboro Occupation: Vermont Senate president pro

Matt Druzba

tempore/former middle school teacher Party affiliation: Democrat Website: beccabalint.com

Age: 58 Town of residence: Burlington Occupation: Chief operating officer; finance industry Party affiliation: Independent Website: MattD4VT.com

What will be your top priority in office?

What will be your top priority in office?

Protecting our democracy is my top priority. As Vermont’s congresswoman, I will do everything possible to make our democracy representative, fair and to ensure voting rights. Only with a strong democracy can we protect our environment and reproductive rights and create a health care system and economy that work for everyone.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? I believe all change starts with conversation and having the courage to connect and find common ground. To break through our polarization, we also need structural reforms: ending partisan gerrymandering, ending the Electoral College and filibuster, and reforming the Supreme Court.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs? Our current health care system is fundamentally flawed. To reduce costs, we must move to a national single-payer approach that delivers the care Vermonters and Americans deserve. We must also end corporate drug profiteering by capping costs and allowing Medicare to negotiate fair prices for prescription medications.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Yes, I strongly support banning stock trades by members of Congress, the judiciary and the executive branch while in office.

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One of my top priorities will be to bring “independent” and nonpartisan “principled leadership” to Washington in the name of all Vermonters. Also, women’s rights, personal reproductive autonomy, Second Amendment support with commonsense gun control, climate change, criminal justice reform, immigration reform, effective military and a “smaller government” direction.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? Being another Vermont “independent” in Congress would send a strong message to Washington. I was a Reagan Republican and a Democrat, each for a dozen years. It’s instrumental now being a left-leaning independent and moderate (with conservative undertones). I will never be beholden to any political party or special interest group.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs? As a nonpartisan independent, I would meet with highly informed, well-intended health care professionals, consultants, experts, etc. (regardless of party affiliation) to listen to (and support the best) well-thought-out and vetted proposals and direction on best approaches to combat rapid-rising health care costs.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? I would support a “partial/hybrid” ban that would clearly address any conflict of interest or perception of a conflict.

Liam Madden

Age: 38 Town of residence: Rockingham Occupation: Director of solar energy department for a home energy tech company Party affiliation: Republican Website: RebirthDemocracy.com

What will be your top priority in office?

Improving the health of our political system so that we can solve enormous and complex challenges. Beyond election finance and term limits (which I support), we need changes in technology, in legal structure and in mindset, which I outline in greater depths at my website, RebirthDemocracy.com.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? Firstly, as an independent, I wouldn’t be beholden to a party agenda and I would be willing to develop relationships with members of any party. Beyond my personal efforts, I will prioritize introducing innovations for the citizenry to bypass gridlock and politicians who don’t listen.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs? By supporting the Prescription Drug Price Relief Act, so Americans don’t pay twice as much as Canadians. Additionally, in service of creating a system of universal and affordable care, we should subsidize the costs of medical school for doctors willing to serve in federally funded, locally controlled, democratically managed health care clinics.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Yes. I don’t own any stocks, as an FYI.

Adam Ortiz

Age: 45 Town of residence: Rutland City Occupation: Former construction worker and “everything guy” Party affiliation: Independent Website: None

What will be your top priority in office?

Paying the bills we have before making new ones. Improving cellphone towers, replacing drinking-water pipes, improving teamwork, updating all “what if” plans.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? I won’t. People are going to feel how they’re going to feel. All I can do is lead by example.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs? We need to prove that our way of doing things works, and it will be up to others if they’re going to follow. By having a team of third-party shoppers buy materials, we’ll save money. Once buyers hear “government,” the price goes up.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? If it is the will of Vermont, I will do what is asked of me.


Ericka Redic

Age: 44 Town of residence: Burlington Occupation: Accountant Party affiliation: Libertarian Website: RedicForCongress.com

What will be your top priority in office?

Restore accountability, transparency and integrity to the federal government. The decisions of our elected officials have created utter chaos around our nation. From the unstable economy and a recession they deny to the increase in suicides and overdoses thanks to the crisis at our southern border. Americans deserve better.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? By focusing on what actually matters — the safety and security of the American people and stability in our economy. These things should not be partisan issues.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

Government intervention continues to be the number-one cause of rising prices and interruptions in the delivery of health care. It’s time for the federal government to stop picking winners and losers and let medical professionals get back to doing what they do best — taking care of patients, not bureaucrats.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Yes, and this should also include immediate family members.

Luke Talbot

Age: 59 Town of residence: Brighton Occupation: Field inspector for the commercial heating and power generation industry Party affiliation: Independent Website: None

What will be your top priority in office?

The southern border must be secured to stop human trafficking along with the flow of fentanyl and the millions of illegal immigrants. This is essential for the safety and security of border protection officers and local communities along with reducing the massive financial burden to the country.

How would you address political polarization as a member of Congress? As a new member of Congress, there is an opportunity to have honest discussions about issues that affect all Americans, regardless of party. I would also advocate for term limits to eliminate career politicians who become more focused on what’s best for reelection instead of what’s best for the country.

How should Congress address rapidly rising health care costs?

I believe there is a large component of the cost that’s related to government mandates in aspects of health care. We must also address factors such as illegal immigrants, malpractice and fraud that all impact cost. Exploring nontraditional options like shopping across state lines and expanding self-funded HSAs are potential solutions.

VG4t-CCTV092822 1

9/22/22 1:28 PM

HAVE YOU

NOTICED OUR LEGAL ADS?

Turn to the Classifieds section or go to sevendaysvt.com/legals for a list of legal notices including: • Act 250 Permit applications

• Notices to creditors

• Foreclosures

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• Storage auctions

Contact Kaitlin for a quote at legals@sevendaysvt.com; 865-1020 x142.

Would you support banning members of Congress from trading stocks while in office? Members must be allowed to invest, but there must be a blind trust preventing them from profiting from their position.

4t-legals2022.indd 1

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Candidates for Governor

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Peter Duval

Kevin Hoyt

Age: 57 Town of residence: Underhill Occupation: Househusband and sailing instructor Party affiliation: Independent Website: peterforvermont.earth

How will you help make childcare more accessible and affordable for working families? I received a lot of correspondence from providers about a broken system. Let’s look at a universal stipend for parents, probably reducing demand for expensive, labor-intensive infant care while encouraging parent-child bonding. A livable wage would help resolve low pay for early childhood education and across the entire economy.

How will you help Vermonters cope with inflation?

Inflation is driven by energy prices — functions of supply and demand. Vermonters can do something about demand. Vermont can organize conservation with a short workweek, real-time ride-sharing, fleet reduction, infrastructure diet and rethinking housing. Jevons paradox: Conservation, not efficiency, cuts costs and emissions quickly. And whatever happens with prices, Vermonters win.

What actions are you taking in your own life to reduce your carbon footprint? I minimize driving my Honda Gen 1 Insight (approximately 5,000 miles per year, about 0.8 metric tonnes CO2E – 0.8 tonnes too much). EnergyStar roofing is installed on my home. Cool and cold zones reduce heating demand. A 12kW PV system is in progress, triple the original design. I eat less meat.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? Yes, Article 22 enshrines an important right. It also creates a state interest in pregnancy – perhaps something to correct later.

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he governor is Vermont’s CEO, the head of its executive branch of government. The Vermont legislature passes bills; the governor decides whether to sign them into law. The roles are reversed when it comes to the state budget, which the governor drafts and the legislature approves. The governor also appoints agency leaders and issues executive orders and proclamations. Republican Phil Scott has held the job since 2017 and is running for reelection. His responses to our questions are listed below, alongside those of his challengers.

Age: 52 Town of residence: Bennington Occupation: Television host and producer; conservation educator; spokesman and advocate for the National Shooting Sports Foundation Party affiliation: Independent Website: vtvault.org/fightback

How will you help make childcare more accessible and affordable for working families? Education reform, school choice and the money follows the student. Decrease the cost of living, that is: remove criminal government and cut taxes. Reduce government regulations, fees and “costs” that oppress Vermonters. Increase wages through employers, not the government.

How will you help Vermonters cope with inflation?

Reduce frivolous government spending and criminal corruption, embezzlement, money laundering, obstruction. Provide equal laws and liability for Congress. Greatly reduce government size and regulation — put Vermont first and cut taxes with nonessential government pork and theft. We need to cut the cost of living. #RICO.

What actions are you taking in your own life to reduce your carbon footprint? I’m helping arrest and remove our criminal leadership and exposing the green-energy scam for what it is. The climate is changing because it’s being “engineered.” Another government-created problem, and their answer is always to restrict, control and tax you more.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? I support a woman’s right to reproduction and everyone’s right to bodily autonomy, but I do not support this bill.

Phil Scott

Age: 64 Town of residence: Berlin Occupation: Governor of Vermont Party affiliation: Republican Website: philscott.org

How will you help make childcare more accessible and affordable for working families? We’ve been focusing on a cradle-to-career approach, so investing in early care and learning is a critical piece of that strategy. From childcare tax credits, afterschool and summer programs, and investing in childcare workforce, we’ve made great progress, but we have much more work to do.

How will you help Vermonters cope with inflation?

While inflation is largely out of our control, there is a lot we can do to make Vermont more affordable and ease the financial burden on everyday Vermonters. This includes making strategic investments in affordable housing, childcare and other big costs for families, while holding the line on taxes.

What actions are you taking in your own life to reduce your carbon footprint? I’ve always been frugal by nature and do my best to reuse and recycle as much as possible. My home is completely weatherized with passive solar on my roof. I also utilize Zoom or Teams whenever possible to reduce travel. I’m very grateful to have a state-owned electric F-150 Lightning.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? Yes. I believe the choice should be between a woman and her doctor.


Candidates for Lieutenant Governor

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he lieutenant governor presides over the Vermont Senate. The position is largely ceremonial — unless the governor is incapacitated or unable to serve. In that case, the LG takes over the top job. Democrat Molly Gray, the current lieutenant governor, is not running for reelection. These are the candidates vying for the job. Ian G. Diamondstone of the Green Mountain Party is also on the ballot but did not respond to our candidate questionnaire.

Joe Benning Brenda Siegel

Age: 45 Town of residence: Newfane Occupation: Consultant, small business owner and educator Party affiliation: Democrat/Progressive Website: brendaforvermont.com

How will you help make childcare more accessible and affordable for working families?

I’m committed to no family paying above 10 percent of their annual income. We must enact universal pre-K, better fund early education centers, support fair wages and benefits for childcare workers across Vermont. It’s not just about making investments in childcare, it’s about making the right investments.

How will you help Vermonters cope with inflation?

Vermont has become less affordable over the last six years. I have a plan for emergency, transitional and permanent housing for low- to middle-income families. Build in-state renewable energy, lower energy costs, bring good paying jobs. Support worker initiatives like mandatory paid family medical leave. Support small businesses.

What actions are you taking in your own life to reduce your carbon footprint? I recycle, compost and waste as little as possible. However, like so many Vermonters, I cannot reach solutions like moving to electric vehicles, heat pumps, solar panels and more. We must increase public transportation, make sure that climate solutions can reach impacted communities and transition farms to carbon sequestration.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not?

Bernard Peters

Age: 76 Town of residence: Irasburg Occupation: Army veteran; retired from the Agency of Transportation Party affiliation: Independent Website: None

How will you help make childcare more accessible and affordable for working families?

You have to get people to do childcare at a reasonable rate so that people who are working don’t have to spend all of their money on childcare. The legislature would have to come up with something, and if I was governor, I probably would vote for it.

How will you help Vermonters cope with inflation?

I don’t know if anybody at the local or state level can do a lot about it. It’s usually the federal government that will handle it. You’ll have to have people in Washington stop inflation, which will help Vermont and working people. It starts higher up, and it trickles down.

What actions are you taking in your own life to reduce your carbon footprint? I don’t even know if I make a carbon footprint. I drive a vehicle. We don’t use any more electricity than we have to because of the price. We don’t just go out and destroy the Earth. I’m not out spreading chemicals all over the place.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? No. I’m hoping we’ll have a debate and some of this can be brought out in a debate.

Yes, and pro-choice is not enough. We need to be proactive. As governor, I will propose a shield law.

Age: 66 Town of residence: Lyndon Occupation: Trial attorney and state senator Party affiliation: Republican Website: JoeBenning.com

What do you hope to achieve in this office?

I would like to provide stability to the institution of the Senate, promote Vermont as a great place to live, work and play, and support Gov. Phil Scott in his attempt to keep Vermont affordable.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? I am in favor of Prop 5/Article 22 because it reflects my view of a proper right to privacy.

David Zuckerman Age: 51 Town of Residence: Hinesburg Occupation: Farmer Party affiliation: Progressive/Democrat Website: ZuckermanForVT.com

What do you hope to achieve in this office?

I hope to use the office to organize support for issues that matter most to working Vermonters, including housing, health care, childcare, climate legislation, social and racial justice, and commonsense gun reform. I will help more people engage with the political system to advocate for the issues they care about.

Do you support the Vermont Right to Personal Reproductive Autonomy Amendment? Why or why not? I wholeheartedly support Article 22. Abortion is health care. A person’s reproductive health care should be between them and their doctor.

Information and photos were provided by the candidates. SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

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Candidates for Secretary of State

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he Secretary of State’s Office manages trademarks, professional licensing and regulation of business services including data brokers, telemarketers and amusement ride operators. It’s also responsible for overseeing Vermont elections. Its elections division maintains a

database of lobbyists and one for campaign finance disclosures, and it works with local Boards of Civil Authority to ensure that the checklist of registered voters is accurate. The current secretary of state, Democrat Jim Condos, is retiring. These candidates are vying to replace him.

Sarah Copeland Hanzas

H. Brooke Paige

What’s the most important thing the Secretary of State’s Office can do to ensure that Vermont continues to have free and fair elections?

What’s the most important thing the Secretary of State’s Office can do to ensure that Vermont continues to have free and fair elections?

Age: 52 Town of residence: Bradford Occupation: State legislator Party affiliation: Democrat Website: SarahForVermont.com

The office will continue to give real-time support and guidance to local elections administrators. Convening a town clerk advisory group will open a conduit to clerks to identify challenges. We will continue our vigilance on election cybersecurity. Regular, transparent review of elections’ results will assure Vermonters our elections are fair.

What will be your top priority in office, outside of elections?

I will hire an education and outreach coordinator who will help create civics curriculum for Vermont’s schoolteachers. We’ll go on a Democracy Tour around the state, to engage with Vermonters on how democracy works and how people can have an impact on what elected leaders do once in office.

Age: Did not provide Town of residence: Washington Occupation: Retired sales executive and retail CEO Party affiliation: Republican Website: brookepaige.us

The Secretary of State has failed to convince voters of the fidelity and security of Vermont’s elections. Many citizens have given up on the process. Changing from an open to a closed primary process and adding safeguards to our new universal vote-by-mail process would help to restore voter confidence.

What will be your top priority in office, outside of elections?

The scope of the Office of Professional Regulation needs to be reviewed and narrowed. OPR has expanded beyond its intended purpose of registering and licensing businesses. OPR’s regulatory and investigative authority has overreached its purpose and, on occasion, ruined legitimate professionals’ careers by delaying investigations for months and, occasionally, years.

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Candidates for Attorney General

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he attorney general is Vermont’s lawyer and represents the state in civil and criminal proceedings. The Attorney General’s Office handles a wide variety of cases, including criminal offenses, civil rights violations, consumer protection and environmental matters. Democrat T.J. Donovan stepped down from this job over the summer. When the current interim AG, Susanne R. Young, was appointed to succeed him, she became the first woman to hold the job. Two candidates are vying to succeed her. Here are their answers to our candidate questionnaire.

I’m running for Senate to work for you.

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Charity Clark

Age: 47 Town of residence: Williston Occupation: Attorney and former chief of staff of the Vermont Attorney General’s Office Party affiliation: Democrat Website: CharityForVermont.com

As Attorney General, how would you: Improve public safety?

All Vermonters deserve to feel safe and be safe in their communities. As attorney general, I will advocate for policies that protect Vermonters, including gun safety and data privacy. I will work to hold individuals and systems accountable, while also investing in a justice system that reflects Vermont’s values.

Ensure accountability of law enforcement officials?

Police have a duty to protect our communities and should be held accountable for any wrongdoings or undue harm. I will provide legal support to the legislature as they review laws affecting police accountability. I will continue the attorney general’s practice of reviewing officerinvolved use-of-force cases.

Protect Vermonters’ civil rights?

I will provide strong leadership to the Civil Rights Division, which enforces laws related to employment discrimination and civil remedies in connection with hate crimes. I’ll also use the deep expertise of the Attorney General’s Office in constitutional law to provide education and support to the legislature on matters of civil rights.

Michael Tagliavia Age: 59 Town of residence: Corinth Occupation: Retired Party affiliation: Republican Website: None

As Attorney General, how would you: Improve public safety?

Do not remove qualified immunity from law enforcement. Give law enforcement funding and training necessary to keep our towns and cities safe. Reopen Windsor detention facility with emphasis on substance abuse abatement and vocational training. Expand L.E.A.D. program in schools to educate youth about the dangers of drug abuse.

Ensure accountability of law enforcement officials?

All law enforcement officers swear an oath upon hiring and are currently subject to ethics rules, as well as being held accountable by the same laws as all Vermonters. When necessary, officers who are found in violation should be held accountable for their actions, including criminally, when circumstances dictate.

Protect Vermonters’ civil rights?

All people are created equal, both under God and the law, and they need to be treated as such. This includes the unborn.

Information and photos were provided by the candidates.

It Costs How Much?! Seven Days is examining Vermont’s housing crisis — and what can be done about it — in Locked Out, a yearlong series.

Find all the stories at sevendaysvt.com/locked-out 4t-LockedOut22.indd 1

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Candidates for Treasurer T

he Vermont treasurer manages the state’s money and investments, collects and returns “unclaimed financial property” — aka your hard-earned cash — and promotes efforts to improve Vermonters’ financial literacy. Treasurer Beth Pearce is not running for reelection. These are the candidates vying to replace her.

H. Brooke Paige

Mike Pieciak

Is Vermont on the right track in terms of fiscal management? What would you change?

Is Vermont on the right track in terms of fiscal management? What would you change?

What will be your top priority in office?

What will be your top priority in office?

Age: Did not provide Town of residence: Washington Occupation: Retired sales executive and retail CEO Party affiliation: Republican Website: brookepaige.us

The next treasurer must be more proactive in providing the legislature with guidance on the State’s ability to operate within its “means.” While the state constitution requires fiscal restraint in matching expenditures to expected revenues, in recent years the state’s budget has been tailored to match unrealistic “rosy projections.”

The next treasurer must provide the legislature with more realistic projections for the return on investments in the state pension funds. Overly optimistic estimates have resulted in a ballooning of the unfunded liability from $3 billion in 2012 to $6 billion to $7 billion today. This practice must be reversed.

Age: 39 Town of residence: Winooski Occupation: Former commissioner of the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation Party affiliation: Democrat Website: MikeForVermont.com

Throughout the pandemic, remote work opportunities and our unique landscape have made Vermont an even more appealing place to live. We have an opportunity to welcome young families, grow our workforce, support our rural economies and ultimately generate more financial resources to support struggling Vermonters.

We must strengthen Vermont’s economy by supporting investments in housing, childcare and climate action. Addressing these three challenges is essential to attracting new Vermonters to our state, preserving the Vermont we love and ensuring all Vermonters have the resources to thrive, regardless of where they live.

Candidates for Auditor M

aking sure the government is spending our tax dollars effectively falls to the state auditor. Doug Hoffer, the current auditor — first elected in 2012 — is running for reelection. Here are his answers to our candidate questionnaire, alongside those of his rival, Richard “Rick” Morton.

Doug Hoffer

Age: 71 Town of residence: Burlington Occupation: State auditor Party affiliation: Democrat/Progressive Website: HofferForAuditor.com

What will be your top priority in office?

Priorities are unchanged: to conduct performance audits and investigations that inform the legislative discourse about matters of policy and identify opportunities to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of state government. Continuing areas of interest include health care and economic development, both of which suffer from a lack of quantifiable results.

What more can the Auditor’s Office do to help the state eliminate waste, fraud and abuse of taxpayer funds?

We’ve identified millions in potential savings, avoided costs and enhanced revenue. Here are a few: health care — state spending and OneCare All Payer; business incentives; contracting; ski area leases; capital projects; lake cleanup. To achieve these outcomes, the administration and legislature must act. I have no control over that.

Information and photos were provided by the candidates. 18

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Richard “Rick” Morton

Age: 74 Town of residence: Brattleboro Occupation: Retired bank compliance/ security officer; part-time chaplain at an assisted living facility Party affiliation: Republican Website: Morton4VTSenate.com — Morton is also running for State Senate in Windham County

What will be your top priority in office?

Equally address all branches (executive, legislative and judicial) and levels of government (municipal, state and federal interactions) and government contracts. Review history of required audits and prioritize discretionary audits looking for gaps that need attention. Address election integrity concerns.

What more can the Auditor’s Office do to help the state eliminate waste, fraud and abuse of taxpayer funds?

Revitalize whistleblower processes and protections. Update and/or establish PERKs (Pre-Exam Request Kits) to be used by audit targets prior to on-site or remote audits in developing risk assessments. Look at more than financial outcomes but also process documentation and internal controls of targeted entities.


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VERMONT’S INDEPENDEN T VOICE FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 2, 2022 VOL.27 NO.20 SEVENDAYSV T.COM

PROOF POSITIVE

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PAGE 38

ORDER UP

MEET HALFWAY

SEEING THINGS PAGE 46

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The pandemic has weakened — but not killed — Vermont’s grand Town Meeting Day tradition PAGE 54

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BY ANNE WALL ACE ALLEN, PAGE 28

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HOW? SHATTERED DREAMS

VOTE ON OR BEFORE

Young man fatally shot in Burlington

V O T E!

NO.40 SEVENDAYSVT.COM 13-20, 2022 VOL.27 DENT VOICE JULY VERMON T’S INDEPEN

PAGE 15

HERO

COUNTDOWN s compete Democratic candidate In the August 9 primary, s lone U.S. House seat for the jackpot: Vermont’ PAGE 26 BY CHELSEA EDGAR,

RICTING REMINDERS / LIST OF DEBATES

CLASS STRUGGLE “Dire” shortage of VT

Gray

Chase clifford

PAGE 14

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HIKERS’ HAVEN

Woodstock man hosts

PAGE 36

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PAGE 34

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PAGE 48

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Henry Sheldon Muse

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VOTING INFO / CANDIDATE Q& As / REDIST

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SEVEN DAYSV T.COM 2022 VOL.27 NO.37 VOICE JUNE 22-29,

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1T-SR092822.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

19

9/23/22 3:13 PM


BHS/BTC 2025

Aging and outdated learning spaces • Does not meet “Collaborative High-Performa PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T Standards” DON’T FORGETSchool TO VOTE! • 1960s classrooms Ballots will be mailed in September Science labs Election Day is •November 8 insufficient for larger class size STEM 2022, equipment in need voted of replacement In •August City Council to allow Burlington School District to place a $165 million $30+ million for maintenance 20 OL bond question on theneeded November ballot to build(in a new • Crumbling infrastructure high school and technical center. gh amounts • Outdated plumbing, electrical, heating, ng a voterand ventilation systems ong list of • Insufficient insulation and windows TO VOTE! •DON’T Outdated FORGET tech infrastructure Ballots will be mailed in September Day is November 8 Does Election not meet current accessibility standa ance • Comprised of six academic buildings with un outdoor walkways ED A NEW SCHOOL • Seven stories from top to bottom  In August 2022, City Council voted to allow s • Elevators outdated and in undesirable locati Burlington School District to place a $165 million were closed due to high amounts bond question on the November ballot to build a PCBs were found during a voternew high school and technical center. oject and added to a long list of 018) dentified.

What is BHS/BTC 2025?

WHY DO WE NEED A NEW SCHOOL? In 2020, BHS and BTC were closed due to high amounts of arning spaces PCBs in the air. The PCBs were found during a voter-approved borative High-Performance renovation project and added to a long list of deficiencies

WHY NOT JUST REMOVE THE P

PCBs are not only in the air • Found in tile, ceiling, walls, soil, and concre •WHY BSDNOT cannot reoccupy without removing all previously identified. JUST REMOVE THE PCBs? contaminated including all the so PCBs are not only inmaterials, the air Aging and outdated learning WHAT spaces HAPPENED TO THE • between Found in tile, buildings ceiling, walls, soil, and concrete floor nt for• larger sizes High-Performance School Does notclass meet “Collaborative ards $70m BOND FROM 2018? BSD cannot reoccupy without removing all contaminated Standards” eed of replacement •• PCB removal would require every window t nheated, materials, including all the soil between buildings • 1960s classrooms BSD no longer has access to•that money replaced, along with two feet ofreplaced, wall on eac PCB removal would require every window to be • Science labs insufficient for larger class sizes •inBSD spent $4m of the 2018 bond request onofto the along with two feet wallnever on each side; in some cases thisand w or maintenance (in 2018) • Building likely be “PCB free” • STEM equipment need of replacement means entire outer walls would have to be removed ReEnvisioning project before canceling the plan re $30+ million needed always need ongoing, costly testing ons • Building likely to never be “PCB free” and will always need for maintenance (in 2018) • All other funds were either returned orcostly never borrowed ectrical, heating, ongoing, testing • Crumbling infrastructure • This new bond s • Outdated plumbing, electrical, heating, and entirely ventilation replaces the 2018 bond THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS PAID FOR BY: systems and windows • Insufficient insulation and windows ucture PCBs? WHY NOT JUST STAY IN MACYS? • Outdated tech infrastructure Does not meet current accessibility Downtown BHSstandards (DtBHS)

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE

is not a long-term solution t accessibility standards • Comprised of six academic buildings with unheated, $70m BOND ete floor • BSD doesn’t own the old Macy’s building and is FROM 2018? Visit www.bsdvt.org/bhs-btc-2025 demic buildings with unheated, outdoor walkways the space BSD no longer hasmore access to project that money to learn about details, • Seven stories from leasing top to bottom oil • Elevators outdated • DtBHS doeslocations not have windows antax auditorium orbond and in undesirable • BSD spentor$4m of impact the 2018 request on the and budget. p to bottom 20 gymnasium ReEnvisioning project before canceling the plan d in undesirable locations to be • BTC is not located in• DtBHS, leases several All otherbut funds were eitherspots returned or never borrowe SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

zes

2018)

w

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE Need for New Spaces WHY IS THIS $70m BOND FROMBalances 2018? and Cost to Taxpayers

dards WHAT HAPPENED unheated, TO THE $70m BSD no THE BEST PLAN? Lowest cost option out of five design longer has access to that• money options Built for Current BOND FROM 2018? • BSD spent $4m of the 2018 bond request on the • Saves taxpayers $20m by leveraging and Future Needs BSD no longer has Congressional grant before canceling the plan to move half • Adaptableproject to future technology ationsaccess to that moneyReEnvisioning of BTC programs to airport (original infrastructure • BSD spent $4m of the• All other funds were either returned project or never borrowed cost was $210m before • LEED Certified, ‘Net-Zero Ready’ saves 2018 bond request on deciding to move programs) • This newenergy bond entirely costs over time replaces the 2018 bond the ReEnvisioning project before canceling the plan All other funds were either returned or never borrowed This new bond entirely replaces the 2018 bond

PCBs? • •

High-efficiency heating and cooling systems Designed with 50-100-year lifespan

Reuses land owned by School District

AND BOND • WHY NOT JUST STAY INBUDGET MACYS?

$190 million*

Total Project Cost

Supports “Deep Learning Downtown (DtBHS) is for allBHS Students”

BSD Contributions ($5m budget $25 million* savings/surplus, $10msolution from capital plan, not a long-term $10m American Rescue Plan) • Flexibleown learningthe spaces andMacy’s updated crete floor • BSD doesn’t old building and is classroom technology all WHY NOT JUST leasing •the space Multi-use spaces can be expanded Total Bond Request on or reduced size based on program or an soil STAY IN MACY’S? • DtBHS does notinhave windows auditorium or $165 million* November Ballot needs Downtown Burlingtongymnasium • Maintains connection to outdoors and High School is not a w to be community • BTC is not located in DtBHS, but leases several spots long-term solution • Meets high-performing standards for ach side in Burlington and South Burlington • BSD doesn’t own the old STEM d will Macy’s building and is• BuildingDesigned is scheduled for demolition following our with Public Engagement leasing the space TAX IMPACT • Design Steering Committee included • DtBHS does not have lease agreement

ed

$190 million* Total Project Cost *InBSD addition to these contributions, Contributions ($5m budgetBSD $25 million* utilized another $10m congressional grant to savings/surplus, $10m from capital plan, move halfAmerican of BTC’sRescue programs to the airport, $10m Plan) reducing the original cost from *In addition to these project contributions, BSD utilized $210m toanother $190m$10m congressional grant to move half of BTC’s programs to the airport, reducing the original project cost from $210m to $190m

*BSD is committed to fundraising to borrow Total Bond Request on $165 million* less than $165m. We also recently supported November Ballot legislation that provides more funding to *BSD is committed to fundraising to borrow districts with students qualify for free and less than $165m. We who also recently supported reduced lunch who aremore learning English. legislation thatorprovides funding to We expect this to substantially reduce the districts with students who qualify for free and reduced lunch or who areon learning English. impact this project has tax rates.

windows or an auditorium or gymnasium BTC is not located in DtBHS, but leases several spots in Burlington and South Burlington Building is scheduled for demolition following our lease agreement

representation from schools, families, community Multiple rounds of feedback from students and community Incorporates community asks from prior projects

We expect this to substantially reduce the impact this project has on tax rates. Fiscal Estimated Cumulative Change Property Tax Income Tax Year Borrowing Tax Impact from Prior Change Change from Fiscal Estimated Cumulative Change Tax Income TaxRate Year Property from Current Current Year Borrowing Tax Impact from Prior Change Change from Rate ($50,000 Year from Current Current Rate ($370K Income Rate ($50,000 Home) Payer) ($370K Income

2023 $30 million

2023 $30 million

0%

0%

2024 $70 million

2.85%

2025 $65 million

9.50%

2024 $70 million

0%

Home)

0%

2.85%

DON’T FORGET TO VOTE!

Ballots will be mailed in September Election Day is November 8

$0

$146

2.85%

$146

$34

9.50%

6.65%

$488

$115

15.67%

6.17%

$805

$190

15.67%

0%

$805

$190

-2.85%

$659

$155

6.65%

$0

15.67%

2027-44

$0

15.67%

2045 2045

$0 $0

12.82% 12.82%

2046 2046

$0 $0

6.17% 6.17%

-6.65% -6.65%

$317 $317

$75$75

2047 2047

$0 $0

0% 0%

-6.17% -6.17%

$0$0

$0 $0

2027-44

$0

$0

0%

-2.85%

$805

$115

2026

2026

6.17%

$488

$0

$34

2.85%

• Visit www.bsdvt.org/bhs-btc-2025 to learn more, or see reverse for project details, tax impact, and budget. 2025 $65 million

$0 Payer)

$0

$805 $659

$190 $190

SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

$155

21


Candidates for statewide, county and legislative offices The following candidates appear on the general election ballot for these statewide, county and legislative offices. Candidates are listed alphabetically by last name. Information was provided by the candidates. Probate judge, assistant judge and high bailiff candidates can be found online at sos.vermont.gov. * = INCUMBENT

STATE SENATOR ADDISON Vote for no more thanTWO.

Christopher Bray (D)* BRISTOL

brayforvermont.us

Robert Burton (R) CORNWALL

Lloyd Dike (R) BRISTOL

Ruth Hardy (D)* MIDDLEBURY

ruthforvermont.com

Mason D. Wade III (I) ROCHESTER

BENNINGTON Vote for no more than TWO.

Brian Campion (D)* BENNINGTON

Dick Sears (D/R)* BENNINGTON

CALEDONIA Vote for no more than ONE.

JT Dodge (R) NEWBURY

jtdodgeforvermont.com

Jane Kitchel (D)* DANVILLE

kitchelforsenate.com

CHITTENDEN CENTRAL Vote for no more than THREE.

Phil Baruth (D/P)* BURLINGTON

facebook.com/ baruthsenate

Infinite Culcleasure (I) BURLINGTON

voteinfinite.com

Martine Larocque Gulick (D) BURLINGTON

Tanya Vyhovsky (P/D) ESSEX TOWN

tanyavforvt.com

CHITTENDEN NORTH Vote for no more than ONE.

Leland Morgan (R) MILTON

Irene Wrenner (D) ESSEX TOWN

wrenner4senate.org

CHITTENDEN SOUTHEAST Vote for no more than THREE.

Thomas Chittenden (D)* SOUTH BURLINGTON

thomaschittenden.com

Virginia “Ginny” Lyons (D)* WILLISTON

senatorginnylyons.com

Kesha Ram Hinsdale (D/P)*

RACES US SENATOR Vote for no more than ONE.

beccabalint.com

Mark Coester (I) WESTMINSTER

mark4vermont.com

Natasha DiamondstoneKohout (GM) DUMMERSTON

ESSEX Vote for no more than ONE.

Russ Ingalls (R/D)* NEWPORT CITY

FRANKLIN Vote for no more than TWO.

Randy Brock (R)* SWANTON

randybrock.com

Pam McCarthy (D) SAINT ALBANS TOWN

pamforvermont.com

Robert W. Norris (R) SHELDON

Jessie Nakuma Palczewski (D) SAINT ALBANS TOWN

GRAND ISLE Vote for no more than ONE.

Stephen C. Bellows (R) GRAND ISLE

Richard “Dick” Mazza (D)*

SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

Matt Druzba (I) BURLINGTON

matt4vt.com

Liam Madden (R) ROCKINGHAM

rebirthdemocracy.com

philscott.org

Brenda Siegel (D/P) NEWFANE

brendaforvermont.com

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR Vote for no more than ONE.

Joe Benning (R) LYNDON

joebenning.com

Ian G. Diamondstone (GM) PUTNEY

Dawn Marie Ellis (I)

Ericka Redic (L)

HINESBURG

redicforcongress.com

STATE TREASURER

CALAIS

BURLINGTON

DawnEllisforVT.com

crisericson.com

JERICHO

BRATTLEBORO

BERLIN

Adam Ortiz (I)

Dean Rolland (R) Rohan St. Marthe (R)

Becca Balint (D)

Phil Scott (R)*

Stephen Duke (I)

Cris Ericson (I)

HINESBURG

REPRESENTATIVE TO CONGRESS Vote for no more than ONE.

keshaforvermont.com

SHELBURNE

COLCHESTER

22

STATEWIDE

CHESTER

Gerald Malloy (R) WEATHERSFIELD

deploymalloy.com

Kerry Patrick Raheb (I)

BENNINGTON

kerryraheb.com

Peter Welch (D) NORWICH

welchforvermont.com

RUTLAND CITY BURLINGTON

Luke Talbot (I) BRIGHTON

GOVERNOR Vote for no more than ONE.

David Zuckerman (P/D) zuckermanforvt.com

Vote for no more than ONE.

H. Brooke Paige (R) WASHINGTON

Mike Pieciak (D)

Peter Duval (I)

WINOOSKI

peterforver mont.earth

SECRETARY OF STATE

UNDERHILL

Kevin Hoyt (I) BENNINGTON

Facebook

Bernard Peters (I) IRASBURG

mikeforvermont.com

Vote for no more than ONE.

Sarah Copeland Hanzas (D) BRADFORD

sarahforvermont.com

H. Brooke Paige (R) WASHINGTON

AUDITOR OF ACCOUNTS Vote for no more than ONE.

Doug Hoffer (D/P)* BURLINGTON

Richard “Rick” Morton (R) BRATTLEBORO

morton4vtsenate.com

ATTORNEY GENERAL Vote for no more than ONE.

Charity R. Clark (D) WILLISTON

charityforvermont.com

Michael Tagliavia (R) CORINTH


LAMOILLE Vote for no more than ONE.

Richard A. Westman (R/D)* CAMBRIDGE

ORANGE Vote for no more than ONE.

John Klar (R) BROOKFIELD

klarforsenate.com

Mark A. MacDonald (D)* WILLIAMSTOWN

ORLEANS Vote for no more than ONE.

Samuel A. Douglass (R) TROY

Robert A. Starr (D)* TROY

RUTLAND Vote for no more than THREE.

Brian “BC” Collamore (R)* RUTLAND TOWN

Dwayne Tucker (R) BARRE TOWN

Anne Watson (D/P) MONTPELIER

annewatsonforvtsenate. com

WINDHAM Vote for no more than TWO.

Mark Coester (I) WESTMINSTER

mark4vermont.com

Wendy Harrison (D) BRATTLEBORO

wendy4windhamvt.org

Nader Hashim (D) DUMMERSTON

hashimforsenate.com

Richard “Rick” Kenyon (R) BRATTLEBORO

Richard “Rick” Morton (R) BRATTLEBORO

Tim Wessel (I) BRATTLEBORO

Joshua Ferguson (D)

timwesselvt.com

joshuaforvermont.com

Alison H. Clarkson (D)*

FAIR HAVEN

Bridgette Remington (D) RUTLAND TOWN

Anna Tadio (D) RUTLAND CITY

David “Dave” Weeks (R)

WINDSOR Vote for no more than THREE.

WOODSTOCK

alisonclarkson.org

Dana Colson Jr. (R) SHARON

Alice Flanders (R)

PROCTOR

HARTFORD

weeksforvtstatesenate. com

Bill T. Huff (R)

Terry K. Williams (R)

THETFORD

huffforvtstaterep.com

POULTNEY

WASHINGTON Vote for no more than THREE.

Paul Matthew Bean (R) NORTHFIELD

Ann Cummings (D)* MONTPELIER

Facebook

Dexter Lefavour (R/L) MIDDLESEX

dexter4vt.com

Andrew Perchlik (D/P)* MARSHFIELD

andrewperchlik.com

Richard “Dick” McCormack (D)* BETHEL

Rebecca White (D) HARTFORD

beccawhitevt.com

STATE REPRESENTATIVE ADDISON-1 Middlebury Vote for no more than TWO.

Peter Caldwell (R) MIDDLEBURY

Robin Scheu (D)* MIDDLEBURY

robinscheu.com

Amy Sheldon (D)* MIDDLEBURY

ADDISON-2 Cornwall, Goshen, Leicester, Ripton, Salisbury Vote for no more than ONE.

Peter Conlon (D)* CORNWALL

conlonforhouse.com

ADDISON-3 Addison, Ferrisburgh, New Haven, Panton, Vergennes, Waltham Vote for no more than TWO.

Matt Birong (D)* VERGENNES

mattbirong.com

Diane Lanpher (D)* VERGENNES

James H. McClay (R) NEW HAVEN

Rob North (R) FERRISBURGH

northforvthouse.com

ADDISON-4 Bristol, Lincoln, Monkton, Starksboro Vote for no more than TWO.

Mari Cordes (D)* LINCOLN

maricordes.org

Lynn Dike (R) BRISTOL

Facebook

Caleb Elder (D)* STARKSBORO

calebelder.com

Valerie Mullin (R) MONKTON

facebook.com/valerieforvt

ADDISON-5 Bridport, Middlebury, New Haven, Weybridge Vote for no more than ONE.

Jon Christiano (R) NEW HAVEN

christianoforvthouse.com

Jubilee McGill (D) BRIDPORT

jubileemcgill.com

ADDISON-RUTLAND Orwell, Shoreham, Whiting, Hubbardton, Sudbury Vote for no more than ONE.

Joseph Andriano (D) ORWELL

BENNINGTON 1

Henry Pearl (D)*

BENNINGTONRUTLAND

Pownal, Readsboro, Searsburg, Stamford, Woodford

Dorset, Landgrove, Peru, Danby, Mount Tabor

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

DANVILLE

CHITTENDEN-1 Richmond

Nelson Brownell (D)*

William Gaiotti (R) MOUNT TABOR

RICHMOND

Bruce Busa (R)

Mike Rice (D)

janabrownforvt.com

POWNAL

READSBORO

BENNINGTON 2

Vote for no more than ONE.

Jana Brown (D)*

DORSET

CALEDONIA-1

Bennington

Barnet, Ryegate, Waterford

Vote for no more than TWO.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Timothy R. Corcoran II (D)*

Bobby FarliceRubio (D)

Dane Whitman

bobby.vote

BENNINGTON

(D)* BENNINGTON

daneforbennington.com

BENNINGTON 3 Glastenbury, Shaftsbury, Sunderland Vote for no more than ONE.

CHITTENDEN-2 Williston

BARNET

Vote for no more than TWO.

Angela Arsenault (D) WILLISTON

angelaforwilliston.com

Erin Brady (D)* WILLISTON

CALEDONIA-2

erinbradyforwilliston.com

Hardwick, Stannard, Walden Vote for no more than ONE.

Chip Troiano (D)* STANNARD

Anthony “Tony” O’Rourke (R) WILLISTON

Bruce Roy (R) WILLISTON

roy4vt.org

CALEDONIA-3

David K. Durfee (D)*

Lyndon, Newark, Sheffield, Sutton, Wheelock

durfeeforvermont.com

Eileen Boland (D)

Vote for no more than TWO.

Dennis Labounty (D)

JERICHO

Charles Wilson (R)

UNDERHILL

SHAFTSBURY

Victor K. Harwood Jr (R) SHAFTSBURY

BENNINGTON 4 Arlington, Manchester, Sandgate, Sunderland Vote for no more than TWO.

Seth Bongartz (D)* MANCHESTER

sethbongartz4staterep. com

Vote for no more than TWO.

WHEELOCK

LYNDON

CHITTENDEN-4 Hinesburg

LYNDON

CALEDONIA-ESSEX Kirby, St. Johnsbury, Concord Vote for no more than TWO.

gervaisforvermont.com

SAINT JOHNSBURY

Scott Beck (R)*

Kathleen James (D)*

scottbeck4vermont.com

MANCHESTER

(D)*

kathjamesforstaterep. com

SAINT JOHNSBURY

campbellforvermont.com

BENNINGTON 5 Bennington, Pownal Vote for no more than TWO.

Jim Carroll (D) BENNINGTON

Mary A. Morrissey (R)* BENNINGTON

Michael Nigro (D)* BENNINGTON

Edye Graning (D) Trevor Squirrell (D)*

Joe Gervais (R) ARLINGTON

CHITTENDEN-3 Jericho, Underhill

Scott Campbell

Vote for no more than ONE.

Phil Pouech (D) HINESBURG

Sarah Toscano (R) HINESBURG

CHITTENDEN-5 Charlotte, Hinesburg Vote for no more than ONE.

Chea Waters Evans (D)

Frank Empsall (R)

CHARLOTTE

Brendan Hadash (D)

Shelburne, South Burlington

SAINT JOHNSBURY

CHITTENDEN-6

Vote for no more than ONE.

SAINT JOHNSBURY

Kate Lalley (D)

CALEDONIAWASHINGTON

SHELBURNE

Danville, Peacham, Cabot Vote for no more than ONE.

Alison Despathy (I)

CHITTENDEN-7 Shelburne, St. George Vote for no more than ONE.

DANVILLE

despathyvthouse.com

Jessica Brumsted (D)* SHELBURNE

joeandrianoforvermont. com CONTINUED SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

» P.24 23


STATE REPRESENTATIVE CONTINUED FROM P.23

CHITTENDEN-8 South Burlington, Williston Vote for no more than ONE.

Noah Hyman (D) SOUTH BURLINGTON

CHITTENDEN-9 South Burlington Vote for no more than ONE.

Emily Krasnow (D)

SOUTH BURLINGTON

emiliekrasnow.com

CHITTENDEN-10 South Burlington Vote for no more than ONE.

Kate Nugent (D) SOUTH BURLINGTON

CHITTENDEN-11 South Burlington Vote for no more than ONE.

Brian Minier (D) SOUTH BURLINGTON

bit.ly/minier4vthouse

CHITTENDEN-12 South Burlington Vote for no more than ONE.

Martin LaLonde (D)*

SOUTH BURLINGTON

martinlalondevt.com

CHITTENDEN-13 Burlington Vote for no more than TWO.

Tiff Bluemle (D)* BURLINGTON

tiffbluemle.com

Tom Licata (I) BURLINGTON

licata4house.com

Gabrielle Stebbins (D)* BURLINGTON

stebbinsforvt.com

CHITTENDEN-14 Burlington Vote for no more than TWO.

Barbara Rachelson (D/P) BURLINGTON

barbararachelson.com

Mary-Katherine Stone (D/P) BURLINGTON

stoneforvermont.com

CHITTENDEN-15

CHITTENDEN-21

Burlington

Winooski

Vote for no more than TWO.

Vote for no more than TWO.

Brian Cina (P/D)*

Daisy Berbeco (D)

cinaforhouse.com

daisyforwinooski.com

Troy Headrick

Jordan Matte (I)

BURLINGTON

(P/D) BURLINGTON

troyheadrick.com

CHITTENDEN-16 Burlington Vote for no more than TWO.

Jill Krowinski (D)* BURLINGTON

jillkrowinski.com

Kate Logan (P/D) BURLINGTON

kateloganforhouse.com

CHITTENDEN-17 Burlington Vote for no more than ONE.

Emma MulvaneyStanak (P/D)* BURLINGTON

emmaforvthouse.com

CHITTENDEN-18 Burlington Vote for no more than TWO.

WINOOSKI

CHITTENDEN-19

CHITTENDEN-22 Essex Vote for no more than TWO.

Karen Dolan (D)* ESSEX

dolanforvthouse.com

Lori Houghton (D)* ESSEX

lorihoughton.com

Seth Adam Manley (R) ESSEX

manleyforvermont.us

CHITTENDEN-23 Essex Vote for no more than TWO.

Leonora Dodge (D) ESSEX TOWN

Maryse Dunbar (R) dunbarforvthouse.org

Rey Garofano (D)* ESSEX TOWN

Denis White (R) ESSEX TOWN

Vote for no more than TWO.

Sarita Austin (D)* COLCHESTER

Patrick M. Brennan (R)* COLCHESTER

Spencer Sherman (L) COLCHESTER

CHITTENDEN-20 Colchester Vote for no more than TWO.

Seth Chase (D)* COLCHESTER

facebook.com/chase4vt

Tom Lesage (R) COLCHESTER

Curt Taylor (D)* COLCHESTER

ct4vt.com

Doug Wood (R) COLCHESTER

dougwoodforvthouse.org

CHITTENDEN-24 Essex Vote for no more than ONE.

Alyssa Black (D)* ESSEX

SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

Terri Lynn Williams (R)* GRANBY

ESSEX-ORLEANS Averill, Avery’s, Brighton, Canaan, Lemington, Lewis, Norton, Warner’s, Warren’s, Charleston, Holland, Morgan Vote for no more than ONE.

Larry Labor (R) MORGAN

Peggy Stevens (D) CHARLESTON

FRANKLIN-1 Fairfax, Georgia Vote for no more than TWO.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Berkshire, Franklin, Highgate, Richford

BERKSHIRE

hangoforhouse.com

Wayne Laroche (R/D)* FRANKLIN

FRANKLIN-6 Bakersfield, Fairfield, Fletcher Vote for no more than ONE.

Brenda Kai Churchill (D) BAKERSFIELD

James Gregoire (R)*

maynard4vt.com

revdevvt.com

FRANKLIN-2

Eileen “Lynn” Dickinson (R/D) SAINT ALBANS TOWN

FRANKLIN-3 Vote for no more than ONE.

SAINT ALBANS CITY

Mike McCarthy (D)* SAINT ALBANS CITY

ilikemikevt.com

Karin Ames (D) SOUTH HERO

Josie Leavitt (D) GRAND ISLE

josieleavitt.com

Michael R. Morgan (R)* Andy Paradee (R)

(R/D)*

ENOSBURGH

GEORGIA

Vote for no more than TWO.

MILTON

Vote for no more than ONE.

Devon Thomas (D)

Alburgh, Grand Isle, Milton, North Hero, South Hero

Lisa A. Hango

Alan “Al” Maynard (D) FAIRFAX

GRAND ISLE-CHITTENDEN

Vote for no more than TWO.

Enosburgh, Montgomery

Joe Luneau (R)*

CHITTENDENFRANKLIN

FRANKLIN-5

GEORGIA

andrewsforvermont.com

MILTON

SWANTON

jamesgregoire.com

St. Albans

Allison Duquette (R)

Matthew E. Walker (R/D)*

Carolyn Whitney Branagan (R)

Julia Andrews (D) WESTFORD

SHELDON

FAIRFIELD

Vote for no more than ONE.

Milton, Westford

Thomas Oliver (R/D)

ashleybartley.org

FAIRFAX

Roger Drury (R) CHITTENDEN-25

Vote for no more than TWO.

votebrendachurchill.com

Fairfax, Georgia

ESSEX

FRANKLIN-4 Sheldon, Swanton

Ashley R. Bartley (R)

alyssaforvt.org

FRANKLIN-7

Allen “Penny” Demar (R) Suzanne “Suzi” Hull-Casavant (I) ENOSBURGH

suzihullcasavant.com

Cindy Weed (P/D) ENOSBURGH

cindyweedforstaterep. com

FRANKLIN-8 St. Albans Vote for no more than ONE.

Lauren DeesErickson (D) SAINT ALBANS CITY

laurenforvermont.com

Casey Toof (R)* SAINT ALBANS TOWN

caseytoof.com

GRAND ISLE

LAMOILLE-1 Stowe Vote for no more than ONE.

Jed Lipsky (I) STOWE

jedlipsky.com

Scott Weathers (D) STOWE

scottweathers.com

LAMOILLE-2 Belvidere, Hyde Park, Johnson, Wolcott Vote for no more than TWO.

Richard J. Bailey (R/L) HYDE PARK

Kate Donnally (D)* HYDE PARK

katedonnallyvt.com

Daniel Noyes (D)* WOLCOTT

dannoyesvt.com

Malcolm “Mac” Teale (R/L) HYDE PARK

LAMOILLE-3 Cambridge, Waterville Vote for no more than ONE.

Lucy Boyden (D) CAMBRIDGE

Rebecca Pitre (R/L) WATERVILLE

LAMOILLEWASHINGTON Elmore, Morristown, Stowe, Woodbury, Worcester Vote for no more than TWO.

Saudia LaMont (D) MORRISTOWN

lamontforvermont.com

Nichole Loati (R/L)

Milton, Georgia Vote for no more than TWO.

MORRISTOWN

Emily Hecker (D)

nicholeloativtrep.com

Ben Olsen (R)

MILTON

emilyforvermont.com

24

ESSEX-CALEDONIA

Vote for no more than ONE.

ESSEX TOWN

Colchester

MILTON

taylorsmallvt.com

Taylor Small (P/D)*

bobhooper.org BURLINGTON

Chris Taylor (R)*

WINOOSKI

WINOOSKI

leonoraforvermont.org

Carol Ode (D)*

MILTON

Burke, Bloomfield, Brunswick, East Haven, Ferdinand, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, Victory

Robert Hooper (D)* BURLINGTON

Chris Mattos (R)*

* = INCUMBENT

MORRISTOWN


Avram Patt (D)* WORCESTER

avrampatt.com

ORANGE-1 Corinth, Orange, Vershire, Washington Vote for no more than ONE.

Carl Demrow (D) CORINTH

carldemrow.com

Samantha Lefebvre (R)* ORANGE

samanthalefebvrevt.com

ORANGE-2 Corinth, Orange, Vershire, Washington Vote for no more than ONE.

Zachary M. Lang (R) BRADFORD

Monique Priestley (D) BRADFORD

moniqueforvermont.com

ORANGE-3 Chelsea, Williamstown Vote for no more than ONE.

Rodney Graham (R)* WILLIAMSTOWN

Seth Keighley (D) WILLIAMSTOWN

ORANGE-CALEDONIA Groton, Newbury, Topsham Vote for no more than ONE.

Joe Parsons (R)* NEWBURY

Kelsey RootWinchester (D) NEWBURY

rootforvt.com

ORANGEWASHINGTONADDISON Granville, Braintree, Brookfield, Randolph, Roxbury Vote for no more than ONE.

Jay Hooper (D)* RANDOLPH

vote4hoop.com

Jackie Klar (R) BROOKFIELD

Larry Satcowitz (D)* RANDOLPH

larry.satcowitz.com

Wayne D. Townsend (R) RANDOLPH

ORLEANS-1 Derby Vote for no more than ONE.

Aimee Alexander (D) DERBY

aimeealexanderforvt.com

Brian Smith (R)* DERBY

ORLEANS-2 Newport Vote for no more than ONE.

Woodman “Woody” H. Page (R)* NEWPORT CITY

ORLEANS-3 Barton, Brownington, Westmore Vote for no more than ONE.

David Templeman (D) BROWNINGTON

ORLEANS-4 Albany, Craftsbury, Glover, Greensboro Vote for no more than ONE.

Katherine Sims (D)* CRAFTSBURY

katherinesimsforhouse. com

Vicki Strong (R)* ALBANY

vickistrong.com

ORLEANS-LAMOILLE Eden, Coventry, Irasburg, Jay, Lowell, Newport, Troy, Westfield Vote for no more than TWO.

Mark Higley (R/D)* LOWELL

Michael J. Marcotte (R/D)* COVENTRY

RUTLAND-1 Ira, Poultney, Wells

Redrawing the Map How redistricting will affect your vote in 2022 BY K E VIN MC C AL L UM & C ATH Y R E S ME R

Every 10 years, Vermont redraws its state House and Senate districts based on population data from the U.S. Census. The goal of this redistricting process is to make sure every resident has equal representation in the 30-member Senate and 150-member House of Representatives. Redistricting was in the news in the spring because 2022 is one of those once-in-a-decade years. In March, the legislature passed a bill finalizing the changes; Gov. Phil Scott signed it into law in April. The changes went into effect starting with the August primary election. Check to see if you’re affected by logging into mvp. vermont.gov, or contact your town clerk. Here are a few of the most significant revisions:

Stowe will now be represented by the threemember Washington County Senate district, though it’s

actually part of Lamoille County.

There are now 16 Senate districts instead of 13.

None of the districts will be represented by more than three senators.

Instead of six senators, Chittenden County will now have seven. That’s because the population of northwest

Vermont has grown considerably over the last 10 years, while most of the rest of the state has lost residents. But those seven senators won’t be part of a single block — the county will now be split into three districts: • The Chittenden Southeast district will have three senators representing the southern part of Burlington, South Burlington, Shelburne, Charlotte, Hinesburg, Bolton, Williston, Jericho and Underhill. • The Chittenden Central district will have three senators representing the northern part of Burlington, Winooski, the southern part of Colchester and most of Essex. • The Chittenden North district will be represented by a single senator from the towns of Milton, Westford and part of Essex, as well as the Franklin County town of Fairfax.

Some voters will now be part of different House districts. For example, voters in

the East End of Burlington are no longer part of the district that includes Winooski; the Onion City is in a district of its own, represented by two House members. The new districts are designed to ensure that each House member represents as close to 4,287 Vermont residents as possible. The resulting 109 House districts include 68 with one member and 41 with two.

There’s a new House district in southern Vermont that includes the Green Mountain towns of Readsboro, Searsburg, Stamford and Pownal. This change offsets population loss in the Bennington area, though some have argued that the decision ignores stark geographic and cultural differences between the communities.

Learn more about how you’ll be affected by studying the Senate and House maps online at sevendaysvt.com/ redistricting-maps, or contact your town clerk.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Patricia A. McCoy (R)* POULTNEY

RUTLAND-2 Clarendon, Rutland, Wallingford, West Rutland Vote for no more than TWO.

Thomas “Tom” Burditt (R)* WEST RUTLAND

Ken Fredette (D) WALLINGFORD

kenfredetteforvermont. com

Arthur Peterson (R)*

Rutland

Rutland

Rutland

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Dave Potter (D)

Paul Clifford (R)

Mary E. Howard (D)*

William Notte (D)*

CLARENDON CLARENDON

RUTLAND-3 Castleton Vote for no more than ONE.

Mary Droege (D) CASTLETON

Jarrod E. Sammis (R) CASTLETON

RUTLAND-4

RUTLAND CITY

RUTLAND-5 Rutland Vote for no more than ONE.

Eric Maguire (R) RUTLAND CITY

RUTLAND-6

RUTLAND-7

RUTLAND CITY

RUTLAND CITY

Cynthia “Cindy” Laskevich (R) RUTLAND CITY

RUTLAND-8 Pittsford, Proctor Vote for no more than ONE.

Charles “Butch” Shaw (R/D)* PITTSFORD

CONTINUED SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

» P.26

25


STATE REPRESENTATIVE CONTINUED FROM P.25

RUTLAND-9 Brandon Vote for no more than ONE.

Stephanie Z. Jerome (D)* BRANDON

stephaniejeromevt.com

RUTLAND-10 Benson, Fair Haven, West Haven Vote for no more than ONE.

William “Bill” Canfield (R)* FAIR HAVEN

RUTLAND-11 Chittenden, Killington, Mendon, Pittsfield Vote for no more than ONE.

Jim Harrison (R/D)* CHITTENDEN

harrisonforvermont.com

RUTLANDBENNINGTON Rupert, Middletown Springs, Pawlet, Tinmouth, Wells Vote for no more than ONE.

Sally Achey (R)* MIDDLETOWN SPRINGS

sallyvtrep.com

Robin ChesnutTangerman (D) MIDDLETOWN SPRINGS

robinforrep.com

WASHINGTON-2 Duxbury, Fayston, Moretown, Waitsfield, Warren

WASHINGTON-6 Calais, Marshfield, Plainfield Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than TWO.

Tina Golon (R)

Rebecca Baruzzi (I)

Marc B. Mihaly (D)

FAYSTON

Gene Bifano (I) WARREN

Kari Dolan (D)* WAITSFIELD

karidolan.com

Dara Torre (D) MORETOWN

linkedin.com/in/ dara-torre-a4867941

WASHINGTON-3 Barre Vote for no more than TWO.

Peter D. Anthony (D)* BARRE CITY

peteranthonyvt.com

Brian Judd (R) BARRE CITY

Thomas “Tom” Kelly (R) BARRE CITY

Jonathan Williams (D) BARRE CITY

forbarre.com

WASHINGTON-4 Montpelier Vote for no more than TWO.

Dona Bate (I) MONTPELIER

batevthouse.org

CALAIS CALAIS

WASHINGTONCHITTENDEN Bolton, Buels, Huntington, Waterbury Vote for no more than TWO.

William McGorry (I) BOLTON

williammcgorry.com

Thomas Stevens (D)* WATERBURY

Kathi Tarrant (R) WATERBURY

Theresa A. Wood (D)* WATERBURY

WASHINGTONORANGE Williamstown, Barre Vote for no more than TWO.

Melissa Battah (D) BARRE TOWN

melissaforbarretown.com

Gina M. Galfetti (R) BARRE TOWN

Francis “Topper” McFaun (R/D)* BARRE TOWN

WINDHAM-1

Michelle Bos-Lun (D)* WESTMINSTER

Ryan Coyne (I) ROCKINGHAM

Bonnie Depino (R) WESTMINSTER

Leslie Goldman (D)* ROCKINGHAM

WINDHAM-4 Dummerston, Putney Vote for no more than ONE.

Lynn Kuralt (R) DUMMERSTON

Mike Mrowicki (D)* PUTNEY

WINDHAM-5 Marlboro, Newfane, Townshend Vote for no more than ONE.

Emily Long (D)* NEWFANE

emilylongvt.com

WINDHAM-6 Halifax, Whitingham, Wilmington Vote for no more than ONE.

John A. Lyddy (R) WHITINGHAM

Facebook

WINDHAM-7 Brattleboro Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Kate McCann (D)

saracoffeyvt.com

emiliekornheiser.org

Glennie Fitzgerald Sewell (P)

VERNON

sites.google.com/ view/glenniesewellfor vermonthouse/home

Vote for no more than ONE.

LUDLOW

logan4vt.com

WASHINGTON-1 Berlin, Northfield Vote for no more than TWO.

Anne B. Donahue (R/D)* NORTHFIELD

Kenneth W. Goslant (R)* NORTHFIELD

Laura HillEubanks (D/P)

MONTPELIER

MONTPELIER

WASHINGTON-5 East Montpelier, Middlesex Vote for no more than ONE.

Ela Chapin (D) EAST MONTPELIER

elachapinvt.com

NORTHFIELD

lauraforvthouse.com

Nancy Gassett (R) WINDHAM-2 Dover, Jamaica, Somerset, Stratton, Wardsboro

BRATTLEBORO

Terry Martin (R) BRATTLEBORO

WINDHAM-8 Brattleboro Vote for no more than ONE.

Laura Sibilia (I)

Mollie S. Burke (D)*

laurasibiliavt.com

mollieburke.com

DOVER

George Wilson (I) WARDSBORO

WINDHAM-3

BRATTLEBORO

SEVEN DAYS 2022 ELECTION GUIDE

John Bartholomew (D)* HARTLAND

johnbartholomew.org

Elizabeth Burrows (D)* WEST WINDSOR

elizabethvt.com

WINDSOR-2 Baltimore, Cavendish, Weathersfield Vote for no more than ONE.

Kevin “Coach” Christie (D)* HARTFORD

kevinchristie.org

Esme Cole (D) HARTFORD

esmecoleforvt.com

WINDSOR-ADDISON Hancock, Bethel, Rochester, Stockbridge Vote for no more than ONE.

Kirk White (D)* BETHEL

kirkwhiteforvthouse.com

WINDSOR-ORANGE-1 Tunbridge, Royalton Vote for no more than ONE.

John O’Brien (D)* TUNBRIDGE

WINDSOR-ORANGE-2

John Arrison (D)*

Strafford, Thetford, Norwich, Sharon

Stuart Lindberg (I)

Rebecca Holcombe (D)

WEATHERSFIELD

CAVENDISH

WINDSOR-3 Springfield Vote for no more than TWO.

SPRINGFIELD

Judy Stern (R) SPRINGFIELD

WINDSOR-4

Vote for no more than TWO.

NORWICH

rebeccaholcombe.com

Bill T. Huff (R) THETFORD

huffforvtstaterep.com

Jim Masland (D)* THETFORD

Matt Stralka (R) THETFORD

WINDSOR-WINDHAM Athens, Grafton, Windham, Chester Vote for no more than ONE.

Heather Chase (D)

Barnard, Bridgewater, Hartford, Pomfret

CHESTER

Vote for no more than ONE.

CHESTER

Heather Surprenant (D)* BARNARD

linktr.ee/heather4vthouse

WINDSOR-5 Plymouth, Reading, Woodstock Vote for no more than ONE.

Eva Ryan (R)

STATE’S ATTORNEY ADDISON Vote for no more than ONE.

Peter Bevere (I)

BRATTLEBORO

WOODSTOCK

Facebook and LinkedIn

teshabuss.com

Eva P. Vekos (D)

WINDHAM-9 Brattleboro Vote for no more than ONE.

Tristan Toleno (D)* BRATTLEBORO

26

Vote for no more than TWO.

Vote for no more than TWO.

Tesha Buss (D)

Vote for no more than TWO.

WESTMINSTER

Hartland, West Windsor, Windsor

WINDSOR-6 Hartford

Rikki Risatti (R)

Brookline, Rockingham, Westminster

Tyler Austin (R)

WINDSOR-1

Kristi C. Morris (D)*

Sara Coffey (D)*

Logan Nicoll (D)*

kellyforvt.org

tristanroberts.co

Gene Leon (R)

GUILFORD

LONDONDERRY

SPRINGFIELD

Mount Holly, Shrewsbury, Ludlow

MONTPELIER

Kelly MacLaury Pajala (I)

HALIFAX

Emilie Kornheiser (D)*

MONTPELIER

Vote for no more than ONE.

Alice M. Emmons (D)*

Guilford, Vernon

RUTLAND-WINDSOR

Andover, Londonderry, Weston, Winhall

Tristan D. Roberts (D)

Conor Casey (D)

Vote for no more than ONE.

WINDHAM-WINDSORBENNINGTON

Keith T. Cappellini (I) PLYMOUTH

ktcappellini.com

* = INCUMBENT

MIDDLEBURY MIDDLEBURY


BENNINGTON Vote for no more than ONE.

Erica Albin Marthage (D/R)* MANCHESTER

benningtoncountysa.com

CALEDONIA Vote for no more than ONE.

Jessica E. Zaleski (R/D)* WATERFORD

CHITTENDEN Vote for no more than ONE.

Sarah F. George (D/P)* WILLISTON

sarahforstatesattorney. com

ESSEX Vote for no more than ONE.

Vincent Illuzzi (R)* DERBY

FRANKLIN Vote for no more than ONE.

John Lavoie (D) SAINT ALBANS CITY

Zach Weight (R) MILTON

zachweight.com

GRAND ISLE Vote for no more than ONE.

Douglas Disabito (D/R)* ALBURGH

LAMOILLE Vote for no more than ONE.

Todd A. Shove (D)* ELMORE

ORANGE Vote for no more than ONE.

Dickson Corbett (I) THETFORD

ORLEANS

WASHINGTON Vote for no more than ONE.

Michelle Donnelly (D) BARRE CITY

WINDHAM Vote for no more than ONE.

Tracy Kelly Shriver (D)* BRATTLEBORO

WINDSOR Vote for no more than ONE.

Ward Hunt Goodenough (D)* WOODSTOCK

goodenoughvt.com

SHERIFF

Vote for no more than ONE.

Jennifer Barrett (R/D)* DERBY

RUTLAND Vote for no more than ONE.

Ian Sullivan (D) PITTSFIELD

ADDISON Vote for no more than ONE.

Michael R. Elmore (R/D) ADDISON

elmoreforsheriff.com

Gerald Grant (I) ADDISON

Mark A. Stacey (I) LEICESTER

BENNINGTON Vote for no more than ONE.

Beau Alexander Sr. (I) SHAFTSBURY

alexanderforbcsheriff.com

James A. Gulley Jr. (D)

ESSEX

ORLEANS

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Trevor Colby (R/D)*

Jennifer Harlow Jacobs (R/D)*

LUNENBURG

HOLLAND

FRANKLIN Vote for no more than ONE.

John Grismore (R/D) FAIRFAX

gulleyforsheriff.com

Joel R. Howard Jr. (R) POWNAL

joelforsheriff.org

CALEDONIA

WASHINGTON

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

Ray C. Allen (D/R)*

Marc Poulin (D/R)

SOUTH HERO

LAMOILLE

WINDHAM Vote for no more than ONE.

Roger Marcoux

Mark R. Anderson (D)*

(R/D)*

James Hemond (R)

MORRISTOWN

BRATTLEBORO

markandersonsheriff.org

ORANGE

Facebook

Joel M. Pierce (I) DANVILLE

Vote for no more than ONE.

CHITTENDEN Vote for no more than ONE.

Dan Gamelin (D/R)

WINDSOR

Bill Bohnyak (R)*

Vote for no more than ONE.

George C. Contois (D)

WOODSTOCK

RANDOLPH

Facebook

BARRE TOWN

Vote for no more than ONE.

Vote for no more than ONE.

WATERFORD

David J. Fox (R/D)* TINMOUTH

GRAND ISLE

BENNINGTON

RUTLAND Vote for no more than ONE.

Michael Chamberlain (R)* Ryan Palmer (D)

ORANGE

WINDSOR

ryanforwindsor.com

COLCHESTER

dangamelin.com

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ABORTION IS HEALTH CARE. ABORTION IS A RIGHT. Important medical decisions should be guided by a person’s health and wellbeing, not by a politician’s beliefs. Now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned by the Supreme Court, state-level protections are more vital than ever to safeguarding our reproductive autonomy. In Vermont, that means passing Article 22, the Reproductive Liberty Amendment, to explicitly enshrine the right to reproductive healthcare in our state constitution.

VOTE YES. ARTICLE 22 Paid for by the ACLU of Vermont Public Question Committee 1T-ACLU090722 1

9/6/22 1:45 PM