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"Life does not revolve around Pokemon, honey."

the weekly read on Vermont news, views and culture

CO-PUBLISHERS/EDITORS Pamela Polston, Paula Routly CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Peter Freyne STAFF WRITER Erik Esckilsen ART DIRECTION Donald Eggert, Tara Vaughan-Hughes PRODUCTION MANAGER Lucy Howe CIRCULATION/CLASSIFIEDS/ PERSONALS Glenn Severance SALES MANAGER Rick Woods ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES David Booth, Michelle Brown, Eve Jarosinski, Colby Roberts, Diane Sullivan CALENDAR WRITER Gwenn Garland CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Marc Awodey, Nancy Stearns Bercaw, Flip Brown, Marialisa Calta, John Dillon, Peter Freyne, Jeff Fuccillo, Anne Galloway, Paul Gibson, John Hagman, David Healy, Ruth Horowitz, Jeanne Keller, Kevin J. Kelley, Rick Kisonak, Peter Kurth, Lola, Melanie Menagh, Andrew Nemethy, Ron Powers, Glenn Severance, Headier Stephenson, Molly Stevens, Matthew Taylor, Pip Vaughan-Hughes, David Weinstock, Margy Levine Young, Jordan Young PHOTOGRAPHER Matthew Thorsen ILLUSTRATORS Paul Antonson, Gary Causer, Paula Myrick, Sarah Ryan, Sean Sims

SEVEN DAYS is published by Da Capo Publishing, Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans and Pittsburgh. Circulation: 20,000. Six-month First Class subscriptions are available for $40. Oneyear First Class subscriptions are available for $80. Six-month Third Class subscriptions are available for $20. One-year Third Class subscriptions are available for $40. Please call 802.864.5684 with your VISA or Mastercard, or mail your check or money order to "Subscriptions" at the address below. For Classifieds/Personals or display advertising please call the number below. SEVEN DAYS shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, SEVEN DAYS may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher.

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Features

The Holiday Gift Guide By Ruth Horowitz and Pamela Polston

page 8

Out of Africa: Jazza Tings By Pamela Polston

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Toy Polloi: Better Planet Books, Toys & Hobbies By Erik Esckilsen

page 11

A Better Sweater?: dia -.

B.D. Press in Georgia, VT.

Pet Project: 4 Dogs & A Wish

SEVEN DAYS, P.O. Box 1164, 255 S. Champlain St., Burlington, VT 05402-1164

By David Weinstock

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The Handmade's Tale: Artisan's Hand By Anne Galloway

Tel: 802.864.5684 Fax: 802.865.1015. e-mail: sevenday@together.net http://www.sevendaysvt.com

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Soapy Sales: Soapdish By Ruth Horowitz

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Mystery in the Making Art Review: Terra Firma By Marc Awodey

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Cosmic Relief For comedienne Lily Tomlin, the 'search' continues By Cassie Horner

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Montreal: Currying Favor The Gift of Gab.

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What the other"Indians" have to offer on Thanksgiving By Jeanne Keller

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...

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D O G RANT N O T AMUSING Like most everyone I know that read Flip Browns... ranting and raving about dogs ["A New Leash on Life," November 3], I was not amused. Mr. Brown seems to miss the point of owning a dog. People own dogs for many reasons: unconditional love, companionship, even therapy — not solely to drive Flip into a tizzy. As for their intelligence ("dumber than a box of biscuits"?), so what? Since when have dogs ever claimed to be members of Mensa? At least their ignorance is charming. "Got a dog? Buy a farm!" Oh, yes, since we all have boatloads of cash laying around, perhaps that's the answer. Um, hello? Most of us rent, and we pay sick amounts of money to live in poorly maintained apartments because we can't afford that farm. And don't get me started on how long it takes to find [one]...since pets are so traumatizing and destroy apartments... Yes, people spend ridiculous amounts of money making their pets happy (which, by the way, makes them happy too — who are you to deny anyone happiness?). Yes, shelters and affordable housing and food shelf supplies are nauseatingly sparse, thanks mostly to drastic government cuts and poor funding, not to dog owners... Burlington, nay, the world is full of dogs, Flip. While most dog owners take marvelous care of their pets, some of them should be ashamed of their negligence. Those of us who are respectful of the community and clean up after, leash and other-

question

How would you have welcomed

the Pilgrims?

I'd h a v e g i v e n t h e m

all skis, then led them up north to found

Vermont. — John Dwyer Sales, Woodie's

Jjt^M With a handshake.

— Kyle Greenfleet Shoe_,sales,„ Lenny v

the Indians did. — Alice Eckles Owner and artist, Alice's Arts Marshfield I'd have been happy to offer them a short obeyed local laws and mores, and walked the walk regarding religious tolerance. — Kerry Skiffington Bookseller, Deerleap Books

mented, rather than the initial requested four to five areas which would be doomed to failure. — Faith G. Emerson Burlington

SUGGESTIONS FOR D O G PARKS Flip Brown's "A New Leash on Life" in the Nov. 3 issue of Seven Days well illustrated what can and has occurred with unleashed dogs in our city's parks. As a lifelong dog owner, I appreciate the dog owners' desire for exercise space, but I am concerned when this activity impinges on the special qualities of our parks as places for relaxation and recreation for people of all ages. Major issues to be resolved include the safety of park users, the impact on the water quality of the lake when the dog area is in close proximity, and the threat to the natural plants and wildlife in the area(s) selected. These issues have been aired recently at Neighborhood Planning Assemblies, and it's now the responsibility of the Department of Parks and Recreation to formulate plans and the City Council to figure out how to fund and enforce the recommendations. These hopefully will include fencing, enforcement of the dog owners' responsibility to pick up solid waste (with appropriate disposal in a trash barrel and not throwing it in the bushes), and owner leashing dog to and from the fenced area. I would suggest that one or two dog parks at most be undertaken for this requested pilot program so that plans can be well imple-

N O T ALL D O G OWNERS ARE IRRESPONSIBLE Wow. [Flip Brown is] one bitter man ["A New Leash on Life," November 3]. I got my dog while living in San Francisco... and I actually enjoy city life with my dog. A major reason is dog parks. Dog parks allow socialization — for owners and dogs. Dogs are incredibly social creatures and, as living beings, deserve off-leash interaction with their peers. At my dog park in San Francisco, we policed each other. Owners of aggressive dogs were asked not to return. And if a dog pooped while its owner wasn't looking, you can be sure five other people saw and made sure the poop got scooped. I am a responsible dog owner. I scoop poop every day. I've trained my dog to listen to me (even when off leash), and never let her run near children she doesn't know. If Burlington dog owners are as irresponsible and cavalier as Mr. Brown suggests, I will be very sad. I think it more likely, though, that he's judging all dog owners by the few bad ones out there. I find it's common for those who dislike dogs to lump all dog owners under the heading, "irresponsible." It's the lowest common denominator argument — some people don't control their dogs or scoop poop, therefore all dogs should be banned from all parks. That's like

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saying some parents let their kids scream in church (or run wild through the supermarket), therefore all children should be banned from these places. I won't lie. I do hope more off-leash areas open up in the city. I can't change Mr. Brown's opinions. But I can continue to act responsibly and have fun with my dog. — Amy Souza Soon-to-be Burlington resident

CORRECTION: Last week's story, "The Negotiating Table," about Burlington's Balkan Pearls and its owner, Vladimir Selec, included the photo caption, "Born to Serb." The editor who coined the pun thought it apt, reflecting Selec's service to his community and the fact that his mother is ethnically Serbian. As Americans, we underestimated the sensitivity of labels like Serb and Croat to members of the Bosnian community. For the record — and as the story made clear — Selec's background is 50 percent Serbian, 50 percent Croatian and 100 percent Balkan. We apologize for any inadvertent hurt or misunderstanding our glib quip may have caused. Letters Policy: SEVEN DAYS wants your rants and raves, in 250 words or less. Letters are only accepted that respond to content in SEVEN DAYS. Include your full name and a daytime phone number and send to: SEVEN DAYS, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164. fax: 865-1015 e-mail: sevenday@together.net

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— Paula Myrick Cartoonist, cook and baker, Stone Soup

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Faille's is located on Route 100 in Monfeville. for directions or more information, call them at 888-5632 or 888-2177

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Journalist Sacked Over Norwich Coverage

standard, there was never a substantive link between the students at Norwich and Kopassus." H e said "the only link" he's aware of is that the cadets have "the same mailing address" as T h e recent firing of Barre-Montpelier Times Kopassus. Mitchell cited the example of an Argus writer/editor Terry Allen has boomeranged American civilian living oversees who receives across the Internet since it broke last week in the mail at a military "APO," or postal address. Boston Globe. And her dismissal has spotlighted "If I'm an American civilian and I have the the comfy-cozy relationship between Times Argus same A P O as the Green Berets," he asked, "does Publisher R. J o h n Mitchell and Americas oldest that make me a Green Beret?" private military academy. If Publisher Mitchell sounds like a Norwich Yes, indeed, folks, there's a whole lot more defensive lineman, it's because he practically is. going on in Northfield, Vermont, these days Mitchell served in the U.S. Army Reserve from besides the quest for a championship ice hockey 1969-1977. He was assigned season. to a military intelligence unit Ms. Aliens scoop about based in Boston. He currently Indonesian military officers and serves on the Norwich undergraduate cadets attending University Board of Fellows. Norwich University first saw the And this good fellow refuses light of day in the Boston Globe to even acknowledge that on October 4. That's because Journalist Terry Allen was the editor in Barre, Vermont, "fired" by his managing editor didn't consider it newsworthy at on the 15th of October. first. Really? "We're not acknowledging Six days later the story finalshe was fired," Mitchell told ly ran in the Sunday Rutland Seven Days. "She was a tempoHerald/Times Argus. By then it rary part-time copy editor was national news, prompting with the Sunday paper doing calls for a congressional investiweddings," he said dismissivegation. ly. "Her situation was spelled N o t only were there connecout clearly by her editor." tions to the Indonesian military, Managing Editor Scott which was carrying out its duty Fletcher told us he "made it by barbecuing East Timor and crystal clear to Allen why we its citizens, but Allen found a needed to part company." He direct link to the military unit declined to give details. described by H u m a n Rights Watch as "unquestionably the Allen said Fletcher BY PETER F R E Y N E informed her "he didn't trust most feared, most hated and most abusive of all Indonesian units in East me, the paper didn't want to have anything to do Timor." T h e unit's name is Kopassus. Allen with me, including laying out weddings." She describes it as an Indonesian version of Hitler's said Fletcher said she had an aggressive, in-yourSS. face style, and told her her writing "belonged in the alternative press." Surely you remember East Timor? Ouch! Mr. Fletcher sounds like a mainstream It is the latest h u m a n butcher shop to hit the press slug with a steep learning curve. g; international news screen. East Timor is a farH o w ironic it was that last Thursday, the day away place where tens of thousands of people the Boston Globe reported Terry Allen's firing, have paid the ultimate price for freedom's quest, Mitchells paper, the Times Argus, contained a 10j 'Democracy always requires a blood sacrifice. page special supplement section highlighting the We're lucky. We're the Land of the Free. T h e glories o f — you guessed it — Norwich beacon of democracy. Why, just last week, the University. Among the warm and cozy relationPentagon finally announced it's closing down the ships between the paper and the university is the controversial School of the Americas it has operannual " Times Argus Invitational" Hockey ated at Ft. Benning, Georgia. T h e School of the Tournament coming up at Norwich the end of Americas is where many of Latin America's most December. notorious war criminals and death squad commanders learned the tricks of their trade. And As far as journalistic ethics go, Mitchell you better believe having their east Asian counrefutes suggestions of crossing the line in his relaterparts "studying" in Vermont is big news! tionship to Norwich University. You can bet no reporter would be permitted to cover Norwich Allen told Seven Days that when she asked while serving in a similar capacity on a university Norwich officials for the h o m e address of the 13 board. "It's very hard to be pure in a small comIndonesian cadets, she found 11 listed the headmunity," the publisher said. "We are trying to get quarters of Kopassus in Jakarta as home sweet more involved in the community." home. T h e n a Norwich official told her Kopassus was just the "billing address." O n e week later, she Great. What's next? Indonesian army papersaid, the official corrected himself once more and boys at the Times Argus? told her Kopassus was only a "mailing address." Just kidding. T h e fact remains, however:

Inside Track

Journalist Allen also found out their Norwich tuition was paid through the Indonesian Embassy in Washington with funds wired by the Indonesian military attache. And Allen noted the cadets currently enrolled at Norwich are not the first Indonesian military men to visit Vermont. Two years ago, she said, a group of 10 commissioned Indonesian army officers attended Norwich's graduate school program. She said Norwich's president and the head of the graduate program had personally visited Indonesia to set up the program. Two generals associated with Kopassus even visited Vermont. W h e n Allen's story hit the front page of the Boston Globe, you can be certain that wasn't snow hitting the proverbial fan back in Vermont. T h e article struck like a 2 0 0 0 - p o u n d smart bomb, dead center in the heart of a genuine Vermont sacred cow — Norwich University. Norwich responded with a public relations blitz, placing full-page ads in Vermont newspapers. There were also favorable editorials backing the school in the Times Argus and The Burlington Free Press. Mitchell told Seven Days Tuesday, "By our

Mitchell and his newspaper appear to be in the tank on this one. Allen, meanwhile, tells Seven Days she plans on continuing her investigative reporting both in the mainstream and alternative press. Good idea. BernieWatch 2 0 0 0 — T h e anticipation is about to end. O n Monday Independent Congressman Bernie Sanders will hold a press conference to announce his decision. Will he run for re-election to the House or challenge Republican U.S. Senator Jim Jeffords for the Senate? "We have gotten a lot of calls over the last few weeks," said Sanders' new communications director, David Sirota, "with the overwhelming sentiment, ' D o whatever you feel is right, but we don't want you to lose.'" It's a biggie. And we've learned that the bidding war between the House and Senate Democrats for OP Bernardo's services reached new heights this week as Rep. Dick Gephardt, the minority leader who dreams of becoming

Inside Track

continued on page 42

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Parts Department Jane Bahor, a medical researcher who makes lifelike body parts for amputees at Duke University Medical Center in Durham,North Carolina, discovered a way to improve prosthetic fingers by using the plastic knee joints from Barbie dolls to make artificial knuckles. Wearers of the fake fingers bend them the same way they would bend Barbies legs. The fingers stay bent until the user straightens them. Bahor said she has used the Barbie knees to make fingers for about a dozen patients, adding the 40-year-old doll has "made her cultural contribution, now she can make a medical contribution." • French physicists Joel Gilbert and Jean-Francois Petiot have developed artificial lips they say will help analyze how brass instruments sound the way they do. The lips, made from latex, are filled with water to mimic the density and flexibility of real lips. Artificial lips were needed because the research requires the lips be held in a fixed position for long periods of time. New Scientist magazine said the researchers hope the latex lips "will lead to trumpets, trombones and cornets that are easier to play."

nEWs QuiRkS

BY ROLAND SWEET

Thirty-two women who work at a Sicilian garment factory announced they have decided to program their pregnancies so that the births do not occur close together, thereby avoiding production slowdowns or layoffs in the factory, which is the major employer in the small town of Riesi. Italian labor unions expressed doubt that the gesture is entirely voluntary, noting that employers have been known to pressure workers not to become pregnant, going so far as to have women, when they are hired, write a letter of resignation that takes effect if they become pregnant.

Litigation Nation After Mortimer Hetsberger, 22, of New York was accused of robbing the same Atlantic City bank twice within three days, he filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against the bank teller who waited on him the first time, charging her with slander. She said he threatened to shoot her. He insisted he didn't.

Crop Rotation

• Molly D'Errico, a former personal assistant to Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Lillian Podgorski, charged her boss with causing her mental anguish because of her "extreme, bizarre and abnormal" behavior. D'Errico said she required psychiatric treatment because for three years the judge made her work in a locked office, check visitors in through a peephole, place all paperwork on the judge's desk face down so no one else could see it and have the judge's business and personal calls routed to D'Errico's home to avoid suspected wiretaps. D'Errico was awarded workers' compensation, but Commonwealth Court denied the claim on appeal, explaining that Podgorski's behavior may have been "uncivil and perhaps excessive," but did not constitute abnormal working conditions. • Vincent Minervini of Keansburg, New Jersey, filed a $35 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Orioles' mascot for

The

hitting and pushing him and taking his property without permission. The suit names Jeff Gartner, one of three people who wear the Oriole Bird costume, two escorts, two police officers and an usher who he claims mishandled him during an Orioles home game against the New York Mets. Minervini is a Mets fan. • A former Bird mascot, John J. Krownapple, filed a $200,000 lawsuit against Louis Vitigliano of Philadelphia, who Krownapple says pushed him off the right field wall during an Orioles-Phillies game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The 10foot fall chipped a bone in one ankle and badly bruised the other. Vitigliano is a Phillies fan. • Susan McDonough filed a $2 million lawsuit in federal court in New York against Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., claiming that she was hit on the head by a coconut husk during a cruise to Puerto Rico. According to the ship's safety officer, the coconut husk, which was used to hold an alcoholic drink called a Coco Loco, was dropped by a careless passenger on the deck above. Noting the drink weighs about four pounds, Daniel Sessa, an owner of the International Bartenders School in New York, told the Wall Street Journal, "Allowing customers to stand at the rail

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Flooded with Success When Vice President Al Gore decided that canoeing along the Connecticut River in New Hampshire last summer would be a good photo opportunity, members of the Connecticut River Joint Commission and the Secret Service visited the site beforehand and determined the low water level might cause the vice president's canoe to run aground. According to the Washington Times, the commission asked the local utility company to open a dam, releasing 4 billion gallons of water to raise the water level. After his trip, Gore announced that the government was awarding the Connecticut River Joint Commission a $100,000 grant. ®

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he telephone bill. The cable bill. A message from some bank telling me I'm "preapproved to apply" for their credit card (thanks for believing in me, boys). On a typical day, opening my mail is hardly a stirring or provocative experience, much less an apocalyptic one. But this was no typical day. It was the day the new Brooks Brothers catalogue came. At first nothing seemed out of the ordinary. The cover identifies it as the 1999 Holiday edition and features a four-color photograph of a sophisticated threesome — two men and a woman arrayed understatedly in black. It wasn't until I'd turned the first few pages that I realized something was horribly wrong. In the immortal words of Bart Simpson: "Ay caramba!" All the swank, traditionally coiffed gents in their classic suits, jackets and coats have vanished, and in their places cavort a goofball panoply of goateed wormboys and Gen-X girliemen! The pinstriped suits, in all their three-piece perfection, are nowhere to be seen. Instead, I gaped at page after page of shiny blazers with little fruity lapels. The models, in some cases, are boys too young to shave. In others, they are boys who were apparently too busy to bother.

looked familiar, then realized he resembles Mel Gibson in the gangster movie Payback. Another model complements a $798 double-breasted camel-hair overcoat with scifi shades and a Kurt Cobain haircut. Nearly all the others have spiky, floofed-up Luke Perry-style do's. And not one of them looks a day over 30. What's with this character on page 13? Standing next to a young brunette on a bizarro purple bubble set, his Florida-shaped sideburns suggest a male porn star in a sweaty Barbarella spoof. And, hey, isn't that Latin sensation Ricky Martin on page 70? Maybe not, but talk about la vida loca: big, baggy cargo

is the United States of America, and our whole way of life is based on the ability to make choices. If every manufacturer in the country is going to take its cues from Lenny Kravitz videos, millions of middle-aged men are going to have no choice but to look like complete idiots. And it bugs me because I am suddenly one of them — middle-aged men, that is. I know life is about change, but we're not talking the inexorable passage of time here. This is John F. Kennedy Jr. to Johnny Depp overnight. We once feared communism was going to conquer the world. Instead, everybody is being coerced into wearing glasses that look like Ben Franklin designed them. David Letterman might be able to pull it off, but do you really want to see these on Dan Rather?

If every manuacturer in_ country is going to take its cues from Lenny Kravitz videos, millions of middle-aged men gg^HDHEJ have no choice but to look like complete idiots. ^

I couldn't believe my eyes: stubble-covered heads, five-o'clock shadow, eyes darkly circled, skin that hadn't seen the sun in months. The cornerstone of traditional haberdashery had gone heroin chic! It's not possible, I told myself. The rest of the world may cast history, taste and tradition aside and pander to the spawn of Mtv. But not Brooks Brothers! The last bastion of trend-resistant men's wear, clothiers of the uppercrust, the final word in no-nonsense finery for generations of bankers, attorneys, physicians and diplomats, Brooks Brothers has always been the unmovable rock against which the tides of fashion have crashed. I f couldwt believe that mighty Bock had crumbled. iBut the evidence is cable. One fellow els a sinister black j ket. I thought he

pocketpants in a Brooks catalogue — how crazy is that? And who is choosing the backdrops for these photos — Prince? It's as though some sort of color boiler had been building up pressure for the past hundred years, and it finally blew. Each page is wilder and more floridly psychedelic than the next. Not to mention: Where have all the staid accoutrements gone? There isn't a single flask, cigarette holder or Swiss-made watch in sight. Imported leather cell-phone cases, laptop briefs and C D holders have taken their place. These guys' toys dress better than they do. So what's it to me if one more old-school institution elects to shake things up, reach out to a new audience . base and build a really rad Web site? It just bugs me, f:Sbiib

That is the path we're on. Leafing through these new Brooks Brothers pages is like tuning into "Meet the Press" and finding Al Gore with a tattoo and a tongue stud. Give me a break. Don't we have enough problems with receding hairlines, bad backs and high cholesterol? On top of everything else, please don't make us go outside in funny clothes. We live in a world inexplicably given over to youth-culture aesthetics and sensibilities. From the new Beetle to the iMac, products of every kind are being retooled to appeal to a demographic that's just getting its first checking account and thinks Carlos Santana is a promising new talent. Even the stodgiest corporate fuddyduddies now have television ads resembling something out of The Matrix. Hello? Half of these people work in coffee shops. Is it really vital for Jaguar to speak their language?

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THE HOLIDAYiink GIFT GUIDE Christmas is coming, and we've made our list. Check it twice - maybe three times - before setting out for yonder shopping mall. We've done a lot of the legwork so yule have an easier time finding those original, outrageous, offbeat items that might otherwise be overlooked. For maximum Claus and effect, we've grouped gifts together by theme to get you in the Magi mood. Oh, and we 'fess up to a strong local bias.

COMPILE* Âť Y Pamela Polston and Ruth Horowitz ILLUSTRATIONS BY Paul Antonson

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9 HOLISTIC NIGHT Let the holiday spirit move you to buy with body and soul in mind. • Mariette in Ecstasy, a novel about turnof-the-century convent life, by Ron Hansen, Crow Bookshop, Burlington, $8.95. • Bundle of Nepali rope incense, Peace and Justice Store, Burlington, $2.25. • Celestial necklace by Christopher Miller, Purple Shutter Herbs, Burlington, $17-60. • Aveda skin-care gift pack, Mens Room, Burlington, $30. • Brass statue of the Indian God Ganesh, Tradewinds, Burlington, $34.50. • Moment to Moment: Poems of a Mountain Recluse, by David Budbill, Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, $14. • Dream Time silk aromatherapy eye pillows, Rail City Market, St. Albans, $16. • Stella Pace Power Bead bracelets in semiprecious stones, Olive & Bette's, Winooski, $21-32. • Parchment paper for all your magic spell needs, Queen of Pentacles, Montpelier, 39 cents a sheet. • Artist-made wrought-iron menorah, Frog Hollow, Burlington or Middlebury, $126. • Brazilian amethyst geodes, Cool Jewels, Montpelier. Prices vary. • Tibetan Singing Bowls, Phoenix Rising, Montpelier, $44-100. • Teen Witch: Wicca for a New Generation, by Silver Ravenwolf, Spirit Dancer, Burlington, $12.95. • Ask Balouie fortune-telling kit, Bennington Potters North, Burlington, $14.99. • Apatite crystal, Global Pathways, Burlington, $11. • The Hidden Light, music featuring the Andy Statman Quartet, Borders, Burlington, $16.99. • Bath and body customized or precreated gift bags, Star Root, Burlington, $13-30. • Spa-Da-Da, a home spa kit for the urban hedonist, Soap Dish, Burlington, $25.

JEEZ1IM CROW SUPERSTAR Don't be syruptitious - let your gifts make a Green Mountain statement, even if you're home for the holidays. • Quart of medium-amber maple syrup in Warren Kimble jug, Apple Mountain, Burlington or Winooski, $18.29. • The Logger, video by Vermont actor Rusty Dewees, various locations, $19.95. • For a nostalgic look at the way it was, a 1965 Vermont Visitor's Guide, North

• Honey bee key ring, Danforth Pewterers, Middlebury, $10. • A Vermont Century: Photographs and Essays from the Green Mountain State, published by the Rutland Herald, BarreMontpelier Times Argus. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, Borders, Burlington, Hero's Welcome, North Hero, Book Rack, Winooski, Deerleap Books, Bristol, Vermont Bookshop, Middlebury, $34.95. • Burlington Community Portrait, matted and laminated, Silver Maple, Burlington, $89. • Gourmet Vermont gift baskets with Green Mountain goods, Cheese Outlet/Fresh Market, Burlington, and Cheese Traders, S. Burlington. Prices vary. • Vermont Heritage Songs, C D by Margaret MacArthur, Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, $15. • Burlington Does Burlington compilation C D , Disc Go Round, Burlington, $10.99.

Mountain Thyme, Middlebury, $11. • Reflexology massage ball, The Body , Shop, Burlington, $5. • An intimate sushi dinner for two catered by Glori Nori, Inc., Burlington. Prices vary. • Soundtrack for romance: Cafe Atlantico, by Cesaria Evoria, Buch Spieler, Montpelier, $15. • Shakespeare in Love, pocket-sized sonnets, Inspirations, Williston, $1.75. • Women and Desire: Beyond Wanting to be Wanted, by Burlington psychologist Polly Young-Eisendrath, Borders, Burlington and Book Rack, Winooski, $23. • Handcuffs, Queen of Pentacles, Montpelier, $5. • Pop the question with an original Alex Sepkus-designed 18-kt diamond engagement ring, Von Bargen's Fine Diamonds and Jewelry, Burlington, from $3600.

BABES IN T0Y1ANP

Felicitas, Burlington, $152.

FLEAS NAVIPAP Don't forget the bete noel-

purr-fect presents and bow-wows of holly for pets, and the people who love them too much. • Colorful saltwater fish, Noah's Ark, Colchester, $8-80. • One pound of puppy-shaped pasta, Anything's Pastable, Burlington, $4.99. • Labrador Retriever 2000 calendar, Initially Yours, Burlington, $11.99. • Felinestein: Pampering the Genius in Your Cat, by Suzanne Delzio, Nature Company, Burlington, $9.95. • Feline poetry magnets by Recycled, Rainbow Room, Middlebury, $10.95. • Trouble-free pets: ceramic elephants, Three Old Bats, Burlington, $18-24. • Multi-colored wooden block swings for the birds, Noah's Ark, Colchester, $12.99-34.99. • Wool kitty balls, Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, $2.25.

Bootie for your little drummer boys and girls.

• French Achile baby socks with doggie tops, Common Threads, $18. • Finger paint, Scribbles, Burlington, $15.95. • Purple hippo wash mitt and floating soap dish, Peace and Justice Store, Burlington, $9.95. Oh, come, all ye faithful... • "Girls Rule" butterfly photo frame, and romantic. Who said all you Rainbow Room, Middlebury, $8.95. • Friends for the Road felt finger need is love? Sometimes it puppets in a pouch, Zutano, takes more than mistletoe to get Montpelier, $8. your yule log rolling. • Four-foot polar bear from the Lou Rankin Collection, by Dakin, Metro Zoo, • Wine-colored silk chiffon and lace S. Burlington, $150. camisole and bikini, Isadora, Burlington, • Set of seven days-of-the-week girl's cot$110 & 36. ton briefs, Wee the Children, Burlington • Photos from the most romantic city: The and Montpelier, $16. First Time I Saw Paris, by Peter Miller, • Preacher's Boy, the latest from Katherine Book Rack, Winooski, $30. Paterson, Children's Pages, Winooski, $15. • A 24-kt heart of gold, Grannis Gallery, • Stuffed Mark McGuire Salvino's Burlington, $295. Bammers bear, Major League Sports, Burlington, $14.99. 15 stretchable frogs, lizards and snakes to go, Boutilier's, Burlington, $8.95. Farm Stories for Families, video by Mac Parker, Apple Mountain, Winooski and Burlington, $14.95. • Organic cotton Ecospirit baby bunting, Greenfields, Middlebury, $27. • Bluedogz Design children's mirrors by Nadine Lerner, The Unicorn, St. Albans, $45-49. M P H Turbo-Kid sled, Alpine Shop, S. Burlington and Middlebury, $74.95. Handmade New England wooden toys, Grass Harp, Burlington, $10-50. • Baby's First Noel stuffed angel or reinMen's deer, Wee the Children, Montpelier or black silk boxers Burlington, $12. with pictures of Michaelangelo's David, • Assorted second-hand Little Golden Ivy Brooks, Burlington and S. Burlington, books, Upstairs Antiques, Burlington, $3. $19.95. • Size 0-1 duck boots, Filene's, Burlington, • The Essential Rilke, translated by Galway $15. Kinnell, Borders Burlington, $22.95. • Alien-in-a-spaceship puppet, Learning • Hammered-silver necklace with 100 Express, Burlington, $19.95 eternally linked circles, Fire and Metal, • Snap-on baby bibs in a variety of fabrics, Burlington, $125. by Sherri Gonyeau, Vermont Folklife • Sumptuous white Turkish-style bathrobe, Center, $4.50. Bertha Church, Burlington, $99. • Echo silk scarf kit to paint your own, • Dirty Girl soap, bubble bath and lip The Dressing Room, St. Albans, $16. balm, 11th Street Studio, $7.50. • And for the preborn: Belly Basics • "Temptation" scent, Nabe Gifts, Maternity Survival Kit, including a tunic, Burlington, $4.95. L V , skirt, leggings and dress in cotton-b

MERRY XXXMAS

• Engravable pet tags with bone or hydrant, 4 Dogs & a Wish, Middlebury, $12. • An actual fire hydrant, Upstairs Antiques, Burlington, $150.

SEASON'S EATINGS Gourmet gifts for the orally inclined. • Set of four black espresso cups and saucers, Uncommon Grounds, Burlington, $27. • Woolen tea cozy that looks like a ski hat, Pier O n e Imports, Burlington, $25.99. • Real sugar plums, Maple City Cards & Candy, St. Albans, $6.50/lb. • Flexible rubber ice cube tray that makes penguin shapes, Kiss the Cook, Burlington, $6.99. • Wild Hog Vineyard zinfandel, Wine Works, Burlington, $22.50. • Blue stoneware milk pitcher from Sweden, Bennington Potters North, Burlington, $23.99. • Shiva or Kali metal lunch box, 11 th Street Studio, $12. • Assorted porcelain teacups and saucers, Three Old Bats, Burlington, $8-12. • Roasted Pepper Onion dipping oil, Mesa, Burlington, $12.75. • Beginner beer-making kit, Vermont Homebrew Supply, Winooski, $59.95; recipes & ingredients $20-30.

Continued on page 10

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Holiday Gift Guide

OUT OF AFRICA

continued from page 9

COOL YULE Tinsel, toys and other ornaments for the trendy set.'

'here's a good chance many of Thembie Gamache's customers couldn't find her homeland on a map. But you don't have to know that Swaziland is on the northeast coast of South Africa — or anything else about the vast continent of diverse nations — to enjoy Jazza Tings. The latest incarnation of the store that evolved from a cart, Jazza Tings opened this summer in the newly renovated St. Paul Street block facing Burlington City Hall Park. And along with the building's facelift, Gamache's narrow boutique has a new look, too. Collectors of objets d'Afrique will not be disappointed: Jazza Tings still offers plenty of exotic masks, dolls, woven baskets, clothing and other adornments. The goat-skinned Senegalese drums ($180-300) and other, less expensive handmade percussion instruments invite an impromptu concert. But under the protective gaze of a $400 beaded-leather mask from Ethiopia there are trays full of silver jewelry whose prices begin at $5 and don't exceed double digits. And while one end of the store is dominated by a cluster of real springbok hides — ruglike or stitched into pillows — most of the fur here is /mx:..Gamache points to the accessories now dominating the front window, her "leopard collection" that includes handbags, gloves, hair scrunchies, scarves, earmuffs, even candles. Affordable enough for fashion mavens on an allowance, these hip animal accents are unlikely to appear on the endangered species list anytime too soon.

V

At Jazza Tings, Soho meets Swaziland, and the combo has appeal even in down-parka'd Vermont. "I like mixing up African and other stuff," Gamache says simply. "Whatever I think is cool and mixes well." And after all, this is a place that embraced the man she calls "brother Bob Marley" — whose image also hangs on her wall — and, by extension, all things Jamaican. Africa is the next logical step. Gamache met her American-born husband while she was working at a U.S. Embassy in Swaziland. Within a year of moving to Burlington in 1991 she opened her cart — featuring mostly jewelry and small African imports — on Burlington's Church Street Marketplace. Not long after that she also began working at Club Metronome — her friendly face greeted patrons for seven years. Now the single mom of a nineand 14-year-old, Gamache still works overtime, but has put all her eggs, as it were, in one beautiful African basket. Jazza Tings' first shop with a roof was in the Wing Building, but she soon found that the Burlington Waterfront was not yet ready for primetime shopping — especially in the winter. Gamache kept the Church Street cart going and regularly sets up a booth at events such as the upcoming International Festival in Burlington. But she's hoping the new location on a freshly refurbished block downtown will make such moonlighting unnecessary. Gamache quite naturally misses her home — all her family lives in Mbabane, about an hour and a half from Johannesburg — and she's none too fond of Vermont's brutal winters. But with her dazzling smile and the colorful backdrop of Jazza Tings, Thembie Gamache has created one of the warmest spots in Burlington. — Pamela Polston

www. pinnaclej ewel ry.com

• Authentic motorcycle jacket, Champlain Leather, Burlington, from $350. • Ball skirt by Nicole Miller, Ecco, Burlington, $148-168. • Antihero Fingerbreaker fingerboard, T h e B-Side, Burlington, $7.99. • McKenzie Childs French striped kneesocks, 4 Dogs & A Wish, Middlebury, $28. • Lydel feather bracelet and choker, Apropos, Burlington, $18.98 & $32.98. • Director's Cut (second-hand copy), by John Waters, Crow Bookshop, Burlington, $19.95. • Black-and-white faux pony hide skirt, Olive & Bette's, Winooski, $124. • Vintage ladies' hats, Bejewelled, Middlebury, $20-50. • Pink leopard-spotted cat-eye shades, Old Gold, Burlington, $12. • Kit Cornell langsam silk jump pants, Kit Cornell, Burlington, $58. • Pink and black feather boa, Glass Bead Game, Middlebury, $20. • Set of nine Lu'au party favors, Bennington Potters North, Burlington, $6.99. • Nana Creations faux fur coats in black or leopard, Monel, Burlington, $185. • Opera-length gloves, Needleman's, St. Albans, $25. • Tiny rhinestone butterfly hairclips, Marilyn's, Burlington, $8. • Black combat boots with side zippers, Burlington Army and Navy, $115. • Leopard-print candles, Jazza Tings, Burlington, $15. • Screeching Weasel "Bark Like a Dog" T-shirt, Disc G o Round, Burlington, $14.99. • Lava lamps, Wild Mountain Thyme, Middlebury, $42.

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IN EXCESSIVE PEO Silver bells, golden rings and...gifts to help you remember why God created the credit card. • Solid oak Morris chair with leather upholstery, Tina's H o m e Design, Burlington, $1629. • Screwpull wine opener, Wine Works, Burlington, $185. • "Whiskaway Weekend" at the Inn at Essex with cooking lessons, N E C I Commons, Burlington, $395. • Red-apple coral and sterling necklace, Marilyns, Burlington, $248. • Silk pajamas in putty, chocolate, silver or smoke, C o m m o n Threads, $136. • Glass dip pens and ink from France, Boutilier's, Burlington, $120. • Celecstron 1000mm telescope, PhotoGarden, Burlington, $599.95. • Pashmina wool wrap — like Julia Roberts wears! — in assorted colors, Olive & Bette's, Winooski, $198. • Fox fur-trimmed leather gloves, Monel, Burlington, $96. • Custom cherrywood C D rack with dispenser, Buch Spieler, Montpelier, $142. • A brand-new Volvo S40 Sedan with sunroof, leather interior and sport touring package, Almartin Volvo, $28,625.

PEACES OF PAPER Even the Magi didn't know...sometimes the best things in life are flat. And oh so easy to mail. • Pair of tickets to T h e Pretenders, March 5 at the Flynn Theatre, Burlington, $30/37.50. • Classes in wine tasting, Wine Works, Burlington, $20. • Season's pass to your beloved's favorite slopes. • Plane tickets to the Caribbean. • Custom calligraphy on anything, by Ink Farm, Underhill. Prices vary. • Gift certificate for a full set of acrylic nails, Nail Emporium, Burlington, $30. • Ten-class pass to Yoga Vermont, Burlington, $85. • Always a pleasure: a visit to your favorite massage practitioner. • Find yourself with a map of the world from Northern Cartographic, S. Burlington, $15-30. • A health club membership. • A membership to the Intervale Community Farm for produce next summer. • Two-dimensional artwork by local artists — visit your favorite galleries. • A writing class at the Book Rack, Winooski, $35-170. • Always a winner: a fat check, U.S. Treasury Bond, or cold, hard cash.

ife does not revolve around Pokemon, honey," says a young mother as she passes behind me in the alcove of Better Planet Books, Toys & Hobbies in St. Albans. In the reflection of the front window, I notice a preschool-age boy and girl tagging along as she enters. I stay in the alcove, eye the display crammed with science, crafts and magic kits, and wonder if the children's wish will be fulfilled. A minute later, I have my answer: "You two are really pushing it, you know that?" the mother admonishes as the trio whirls away, hand-in-hand, down Main Street. Pokemon is not spoken here. "There's nothing inherently bad in it," Better Planet owner Fred Kosnitsky says of the latest nationwide toy craze. He'd just rather stock his shelves with items possessing "some intrinsic value." A stroll down the aisles reveals what Kosnitsky means: products emphasizing educational, hands-on fun. This is where collectors of the newly minted quarters will find display folders ($2.99). Budding scientists can experiment with the Microchem XM3000, "the safest chemistry set made" ($39.99). Veterinarians-intraining will never mistake the forelock and the fetlock again, thanks to an anatomically accurate model horse with visible skeleton and internal organs ($24.98). Tiny tricksters can pick up Marshall Brodien's Magic Shows ($29.98-49.98), as well as magic tricks and kits in the under-$5 range. And kids with a creative streak can express themselves on the "Cadet" hardwood easel ($79.99), using materials in the ParentBanc brand art school — a 150-piece set of colored pencils, paint and markers priced at $19.99. As the name Better Planet suggests, an environmental theme runs through the store — a reflection, no doubt, of Kosnitsky's background. After running Walt's Corner toy store in Newport in the 1970s, he earned a master's degree in environmental law from Vermont Law School. In addition to operating Better Planet, which opened in April 1991, he teaches environmental studies courses at the Community College of Vermont and sits on the board of the Vermont Population Alliance. It makes sense, then, that Better Planet is the place for globes ($29.99-34.99); posters of animal tracks of New England, volcanoes, dinosaurs and rainforest life ($6.99); and ant farms ($5.99-19.95). But Better Planet is not the Nature Company. Kosnitsky calls it "a general store of fun." Emphasis on general. The high-ceilinged aisles are pleasantly packed with items for children of all ages and interests, as well as products for adults. The book section, for example, serves that market niche for grown-up readers in the region. The video series Vermont Memories, some Mac Parker storytelling titles and a modest offering of Vermont-made music, round out the adult fare. Better Planet stocks kids' books too, including this year's other craze: the Harry Potter series. The "general store" atmosphere permeates aisles stocked with bulk items — puzzles, rubber insects, red-eyed tree frogs. The front counter is a treasure of inexpensive impulse items, including pencils, yo-yos, decks of cards. It's also the most convenient place for Boy Scouts to report for uniforms, manuals, badges, knot-tying kits, flashlights and anything else necessary to "Be Prepared." This season, be prepared to get your Pokemon elsewhere. Beanie Babies, too. "I try to stay away from the kinds of things that I don't feel is real good stuff," Kosnitsky says. Burger King, you've got nothing to worry about here.^f — Erik Esckilsen

Continued on page 12

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Holiday Gift Guide

A BETTER SWEATER?

DDDODIA IBIT

ighteen years ago Dia Jenks was laid up with a running injury. To bide the time, she hand-loomed a sweater for herself. It was a pullover with an apple tree spilling its branches over one sleeve and a bear fleeing a swarm of bees on the other. There was a sheep on the front and purple mountains in the background. When Jenks wore it in Boston, someone bought it — literally off her back — for $200. "I had no intention of selling it, but a deal was struck," she recalls. Her second sweater sold just as quickly, and Jenks realized she could make money doing something she enjoyed. She began to lay out new designs on her kitchen table, and soon made enough sweaters to sell at a shop that bears her name in her home town of Stowe. Jenks stopped using the kitchen table a long time ago. Today, in addition to her store outlet, she and her husband manage a wholesale operation in Middlebury that produces specialty lines of sweaters, dresses, pants and skirts for more than 250 boutiques across the country. The adjoining "studio shop" also offers dia at a discount. Jenks designs 30 new handknit separates three times a year, for her spring, fall and holiday lines. Right now she's finishing up the fall 2000 designs. In January, she'll give private trunk showings to the small specialty stores that carry her one-of-a-kind clothing. For this year's collection, Jenks cribbed ideas from at least a dozen cultures around the world, inspired by a passion for museum-going. Her intricate fabric patterns are derived from an eclectic, world-pop assortment of legends and images — from the talismanic patterns of the Ottoman empire, to royal garments from the Ashanti culture of Ghana, to Eskimo lore about mythical spirits, to the swirling Indian patterns the English dubbed paisley. Each sweater in the collection has a name. "Karma" ($430), for instance, is a short, boxy jacket inspired by the Buddhist maxim, "What goes around comes around." The "Song" ($425) incorporates themes from Native American ceremonial garb into a narrow band of symbols on an otherwise sedate chenille cardigan. Perhaps the least politically correct dia design is the florette-covered, shawl-collared jacket called "Antoinette" ($425), named after the Marie who allegedly said, "Let them eat cake." Even middle-class plebes would be tempted to spend a month's salary on a dia wardrobe. The foundation pieces of the collection — somewhere between runway chic and handknit nubbly — include the sleeveless "willow" dress ($320), the mock turtle shell ($165), pocket pants ($275), Tee ($175), scarf ($110) and short and long skirts ($205). The fabric of this wool-and-rayon collection is an intricate web of multi-colored stripes that from a distance widen and narrow like the stripes of a tiger. The fine hues of gold, red, orange and blue in the "millennium" jacket, with its pointy collar and raglan sleeves, collide in different directions, creating an optical illusion. Unfortunately, the asking price — $350 — is real. Jenks says her prices reflect the company's commitment to buying quality fibers and relying on local labor. Vermont and New York handknitters produce the sweaters from baby alpaca, Italian wool, merino, chenille and rayon. Those with champagne taste on a beer budget can consider these options: the one-day, post-Thanksgiving sale where you can pick up a 1998 sweater for as little as $45. Or the solid-colored cardigan sweaters ($95) made with leftover fiber, and which can be dressed up with dia's fabulous selection of buttons in mother of pearl, carved horn or clay. ^

G R E

L S A T

continued from page 11

A COLORIHG WE GO Sometimes the art of giving means an artful gift. • Tin of 30 Swiss colored pencils, Boutilier's, Burlington, $17.50. • Paint two coffee mugs to keep, Blue Plate Ceramic Cafe, Burlington, $25. • Oil painting lessons from Tad Spurgeon. Prices vary. • Kissers, cartoon book and C D by James Kochalka, Crow Bookshop, Burlington, $16.95. • Learn to make pots, woodcrafts, glassware and more, in classes at Frog Hollow, Burlington and Middlebury, or the Shelburne Craft School. Prices vary. • Handpainted silk "windows" by Sarah M u n r o , Phoenix Rising, Montpelier, $16-30. • Herb Leff Kinetic sculpture, Doll-Anstadt Gallery, Burlington, $1200-1400.

PASHING THROUGH THE SNOW Never mind a one-horse open sleigh; what about sleds, skates, skis, boards and other gear for enjoying or just surviving - a winter wonderland? (For more on this theme, see page 18.) • Burton snowboards board bag with removable boot pockets, T h e B-Side, Burlington, $169.95. • Purple fleece sports socks, Colorado, Burlington, $6. • Camelback Hydration Packs for winter or s u m m e r use, Northstar Cyclery, Burlington, $29.95-94.95. • Sherpa aluminum snowhoes gift set (shoes, poles & instruction book), O u t d o o r Gear Exchange, Burlington, $140. • Wellspring wool rabbit blanket, Greenfields, Middlebury, $115. • Chippewa steel-toed boots, Lenny's, Williston, Barre & St. Albans, $169.99.

G M A T

Taking one of these tests is like using a vacuum cleaner in a minefield:

1) It sucks

• 2) There's a lot of pressure. 3) No matter how intelligent you are, if you haven't been precisely

trained, it can blow up in your face. 4) There are all these weird brushes and uttuchmcnts thut you're not sure how to use. 1 have been tutoring for 15 years, including a few years of teaching classes in ten different tests for The Princeton Review (TPR), and training its teachers. TPR is the original and by far the best of the big test prep companies, but it still has its limitations. I have spent many years improving upon TPR techniques, and adapting my strategies to the strengths and weaknesses of individual students.

Tutoring is also available in math, writing, English, science, philosophy, psychology, the SAT, ACT, and numerous other subjects and tests.

Michael Kraemer • 862*4042 Brett says: " ^ ^ L I .T " T h e Ultimate Gift f o r any Sewer" I t

s

Sew

E a s y

T o

S e w

tjjjHusqvarna

O

SILVER ES MAPLE ART POSTER GALLERY

Art that will lift up your ears over the holiday season.

n

VIKING

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v; page

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SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1999

Looking for that special giftf Preserve your personal images, collages andphotos with Silver Maple's fine art lamination and mounting. Elegant, affordable, ready-to-hang, with no glass and no glare. 129 St. P a u l S t r e e t , B u r l i n g t o n

802.865.0133 •

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• H a n d m a d e wool Ecuadorian hat with earflaps, Inca Trail, Burlington, $7.95. • T i n u h a n d k n i t wool sweaters, Monel, Burlington, $84. • Stretch silkweight Capilene undies, Ski Rack, Burlington, zip turtleneck, $49; tights, $38. • Carhartt lined jackets in sandwashed colors, Phil's Trading Post, Essex Junction, $65-100. • All-purpose outdoors tool, Nature Company, Burlington, $20. • Tracking and the Art of Seeing: How to Read Animal Tracks and Signs, by Paul Rezendes, Everyday Books, Burlington, $24. • Cozy flannel PJs by Salvage, Wild M o u n t a i n T h y m e , Middlebury, $52.

Continued on page 15

1

DOGSAND""AlilISH

rswll

PET PROJECT

r

enelope Fenyvest and trail-riding buddy Jeanne Peech have plenty in common. They are both seasoned retail veterans and serial pet rescuers. Fenyvest, who worked for nine years in another Middlebury boutique, harbors several dozen pre-owned felines, a retired thoroughbred and a draft-deferred Clydesdale, along with two more practical riding mounts. Peech, founder of Blackhawk's, a former women's shop in Shelburne, has one saddle horse, two Great Danes and a more reasonable number of cats. One day after a long ride, the two women dreamed up a shop called 4 Dogs & A Wish. The wish came true this summer, when prime corner space opened in Middlebury's Frog Hollow Alley. Subtitled "an exclusively unexclusive, unusual store for eccentric people and their pets," the inviting shop offers a quirky mix of women's clothing ($22-290), gifts for pets and pet owners ($10-50), miscellaneous luggage and home accessories ($14-190) and a killer assortment of unusual stocking stuffers ($1.50-24). "We have the best time going to New York to find things," Peech says. "We didn't know exactly what the store would be, but we wanted things that were fresh, colorful and useful. Somehow it all came together." Fenyvest adds, "I wanted to sell clothing that wasn't exclusively for tiny people." Clothing ranges from the basic (Le Petit Bateau French camisoles, Tees and turtlenecks, $22-28), to the specialized (French riding pants in pink and purple, $185), to the extravagant (an enormous hot-pink silk-cashmere shawl, $290). Body care products include a high-calorie bath scrub: a slurry of coarse granulated sugar in perfumed sunflower seed oil. (Don't need

exfoliant? Try it as a marinade.) Then there are the novelty soap sculptures of disembodied noses, lips and ears. Do peek into the jewelry counter. In addition to some storage items that can only be described as earring hammocks, the case encloses a converted stainless-steel sink full of live fancy goldfish, swimming around in designer spring water. But what makes this colorful place truly unique is the pet merchandise. For your own non-petite dog, try a very large leather collar decked with silver armadillo conchitas. It's just begging to be clipped to an elegant braided leash ($42). Or fabric squeak toys in favorite chewable human shapes, like Mailman and Veterinarian ($6-14 in both cat and dog sizes). The piece de resistance? Buster's Food Cube, a kind of I Q test for dogs: You put food bits inside a wire cage, and watch Buster spend several hours trying to get them out. Oh, and don't worry about the beasts lying about the store — one or more of the "4 Dogs"; they're shopper-friendly. "Moses has lots of retail experience, too," Fenyvest says of her mammoth Great Dane/German Shepherd hybrid. But he's usually doing his best impression of a polar-bearskin rug. — David Weinstock

BIRTH CONTROL STUDY participants wanted The Vermont Women's lealth Center, providing comprehensive gynecol and obstetrical care for over 25 years, is women ages 18-35 to participate in a control study comparing five different types of t ilcide. This study is spoi by Family Health International, a m re* dedicated to contracej family planning aroui Participants will be compensated. If you are interested,

802.863.1386

for more infomiution

Burlington

O P E N 7 DAYS A WEEK

BARRE M a i n Street1 476-7446

ST. A L B A N S Highgate Shopping 527-0532 november 24, 1999

WILLISTON Tafts Corner 879-6640 ;

SEVEN DAYS

page 13


You/ COM/ actually ENJOY your oum party with

^ ^

from th& gateway Qrill!

M

Choose' among our breakout, lunch>, dinner or dessert platters — beer & wine are also available! Reservations now-being accepted for upto 50people on-site... or we'll cater to your off-site needsfor up to 2000people! Perfectfor office parties, business luncheons, holiday bathes, etc.

JPj%

For more information, call Jason or Luc.

,

Restaurant

Corner of Main & Battery By the Waterfront

.

**

J* .. ,

Burlington, Vt 862-4930

G R I X A >

JVatuxe&tiemlfy duality a£l-natwcaC product? fox ev&qfday, fating,.

• • • • • • •

Candles Bar Soap Liquid Soap Shampoo Baby oil Lotion Lip balm

Natural

THE HANDMADE'S TALE rtisans' Hand started out the way a lot of businesses do: It was just a good idea. Specifically, 17 central Vermont craftspeople thought it would be a good idea to sell their work during the Christmas season in an empty storefront in downtown Montpelier. At first they rented a shop on Langdon Street on a month-by-month basis. The experiment lasted into spring, and the craft cooperative defied all projections. In the first year, they stuffed $25,000 into a cigar box. That was 21 years ago. Artisans' Hand has been open continuously ever since, for the longest period on Langdon, then on State Street until the flood of 1992. Now the store occupies a prime piece of real estate on Main Street — in City Center between Ben & Jerrys and La Brioche bakery — and represents 130 Vermont craftspeople and grosses $400,000 a year. No small feat for a shop that sells high-end crafts in a city of 8000. What's remarkable about Artisans' Hand is the quantity, quality and breadth of the work on display. All 130 craftspeople are represented in the mid-sized store; every nook and cranny is filled with jewelry, pottery, glass, weaving, knitting, prints, baskets, woodware, quilts. Still, there's always room for more. The craft cooperative's 10-member board brings about a dozen new craftspeople into the fold every year. When they turn people away, says board member Jennifer Boyer, they also critique the work. She points to Peggy Potters luminescent, hand-painted wooden bowls. Boyer says the board rejected Potter's earlier work three times. Potter fine-tuned her style to suit Artisans' Hand and is now an extremely successful craftsperson. "We think the collection is really strong because craftspeople are choosing what's here," Boyer says. "When we look at work we're pretty picky about what we take." This approach has paid off. The cooperative carries the work of some of the most respected craftspeople in Vermont, including printmaker and painter Sabra Field and Mary Azarian — who recendy won a Caldecott Award for her woodcut illustrations in the children's book Snowflake Bentley. The work of lesser-known talents is just as compelling. Bill Butler's silver and gold jewelry is inspired by water. The forms for his earrings, rings and pendants ($15-1000) are based on the shapes of waves, cr swirls and bubbles. Hoyt and Nancy Barringer use a wood-fired kiln to achieve a glossy surface on their % traditional pottery. Bits of wood ash deposit a mottled surface on the glaze. A khaki-colored conical ^ mug sells for $14, a matching pitcher for $55. Animal lovers can choose from a large selection of <t totems: Greg MacMartin's ceramic sculptures of snapper turtles ($30 and up) and a yellow spotted sala£ mander ($250) are lifelike enough to give nearby shoppers a jolt. The handcarved and painted song fS birds ($13.50) by Gary Starr of Starr Decoys are perfect for the Christmas tree. But never mind realism; whimsy abounds here, too. The Hot Pepper Journal ($32) by Langdell Paperworks has a cayenne seed cover. The 100-percent recycled interior pages are sprinkled with paprika. For the extra eco-correct, there's the Kaleidescope Journal ($32) made from Seventh Generation mail-order catalogues. You might call Artisans' Hand an alternative gift store: It offers beautiful handmade objects at reasonable prices, right in your own backyard. — Anne Galloway

a

Vermont

Vfait owe online ttoxe fox a piee sample of owe high quality, all-natwial soap.

www.naturefriendly.com

H A R D

Class cards - any class, any time, no explratioi be shared with friends like you. Wrapped up ar $10- single class $45 - 5 class card (holiday special) $85 -10 class card

CANDY

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I I

Yoga Mat $25 Leggings $35 Shorts $25

Muvaufi 14

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Astanga Practice Manual $27 Yoga Mala Book $27 Power Yoga Book $16 Beyond Power Yoga Book (available 12/15} $17 David Swenson Astanga Videos $29

v; page

T

SEVEN

M DAYS

november 24, 1999

| f£t»tia £?<*?*>> 1 Het Wt.

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Olive & Bette's • Champlain Mill, Winooski 655-4351 Olive & Bette's • 252 Columbus Ave., NY, NY Olive & Bette's • 1070 Madison Ave., NY, NY call for free catalog 1-888-767-8475


RICHMOND BEVERAGE

Holiday Gift Guide continued from page 13

Korbel Extra Dry

HO-HO-HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

and Brut $ 1 1 . ' 5 Beringer Founder's

Deck the halls. 'Nuf said.

Estate

Great wine selections for your Thanksgiving table! Milennium Champagne Available Now. Great Gift Ideas and Collectible Bottles Special Orders and Case Discounts Available BRIDGE STREET, RICHMOND 4 3 4 - 3 2 3 4

• Brass umbrella stand shaped like...an umbrella, Tina's H o m e Design, Burlington, $94.95. • Trio of iridescent beetles from Thailand, encased in glass and framed, Bazou, Burlington, $140. • Aged Italian glazed terracotta wall vases, Vivaldi Flowers, S. Burlington, $60-125. • Wall mirror with hammered-tin frame in floral motif, Pier O n e Imports, Burlington, $100. • "If you haven't anything nice to say, come sit by me" toss pillow by Design Legacy, Rainbow Room, Middlebury, $54. • Laminated vintage art posters from Europe, Silver Maple, Burlington, $45-250. • Moire handblown caneglass vase by Alan Goldfarb, Goldfarb Studio, Burlington. Prices vary. • Moroccan metal and glass candle lamps, 11 th Street Studio, $4885. • T h e Weather Stick — sort of a climatological dowsing rod, Vermont Folklife Center, $3.75. • Vienna damask woven tablecloth in ivory, various sizes, Soft Home, S. Burlington, $40; napkins $4. • Early American decorated wastebaskets by Barbee Bellefeuille, Artisans' Hand, Montpelier, $55. • Two-hour holiday special feng shui consultation for your home with Carol Wheelock, Waitsfield, $100. • Instant ancestors: antique photos in frames, Three Old Bats, Burlington, $7-70. • Illuminee du M o n d e Vermont Honey Lights candles, Apple Mountain, Winooski and Burlington, $20.99. • Monochromatic flower, ribbon and candle arrangement for the dinner table, Pompeii Floral, Winooski, $15-40. • Gregorian wind chimes, Inspirations, Williston, $50.

Continued on page 16

Give a gift that lasts a lifetime

Harpoon Winter Warmer

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§>teckng

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Celebrate the season with this winter classic. Cheers!

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Burlington's newest showplace for handmade crafts

Gr&ss Uafp CRAFT GALLERY • GIFTS • WOOD

ROCKIN' AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE These hills are still alive with the sound of music, and it ain't "Edelweiss." • Hampton Comes Alive, six-CD set by Phish, Borders, Burlington, $54.99 (sale price). • Bamboo flute from Southeast Asia, Bazou, Burlington, $18. • Tascam Porta-02 basic four-track recorder, Advance Music, Burlington, $179. • Loud Guitars Big Suspicions, by Shannon Curfman, Pure Pop, Burlington, $13. • Hohner Marine Band harmonica, Calliope, Burlington, $20.95. • Grateful Dead Bean Bear collectibles, Wild Mountain Thyme, Middlebury, $8.50. • Kazoo, Vermont Folk Instruments, Burlington, $1.89. • The Battle of Los Angeles, Rage Against the Machine, Vibes, Burlington, $14.99. • Onkyo audio receiver, Sound Source, Middlebury, $349.95. • Instant Virtuoso electronic violin, Learning Express, Burlington, $17.95• Goatskin drums from Senegal, Jazza Tings, Burlington, $180-300. • From Spirituals to Swing, recorded by John Hammond at Carnegie Hall in 1938, a three-CD boxed set, Borders, Burlington, $45. • Ralph Marlin silk ties featuring Elvis, The Beatles or Pink Floyd, Champlain Clothing, Burlington, $25-32. • Rustic wood-and-metal xylophone from Peru, 11 th Street Studio, $16. • Rrribbit wooden frog percussion instrument, Greenfields, Middlebury, $4.95 (small) and $10.95 (large). ®

the

POTTERY

continued f r o m page 15

CRAFTS

• JEWELRY

• IIANDBLOWN

GLASS

28 CHURCH STREET • BURLINGTON • 864.5454 • M - $A 10 AM-9 PM • Su 12-5 PM

NOT ENOUGH TO EAT... Last m o n t h h u n d r e d s of f a m i l i e s r e c e i v e d a o n e - w e e k ration f r o m t h e C h i t t e n d e n E m e r g e n c y Food Shelf. For m a n y it w a s their o n l y s o u r c e of f o o d .

{After

10th Anniversary Storewide Jewelry Sali Don't miss this fantastic customer

106.7 WiZN AND 99.9 THE BUZZ PRESENT...

appreciation sale ltou'll save 1 / 3

' f e e d YOUR NEIGHBOR' c a m p a i g n c h a l l e n g e s

our already rock bottom prices!

p e o p l e t h r o u g h o u t t h e c o u n t y t o collect t w o t o n s of f o o d for t h e Food Shelf d u r i n g t h e h o l i d a y s . Stop b y w i t h your d o n a t i o n . Protein t h a t d o e s n ' t require r e f r i g e r a t i o n c a n n e d t u n a , chili, beef s t e w , b e a n s , b a b y f o o d a n d f o r m u l a is

idnight)

3 DAYS ONLY! FRIDAY - SUNDAY NOVEMBER 26TH - 28TH University Mall, South Burlington • 862-3608

especially n e e d e d . Financial c o n t r i b u t i o n s c a n b e m a d e as w e l l .

All glasses change the way you view the world, our frames change the way the world views you.

LOOK FOR W I Z N A N D THE BUZZ AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS A N D DATES: • W e d n e s d a y , N o v e m b e r 24, n a . m . - 3 p . m . , at Costco, Mountain View Drive, Exit 16 off I-89, Colchester • Saturday, N o v e m b e r 27, n a . m . - 3 p . m . at Hannaford Food 6 Drug, Taft Corners, Williston

offbeat spectacles

• Saturday, December 4, 11 a . m . - 3 p . m . at Price Chopper, Shelburne Road,

JiJjL,

cool shades

South Burlington

vintage frames

• Saturday, December w, n a . m . - 3 p . m . at S h a w ' s , Exit 16 off I-89, Colchester IS'AMli'M:: T

mm ym JSfess..

.

' : ^ ^

It

I

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A T E

UNIVERSITY MALL

/ / Wht fcotteryj

168 battery St. burlington, vt v; page

16

SEVEN DAYS

november 2 4 , 1 9 9 9

802.651.0880


SOAPY SALES

The Sand Bar Restaurant

grew up in a big Victorian house with lots of bedrooms and nearly as many baths. My room came equipped with its own cozy sanctuary centered around a slippery-smooth porcelain tub standing on sturdy ball-and-claw feet. Though I'm not big on body culture — I seem to have skipped class the day they taught the other girls about makeup, hair care and other beautification rites — I know what it means to lose yourself in the private bliss of hot water up to your chin. For Kathleen Bradley, owner of Soap Dish, a body-care boutique that opened in Burlington in September, the road to a good bath begins with good bath products. She and co-owner Timothy Douglas, a chef and former welder, have recreated the College Street storefront — SOAPDISH which once housed Java Blues — as the Valhalla of bathrooms. Sitting sassily in the window is a near replica of my childhood tub, brimming with enticing blocks of candy-colored glycerin soaps: pink jasmine, orange honeysuckle, green cucumber. Inside the store, with its whitewashed walls and cabinetmaker detailing, everything is appropriately clean, bright and fresh. Perfectly folded terry towels, vases of artfully informal lilies and seaweed sponges fanned like ornamental kale set off an array of goods whose sole purpose is to make you look and feel good. There are aromatic eye pillows; multi-toned lip crayons; cocktail-scented colognes; silver-plated razors; and edible-sounding cleansing products that make "washing your mouth out with soap" sound more like a promise than a threat. "I'm obsessed with skin care in general, because I have sensitive skin," confides Bradley. The petite, delicatefeatured blonde wears her hair pulled back, as if ready to wash her face at any moment. Because her skin reacted badly to most conventional brands of beauty products, she says, when she was in her early twenties she started shopping at health food stores and experimented with her own recipes, using ingredients like milk, eggs, oatmeal, clay and essential oils. Now 31, Bradley doesn't have time to whisk up her own lipstick — and neither does anyone else. That's why she's convinced finding high-quality, organic skin products is a high priority for many folks. "People are realizing that the skin is an organ and that they need to care for it like the rest of your body," she remarks. To cater to the egg-on-your-face crowd, Soap Dish offers hard-tofind, natural potions that come in packages as attractive as their buyers hope they'll feel after using them. "I like a product that comes in a beautiful bottle," Bradley admits. One stand-out brand is Neal's Yard Remedies, whose wampum-blue glass bottles look like something from an imaginary apothecary. Neal's Yard — unavailable anywhere else in the state — is a European import, like lots of the brands Bradley stocks. She also carries several local products, including Geremy Rose, a brand of "fresh botanicals" produced in Brattleboro, and handmade goat's-milk soap from Vermont-based Jumping Moon Farms. For those who would like to try their hand at whipping up their own lotion, Soap Dish carries essential oils. Bradley's long-range plans include a custom fragrance bar, where customers will be able to create their own personal blends of aromas for the body or the home. Chances are the store's welcoming, you're-worth-it atmosphere will bathe Bradley and Thomas in the comfy green smell of success. 'fC — Ruth Horowitz

I

fine food • casual dining

>

From Our Dinner Menu NY Strip Steak with Roasted Garlic and Gorgonzola Grilled Salmon with a Citrus Herb Buerre Blanc Pasta with Shrimp, Tomato and Fresh Mozzarella Nightly Specials Saloon Menu Always Available

\ ^m

Dinner, 7 nights a week — 5 to 9, Sunday Brunch 9 to 1 South Hero Island • Lake Champlain, Vermont • 802-372-6911 Reservations Accepted / Catering Available / Holiday Parties

s o a p d i g h SERVE

YOURSELF. 197 C o l l e g e Street Burlington

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL A Celebration of Crafts & Cultures

Enjoy food, dance, crafts & music from around the world Friday, Dec. 3, 5pm - 8 pm Saturday, Dec. 4,10 am - 6 pm • Sunday, Dec. 5, 10 am - 5 pm

MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM Burlington, Vermont • Admission $3 • Info: 8 0 2 - 8 6 3 - 6 7 1 3 FREE 2-hour parking at designated downtown garages. Presented by the Vermont Performing Arts Leogue. Sponsored by: Burlington City Arts & lintilhoc foundation

C

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"VMortk

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Oilvermine (802) 864 - 3 5 5 0

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november 2 4 , 1 9 9 9

;

SEVEN DAYS

page 17


r-'^C'C

A PaintYourl Own Pottery Studio ••• & g r e a t coffee t o o !

GREAT GIFT IDEAS!

at the

Windjammer Friday, December y , 1999 Join us for a four-course dinner, including: -Choice of Appetizer - Famous 40-item salad boat -Choice of Entree -Dessert -Glass of Champagne in a souvenir flute!

K

$50 per person

Price does not include tax or gratuity

Reservations Required: < 862-6585 < 1076 Williston Rd. South Burlington (all t h e Best W e s t e r n W i n d j a m m e r I n n lor o u r m i l l e n n i u m hotel p a c k a g e s : 863-1125

• Gift Certificates • I O-Visit Cards Paint early for Christmas! %

119 College St. Burlington • 6 5 2 - 0 1 0 2

COCAINE

Great Gifts for Gearheads Shopping for the wild and woodsy on your list

FREE, CONFIDENTIAL COCAINE ABUSE TREATMENT Outpatient treatment with Behavioral Counseling and Supportive Services for adults • Employment Couseling • Relationship Counseling • Referral for Community Services, Social and Recreational Counseling • Treatment available immediately For questions or an appointment, call I-800-377-8714 The UVM Substance Abuse Treatment Center 1 South Prospect Street, Burlington at The University Health Center

B Y DAVID HEALY

F

or the outdoor enthusiast, the coming of winter means only one thing, and it ain't the chance to join in reindeer games. No, the holiday season means lust and opportunity — a chance to expand the apparel and toy collection without shelling out a dime of one's own. C o m e December, gearheads stop trying to calculate the interest payments on a

$3000 Kevlar kayak because, in and fast bases. Try the Swix the spirit of the season, it might Pocket Edge Sharpener ($12.95) just appear under the tree! or a tin of fluorinated Swix F4 But if you think shopping wipe-on wax ($11)., which is for gear has to tax your credit easy to use and good for a wide line, don't despair. T h e followrange of temperatures. ing list of small gifts — all for For the feet, you can never under $25 — will please any go wrong with rag-wool socks outdoor enthusiast. Call 'em ($8.50) for hiking, or even stocking stuffers if you wish; we under the Birks. But for loungprefer to call them bargains ,< ing around, or apres skiymt from the bottom up. favor the softer touch of fleece Starting underfoot, skiers ($17). and riders all need sharp edges At the ankles, think safety.

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Two m o n t h s ' F R E E I n t e r n e t and F R E E online holiday

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v ; page

18

SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1 9 9 9


••

,

f

Come December, gearheads stop trying to calculate the interest payments on a $3000 Kevlar kayak because, in the spirit of the season, it might just appear under the tree! Give your loved one a reflective Bikealite Legband and Chain guard ($6.95) and play it double-time for joggers ($7.50). Moving up a joint, protect the patella. Roller Derby makes a reasonably priced kneepad ($15.95) that works well for telemark skiers and in-line skaters as well. For the hard-to-find lap, we 3'Tecommend a Sealline 12" x 16" waterproof map and chart holder ($12) that clips to the deck of

one of those fancy kayaks. It beats getting lost at any price. Speaking of water, give a hydration pack ($19.50) that's worn at the waist. And, go ahead, splurge on the matching Nalgene water bottle ($6). Cover your bets — and your beloved's butt — with a pair of nylon hiking or swim shorts ($24) and you'll hear nary a complaint, except, perhaps, from the naturists on your list. Speaking of skin, you always

want to wick moisture away from the body — it gets cold on high peaks even in summer. Shortsleeve synthetic T-shirts ($19.95) are a nifty addition to any hiker's wardrobe, and close-outs abound for savvy shoppers. Smart travelers always want to keep the maps close at hand when venturing off into the backcountry. For most people that means right inside a chest pocket, but no matter where you stash it, any map by M a p

HOLIDAY

WEEKEND

DEALS

THROUGH SUNDAY WONDERFUL GIFTS... for everyone ^ you know Mt: who's active or likes to be outdoors!

Rossignol CUT 10.4 ALPINE SKIS.. easy-carving trendsetters were $369, sale $ 199.99

SNOWSHOES 10-30% OFF

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u

Rossignol Tempo Trail < xc ski package includes skis, boots, bindings and poles, msrp $273, sale $199.99 All 1999 bikes on sale...kids', bmx, mountain, road & cross All goggles...20% Off Smith, Oakley, Scott. Layers long underwear 20% off...men's, women's, kids...crews, Zip-T's, Pants. Layers f l e e c e 20% off... vests, jackets, pants, zip-T pullover. Swix cross-country gloves reg. $30, Sale 19.99, or 2 for $29.98! Kids' and adults' Acorn Polartec® socks... Buy one pair at regular price, get another at half price. Sorel Trooper youth's insulated boots, reg. $44.99...sale $39.99 Columbia Bugabootoo men's and women's insulated boots, reg. $95.99...sale $79.99

Atlas 'shoes 20%

O

N

1 0

L t o

off! Merrell waterproof boots...Blast and Eagle models, over 30% off.

V B

Inside Edge insulated clothing 30% off msrp... parkas and bibs. Insulated bibs, kids' sale $29.99, adults sale $39.99

p m

$20

GIFT CERTIFICATE

f o r YOU

ATSK1RACK&DOWNHIU.EDGE with any purchase of $100 or One per customer. Good through

1/16/00 for

merchandise.

»' Black Dot snowboard clothing 50% off msrp... jackets and pants. Huge Savings on last year's alpine ski, xc ski, and | snowboard equipment and * clothing...30% t o 70% off!

r v - A

I N G T O j y T

The 'Rack: 85 MAIN ST. 6584313 The 'Edge: 65 MAIN ST. 862-2282 VERMONTS OUTDOOR SPORTS HEADQUARTERS!

'1

Quicksilver Studios

OPEN STUDIO SALE!

Ei ^^SSfijj^S"

Stained Glass by Terry Zigmund

mtiMMiHMiDffllH i

All the right stuff:

Special purchase, Tubbs' best selling snowshoe ever, last year's Aurorawas $ 159, now $ 124.99.

any purchase except swap

HOLIDdT 50QIAL!

jewelry • candle shelters sun-catchers • wind chimes

*1

l|t|j

"fm

! I

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3 , 6 - 9 P M

itf• ''

\

«

SHOWTIME 5:30 PM

THANKSGIVING

H O L I M T

SATURDAY, D E C E M B E R 4 ,

\

MERCANTILE

S O C I A L !

TMVIKSDflT. b C C C H P E K 2 N b L O P P Y O r TI1E H O W A R D PrtNK

PARKING FREE

T I C K E T S $12 Please US VP (,EOIi(.ENE at the BBA Office at S(>3-1 17 > b\ Dei ember 1st! Mail to BRA, P.O. Box $14. Burlington, VT 0 >402

I0-6PM

4 Howard Street Burlington

What to Give?

865-6056

Buy H i m a beautiful Hemp Shirt for the Holiday 46 Main St • Middlebury • 388.8221 november 2 4 , 1 9 9 9

;

SEVEN DAYS

page 1 9


CHEMICAL FREE CHRISTMAS TREES

Your home for

No Pesticides or Defoliants Used

the classics.

MOUNTAIN MEAD FARM

a Worcester, VT

Real Trees Make Scents.

Sold at

223-2523

CT Farm & Country

'

1961 Williston Rd, Burlington, VT 05403

g

m

&

ALL C L A S S I C A L . A L L THE TIME.

Y

GREENFIELDS u

twice baked turkey, turkey dogs, turkey jambalaya, chipped turkey on toast,

• Looking for something j new this season?

•OJD

Great Gift Ideas For the Entii

MERCANTILE

What to Give?

Buy Him a beautiful Hemp Shirt for the Holiday 46 Main St • Middlebury • 388.8221

wis, Unlimited Quest & Woolrtch

H H

Fleece from AH, Columbia, Dakirn, Marmot, North Face, Patagonia & Tsunami Clothing from Gramicci, F O R H I M : Great looks, handsome styles, and flawless function...all in his color! M+n. Hardwear, North Face, Nordica, Pataaonia, Phentx & mare

Parkas & ShellsfromBurton, Fleece from Alf, Columbia, Marmot,

Clothing from Gramicci, Kavu, Patagonia & Royal Rabbins

FOR THE KIDS: Great outerwear for kids! ParkasfromBack HiU by Burton, Black Dot, Boulder Gear, CB Sports, Columbia & Nordica Fleece by Chuck Roast, plus, mittens, gloves, socks, long underwear, turflenecks, hats & headbands DOWNHILL SKIS: this year's best sellers from Salomon

M f g . List

O u r Price

Salomon X-Scream Series - gold medal, all Salomon X-Scream Teneighty - pipe or park,

$775.00 $595.00

$669>00 $519.00

apart from the crowd.

Also check out the new skis by Nordica.

saw it IN

SEVEN DAYS

BOOTS: Burlington's best bootfitters - boots by Salomon, Rossignol, Lange, Tecnica, Delbello & Nordica just $149.00

Keep your feet warm with Hotronics

Karhu Pioneer X/C ski package - includes Karhu Backcountry skis - by Karhu, Fischer and more JJT o

boots & bindings

just $199.00 from $139.95

SNOWSHOES: by Tubbs of Stowe, lifetime guarantee! Tubbs Adventure 25 just $159.00

Tubbs Altitude 30 just $189.00

Tubbs Expedition 36 just $287.00

c e l l division

Red Hot Winter Specials! Kids/Adults

Black Bear Bibs North face Denali vests

reg. $59/$79

Now $29/$39

reg. $120

Now $89

Past season winter clothing up to 60% offi

Gift Season Ski & Snowboard leases Give the gift of a ski/snowboard lease, starring at just $99*!

Parltina1 * fpw*^"*

Layaway. Just 25% down.

ALPINE SHOP

Open Daily 862-2714 Williston Rd., So. Burlington Open Daily 388-7547 Merchants Row, Middlebury

$99, at $169.

*Kids skis start at

Adults

s^uj|diunp pue Aavjjni 'Aevjjnj Ague} 'epeimoua Aavj-inj 'Aayjjn^ p a u j v; page

20

SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1999

Adventures is a bargain guide to the great outdoors. My personal favorite is the Northern Vermont Adventure Skiing map ($6.95). At the neck, everyone needs a collection of gaiters ($12.50) and the new lightweight, breathable variety is on my wish list. And consider a combination compass-safety whistle ($10.50 ) for those rare occasions when the overly enthusiastic sportsman or w o m a n wanders into the wilderness. Don't forget to take care of your sweetie's bones. "Strength training" is believed to ward off osteoporosis. Buy her some lightweight chrome dumbells ($21.95) to keep her going for the long haul. While you're at it, protect the f u n n y bone with elbow pads by Street Gear ($19.95). And for those Arnold Schwarzenegger types, there's always the real-deal hexagonal dumbells. At $1 per pound, they are cheaper than protein supplements.

18kt earrings with diamonds from $2835

Von Bargen's Fine Diamonds and Jewelry

864-0012

Put a dab of the Body Shop's Face Protector cream ($9) on your hands, apply to face, and protect the skin from wind and cold. Instead of overpriced skiing and riding skull caps — a.k.a. helmets — invest in a Petzl Micros Headlamp ($24). Remember, if you knock your noggin camping, it hurts like the dickens! And then there's the taste buds. Don't even try to pass off instant coffee, no matter how remote the camp site. N o t when you can carry a mini-espresso maker ($16.50), or a Black Fly Roast Coffee Kit ($10), which use a unique teaball system to make some kickin' brew. Keep the innards in proper working order — and avoid the dreaded beaver fever — with Potable Aqua pills ($5). Give inspiration and food for thought with a Long Trail guidebook ($14.95) or — for families, naturalists and those with more modest hiking aspirations — try Elizabeth Basset's superbly written Nature Walks in Northern Vermont and the Champlain Valley ($12.95).

All goggles by Bolle, Briko, Scott & Smith upito 20% offi

Ff66

continued from page 19

D o a good turn and cover the arms with a C a t a m o u n t Trail Association long-sleeve T-shirt ($18) and publicize Vermont's end-to-end ski trail in style. Protect the palms with Pearl Izumi bike gloves ($22) and help your climbing friends get a grip with a new chalk bag ($18). Neurotic climbers have long had a thing for finger-fortifying * Power Putty ($7), but wakeboarders and others in need of forearm strength have come to discover its benefits, too.

na • Sweaters from Ariandia, Dale of Norway, Demefre, H I |

Gearheads

1-800-841-8820

150 Church Street, Burlington, Vermont

Finally, for heart and soul, give a membership or donation to one of Vermont's many deserving nonprofit outdoororiented organizations. Because in the end, it's all in the experience. ®


6

The Eagles

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Better t h a n a coupon,

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With the n e w W I Z A R D C A R D you'll get free or discounted passes for concerts, clubs, movies, plus deep discounts from WIZARD advertisers and F R E E p r i z e * f r o m t h e W I Z A R D - only for you!

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Y E S , I w a n t to see t h e Eagles in concert, r e u n i t e d f o r one b i g concert in Los Angeles - t h i s N e w Year's Eve! I'll get FREE

a i r f a r e a n d h o t e l a c c o m m o d a t i o n s ! D r a w i n g h e l d December 10, 1999. Plus, I w a n t to Carry t h e P o w e r w i t h m y f r e e WIZARD Card! It's y o u r FREE p a s s p o r t f o r g r e a t deals on music, concerts, skiing, r i d i n g , r o p i n g (well, m a y b e not r o p i n g ) a n d special events!

WIZARD CARD APPLICATION NAME

HOME ADDRESS

CITY

STATE/PROVINCE

PHONE C

)

FAX

).

C

ZIP

EMAIL

WORK PHONE C.

May we fax/email you about future events? • •

Male L J Female

DATE OF BIRTH

/

/

Yes •

Single •

No Married •

HOW MANY PEOPLE, INCLUDING YOURSELF, LIVE IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD? DO YOU HAVE CHILDREN? • DO YOU •

OWN OR •

Yes •

No

AGES/HOW MANY? •

RENT YOUR HOME?

WHAT IS YOUR OCCUPATION?

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• l 0 2 0 3 Q 4 0 s + Under 5 •

6-12 •

DO YOU USE THE INTERNET REGULARLY?

• B u s i n e s s Owner

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Clerical/Office

Homemaker

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Computer Related L J Sales/Marketing • L I Student

Over 18

Yes •

No

Q

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13-18 •

Retail

Education

Other

PLEASE CHECK ALL OF THE ACTIVITIES IN WHICH YOU PARTICIPATE OR HAVE AN INTEREST

Fitness

L J Gardening

Video Games

Automobiles

Summer Sports

L I Advertiser discounts

Kids Activities

LI

Shopping

Professional Sports

Movies/Videos

College Sports

LJI Home Office

Q

The Arts

Fishing/Hunting/Camp

Personal Investments

Q

Crafts/Craft Shows

Skiing

Computers/Internet

Q

Music Concerts

Boarding

Home Electronics

Q

Travel

Home Improvement

HOW MANY TIMES A MONTH DO YOU (1-5, 6-10, OR 100:

rent movies?

eat out?

attend a sports event? •

HOW MANY HOURS PER DAY DO YOU LISTEN TO THE RADIO? •

attend a concert/club? less t h a n 1 •

WHERE DO YOU LISTEN TO THE RADIO (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY)? •

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2-3 • Home •

3* Work

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SEVEN DAYS

page 21


Choice of: W i l d Bird Canary

1 lb. Of

Stowe I Farmers' * Market *

esses o n sole this

Pet

HOLIDAY j BAZAAR

Food!

Parakeet Parrot Finch

FREE

Hamster Rabbit

TropicalFish $1.99 or l e s s

Guinea Pig

1 coupon per visit exp. Nov 301999

1 coupon per visit exp. Nov 301999

Sat., Nov. 27th Stowe Elementary School •

Seekend!

11 am - 4 pm featuring Vermont Handcrafted Gifts, Wreaths, Maple Syrup, Herbal & Wool Products, Cheese, and Prepared Foods.

btbg, bisou-bisou, michael stephens, o d e s s a , n i c o f e mf|}er> french connection.„the

1 coupon per visit exp. Nov 30 1999

FREE Admission &

b e s t selection e v e r ]

NOAH'S ARK

LIVE MUSIC by

The Nattetjack Band clothes for women

Be Part of the Miracle

Bring a non-perishable food item or warm winter clothing • for local charities & receive a • FREE raffle ticket.

Pet & Grooming Center

Just Off 1-89, exit 16 Across from Libby's 655-0421 noahspet01@aol.com

on the Church Street Marketplace

CAPITOL GROUNDS

TADAS M E N U ! 1

offERilNq VEQETARiAN, SEAfood & SpiCEd MEAT dislHES.

ART IS IN HAND

CAFE & R O A 5 T E R Y

Complete your Thanksgiving feast with our holiday special. (thru Thurs. 1 1/25) While it lasts, get 1 lb. of Kenya AA..$8.89 (1/2 lb. $4.45)

cafe

^ e i i t a i v

38 Elm Street, Montpelier 05602 2 2 9 - 1 0 1 9

Organic Colombian Cauca

$7.89 (1/2 lb. $3.95)

Bobs' House Blend

$7.89 (1/2 lb. $3.95)

Costa Rican Decaf

$6.89 (1/2 lb. $3.45)

Open 8 a m - 6 p m Thanksgiving D a y 45 S T A T E S T R E E T * M O N T P E L I E R * 2 2 3 - 7 8 Q O

Vase by Danforth Pewterers

Holiday Lighting Ceremonies Wednesday, December i

ARTISANS' HAND C R A F T GALLERY

The Satehouse Tree will be lit by Governor

89 Main Street at City Center

Howard Dean at 4:30 pm, followed by a

Montpelier, V T v (802)229-9492

parade (featuring Santa's arrival)

M-Sat 10-5:30 • Sun 12-4 • Open Friday til 8

to Montpelier City Hall. Join us in a concert of holiday music and sing-along with the Montpelier High School Jazz Band and U-32 and Montpelier High School Choruses will follow. Free coffee,

^ T H E H O t f c V

hot chocolate and donuts!

WITH A GOOD READ FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST

J

- FICTION/POETRY - NON-FICTION FOR ALLIHTERESIS - CHILDREN'S ROOM UPSTAIRS - PUBLISHED REMAINDERS

BEAR

- CARDS & CALENDARS - FREE Gin WRAPPING

POND

• GIFT CERTIFICATES REDEEMED AT

I N D I I'I N D I N R B O O K S T O R E 1 O K I M > I IM M M V R

v; page

22

SEVEN DAYS

Special Holiday Shopping Hours in Downtown Montpelier November 26 - December 23 Fridays: open until 8 pm

BGDKS MINDS

7 7 MAIN STREET MONTPELIER 229.0774

november 2 4 , 1 9 9 9

RIVER STREET

POTTERS classes • GaJiery • studio

Sundays: open 11 am - 4 pm December

BOOKSENSE STORES NATIONWIDE AN

Sponsored by the Coffee Corner and Dunkin' Donuts.

13-23

Extended weeknight hours until 8 pm

141 River Street • Montpelier • 224-7000


•mm*

h-

M a i ke a Middlelbury Ckristmas part oJfyour Jfami]lyl kolidlay tradlition. Cafe S w i f t

j—mes"t

H OlIS©

Dmmg

802-388-9925 Rte. 7 & Stewart Lane

Give your child a gift they'll always remember...

Their 1st Bicycle!

The Bike Center 388-6666 74 Main Street In Downtown Middlebury

H J ^ j

msm

Middlebury Jewelry & Design Fabulous Jewelry for Every Occasion • 14k gold wedding & engagement rings • Sparkling Diamonds &. Gems 40 Main Street Middlebury

JL JS/Lidalehurv Chm stm

Middlebury's Best Kept Shopping Secret! For all ages...

JL

Come t o Middlebury December

Delightful Gifts from the Past and the Present! The Museum

The Country Peddler In the Middlebury Inn

The Country Peddler is overflowing with Christmas treasures for everyone on your list! Open daily 7:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. On The Greens, Middlebury

" f a n d ^

802-388-4961

f o r traditional holidatj pleas u r e s - visit w i t h S a n t a in a s e a s o n a l I L) d e c o r a t e d h i s t o r i c home, t a k e a horse drawn w a g o n ride, listen t o seasonal music, t a k e in a p e r f o r m a n c e o f Oliver, a t t e n d h o l i d a i j o p e n houses at area galleries a n d museums, a n d stroll a r o u n d a small New E n g l a n d t o w n all d r e s s e d u p inholidaL) style.

www.middleburyinn.com E-mail: middinnvt@sover.net

TS for all o f y o u r TVs, V C R s , Compact Discs

December 5 Ginge r b r e a d H o u s e Pa r t u at Vermont Pollchfe Center, p.m., Info.

388-2755

Oliverperformed by Middlebury Community Players at M U H S Auditorium, 8 p.m.

d an f ort h h a n d c r a f t e d in V e r m o n t

Visit our gift store in the Marble Works, Middlebury Open Mon.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 11-4 388-0098 www.danforthpewter.com

Middlebury

Autumn G o l d ^

• Fine Jewelry • Gifts • Estate Pieces • Appraisals • Gemological Laboratory

T r e e h o r s e - d r a w n w a g o n r i d e s from downtown Middleburu t o Middleburu College Center forthe Arts from 10:}0 a.m. until 2:}0 p.m. Info. ^88-Ml6 A G l i m p s e o f C h r i s t m a s P a s t : Music, Dance and other Diversions. Holiday Exhibit and O p e n House at Sheldon Museum, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Info. ^88-ZU/ Oliver

5 Park St.

downtown

Mary Johnson children's Center P e s t i v a l o f W r e a t h s at Middleburu College Center f o r the Arts, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Info. >33-25^5

makn ig Business easier' worlowioe December Holiday Hours •Weekdays 8 am - 7 pm FedEx -Saturdays 9 am - 5 pm | n | — ijp; -Sundays Noon - 4 pm

B.

stereo needs&

December Visit w i t h S a n t a C l a u s at the Middlebury Community House, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Info. 588-M16

M A I L BOXES ETC"

Shop

M L HENRY SHELDON M U S E U M 1 Park Street, Middlebury • 388-2117

61 Main Street Middlebury, Vermont 05753 T 388-6788

performed by Middlebury Community Players at M U H S Auditorium 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.

December J A Glimpse o f C h r i s t m a s P a s t : Music, Dance and other Diversions. Holiday Exhibit and O p e n House at Sheldon Museum, 2-5 p.m. rathe r Christmas Info. 388-2U/

p^ ^ ( ^ R r

A H o l i d a u S t r o l l 2 - 5 p.m. A wallcing tour o f historic homes and b u i l d i n g in Middlebury. Pee charged. Info. J88-1117 Oliver

i s t m a ?

A S p e c i a f . . , LMtdTmt Offerl

performed by Middlebury Community Players at M U H S Auditorium 2 p.m.

P u r c h a s e $100 w o r t h of gift certificates, and receive an additional $25.00 O F F PEAK gift certificate FREE!

A visit t o M i d d l e b u r y a n y t i m e c a n make u o u r h o l i d a u s h o p p i n g a p l e a s u r e w i t h g r e a t g i f t s e l e c t i o n s , f r e e p a r k i n g , a c h a r m i n g h i s t o r i c small t o w n e x p e r i e n c e , a n d amazingly f r i e n d l y c u s t o m e r service. M a n y s t o r e s o f f e r g i f t r e g i s t r i e s a n d f r e e g i f t w r a p p i n g .

1-800-367-7166 Order by phone or in person.

SS-Jfe

Wooden Toys and Gifts

BOOKS

Cassettes • CD's Cards • Calendars

Factory Store Open Mon-Fri 9-5/Sat 9-4

Sweet

We ship books anywhere! Maple Landmark 1297 Exchange St. Middlebury, VT 802-388-0627 www.maplelandmark.com Easy Parking • Just off Route 7

Everything for the rink, pool, court, field and diamond M a i n St.,

Middlebury

BEN FRANKLIN

MAIN S T R E E T 388-4927

f,

t Vermont

<Book.Sfiop

M a i n Street, M i d d l e b u r y 388-2061 Vermont State Craft Center

FROG HOLLOW

Your headquarters for the holidays and the millennium, Open Sundays now through Christmas.

Truly Unique gifts handcrafted by VT Artists visit www.froghollow.org online gallery

7 3 M a i n St. • Middlebury , , , 388-2101

1 Mill Street Middlebury • 388-3177

N o w on Main Street Middlebury

7 th A n n u a l Traditional Arts Showcase &. Sale December 3-23 A selection of outstanding contemporary folk crafts and heritage foods from Vermont and the region -Gifts from $3 to $300

A Country Store

Gingerbread H o u s e Competition December 3 - 1 8 A display created by Vt. chefs and home bakers

for Christmas

388-3353

For your winter fun!

sponsored by dada and

*'LNCi!Zu /American Middlebury.

Express,

The Vermont Foiklife Center ALPINE S H O P 388-7547 Merchants Row, Middlebury

november 2 4 , 1 9 9 9

Masonic Hall, Court St., Middlebury (802)3884964 Holiday Gallery Hours: Monday-Saturday, 10 am - 5 pm

;

SEVEN DAYS

page 2 3


24 WEDNESDAY

COMPANY'S COMING Some of the repertoire of the Wood's Tea Company comes from wandering dudes — the sea shanties and Celtic fare in particular. But this week the Adamant-based traditional troubadours offer up musical wanderlust to aid those who have no homes at all. The benefit for COTS — the Committee on Temporary Shelter — starts at 8 p.m. this Friday at Higher Ground.

LASSO LASSIE Connie Dover has been called a Celtic cowgirl — for her other occupation as cook on a Wyoming ranch — but you could also say the Kansas native has approached traditional British Isles music like it was her own wild frontier. Backed by the astounding Roger Landes on

IRISH FOLK, Dockside, 7 p.m. N C . P.R-SMITH'S HIDDEN DRIVES (improv jazz/poetry), Colburn Gallery, UVM, 7 p.m. N C . DAWN DECKER W/DICK FORMAN & WILL PATTON (jazz), Leunigs, 7:30 p.m. N C . KARAOKE KAPERS (hosts Bob Bolyard & Eric Brenner), 135 Pearl, 9:30 p.m. N C . ABAIR BROS, (rock), Nectar's, 9:30 p.m. N C . JO M0 F0 (funk), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. N C . SEX FLY (funk; DJ Benge), Club Metronome, 9:30 p.m. $2. HIP-HOP NIGHT (DJs), Rasputin's, 9:30 p.m. N C . OPEN MIKE, Manhattan Pub, 9:30 p.m. N C . HERBAN LEGENDZ (DJ Frostee), Club Extreme, 9 p.m. NC/$2. KARAOKE, J.P.'s Pub, 9 p.m. NC. SAND BLIZZARD (rock), Trackside Tavern, 9 p.m. $2. OPEN MIKE, Swany's, 9 p.m. NC. TNT KARAOKE, Thirsty Turtle, 9:30 p.m. N C .

mandolin, guitar and bouzouki, Dover's lilting soprano fills the Knights of Columbus Hall in

TAMMY FLETCHER & THE DISCIPLES (soul/blues), Rusty Nail, 8:30 p.m. $5. OPEN MIKE, Charlie O's, 9 p.m. N C .

25 THURSDAY THANKSGIVING DANCE, 135 Pearl, 9 p.m. $3. THE X-RAYS (rock/r&b), Nectars, 9:30 p.m. N C . DJ JOEY K (hip-hop), Club Extreme, 9 p.m. N C / $ 2 . KARAOKE W/MATT & BONNIE DRAKE, Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. N C . WITHIN REASON (acoustic duo), Nightspot Outback, 9 p.m. N C .

26

FRIDAY PICTURE THIS (jazz), Windjammer, 5:30 p.m. N C . RODNEY & FRIENDS (acoustic), Ri Ra, 6 p.m. N C . RIK PALIERI (folk), Dockside, 7 p.m. N C . BOOTLESS & UNHORSED (Irish), Last Chance Saloon, 7:30 p.m. N C . MEG HUTCHINSON (singersongwriter), Borders, 8 p.m. NC. MARGO HENNEBACH W/MARK SAUNDERS (singersongwriters), Burlington

Middlebury this Friday.

ap ro pos

SMUGGLERS' NOTCH V-E-R-M-O-N-T

A pair of Smuggs lift tickets will be given away every hour on the hour, Friday through Sunday, Nov. 26-28. Register to win with any

HIGH-SPEED INTERNET SERVICES

purchase

since 1995

0 . I

SOVERNET.

VERMONT'S SOVEREIGN INTERNET CONNECTION

toll free ( 8 7 7 ) 8 7 7 - 2 1 2 0

v; page

24

SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1999

• sales@sover.net

www.sover.net


Coffeehouse at Rhombus, 8 p.m. $8. ARTFUL DODGER (acoustic), Sweetwaters, 9 p.m. NC. BARBACOA (surf n<>ir), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. N C . ROB HANDEL (piano) 135 Pearl, 6 p.m. N C , followed by DJ FROSTY, 9 p.m. $4/5, followed by DJ CRAIG MITCHELL, 11 p.m. $4/5. TOP HAT DJ, Ruben James, 11 p.m. N C . U.N.I, (reggae), Club Metronome, 9:30 p.m. $5. THE X-RAYS (rock/r&b), Nectars, 9:30 p.m. N C . ORGY (retro remix/r&b/hip-hop; DJs Frostee & Robbie J.), Club Extreme, 9 p.m. $3/5. CURRENTLY NAMELESS (groove rock), Vermont Pub 6 Brewery, 9:30 p.m. N C . RUSS & CO. (rock), Alley Cats, 9:30 p.m. NC. COMEDY ZONE (stand-up), Radisson Hotel, 8 & 10 p.m. $8. THE NATURALS (rock), Henrys Pub, Holiday Inn, 9 p.m. N C . WOOD'S TEA COMPANY (traditional; benefit for COTS), Higher Ground, 7 p.m. $7. SAND BLIZZARD (rock), Trackside Tavern, 9 p.m. $2. THE IMPOSTERS (rock), Champions, 9 p.m. N C . KARAOKE W/MATT & BONNIE DRAKE, Backstage Pub, 9 p.m. N C . FULL CIRCLE (rock), Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. N C . JOHN CASSEL (jazz piano), Tavern at the Inn at Essex, 7 p.m. N C . LIVE JAZZ, Diamond Jim's Grille, 7:30 p.m. N C . ADAMS & EVE (rock),

weekly

Franny O's, 9 p.m. N C . DISTANT THUNDER (rock), City Limits, 9 p.m. N C . CONNIE DOVER & ROGER LANDES, SCOTT ALARIK (Celtic; storyteller), After Dark Series, Knights of Columbus Hall, 8 p.m. $16/18. SHOTGUN WEDDING (rock), Thirsty Turtle, 9 p.m. $3. LES RIOS (singer-songwriter), J.P. Morgans, 7:30 p.m. N C . COBALT BLUE (rock/blues), Charlie O's, 9 p.m. NC. BETSY JAMISON & DAN JESSIE (j azz/swing), Villa Tragara, 6:30 p.m. $5 with dinner. BL00Z0T0MY (jump blues), Mountain Roadhouse, 9 p.m. NC. ABAIR BROS, (rock), Rusty Nail, 8:30 p.m. NC. DUB SQUAD (reggae), Matterhorn, 9 p.m. $5. APATHY JONES (rock), Nightspot Outback, 9 p.m. $5-7 HARVEY & THE WALLBANGERS (rock), Wobbly Barn, 9 p.m. $6-8.

SATURDAY TAMMY FLETCHER & THE DISCIPLES (blues/soul), Dockside, 7 p.m. NC. BOOTLESS & UNHORSED (Irish), Last Chance Saloon, 7:30 p.m. N C . GREG GREENAWAY (singersongwriter), Burlington Coffeehouse at Rhombus, 8 p.m. $8. DJ LITTLE MARTIN, 135 Pearl, 10 p.m. $4/5. THE X-RAYS (rock/r&b),

list i ngs

on

Nectars, 9:30 p.m. N C . MARC BRISSON (acoustic), Sweetwaters, 9 p.m. NC. RETRONOME (DJ), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2. STARLINE RHYTHM BOYS (hillbilly boogie), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. NC. KARAOKE, J.P.'s Pub, 9 p.m. NC. PERRY NUNN (acoustic), Ruben James, 5 p.m. NC, followed by DJS TIM DIAZ & RUGGER (hip-hop/r&b), 10 p.m. NC. FLASHBACK ('80s DJ), Rasputin's, 10 p.m. NC. HIP-HOP PARTY (DJs Spin & Irie), Club Extreme, 9 p.m. $3/5. DJ JOEY K (hip-hop), Last Chance Saloon, 9 p.m. NC. DYSFUNKSHUN (hiphop/funk), Vermont Pub & Brewery, 9:30 p.m. NC. COMEDY ZONE (stand-up), Radisson Hotel, 8 & 10 p.m. $8. GUY COLASACCO (singersongwriter), Jake's, 6:30 p.m. NC. THE NATURALS (rock), Henry's Pub, Holiday Inn, 9 p.m. NC. SAM ARMSTRONG (jazz favorites), Tuckaway's, Sheraton Hotel, 9 p.m. NC. COMMANDER CODY & HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN, THE SUN MOUNTAIN FIDDLER (country rock), Higher Ground, 8 p.m. $8. THE IMPOSTERS (rock), Champion's, 9 p.m. NC. EAST COAST MUSCLE (blues), Backstage Pub, 9 p.m. NC. FULL CIRCLE (rock), Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. NC. BUCK HOLLOW BAND (country; line dancing), Cobbweb, 8:30 p.m. $7/12.

8084 (rock), Sha-Booms, 9 p.m. $5. KARAOKE W/FRANK, Franny O's, 9 p.m. N C . DISTANT THUNDER (rock), City Limits, 9 p.m. N C . GARNET ROGERS, SCOTT ALARIK (singer-songwriter; storyteller), After Dark Series, Knights of Columbus Hall, 8 p.m. $16/18. LAST KID PICKED (rock), Thirsty Turtle, 9 p.m. $3. DUB SQUAD (reggae), Matterhorn, 9 p.m. $5. BLUES BUSTERS (blues), Mountain Roadhouse, 9 p.m. NC. ABAIR BROS, (rock), Rusty Nail, 8:30 p.m. $5. AUGUSTA BROWN (rock), Charlie O's, 9 p.m. N C . APATHY JONES (rock), Nightspot Outback, 9 p.m. $5-7 HARVEY & THE WALLBANGERS, THE R0RY DANIELS BAND (rock), Wobbly Barn, 9 p.m. $6-8.

where to go After Dark M u s i c S e r i e s , K n i g h t s of C o l u m b u s H a l l , M i d d l e b u r y , 3 8 8 - 0 2 1 6 . All'ey-Cats, 4 1 K i n g St., B u r l . , 6 6 0 - 4 3 0 4 . A d a m s A p p l e Cafe, P o r t l a n d & M a i n s t r e e t s , M o r r i s v i l l e , 8 8 8 - 4 7 3 7 . , B a c k s t a g e Pub, 6 0 P e a r l St., Essex Jet., 8 7 8 - 5 4 9 4 . Barnes & N o b l e B o o k s e l l e r s , 1 0 0 Dorset St., S. B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 4 - 8 0 0 1 . Boony's, Rt. 2 3 6 , F r a n k l i n , 9 3 3 - 4 5 6 9 . B o r d e r s B o o k s & M u s i c , 2 9 C h u r c h St., B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 5 - 2 7 1 1. B u r l i n g t o n C o f f e e h o u s e at R h o m b u s , 1 8 6 C o l l e g e St., B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 4 - 5 8 8 8 . C a c t u s Cafe, 1 L a w s o n Ln., B u r l . , 8 6 2 - 6 9 0 0 . C a m b r i d g e Coffee House, S m u g g l e r ' s N o t c h Inn. J e f f e r s o n v i l l e . 6 4 4 - 2 2 3 3 . C a p i t o l G r o u n d s , 4 5 State St., M o n t p e l i e r , 2 2 3 - 7 8 0 0 . C h a m p i o n ' s , 3 2 M a i n St., W i n o o s k i , 6 5 5 - 4 7 0 5 . C h a r l i e O's, 7 0 M a i n St., M o n t p e l i e r , 2 2 3 - 6 8 2 0 . C h o w ! B ^ a , 2 8 N. M a i n St., St. A l b a n s , 5 2 4 - 1 4 0 5 . City L i m i t s , 1 4 Greene St. V e r g e n n e s , 8 7 7 - 6 9 1 9 . Club E x t r e m e , 1 6 5 C h u r c h St., B u r l i n g t o n , 6 6 0 - 2 0 8 8 . Club M e t r o n o m e , 1 8 8 M a i n St., B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 5 - 4 5 6 3 . Club 1 5 6 , 1 5 6 St. Paul St., B u r l i n g t o n , 6 5 8 - 3 9 9 4 . C o b b w e b , S a n d y b i r c h Rd., G e o r g i a ,

Dockside Cafe, 2 0 9 Battery, Burlington, 8 6 4 - 5 2 6 6 . Edgewater Pub, 340 Malletts Bay Ave.. Colchester, 8 6 5 - 4 2 1 4 . Finnigan's Pub, 2 0 5 C o l l e g e St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 8 2 0 9 . F r a n n y O's 7 3 3 Q u e e n C i t y P k . R d . , B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 3 - 2 9 0 9 . G o o d T i m e s C a f e , H i n e s b u r g V i l l a g e , Rt. 1 1 6 , 4 8 2 - 4 4 4 4 . H a l v o r s o n ' s , 16 C h u r c h S t . , B u r l i n g t o n , 6 5 8 - 0 2 7 8 . Henry's, H o l i d a y Inn, 1068 W i l l i s t o n Rd., S. Burlington, 8 6 3 - 6 3 6 1 . Higher Ground, 1 M a i n St., W i n o o s k i , 6 5 4 - 8 8 8 8 . H o r n of t h e M o o n C a f e , 8 L a n g d o n S t . , M o n t p e l i e r , 2 2 3 - 2 8 9 5 . Jake's, 1233 S h e l b u r n e Rd., S. Burlington, 6 5 8 - 2 2 5 1 . J.P. M o r g a n ' s at C a p i t o l P l a z a , 1 0 0 M a i n S t . , M o n t p e l i e r , 2 2 3 - 5 2 5 2 . J.P.'s P u b , 1 3 9 M a i n S t . , B u r l i n g t o n , 6 5 8 - 6 3 8 9 . LaBrioche, 89 M a i n St., Montpelier, 2 2 9 - 0 4 4 3 . L a s t C h a n c e S a l o o n , 147 M a i n , B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 2 - 5 1 5 9 . Leunig's, 115 C h u r c h St., Burlington, 8 6 3 - 3 7 5 9 . L i v e Art at the B a r r e O p e r a H o u s e , 4 7 6 - 8 1 8 8 , or W o o d Art G a l l e r y , Montpelier, 883-9307. M a d M o u n t a i n T a v e r n , Rt. 1 0 0 , W a i t s f i e l d , 4 9 6 - 2 5 6 2 . M a d R i v e r U n p l u g g e d at V a l l e y P l a y e r s T h e a t e r , Rt. 1 0 0 , W a i t s f i e l d , 4 9 6 8910. M a i n S t . B a r & G r i l l , 118 M a i n S t . , M o n t p e l i e r , 2 2 3 - 3 1 8 8 . M a n h a t t a n Pub, 167 M a i n St., B u r l i n g t o n , 6 5 8 - 6 7 7 6 . Matterhorn, 4 9 6 9 M o u n t a i n Rd., S t o w e , 2 5 3 - 8 1 9 8 . T h e Mountain Roadhouse, 1677 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 2 5 3 - 2 8 0 0 . Nectar's, 188 M a i n St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 4 7 7 1 . The Nightspot Outback, Killington Rd., Killington, 4 2 2 - 9 8 8 5 135 Pearl St., Burlington, 8 6 3 - 2 3 4 3 . Pickle Barrel, Killington Rd., Killington, 4 2 2 - 3 0 3 5 .

SUNDAY

Radisson Hotel, 6 0 Battery St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 6 5 0 0 . Rasputin's, 163 C h u r c h St., B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 4 - 9 3 2 4 .

DAYVE HUCKETT (jazz guitar), Sweetwaters, 11:30 a.m. NC. THE MANDOLINQUENTS (bluegrass), Borders, 4 p.m. NC. SUNDAY SESSIONS (trad. Irish), Ri Ra, 5 p.m. NC. COBALT BLUE (blues/rock), Nectars, 9:30 p.m. NC. SUNDAY NIGHT MASS (DJ), Club Metronome, 9:30 p.m. $2. HIP-HOP NIGHT W/T0P

Red S q u a r e , 136 C h u r c h St., Burlington, 8 5 9 - 8 9 0 9 . Rhombus, 186 C o l l e g e St., Burlington, 8 6 5 - 3 1 4 4 . R i p t o n C o m m u n i t y C o f f e e H o u s e , Rt. 1 2 5 , 3 8 8 - 9 7 8 2 . Ri Ra, 1 2 3 C h u r c h S t . , B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 0 - 9 4 0 1 . Ruben James, 159 Main St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 0 7 4 4 . Rusty Nail, Mountain Rd., S t o w e , 2 5 3 - 6 2 4 5 . S h a - B o o m s , 4 5 Lake St., St. A l b a n s ,

ww w . s e v e n d a y s v t . c o m

Starksboro, 434-4254. Strand T h e a t e r , 2 5 Brinkerhoff St., P l a t t s b u r g h , S w a n y ' s , 215 M a i n St., V e r g e n n e s ,

S w e e t w a t e r s , 118 C h u r c h S t . , B u r l i n g t o n , 8 6 4 - 9 8 0 0 . T h e T a v e r n at t h e I n n at E s s e x , E s s e x J e t . , 8 7 8 - 1 1 0 0 . T h i r s t y Turtle, 1 S. M a i n St., W a t e r b u r y ,

T r a c k s i d e T a v e r n , 18 M a l l e t t s B a y A v e . , W i n o o s k i , 6 5 5 - 9 5 4 2 . T u c k a w a y ' s , S h e r a t o n , 8 7 0 W i l l i s t o n Rd., S. B u r l i n g t o n . 8 6 5 - 6 6 0 0 . Vermont Pub & Brewery, 144 C o l l e g e , Burlington, 8 6 5 - 0 5 0 0 . V i l l a T r a g a r a , Rt. 1 0 0 , W a t e r b u r y C t r . , 2 4 4 - 5 2 8 8 : Windjammer, 1076 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 8 6 2 - 6 5 8 5 . W o b b l y Barn, Killington Rd., Killington, 4 2 2 - 3 3 9 2 .

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MIKE NESS, UNDER THE INFLUENCES (Time Bomb, C D ) — W i t h this collection of raucous takes on roots-country hits, Mike Ness takes himself further and further into his own rockabilly reality. Regardless of his country bent, it still shows that this 20-year veteran of the semi-underground rock 'n' roll circuit once led the punkish Social Distortion. Punk energy continues to swell in Ness' brooding, ragged voice. Even the Carter Family classic, "Wildwood Flower," a tame piece of American folk balladry, is affected by the growl of Ness' cigarette-tattooed vocal delivery. A tight and talented band backs him with exacting precision. But, however unique and musically realized, this blast of 13 country favorites is something of a throwaway. Let's face it, the originals are way better. By attempting to pay tribute to his influential heroes — a daunting challenge, to be sure — Ness sets himself up for failure. O n the whole, his attempt to project his trademark style into the music of H a n k Williams Sr., George Jones, Bobby Fuller, Carl Perkins and other greats ends up diluting the powerful properties that made these songs classics in the first place. Still, Ness deserves props for even trying to recreate the likes of "Gamblin' Man" and "I Fought the Law" (remember when the Clash blew it back in the early

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'80s?). And the fact that he's performing songs by mostly deceased artists at least introduces them to a whole new generation of listeners who might never know their music otherwise. Ness and his band present their rocking take on country this Tuesday at Higher Ground. —JejfFuccillo MARGO HENNEBACH W/MARK SAUNDERS, COMFORT & JOY (Fireflies & Windows Music, C D ) — Comfort & Joy is an apt title for singer-songwriter Margo Hennebach's latest disc. It is, after all, a rendition of old English traditional Christmas carols — beginning with "God Rest You Merry," the source of the "comfort and joy." For anyone who's ever memorized just the first verse of a jillion carols, here's an opportunity to sing along with Margo's clear soprano and pick up a few more — at least on these halfdozen tunes you're likely to recognize. Her husband and longtime musical collaborator, Mark Saunders, provides able and updated accompaniment to Hennebach's rather straightforward versions of the standards, which also include "How Far Is It to Bethlehem," "We Three Kings," "Joy to the World," "Away in a Manger" (who knew it was written by Martin Luther?), "Little D r u m m e r Boy" and "I Saw Three Ships." Saunders contributes vocals, too, on a verse of "Three Kings," and he's the composer of the pretty instrumental, "The Calling." His guitar adaptation of "Joy" is quite lovely, and mimics the sound of the harpsichord that composer George Frederick Handel

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may have had in mind. Other fare includes

a Czech carol, "Rocking" (as in rocking the cradle, not rockin' around the Christmas tree, though there is a brief, humorous lapse into Queen's anthemic refrain, "We will, we will rock you"); an Irish traditional medley of three polkas — which again showcases Saunders' lithe, flawless picking and crystalline tone. T h e a cappella spiritual, "Mary H a d a Baby," is much too short. "I Wonder as I Wander" sounds contemporary, as is, obviously, Hennebach's own closing composition, "Hold M e Close." Hers is more a love song than a holiday song, but then, maybe love is what it's all about. My favorites on Comfort & Joy are the duo's exceptional renditions of "Little D r u m m e r Boy" — a spare and solemnly beautiful tune — and the equally reverential "We Three Kings." Chances are Hennebach and Saunders will go a-caroling this Friday at the Burlington Coffeehouse. — Pamela Polston

rhYtHm&nEws

w i l l return next w e e k

Got a musical tip for Rhythm & News? Send it to Pamela Polston at Seven Days, FOB 1164, Burlington., VT 05402, e-mail to sevenday@together.net, fax 865-1015 or call 864-5684.

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just pull up a bar stool and tap your toes: The Starline Rhythm Boys are back to boogie. This Saturday Vermont's nod to early rockabilly — and great stage outfits — pulls up to Red Square for an evening of northern shake, rattle & roll. HAT (DJ), Rasputin's, 9:30 p.m. NC. COLIN MCCAFFREY (acoustic), Capitol Grounds, 11 a.m. N C . JOSH BROOKS (singer-songwriter), La Brioche, 11 a.m. NC. SETH YACOVONE BLUES BAND, Nightspot Outback, 9 p.m. $5.

9

MONDAY ALLEY CATS JAM W/NERBAK BROS, (rock), Alley Cats, 9:30 p.m. N C . SEMANTICS (rock), Nectars, 9:30 p.m. N C . DAVE GRIPPO (funky jazz), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. N C . THE HALOGENS (alt-rock), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2. OPEN MIKE, Rasputin's, 9 p.m. NC. THE SAMPLES, ANGRY SALAD (modern rock), Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $12/14. TOM BISSON (acoustic; benefit for "Warm Hands"), Horn of the Moon, 8 p.m. Gloves/mittens or cash donations.

JERRY LAVENE (jazz guitar), Chow! Bella, 6 p.m. NC.

TUESDAY DAWN DECKER W/DICK F0RMAN & WILL PATTON (jazz), Leunig's, 7:30 p.m. NC. OPEN MIKE (acoustic), Burlington Coffeehouse at Rhombus, 8 p.m. Donations. DRAG BINGO W/LADY ZEN0, 135 Pearl, 8 p.m. NC. MARTIN & MITCHELL (DJs), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2. JAMES HARVEY (jazz), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. N C . ONE WAY STREET, Nectar's, 9:30 p.m. NC. '80S NIGHT (DJ Frostee), Club Extreme, 9 p.m. $2/NC. BASHMENT (reggae/dancehall DJs), Ruben James, 10 p.m. NC. RUSS & CO. (rock), J.P.'s Pub, 9:30 p.m. N C . MIKE NESS, ROAD KINGS (punkabilly), Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $15/17. ART EDELSTEIN (jazz), Tavern, Inn at Essex, 6 p.m. NC.® ' •

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bye, bye birdie: Shakespeare said a mouthful when he quipped, "Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast." Christmas may be completely commercialized, but Thanksgiving is still what it's always been about: eating in good company. That's one reason local institutions are opening their doors and larders to the elderly, students, needy and folks just looking to pass the time — and the potatoes. Sweetwaters also gives up live music and warm winter coats for those without, while St. Mark's serves the shut-ins. Thursday, November 25. Sweetwaters, Church Street Marketplace, noon - 5p.m. Info, 864-6360. St. Mark's Catholic Church, 1251 North Ave., Burlington, noon - 2p.m. Free. Info, 864-7686.

M l

PUBLIC NOTICE ^JxOS^rs

A

thanksgiving 'til it hurts: Honest Abe

unjust cause:

In 1996, American journalist L<| Berenson became "the story." Accused of leading a Peruvian terrorist group, she was convicted of treason by; secret military tribunal. Despite the assurances of the U.S. ambassador to Peru that she is not guilty, Berensq- remains a political prisoner — with a life sentence — in the Andes to this day. Her cell has no heat or fining water, and she is allowed only letters in Spanish. The political pageanteers at Bread and Puppet Tl ter lead a moving vigil to mark Berenson's fourth year of imprisonment. Sunday, November 28. Top of Church Street Marketplace, Hington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1237.

license to twill : A lot more women would h|

worn the pants in the famille— if 19th-century France had allowed it. Painter Rosa Bonheur found a way ound the law. She got an official permit from the police, "for health reasons," to wear trousers. In pants, Boi eur could more easily negotiate the slaughterhouses and horse fairs that inspired her art. Romance lang; tge professor Gretchen van Slyke tracked down the long-lost license in French police archives, published a anslation of the artist's autobiography, and talks about her unconventional life in an upcoming speech. Monday, November 29. Waterman Manor, UVM, Burlingto\ 4:30p.m. Free. Info, 656-3196.

by gwenn garland

knew the nutritional value of humble pie. He declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in the wake of the Civil War — a catastrophe he believed was caused by too much pride and not enough thanks. The first feasts resembled the ones we have today — minus the marshmallows — but post-meal activities had a way of working off the calories. After you've given thanks — and enjoyed the traditional nap and football game — see what life was like on a late 19th-century dairy farm. You will never call Turkey Day preparations "hard work" again. Friday, November 26 through Sunday, November 28. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m. - 4p.m. $7. Info, 457-2355.

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music

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art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. OPEN PAINTING: Bring your paintbrush and palette to this creative expression session. Art Gallery of Barre, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 476-1030.

words

OPEN P O E T R Y READING: "Give thanks or blast the celebration of imperialism" at a preTurkey Day reading. Rhombus Gallery, 186 College St.,

page 28

SEVEN

DAYS

november 24, 1999

Burlington, 8 p.m. $3-6. Info, 865-0569.

kids

S T O R Y T I M E : Young readers ages three to five learn from light-hearted literature, songs and activities at the S. Burlington C o m m u n i t y Library, 11 a.m. Free. Register, 652-7080.

music • See listings in "Sound Advice.'

etc

SWEETWATERS' THANKSGIVING: T h e eatery serves up

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE turkey with all the trimmings, DEAD': Northern Stage perlive music and warm winter forms Tom Stoppard's tale of two coats. See "to do" list, this issue. confused minor characters from Sweetwaters, Church Street Hamlet. Briggs Opera House, Marketplace, Burlington, noon White River Junction, 8 p.m. 5 p.m. Free. Info, 864-6360. $20. Info, 296-7000. THANKSGIVING MEAL: Everyone is welcome at a free holiday feast. Meals on wheels are also available. See "to do" list, this issue. St. Mark's Catholic Church, 1251 North Ave., Burlington, noon - 2 p.m. Free. Info, 864-7686.

kids

PAJAMARAMA': Parents and kids cuddle up with a good book at this pro-pajama event. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

etc

frirfav music

• Also, see listings in "Sound Advice."

BLOOD DRAWING: Black Friday blood donors get a free pancake breakfast at the Burlington Red Cross Blood Center, 32 N . Prospect St., 7:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 658-6400.

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G L B T Q S U P P O R T GROUP: Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered and questioning youth make new friends and get support. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 800-452-2428.

•Also, see listings in "Sound Advice." B O O G A L O O SWAMIS: "New England's Cajun kings" mix blues and zydeco for a warm Southern sound. See "to do" list, this issue. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 728-9878.

dance ' T H E NUTCRACKER': The Albany Berkshire Ballet kicks off the Christmas season with the timeless tale of dancing confections. Flvnn Theatre, Burlington, 3 & 7:30 p.m. $13-29. Info, 863-5966.

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: Gumbo has a little bit of everything in it. It makes sense, then, that the Boogaloo Swamis spice their Cajun music with the same melting-pot philosophy. The Boston-based musicians blend zydeco, blues and an infectious dance beat for a sound some call "soul stomping." The lack of a Bourbon Street address doesn't keep them from sticking close to their roots. And when the accordion gets going, the zydeco Zeitgeist takes over — compelling crowds take to the dance floor in Mardi Gras style. The Swamis make sure there's plenty of room to route in Randolph. Saturday, November 27. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 8p.m. $15. Info, 728-9878. M^MIWMBBBMIHMMMMMliaMaWBBii

HOLIDAY L I G H T I N G CEREMONY: A single switch turns on more than 100,000 lights in shop windows and on a 30-foot tree on the Church Street Marketplace. Burlington City Hall, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 863-1648. HIBERNATION TALK: Staff members explore winter survival techniques as practiced by local reptiles and amphibians. See "to do" list, this issue. Lake Champlain Basin Science Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. $3. Info, 864-1848. 'BUY N O T H I N G ' DAY: Antishoppers crash consumerism with handmade gifts and satirized Christmas carols. Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free. Info, 425-3377. OLD-FASHIONED THANKSGIVING: Horse-drawn wagon rides and traditional activities demonstrate how the holiday was celebrated a century ago. See "to do" list, this issue. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. $7. Info, 457-2355.

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MEG H U T C H I N S O N : The singer-songwriter from Massachusetts sings for shoppers at Borders, Church Street Marketplace, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711.

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the big sleep: Whether by frostbite, windburn or cabin fever, winter in Vermont will get to you — unless you're a wood or peeper frog. These hardy species produce a sugary antifreeze that gets them through the chilling process without the freezer burn-type cell damage that usually occurs. Still other frogs head out — or down, that is — burying themselves in mud or hanging out underwater with the turtles. An upcoming talk on reptile and amphibian hibernation features a look at these soon-to-be-sleeping amphibians. Friday, November 26, through Sunday, November 28. Lake Champlain Basin Science Center, Burlington, 1 p. m. $3. Info, 864-1848.

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SEVEN DAYS

page 29


sport

CONTRA DANCE: Lausanne Allen callsforT h e Zillionaires at this n o r t h e r n style c o m m u n i t y h o e d o w n . Holley Hall, Bristol, 8 p . m . $6. Info, 3 8 8 - 4 5 4 8 .

APPALACHIAN TRAIL H I K E : Steve Lightholder leads a moderately paced trek o n the trail f r o m N o r w i c h to Hanover. Meet at Montpelier H i g h School, 10:30 a.m. Free. Register, 4 7 9 - 2 3 0 4 . 'WALK SOFTLY' HIKE: T h e Burlington section of the Green M o u n t a i n C l u b leads the w a y to t h e future h o m e of the Walk Softly N a t u r e Center. Info, 8 9 9 - 4 7 1 7 . T U R K E Y T U M B L E : A ski b u m p c o m p e t i t i o n helps w o r k off the gravy. Sugarbush Resort, 10 a.m. $ 4 0 . Info, 583-6789.

drama 'ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE D E A D ' : See N o v e m b e r 2 6 .

art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. PAINTING D E M O : The Green M o u n t a i n Decorative Painters demonstrate techniques for handpainting crafts. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. A R T A U C T I O N : Native American a n d other fine a r t a n d crafts go o n t h e block to benefit counseling a n d awareness p r o g r a m s at t h e D a w n land Center. T.W. W o o d A r t Gallery, V e r m o n t College, Montpelier, 7 - 9 p . m . Free. Info, 2 2 9 - 0 6 0 1 .

B A L L O O N M A N : D u x the Balloon M a n brings inflatable f u n to Borders, C h u r c h Street Marketplace, 1 & 3 p . m . Free. Info, 8 6 5 - 2 7 1 1 . S T O R Y T I M E : Little listeners learn f r o m lighthearted literature at t h e Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. I n f o , 8 6 5 - 7 2 1 6 . S T O R Y T I M E : Young readers delve into classic a n d n e w tales at a laid-back, literary h a p p e n ing. Borders, C h u r c h Street Marketplace, Burlington, 1111:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-2711.

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WRITER'S WORKSHOP: Local a u t h o r Steven Shepard encourages w a n n a b e authors with assignments a n d regular feedback. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 7 p . m . Free. Info, 864-8001. VICTORIAN BOOK G R O U P : Readers reflect o n T h o m a s Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles in a roundtable reserved for Victorian literature. W a k e Robin, Shelburne,

Traditional Irish music sessions 5-8pm

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etc W O M E N ' S FESTIVAL O F C R A F T S : See N o v e m b e r 2 7 . H I B E R N A T I O N TALK: See November 26. OLD-FASHIONED T H A N K S G I V I N G : See N o v e m b e r 26. LORI B E R E N S O N VIGIL: M e m b e r s of Bread a n d P u p p e t Theater lead a silent protest of the i m p r i s o n m e n t of the American journalist in Peru. See "to do" list, this issue. C h u r c h Street Marketplace, Burlington, 2 - 3 p . m . Free. Info, 8 9 9 - 1 2 3 7 . SEX A N D L O V E A D D I C T S A N O N Y M O U S : Can't get enough? This free 12-step pro-

dance D A N C E HISTORY FILM S E R I E S : T h e stage meets t h e screen in t h e dance d o c u m e n tary entitled The Twyla Tharp Scrapbook Tape. Sunderland Building, M i d d l e b u r y College, 7 p . m . Free. Info, 4 4 3 - 6 4 3 3 .

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sport T U R K E Y T R O T : Walk, r u n or bike off excess poultry p o u n d s while y o u raise m o n e y for t h e H i n e s b u r g Land Trust. Turkey Lane Bridge, Hinesburg, 12:30 p.m. $ 1 0 . Info, 4 8 2 - 3 3 4 7 . 'CARVE T H E TURKEY': Snowboarders o f all levels c o m p e t e at Sugarbush Resort, 10 a.m. $ 4 0 . Info, 5 8 3 - 6 7 8 9 .

music

• Also, see listings in " S o u n d Advice." CHAMPLAIN ECHOES: T h e all-female barbershop chorus hosts a prospective m e m b e r night f o r vocal w o m e n . T h e Pines, Dorset St., S. Burlington, 7 : 3 0 p.m. Free. Info, 8 6 4 - 4 6 8 5 . T O M B I S S O N : Bring giveaway gloves, o r mittens, to t h e local folkie's concert a n d help the organization W a r m H a n d s . H o r n o f the M o o n Cafe, Montpelier, 8 - 9 p . m . D o n a t i o n s . Info, 2 2 3 - 0 1 0 2 .

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• Also, see listings in "Sound Advice." THE MANDOLINQ U E N T S : D o u g Perkins leads the trio in a bluegrass, newgrass and acoustic "jazzgrass" performance. Borders, C h u r c h Street Marketplace, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711. BARBER FARM C O N S O R T : Using recorder, guitar a n d h a m m e r e d dulcimer, t h e g r o u p plays Renaissance music a n d traditional Irish tunes. D e b o r a h Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2-3:30 p . m . Free. Info, 8 9 9 - 4 9 6 2 . GOSPEL CONCERT: The Montpelier Gospel C h o i r belts o u t traditional soulful sounds at the First Methodist C h u r c h , Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 454-1357. MUSICA PROPRIA: The acclaimed instrumental group performs J o h n Davison's "Magnificat," as well as works by Brahms a n d Bach. H o l y Trinity Episcopal C h u r c h , Swanton, 3 p.m. $8. Info, 326-4603.

PHOEBE STONE: The M i d d l e b u r y author a n d illustrator reads her latest b o o k for children, Go Away, Shelley Boo. Borders, C h u r c h Street Marketplace, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 8 6 5 - 2 7 1 1 .

29 monday

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gram meets weekly at 7:30 p.m. Info, write to P.O. Box 5843, Burlington, V T 05402-5843.

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OLD-FASHIONED T H A N K S G I V I N G : See November 26. H I B E R N A T I O N T A L K : See November 26. W O M E N ' S FESTIVAL O F C R A F T S : Find holiday gifts a m o n g a wide assortment of fine female-made goods. Burlington C i t y Hall, 10 a.m. - 5 p . m . Free. Info, 5 8 3 - 2 3 5 7 . H O L I D A Y BAZAAR: H u n t for h a n d m a d e gifts a n d h o m e m a d e treats by local artisans. Stowe Elementary School, 11 a.m. - 4 p . m . Free. Info, 777-0833. A N T I Q U E S H O W : Browse for battered treasures f r o m 2 7 select dealers to benefit t h e Addison C o u n t y H u m a n e Society. American Legion, Middlebury, 10 a.m. - 4 p . m . $4. Info, 3 8 8 - 1 1 0 0 . KIRBY QUILTERS CRAFT FAIR: T h e sewing stars of V e r m o n t Public Television's

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PUB Q U I Z TUESDAYS Come in and rack your brain with other teams while competing for tons of prizes. The fun starts with "Quizmaster Ray" at 8:30pm

WEDNESDAYS "Have you had your Slo Bob today?" Try Magic Hat's newest creation available only at Ri'-R£, $3 pint

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etc WORKER'S RIGHTS: Employees facing discrimination, unsafe w o r k i n g conditions, insurance problems a n d other labor issues get help f r o m an advocate at the Worker's Rights Center, Burlington C i t y Hall, 2:306:30 p . m . Free. Info, 865-7184. LITE-N-LENS CAMERA C L U B : Local shutterbugs focus o n a lecture covering filters a n d color effects in 201 D e l a h a n t y Hall, Trinity College, Burlington, 7 - 9 p . m . Free. Info, 8 6 4 - 6 4 8 5 . CROSS-DRESSING HIST O R Y : G r e t c h e n van Slyke looks into the trouser troubles of 1 9 t h - c e n t u r y French artist Rosa Bonheur. See "to do" list, this issue. W a t e r m a n M a n o r , U V M , Burlington, 4 : 3 0 p . m . Free. Info, 6 5 6 - 3 1 9 6 . 'ASPECTS O F MILLENN I A ' : IBM's vice president of c o m p u t e r development, Paul Ledak, introduces seniors to c o m p u t e r changes in the next m i l l e n n i u m . S. Burlington C o m m u n i t y Library, 3 p . m . $5. Info, 6 5 8 - 4 3 9 8 . AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION OPEN HOUSE: Staff m e m b e r s a n d volunteers introduce the public to their education a n d advocacy programs. 4 3 4 H u r r i c a n e Lane, Williston, 5:30-7:30 p . m . Free. Info, 8 0 0 - 6 3 9 - 6 0 2 4 . FINANCIAL AID W O R K S H O P : College-bound students and parents get valuable

november 24 - tfecember

advice o n making the financial aid grade. M o u n t Abraham U n i o n H i g h School, Bristol, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 800-642-3177. PUBLIC MEDITATION P E R I O D : Take a step o n the path to e n l i g h t e n m e n t in an e n v i r o n m e n t that instructs beginners and supports practiced thinkers. Ratna Shri Tibetan Meditation Center, 12 Hillside Ave., Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-5435. BATTERED W O M E N ' S SUPPORT GROUPS: W o m e n H e l p i n g Battered W o m e n facilitates a g r o u p in Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 6 5 8 - 1 9 9 6 . Also, the Shelter C o m m i t t e e facilitates a meeting in Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 2 2 3 - 0 8 5 5 .

D a r t m o u t h College, Hanover, N . H . , 8 p.m. $12.50. Info, 603-646-2422.

dance SCOTTISH COUNTRY D A N C E : Bring soft-soled shoes to this wee weekly event, where partners and kilts are b o t h optional. First Congregational C h u r c h of Essex Junction, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $2. Info, 8 7 9 - 7 6 1 8 .

drama 'A C H R I S T M A S C A R O L ' : 'Tis the season for Dickens' classic tale about holiday spirits and the h i d d e n costs of n o t giving your staff a Christmas bonus. D i b d e n C e n t e r for the Arts, J o h n s o n State College, 7 p.m. $6. Info, 6 3 5 - 1 3 8 6 .

words

tuesriay music • Also, see listings in " S o u n d Advice." AMATEUR MUSICIANS O R C H E S T R A : Vermont S y m p h o n y violinist David Gusakov oversees this weekly h a r m o n i c convergence of amateur musicians. Music R o o m , S. Burlington H i g h School, 7 : 3 0 - 9 : 3 0 p.m. $5. Info, 985-9750. 'CELEBRATION FOR T H E SEASON': Heywood Alexander conducts the H a n d e l Society choir in a perf o r m a n c e o f J . S . Bach's "Magnificat," along with other seasonal favorites. Spaulding A u d i t o r i u m , H o p k i n s Center,

BURLINGTON WRITERS G R O U P : Bring pencil, paper and the will to be inspired to this writerly gathering at the Daily Planet, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 8 6 2 - 9 6 4 7 . 'GREAT BOOKS O F T H E CENTURY' GROUP: M e m b e r s of the literary roundtable review their readings and raffle off a copy of Peter Jennings' The Century. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

kids S T O R Y T I M E : See N o v e m b e r 24, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m.

etc LILY T O M L I N : T h e comic goes cosmic in her onew o m a n , character-filled show,

" T h e Search For Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe." See interview, this issue. Flynn Theatre, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $ 4 5 - 7 5 . Info, 863-5966. BILL BRADLEY I N F O R M A T I O N S E S S I O N : Former V e r m o n t Senate president Peter Welch and other local campaigners d r u m u p s u p p o r t for their candidate of choice. Colchester H i g h School, 7 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1664. BIKE FERRY M E E T I N G : Citizens share t h o u g h t s o n the proposed bicycle a n d pedestrian river crossing between Burlington a n d W i n o o s k i . W i n o o s k i C i t y Hall, 7 p . m . Free. Info, 6 6 0 - 4 0 7 1 . FRENCH CONVERSAT I O N G R O U P : Freshen u p your French, with a Quebecois accent, in this informal social cercle at Borders, C h u r c h Street Marketplace, Burlingt o n , 6 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711. OVEREATERS A N O N Y M O U S : Compulsive eaters weigh in on b o d y image issues at the First Congregational C h u r c h , Essex J u n c t i o n , 7 p.m. Free. Info, 6 4 4 - 8 9 3 6 . BATTERED W O M E N ' S S U P P O R T G R O U P : Meet in Barre, 10:30 a.m. - n o o n . Free. Info, 2 2 3 - 0 8 5 5 .

Wednesday music • Also, see listings in " S o u n d Advice."

CLASSICAL M U S I C C O N C E R T : Local musicians Carol Baker, Fred Geiersbach, Paul Liszt a n d J e n n y Blackman perf o r m classical pieces at the C a m b r i d g e Coffeehouse, Smuggler's N o t c h I n n , Jeffersonville, 7 - 9 p . m . D o n a t i o n s . Info, 6 4 4 - 2 2 3 3 .

film ' T H E RED VIOLIN': F r e n c h - C a n a d i a n Francois Girard directed this cinematic story of a 300-year-old violin. R u t l a n d Plaza Movieplex, 7 p . m . $7. Info, 7 7 5 - 5 4 1 3 .

art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. F I G U R E D R A W I N G : See N o v e m b e r 24. O P E N P A I N T I N G : See N o v e m b e r 24.

words P O E T R Y R E A D I N G : Read, relax a n d respond at an o p e n reading. R h o m b u s Gallery, 186 College St., Burlington, 8 p . m . $3-6. Info, 8 6 5 - 0 5 6 9 . 'FILM, FEASTS A N D FICTION' BOOK GROUP: Voracious readers reflect o n tasteful literature transferred to film. Isak Dinesen's Babette's Feast is o n the m e n u this week. S. H e r o C o m - m u n i t y Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 3 7 2 - 6 2 0 9 . 'TALES O F LAW A N D LAWYERING': Vermont a u t h o r a n d attorney Peter Langrock talks a b o u t the litigious life and his new book, Beyond the Courthouse. Deerleap Books, Bristol, 6:30-

Continued on page 34

Club

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HOTTEST A L L - N U D E CLUB I N THE N O R T H E A S T PRESENTS

38D-22-J4 HEATHER M O N R O E You've seen her in your favorite videos and magazines — now see her L I V E O N S T A G E Dec. I - 4! 8 P M • 10 P M •

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AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! 24 MAIN STREET, WINOOSKI • MON-SAT 10AM-9PM

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ARTFUL DODGER Friday 11/26

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DAYVE HUCKETT Sunday Brunch 11/28 Brunch 1030, Dayve1130

Extraordinary Banquef Including Drinks champagne

Champagne Toast Party Favors Do Not Miss This Moment in Time. Tickets $25 .jllllll Available at Metronome &Pure Pop r88mainstburHhgi:on86S45B3

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J l o l t b a p < B p t n H o u s i e ,, , , ^ , December 4, 10-3

Gift Making Workshops *** Pottery Sale Gallery Opening^ Refreshments We will be hosting the following workshops:

Clay Ornaments: 10:00-11:30 Relief Print Cards: 10:00-11:30

N E W DANCERS A L W A Y S W E L C O M E

CALL H 8 - > 6 W 4 I >

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Clay Gifts: 12:30-2:00 Card Making: 12:30-2:00

No Cover Ever 864 9800

| The cost of each workshop will be $10. Workshops are open to all ages 6 and up! Please register in advance by calling 985-3648

Church Street Marketplace — w w w . S w e e t w a t e r s B i s t r o . c o m Eat Well • l aujjh Of ten • Live

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31,1999 SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 2000 open at 5pm continuous hors d'ouerves hats & noisemakers commemorative gifts c h a m p a g n e - d j little m a r t i n

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Lake Champlain Waldorf School

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Free H o r n D r a w n C a r n a g e 12 n a o n

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-

2 6 - 2 8 : Rides

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3 6:30-8:00 PM 'Secret' Shopping for Adults 8:00 pm Holiday Concert with the LCWS Community Singers SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM Children's Holiday Market Craftmaking & Activities for Children Unique Gifts & Crafts for Sale Kindergarten Puppet Show Chrystal Cave LCSW Community Singers Festival Cafe

985-2827 359 Turtle Lane, Shelburne, V T

Sides 12 n o o n - 4

Rediscover The Spirif of GiVfog ,, This Holiday Season/

pm

Send your letters to Santa At the Holiday Post Office

choose ?air Trade iwsfead o f S w e a f S h o p Shopping/

EVBRyTHlMG y o U MEED VoR HAMUfcfcAH Menorahs • candles • c a r d s • Efc.

Top Block, All D a y W e d n e s d a y s - S t m d a y s (Sponsored'by Borders Books & ?Amt<zmh WOKO FM, a n d t h e U.S. Postal Service.)

P e a c e &: J u s t i c e S t o r e

friends of

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Learning ExpHfSS J

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Wbetberyoufeel more comfortable in a bow tit or blue jeans, the Vermont Symphony Orchestra bad an evening of: outstanding classical music to suit you. Put on your fanciest or most casual attire and come to New Attitudes or enjoy Masterworks more traditional concert experience.

new attitudes •C L * S S I C A l

MUSIC

WITH

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ISABEL'S0N THE ^ATERFR0NT A

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Winter Cooking Classes Call 865-2522 to register!

TWIST)

Dec 6

Gingerbread Houses (Limited Enrolment) - $40

F r i d a y , D e c e m b e r 3, 8 : 0 0 p m

Jan 10

Sauces, Stocks & Soups! - $ 4 0

Flynn Theatre, Burlington

Jan 17

Experience the W a r m Flavors of Spain -

Sponsored by:

®

Tapas & W i n e s - $ 5 0

Media co-sponsors.

SEVEN DAYS Anthony Princiotti conductor

MASTERWORKS

Janet Polk bassoonist

Jan 2 4

W i n t e r C o m f o r t Foods - $ 4 0

Feb 7

U n u s u a l W i n e s & U n i q u e Food - $ 5 0

Feb 2 8

Breakfast & B r u n c h Creations - $ 4 0

M a r 13

French W i n e & Food F r o m Bordeaux & B u r g u n d y - $ 5 0

Respighi

Ancient Airs and Dances

Mar 20

Poultry — f r o m C h i c k e n to E m u - $ 4 0

Saturday, December 4, 8:00 pm

Mozart

Bassoon Concerto

Apr 3

Fanciful Fish - $ 4 0

Flynn Theatre, Burlington

Faure

Pelleas & Melisande Suite

Traditional Symphony

Sponsored by: QRadiSSOQ

Experience

Media co-sponsor: X^KM.7

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Charge your Tickets By Phone at: 8 0 2 . 8 6 4 . 5 7 4 1 , ext.1 2 Purchase online at: www.vso.org v; p a g e

32

SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1 9 9 9

Classical S y m p h o n y

Sci.w/i >/-,>//,•,>/v,'/V

Apr 10

N e w Zealand Food & W i n e - $ 5 0

Apr 17

Light & Luscious Spring Ideas - $ 4 0

All classes meet 6-9 pm on Mondays at Isabel's (Prepayment required. 10% discount available for 3 or more classes.) J o i n us for d i n n e r by t h e fireplace. T u e s d a y - S a t u r d a y 530 - 9 p m


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aikido AIKIDO OF CHAMPLAIN VALLEY: Adults, Monday through Friday, 5:45-6:45 p.m. and 7-8:15 p.m., Saturdays, 911:45 a.m. Children, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4-5 p.m. Aikido of Champlain Valley, 17 E. Allen St., Winooski. $55/month, $120/three months, intro specials. Info, 654-6999. Study this graceful, flowing martial art to develop flexibility, confidence and self-defense skills. AIKIDO OF VERMONT: Ongoing classes Monday through Friday, 6-7 p.m. and 7-8 p.m., Saturday, 9-10:30 a.m., Sunday, 10-11:30 a.m. Above Onion River Co-op, 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info, 862-9785. Practice the art of Aikido in a safe and supportive environment. R I C H M O N D AIKIDO: Adults, Thursdays, 5:45-7:45 p.m. The Movement Workshop, 920 W. Main St., Richmond. Info, 4345933. Study this healing art to discover peaceful alternatives for conflict resolution.

art 'HOLIDAY PRINTS': Saturday, December 11, 1-3 p.m. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts, 135 Church St., Burlington. $10. Register, 865-7166. Kids andpar' ents use simple printing techniques to make a series of one-of-a-kind prints. FIGURE DRAWING: Ongoing Mondays, 6-8:30 p.m. Fresco Studio, Union Station, 1 Main St., Burlington. $4-6. Info, 8624893. Artists of all abilities are welcome at this weekly drawing session.

astrology ' M O O N PHASES': Two Thursdays, December 2 and 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Winooski. $20. Register, 862-8240. Learn about lunar influences on your feelings and behavior, using your birth chart.

business/career 'START UP': Beginning February 4. Women's Small Business Program, Trinity College, Burlington. $1250, grants available. Info, 846-7160. Learn valuable skills as you write a business plan.

craft POTTERY: Ongoing classes for adults and children, beginners and intermediates. River St.

Potters, 141 River St., Montpelier. Info, 224-7000. Take classes in working with a wheel or in hand building; 24-hour access to the studio is available for a limited number of experienced potters. TEENS' OPEN CLAY STUDIO: Ongoing Saturdays, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Frog Hollow, Middlebury. $2. Info, 388-3177. Teens work on hand building with clay or at the wheel, exploring their own creative ideas. PAINTING CERAMICS: Ongoing Wednesdays, 2-3:30 p.m. and 5:30-7 p.m. Blue Plate Ceramic Cafe, 119 College St., Burlington. Free. Info, 652-0102. Learn the fundamentals of painting ceramics.

dance LATIN, BALLROOM OR SWING: Ongoing classes. Jazzercise Fitness Center, 5 Countryside Ln., Williston. Info, 862-2207. Rumba, waltz or swing the night away with Samir Elabd.

herbs HERBAL HOLIDAY GIFTS: Wednesday, December 8, 6-9 p.m. Purple Shutter Herbs, Main St., Burlington. $40. Info, 865HERB. Make a gift box of handblended teas, a fragrant windowsill garden and a botanical glass candleholder.

kendo KENDO: Ongoing Wednesdays and Fridays, 6:45-8:30 p.m. Warren Town Hall. Donations. Info, 496-4669. Develop focus, control and power through this Japanese samurai sword-fencing martial art.

kids BEADS: Saturday, November 27, 3-5:30 p.m. Spirit Dancer Books, 125 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Free. Info, 660-8060. Kids six and up make playful animals and jewelry with beads.

language SPANISH: Ongoing individual and small group lessons, all levels. S. Burlington. Info, 864-6870. Join in on the Jun of learning a new language. ITALIAN: Group and individual instruction, beginner through advanced, all ages. Middlebury area. Info, 545-2676. Immerse yourself in Italian to get ready for a trip abroad, or to better enjoy the country's music, art and cuisine.

meditation ZEN MEDITATION: Mondays, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Thursdays, 5:306:30 p.m. Burlington. Free. Info, 658-6466. Meditate with a sitting group associated with the Zen Affiliate of Vermont. 'THE WAY OF THE SUFI': Tuesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. S. Burlington. Free. Info, 658-2447. This Sufi-style meditation incorporates breath, sound and movement. MEDITATION: First & third Sundays, 10 a.m. - noon. Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave. Free. Info, 658-6795. Instructors teach nonsectarian and Tibetan Buddhist meditations. MEDITATION: Thursdays, 78:30 p.m. Green Mountain Learning Center, 13 Dorset Lane, Suite 203, Williston. Free. Info, 872-3797. Don't just do something, sit there! GUIDED MEDITATION: Sundays, 10:30 a.m. The Shelburne Athletic Club, Shelburne Commons. Free. Info, 985-2229. Practice guided meditation for relaxation and focus.

photography PHOTOGRAPHY: Private or group. Ongoing eight- and sixweek classes and day and weekend workshops. Grand Isle, . Burlington, Stowe and Vergennes. Info, 372-3104. Learn creative and technical camera and darkroom skills in black and white and color.

reiki REIKI JIN KEI D O : Saturday, December 11, Vt. Center for Integrative Medicine, Berlin. Info, 223-5435. This comprehensive energy healing method requires training in meditative awareness and energy transmission.

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Info, 862-4516. If you're ready to stop using drugs, this group of recovering addicts can offer inspiration.

REIKI CLINIC: Ongoing Wednesdays through December, 7-9 p.m. Fletcher Free Library, College St., Burlington. Free. Info, 877-8374. Get an introduction to an ancient healing method used to restore health and balance to body, mind and spirit.

wine W I N E TASTING: Friday, November 26, 6-7 p.m. Wine Works, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington. Info, 951-WINE. Get a taste of pinot noir.

self-defense BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Ongoing classes for men, women and children, Monday through Saturday. Vermont Brazilian JiuJitsu Academy, 4 Howard St., Burlington. Info, 660-4072 or 253-9730. Escape fear with an integrated self-defense system based on technique, not size, strength or

yoga BEECHER HILL YOGA: Monday through Saturday, daytime & evening classes for all levels. Info, 482-3191. Get private or group instruction in integrative yoga therapy, vigorous yoga or yoga for pregnancy. U N I O N STREET STUDIO: Ongoing classes for all levels. Mondays, 5:30-7 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7:15-8:15 a.m. and 8:30-10 a.m., Wednesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. Saturdays, 8:30-10 a.m. Burlington. Info, 860-3991. Practice Hatha yoga with Lisa Limoge. YMCA YOGA: Ongoing classes. YMCA, College St., Burlington. Info, 862-9622. Take classes in various yoga styles. YOGA: Tuesdays, 6:15 p.m. Green Mt. Learning Center, 13 Dorset Lane, Williston. $8. Info, 872-3797. Practice yoga with Deborah Binder.

sexuality 'WOMEN'S ORGASM, MYTHS & REALITIES': Monday, November 29, 2-3 p.m., or Tuesday, November 30, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4651. Brigitte the sexologist hosts this class via teleconference and helps you get to know your body.

spirit 'KABBALAH, MEDITATION A N D TRANSFORMATION': Three Wednesdays, December 1, 15 and 22, 6-8 p.m. Spirit Dancer Books, 125 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. $10/class. Info, 660-8060. Learn about this ancient Jewish mystical path through meditation, song and chants. 'SPIRITUAL ABILITIES A N D TOOLS FOR INTUITION': Three Thursdays, December 2, 9 and 16, 6-8:15 p.m. Spirit Dancer Books, 125 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. $15/class. Info, 6608060. Meditate to direct the flow of "cosmic" and personal energy.

YOGA VERMONT: No classes November 25 and 26. Daily classes, 12 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Chace Mill, Burlington. Info, 660-9718. Astanga style "power"yoga classes offer sweaty fun for all levels of experience. ©

support groups VT. RESOLVE INFERTILITY SUPPORT GROUP: Wednesday, December 1, 6-8 p.m. New England Federal Credit Union, Taft Corners, Williston. Info, 657-2542. Talk with others about infertility issues. A L C O H O L I C S ANONYMOUS: Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 6584221. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step — of 12 — and join a group in your area.

List your class here for $7/week or $21/four weeks. Mail info and payment to: Classes, Seven Days, P0 Box 1164,

NARCOTICS A N O N Y M O U S : Ongoing daily groups. Various locations in Burlington, S. Burlington and Plattsburgh. Free.

Burlington, VT 05402

H o l i d a y S t u d i o S a m p l e Sale

1111 11111111

Friday \

ITALIAN: Ongoing individual and group classes, beginner to advanced, adults and children. Burlington. Info, 865-4795. Learn to speak this beautiful language from a native speaker and experienced teacher. ESL: Ongoing small group classes, beginners and intermediates. Vermont Adult Learning, Sloan Hall, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester. Free. Info, 654-8677. Improve your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in English as a second language.

St

Dec.

3rd,

Unique

m

5:00

pm

Decorative and

- 8:00 Pillows,

Designer

pm

Lienhard

Textiles,

187

Saturday

Pillowcases, Fabrics W H I L E

Laura

&

South

Dec.

Placemats,

Winooski

10:00

Throws,

all at W h o l e s a l e

S U P P L I E S

4th,

am

- 3:00

pm

Tablerunners

Prices.

L A S T

Avenue,

Burlington

november 24, 1999

Phone:

;

6 60 -8 5 2 8

SEVEN DAYS

page 32


alendar Continued from page 31 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 453-5684.

DAVID BUDBILL: The

No-t rainer Getting /or

her

the holiday

the rest

people

N o b rains gift

that

of her life is easy!

who make

guys

look

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like

Vermont poet leaves his hermitage to read from his new collection, Moment to Moment: Poems of a Mountain Recluse. H a y b a r n Theater, G o d d a r d College, Plainfield, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info,

treasure see the

geniuses.

454-8311.

9 e s i g n e r s •n

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in kindergarten through fifth grade attend the later session. Vermont Clay Studio, Waterbury, 10 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 2 4 4 - 1 1 2 6 .

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hear about in vitro fertilization, adoption and sperm and egg donation. N e w England Federal Credit Union, Taft Corner, Williston, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 6 5 7 - 2 5 4 2 .

BICYCLING TALK: The director of the Bicycle Coalition of M a i n e shares tips o n improving local cycling opportunities and shows slides of his worldwide tour. Capitol Plaza Hotel, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 8 8 3 - 2 3 1 3 .

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Calendar is written by Gwenn Garland. Classes are compiled

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dents hear stories a b o u t destiny. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 8 6 5 - 7 2 1 6 .

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South Burlington and M i d d l e b u r y H i g h Schools, 7 p.m.

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T o m G e n o traces the roots of St. Michael's College back to the beginnings of the E d m u n d i t e order in France. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 8 6 2 - 8 2 1 9 .

by Lucy Howe. All submissions are due in writing on the Thursday before publication. SEVEN DAYS edits for space and style. Send to: SEVEN DAYS P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 054021164. Or fax 802-865-1015.

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Burlington photographer Fred

Stetson takes on rooms with a view — that is, a Vermont view — in his current exhibit, "Barns and Buildings," at the Dorothy Ailing Memorial Library in Williston. New (the waterfront's Wing Building) or old (the Round Church in Richmond), the color photos prove that the view from the outside looking in is pretty nice, too. Pictured,

Burlington's

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s p r i n g housebuilders, take note: The Vermont Folklife Center has extended the deadline for entries to its Gingerbread Competition. Open to professional and amateur bakers alike, the competition requires that a finished gingerbread house be on a base of 12 x 16 inches. For other guidelines, prizes and competition dates, call Cathy Neif at 388-4964, or get an entry from the V T Folklife Center, Masonic Hall/Box 442, Middlebury, V T 05753. Artspace is looking for artists to do facepainting at Burlington's First Night. Paid and volunteer openings; training available. Info, call Kate at 862-2898.

openings

Glassblowing Demonstration & Sale Sat. Nov, 27th & Sun. Nov. 28th • 10 am - 4 pm Unique Glass from Classic to Witty 143 North Ave. (The Lyla Building) Burlington 865-9820

CHANTS AND JAZZ MANTRAS, bleach-water portraits of Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis and Charlie Mingus. Colburn Gallery, Williams Hall, UVM, Burlington, 656-2014. Reception November 24, 5-7 p.m. OPEN STUDIO: Photographs, oils, watercolors, drawings and cards by Lina Maria Testa. B8 Stonehedge Drive, S. Burlington, 865-4795. November 26-28, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. OPEN STUDIO: Glassblower Alan Goldfarb demonstrates his craft for the public. Goldfarb Studio, Lyla Building, Burlington, 865-9820. November 27 & 28, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. VOLUME I, works on plastic and paper by Sean Sims, and a collection of sculptural pieces by Dennis Sparling. Ferrisburgh Artisans Guild, 877-3668. Reception November 27, 6-9 p.m.

ongoing Up to 30x40, Metal frame in Silver, Gold, Contrast Grey, or Matte Black. Includes dry mounting, dear picture glass, and assembly.

v; page

36

SEVEN DAYS

november 24, 1999

BURLINGTON AREA THE FIRST FIVE YEARS, works in a variety of media by Artspace alumni and instructors. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 8657211. Through November. BLACK DRAGON ART, mixed media canvases by Jade Bristol, and NATURAL CURVES, works in watercolor and found pigments by Kate Hartley. Also SENIOR ART SPECTACULAR, works in a variety of media by local seniors. Fletcher

Free Library, Burlington, 8657211. December 1-31. EARL'S VIEW, handmade prints by Roy Newton. Red Onion Cafe, Burlington, 865-2563. Through January 25. BARNS AND BUILDINGS, photographs by Fred Stetson. Dorothy Ailing Memorial Library, Williston, 878-4918. Through January 7. MICHAEL MONTANARO, mixed media on canvas. McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael's College, Colchester, 654-6220. Through December 6. WELCOME TO MY HOME, featuring the art of children in Very Special Arts Vermont's "Home in Arts II" program. Red Square, Burlington, 658-6612. Through December 15. MARC AWODEY, Poetry Machines and Other New Works, Living/ Learning Gallery, UVM, Burlington, 656-4200. Through December 8. ONE FOR ED, a mixed-media installation by Tom Shea. One Wall Gallery, Seven Days, Burlington, 864-5684. Through December 10. LAYERS OF TIME, mixed-media photographic images by Donna Hamil Talman, and EARLY MEMORY AS ICON, photographic and found-object art works by Alexandra Bottinelli. Doll-Anstadt Gallery, Burlington, 864-3661. Through November. CARAVAN ARTS INVITATIONAL, works in mixed media from seven curators and other invited artists. Borders, Burlington, 660-9060.

Through November. TEXTURAL STUDIES, precious metal interpretations by Karen Klinefelter; and FALL/FALL SERIES, new paintings by Linda Jones. Grannis Gallery, Burlington, 6602032. Through November. STRAIGHT 0UTTA JOE'S GARAGE, abstract paintings by Joe Harig. Daily Planet, Burlington, 8634649. Through November. RISEN FROM THE BEAST, blackand-white photos by Ivey, about moments of self-actualization, with poetry by Todd Grooms. Rhombus Gallery, Burlington, 865-3144. Through November. PLAY OF LIGHT, oils and pastel paintings by Joy Huckins-Noss. Isabel's on the Waterfront, Burlington, 229-0832. Through January 3. SERENITY, photographs of Vermont landscapes and people by Monique Laperle. Book Rack, Champlain Mill, Winooski, 6550231. Through November. STRONG HEARTS: Native American Visions and Voices, featuring color and black-and-white photographs by 29 Native American photographers. Fleming Museum, Burlington, 656-0750. Through December 19. WHERE THE SEEDS HIDE, paintings of Vermont by Sylvia Haron. Metropolitan Gallery, Burlington City Hall, 865-7166. Through November. WHAT YOU LOOK LIKE: Portrait Photographs by more than 25


Vermont photographers, and COLLAPSIBLE CITY, a "city-in-a-suitcase" installation by Stephanie Seibert. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts, Burlington, 865-7165. Through December 5. CAROL NORTON, JOANNE DELANY & CELENE HARGRAVES, paintings. Better Bagel, Tafts Corners, Williston, 864-1557. Through January. POLLY THOMPSON, new paintings. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery, Shelburne, 985-3848. Through November. A GARDEN PARTY, new paintings by Elizabeth Bunsen and her fouryear-old son, Boone Wilson. Alley Cats Arts, Burlington, 865-5079. Through November. THE MATING HABITS OF LINES: Sketchbooks and Notebooks of Ree Morton, featuring drawings and journals detailing the artistic process, from an early pioneer in installation art who died in 1977. Fleming Museum, Burlington, 656-0750. Through January 23. FOUR HONDURAN ARTISTS, featuring the work of Mario Castillo, Virgilio Guardiola, Rolando Lopez Trochez and Xenia Meji'a. Fleming Museum, Burlington, 656-0750. Through February 13. PURSUING THE LIGHT: Visual Impressions of the Natural World, featuring fine art color photography by Christopher C. Leeper. Working Design Gallery at the Men's Room, Burlington, 8642088. Through November. DAVID GOODRICH, pen and ink drawings of Vermont views. The Book Rack, Winooski, 654-4650. Through December. RICK SUTTA, representational oil paintings. Rick Sutta Gallery, Burlington, 860-7506. Ongoing. GERRIT G0LLNER, abstract paintings and prints. Farrell Rm., St. Michaels College, Colchester, 6542487. Through December.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY HOLIDAY ART SHOW AND SALE, works in all media by members of the Northern Vermont Artist Association. Old Red Mill Gallery, Jericho, 899-3225. Through December 28. SUSAN SMEREKA, abstract iconographic paintings in gouache, oils and mixed media. Woody's Restaurant, Middlebury, 7673253. Through December. HORATIO GREEN0UGH: An American Sculptors Drawings, a retrospective on the life of the early American artist (1805-1852), featuring 15 sculptures, 48 drawings and related materials, from the private collection of George R. Rinhart. Middlebury College Museum of Art, 443-5007. Through December 12.

CENTRAL VERMONT WINTER WHIMSY, works in clay by 20 regional artists. Vermont Clay Studio, Waterbury Center, 2441126. December 1 - January 14. THE FIRST TIME I SAW PARIS, black-and-white photos by Peter Miller. Mist Grill Gallery, Waterbury, 244-2233. Through January 3. LOCAL ARTISANS, works by Vermont potters, sculptors and quiltmakers. Blinking Light Gallery, Plainfield, 454-1571. Ongoing. DREAM HOUSES, featuring models made from found and salvaged

materials by members of the Northeast Regional Correctional Facility art class. Institute for Social Ecology, Plainfield, 454-8493. Through November. ABI SPRING, frescos. Vermont Supreme Court, Montpelier, 8283278. Through December 10. NESTS AND EGGS, featuring part of a painting series by Janet Van Fleet. Phoenix Rising, Montpelier, 229-0522. Through November 27. PASTELS by Barbara "Ara" Banks, and works by other member artists. The Art Gallery of Barre, 4761030. Through November. TWO PATHS, paintings by Maureen R. Russell and Randy Allen. Also, RECENT WORK, oil paintings and digitally altered photographs by Charles T. Kellman and John Solaperto. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, 828-8743. Through November 28. RELIGION, MYTH AND FANCY, a selection from the permanent collection. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, 828-8743. Through December 24. ALICE ECKLES, a permanent changing exhibit of selected paintings and prints. The Old School House Common, Marshfield, 4568993. Ongoing. SCRAP-BASED ARTS & CRAFTS, featuring re-constructed objects of all kinds by area artists. The Restore, Montpelier, 229-1930. Ongoing.

NORTHERN ADJUNCT FACULTY SHOW, featuring the works of nine art teachers at the college. Julina Scott Memorial Gallery, Johnson State College, 635-1310. Through November 26. 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN ARTISTS, including landscape paintings by Vermont artists Kathleen Kolb, Thomas Curtin, Cynthia Price and more. Clarke Galleries, Stowe, 253-7116. Ongoing.

ELSEWHERE HITCHCOCK, a collection of stills, posters, set models and artwork that reveals the directors aesthetic influences. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Jean-Noel Desmarais Pavilion, 514-285-1600. Through March 18. FOR SALE, a public art installation created by the Swiss art alliance relax. Dartmouth College Green, Hanover, N.H., 603-646-2808. Through January 3. TRANSIENCE: Chinese Experimental Art at the End of the 20th Century, featuring works in mixed media by the country's younger generation of artists. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 603-6462426. Through December 19. HOLLY KING, landscapes of the imagination in black-and-white and color photography. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Jean-Noel Desmarais Pavilion, 514-2851600. Through December 5. (Z) PLEASE NOTE: Seven Days is unable to accommodate all of the displays in our readership area, thus these listings must be restricted to exhibits in truly public viewing places. Art in business offices, lobbies and private residences or studios, with occasional exceptions, will not be accepted.

Mystery in the B Y M A R C AWODEY

A

s the Year 2000 looms large in the public's mind, two artists featured at Burlington's DollAnstadt Gallery seem content to look backwards. The Neolithic-inspired mixed-media graphic works by Donna Hamil Talman revisit universal images of primeval spirituality, and 22 of Alexandra Bottinelli's pieces are collage paintings from her "Early Memory as Icon" series. Both artists employ technical and conceptual layering in their work to describe the past as a living element of the present. Talman borrowed images from archaeological texts and reproduced them using 19thcentury photographic processes akin to blueprinting. The processes of cyanotype and Van Dyke create transparent blues and browns that bring out finegrained textures in the paper. Talman judiciously added watercolor, and so created

the left. Talman varies the intensity of her limited hues, and individual lines often appear as pale, fine negative marks. "Snake Goddess" features a central form that looks like a geometric interpretation of Medusa radiating serpentine extremities. It floats atop areas of "Terra Firma," a cyanotype, Van Dyke and watercolor work by Donna Hamil Talman brown and blue separatimages populate these fields and ed by a demarcation of pale red. are conjured into life by In "Shaki Women," angular Bottinelli's painterly atmospherskirted forms with halos around ics.

Both artists employ

technical and conceptual layering in

m

their work to descri the oast as a living

element of the present. vibrant yet ethereal transpositions of 7000-year-old pictographs, geometric shapes, terracotta effigies and ghosts of modern text. There's a feminist edge to Talman's works, as many recapture primordial Earth-goddess images. She seems as well acquainted with Neolithic artistic sources as with her unique technical processes. O n e of the most oftenrepeated goddess images is a two-dimensional shape with broad hips, fecund in geometric patterning, a triangular torso and a large round head. T h e source for this figure showed a pair of these goddesses side by side, and two sets of them are grouped to the right in Talman's horizontal composition, "Complete Unto Herself." They are balanced by circular shapes and saw-toothed patterns on

circular heads are centered between semi-circular shapes in the upper left and lower right corners. Overlapped strata of cyanotype blue and Van Dyke brown mingle in all of Talman's works, while the edges of the images waver between one hue and the other — just as the images themselves seem to waver between ancient and contemporary abstraction. Bottinelli builds her paintings in layers of oil and collage, and likewise keeps her chromatic harmonies simple and transparent. By glazing onto and wiping layers off of her surfaces, Bottinelli pulls out a broad range of closely related hues. Each of the small, square pieces is conceived from color fields whose compositional skeleton consists of a few horizontal or vertical axes. Small collage

Each of these works is a beautiful riddle. In the main series, titled "Early Memory as Icon," the collage elements roam through history into the 1960s. Mixed together are known and unknown people, locations and events — from moon landings, to the Indian Wars, to the civil rights movement and the Holocaust, all locating points in time. But the connections are often unpredictable. In "John and Yoko," an image of the famous couple is at upper right, while a photo of two 19th-century pioneer families resting by their Conestoga wagons resides near lower left. Pictures of rose petals dot the surface, and the overall harmony is based on a pale red. Each of Bottinelli's paintings is based around a key hue, often with subtle words incorporated within them. A few of the works have raised letters. In "Crosses," the raised letters of the word "cross" appear as in a crossword puzzle. "Eight-Nine-Ten" presents the numerals "8" and "9," along with the word "ten" superimposed over images that include Jimi Hendrix. While the references may have clear meaning for Bottinelli, her paintings may best be understood by others simply as elegant objects of mystery. In that regard, they are similar to the partially decipherable Neolithic objects resurrected by Talman. ©

Donna Hamil Talman and Alexandra Bottinelli, Doll-Anstadi Gallery, Burlington. Through November. november 24, 1999

;

SEVEN

DAYS

page 37

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Schedules for the following theaters are not available at press time.

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As dramatic a sight as the horseman is initially, the routine gets old fast. Lots of semi-developed side plotlets clutter the film, but none involves characters or ideas of significant interest. It is staggering, really, to step back and consider how much deeper and more complete a work something like the first Batman is beside this overfunded doodle. After the bashing he took for the self-indulgent Mars Attacks!, one might have expected the filmmaker to regroup, return to form and once more deliver a movie which marries the fears of childhood and the darker psychology of adults. There was a time when no one could do that as elegantly as T i m Burton. N o w no one seems able to do it at all. (7)

W h e n he first arrives, Depp's character views

FILMS RUN

the town's inhabitants as provincial and superstitious. W h e n they relate the legend of a phantom horseman w h o has risen from the grave to claim the heads of townsfolk, he pompously assures them that his cutting-edge methods will uncover a fleshand-blood culprit. T h e film's most entertaining m o m e n t comes when the officer finds himself faceto-face — well, face to thorax — with the undead equestrian. If the rest of Sleepy Hollow were even half as funny, this would be the funniest film in theaters right now. But the rest of the film isn't, and Sleepy Hollow is not. It is the goriest, though. Every time the horseman gallops into town to make someone a little shorter, Burton treats the audience not only to a ringside view of the slashing, but to an up-closeand-personal look down the severed neck as well.

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Zorros Catherine Zeta-Jones stars here as an insurance investigator posing as a master thief in order to catch a master thief played by Sean Connery in the latest from Jon (The Man Who Knew Too Little) Amiel. With Ving Rhames and Will Patton. (PG-13) THE HAUNTING" 2 From Jan De Bont {Speed, Twister) comes the second big-screen adaptation of Shirley Jackson's 1959 novel about a professor who conducts a psychological experiment on three test subjects in a strange old house. Liam Neeson stars. (PG-13) THE IRON GIANT*** Well, it's not

END OF DAYS Arnold Schwarzenegger is back on the big screen for the first time since 1997. Saving one person at a time apparently is old hat at this point for the 52-year-old action star, so this time out he's saving the whole human race. From Satan, no less. Gabriel Byrne co-stars. Peter Hyams directs. (R) TOY STORY 2 Everybody's favorite living dolls reunite for an all-new animated adventure when Woody (Tom Hanks) is kidnapped by an unscrupulous toy collector and Buzz (Tim Allen) rallies the 'toon troops to rescue him. (G)

every day you get to take in a cartoon about a huge robot based on a novel by Sylvia Plath's husband and featuring the voices of Jennifer Aniston and Cioris Leachman. But then you can probably live with

new on video

ENTRAPMENT*"4 The Mask of

shorts

rating scale:

* —

that. (PG) THE LOVE LETTER**"2 Uh-oh — Ellen DeGeneres Alert! The thoroughly entertaining comic-turnedrelentlessly-dispensible thespian {Mr. Wrong, EDtv) turns up in yet another production with high flop probability. Peter Chan adapts Chathleen Schine's 1995 bestseller about the romance between a bookshop owner and a younger man. With Kate Capshaw and Tom Selleck. (PG-13) SOUTH PARK: BIGGER, LONGER AND UNCUT**** Everybody's favorite little terrors make it to the big screen in what I would guess to be the first major studio cartoon to sport an anti-censorship theme. Featuring the vocal stylings of Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Isaac Hayes. (R)

5

transports him into the brain of the actor John Malkovich. With Cameron Diaz, Catherine Keener and — surprise! — John Malkovich. (R) DOUBLE JEOPARDY**"2 Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones are teamed for the saga of a woman who's wrongly imprisoned for murdering her husband, and rightly miffed when she learns he's actually alive and living with another woman. When she gets out, she figures that, as long as she can't be tried for the same crime twice, she might as well commit it once. So she packs some heat and pays him a visit. (R) POKEMON*** Kiss your kids goodbye. You're not likely to see much of them now that the most popular TV show/marketing gimmick in the universe has hit the big screen. At least not until it makes it to home video. (G) THE INSIDER**** A1 Pacino and Russell Crowe star in Michael Mann's fact-based account of compromises that took place behind the scenes at "60 Minutes" when the legendary news magazine was pressured to kill a whisde-blowing tobacco industry piece. Christopher Plummer plays Mike Wallace, who probably won't be lining up for a ticket to this any time soon. (R) THE BACHELOR*** Recent Burlington visitor Renee Zellweger catches Chris O'Donnell's eye in this remake of a 1925 Buster Keaton classic about a young man who has just 24 hours to find a bride if he wants to inherit a fortune. With Brooke Shields and Mariah Carey. (PG-13) MUSIC OF THE HEART***"2 It's not unusual for director Wes Craven to have a new movie released around Halloween. It is, however, nothing short of shocking for it to tell the story of little kids learning the violin in East Harlem and star Meryl Streep. (PG) AMERICAN BEAUTY****"2 Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening play the heads of a nuclear family in the process of meltdown in the feature debut from from white-hot Broadway director Sam (The Blue

I

building characters

* * * * * NR = not reviewed

THE HARMONISTS (NR) Documentary filmmaker Joseph Vilmaier traces the rise and fall of the Third Reich's most popular musical group, a group which included three members who were Jewish. (PG-13) HAPPY, TEXAS*** A big winner at this year's Sundance, Mark Illsley's J offbeat comedy features Steve Zahn and Jeremy Northam as redneck criminals who hide out in Happy — yup, it's a real place — Texas only to be mistaken for two gay guys who put on beauty pageants for kids. (PG-13) DOGMA**1/2 Clerks director Kevin Smith is stirring up the usual hysteria among the religious right with his new comedy. Ben Affleck and Matt Damon play angels who come to Earth and then try to scam their way back into heaven. Filmmaker Terrence McNally has already received his first death threat. (R) THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH*** And, apparently, audiences can't get enough when it comes to these deals. Which always mystfies me. Pierce Brosnan presides over the 19th Bond film, in which the Menudo of undercover operatives faces off against an evil genius with designs on the planets oil supply. With Robert Carlyle and Denise Richards. Michael Apted directs. (PG-13) THE BONE COLLECTOR** Australian director Phillip (Dead Calm) Noyce brings us this bleak thriller about a suicidal quadriplegic ex-detective obsessed with a brutal serial killer. For everyone who thought The Sixth Sense was too upbeat. Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie star. (R) ANYWHERE BUT HERE**"2 Wayne (The Joy Luck Club) Wang directs this big-screen version of Mona Simpson's 1986 bestseller. Susan Sarandon and Natalie Portman star as a Wisconsin mother and daughter who start a new life in L.A. (PG-13) BEING JOHN MALKOVICH**** Music video director Spike Jonze makes his big-screen debut with this odd-a-thon about a guy (John Cusack) who discovers a portal that

d

Room) Mendes. (R) ELMO IN GROUCHLAND*** The fuzzy red one makes his big-screen debut alongside the more experienced Mandy Patinkin, who costars as a mean junkyard owner who tosses a beloved blankie into Oscar the Grouch's trash can. (G) THE FIGHT CLUB*** Brad Pitt and Edward Norton are teamed in the dark new film from Seven director David Fincher. Based on the bestselling novel by Chuck Palahniuk, the picture concerns an underground organization in which men meet to beat the post-modern numbness out of each other. (R) THE STORY OF US*** Bruce Willis and Michelle Pfeiffer are paired for this romantic comedy about a couple which attempts a trial separation after 15 years of marriage. Rob Reiner directs. Rita Wilson and Paul Reiser co-star. (R) RUNAWAY BRIDE**"2 Hey, didn't she just settle down with Hugh Grant? I guess there's no such thing as happily ever after when you sell tickets the way Julia Roberts does. This time around she plays an altarphobic chick whose last-minute chapel exits attract the attention of newspaper columnist Richard Gere. From the director of Pretty Woman (PG) STIR OF ECHOES***"2 Writerdirector David Koepp brings us this adaptation of the 1958 Richard Matheson book about an ordinary guy who begins experiencing some very extraordinary things after being hypnotized. Kevin Bacon and Illeana Douglas star. (R) BATS** Movie small towns have been the victim of killer birds, frogs, rabbits, cats and snakes. Now Lou Diamond Phillips and Dina Meyer take on killer bats. (R) BLUE STREAK** Martin Lawrence has been impersonating a comedian for years, if you ask me. Now he pretends to be a cop in this buddy film about a thief who attempts to recover a priceless gem buried beneath a police station. With Luke Wilson. (PG-13)

We thought we'd devote this week's quiz to those unsung heroes of Hollywood — the character actors-performers whose faces you know so well and whose names are just on the tip of your tongue. Some assembly required.

a

For more film fun don't forget to watch "Art Patrol" every Thursday, Friday and Sunday on News Channel 5!

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page 39


B Y A M Y KROIN

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on't hate Lily Tomlin because she can sleep on airplanes. "I'm one of those people who can doze off right away," she said during a recent telephone interview, just one hour after a transcontinental flight to California. "I've got one of those pillows and I just stretch out and put my feet up and I'm out. I fall asleep and the stewardess has to wake me up." It stands to reason that Tomlin has never known the agony of in-flight dehydration, the horror of being forced to endure a film like Operation Dumbo Drop — the true-life

course of Search, Tomlin cycles through a cast of characters ranging from a punk runaway to a pair of Times Square streetwalkers — Tomlin's partner Jane Wagner wrote Search in 1986, a full decade before Giuliani Disneyfied Manhattan's once-infamous hotbed of sin and excess. T h e collage-like piece, whose original timeline ran from the Women's Strike for Equality march in 1970 through Geraldine Ferraros nomination as the Democrats' vicepresidential candidate, is anchored by the figure of Trudy, a homeless woman with moxie to spare.

Vietnam War-era tale about Army men assigned to replace one village's prized pachyderm with another. If Tomlin is not a comic genius who draws on tragedy to serve up yuks — she's no sad clown in the Buster Keaton tradition — then it follows that she is a comic genius who draws on life's more palatable absurdities for the same purpose. Next week at the Flynn Theatre Tomlin will perform her acclaimed one-woman show, The Search for Intelligent Signs of Life in the Universe, reviving a Tonywinning tour de force that explores cosmic truths — as well as more mundane concerns of the what'sup-with-pantyhose variety. In the

Tomlin decided to revive Search after she and Wagner con-

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ducted a series of workshops with students at the University of Southern California. "I hadn't done Search in ages and, of course, none of these kids had seen it. W h e n I started performing it the material still resonated and the kids were so responsive to it. It seemed as relevant and moving and funny as it ever was, and in some ways it felt even more relevant. It's a really exhilarating piece to perform, and if you do it well, it's like playing a piece of music." Wagner and Tomlin have updated Search for the current tour, tweaking it in fine, subtle ways. "It's an ongoing process," said Tomlin. "We added material

that projected into the future, but that's sort of a matter of course. Theater is infinitely perfectable. Every time you do it you're starting again from the beginning. But the essential emotional arc of the play is still there." T h e piece requires Tomlin to shift identities with quicksilver speed, to define characters without the benefit of elaborate props or stage sets. There are few performers who can rise to such a challenge — Tracey Ullman comes to mind — but Tomlin is clearly at home in the world of multiple personalities. "That's something I've done since the time I was a kid," she said. "I had a teacher in grade school who

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used to read dialect poems for us and I'd Just live for it. I'm sure they don't even allow these poems in the school system anymore because they're very politically incorrect. They're very broad, phonetically written poems in these various voices — black, Yiddish, Italian, German, Swedish," Tomlin continued, "but the teacher would create this whole scene with these different characters, and I thought it was just magical. To do a piece like Search, it has to be filmic, you have to cut between characters. So I think of it as a film almost, on the stage." Reviving Search has also allowed Tomlin to reclaim the material: After the productions initial run, she and Wagner sold the amateur and stock rights. "We sold the rights because so many people think I'm the writer, and to protect Jane's authorship we wanted the play to be out there as a piece of literature others could perform," said Tomlin. "I don't like someone else doing my characters, but at the same time it's fun and I wish I could see it. People have produced it with one actor or with many. Part of the metaphor is of one person performing it because we're all connected — Trudy says we all timeshare the same atom. I don't think it's essential to have one person performing the Search, but it probably resonates more."

F

or many Tomlin fans, the defining moment in her career may be her Oscarnominated turn as the mother of two deaf children in Robert Altman's epic Nashville. For other admirers, no talky Altman moment comes close to rivaling Tomlin's performance as an increasingly tiny housewife in The Incredible Shrinking Woman. And then there are the admirers of Ernestine, Tomlin's power-happy New York telephone operator from TV's "Laugh-In". In fact, the distinguishing feature of Tomlin's three-decade-plus career is its rich diversity. The winner of six Emmys, two Tonys, a Grammy and two Peabody awards, Tomlin has appeared in her share of dreck — see 1978's Moment by Moment, in which Tomlin plays a bored Malibu resident pursuing hunky John Travolta. But for every Big Business— a tepid farce about corporate power and mismatched twins — there is an All of Me, the out-of-body screwball comedy that pairs Tomlin with a remarkably elastic Steve Martin. Through it all, Tomlin remains a performer who transcends the limitations of the most tired material — and elevates the most inspired work. But the question Martin once posed of himself remains: "How did you get to be so fucking funny?" "I don't know that I ever articulated that to myself," said Tomlin. "As a kid I always put on

shQWsrthougli I don't know if I consciously thought of that as being funrty. I must have just thought it was thrilling. "I'd pull stuff off of television or imitate the neighbors, and I did begin to see women on television who were funny. There was a woman named Jean Carroll who was the first woman standup and she was on Ed

Ernestine and five-year-old J p h Ann. Her 28-year collaboration with Jane Wagner grew out of her desire to find a writing partner who could push her in new directions. "I was doing a benefit a few weeks ago and during the Q&A session someone asked, 'How do you and Jane work together? What is your collaborative

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Our New Home > ' H f t f t o V l a g e C f c * / W1WSTOH Sullivan when I was a kid. She used to do husband jokes and family jokes. I was also an admirer of Bea Lillie, a totally different kind of performer, this incredibly sophisticated, irreverent, insouciant person who was like a contemporary Noel Coward. She wore a pillbox hat and she'd throw pearls around her neck, and yet she would burst that bubble of pretension." Tomlin recalled that she would imitate Jean Carroll and Bea Lillie, as well as Imogene Coca and Lucille Ball. "I was crazy about Lucy and I'd do all of [her] slapstick and physical comedy," the comedienne said. "And I used to go to the bars with my dad and I'd sing and perform. I got pleasure out of it and people seemed to respond, so I didn't see any point in denying them." Tomlin drew inspiration early on from the neighbors in her apartment building on the outskirts of Detroit. "I used to go from apartment to apartment and just hang out, soak up everything they did and just play the room, whatever they wanted to do I just did it to fit in, so I could stay there," she reminisced. "There was an old couple in their eighties, and I'd just listen to them tell stories and admire their doilies. There was also a young couple with kids — with them I'd dance the chicken and drink Pepsi and play canasta. "Another woman, Mrs. Rupert, was a botanist, very educated and conservative politically, and she was going to teach me how to be a lady so I would marry well," Tomlin continued. "I mean, there were so many people in that building that it was kind of a big love affair, you'd just become infatuated with all these different types. I'm sure bits and pieces of those people made their way into my characters. You can't be really sure of how something informs something later." Tomlin, who once contemplated a career in medicine, first made a name for herself on the comedy circuit before landing a gig on "Laugh-In," where she developed characters like

process?' So I fell to my knees and said, 'Please write some material, please!' I just can't write as well as she can, not by a long shot," Tomlin replied. "I'm a very nothing writer, and she's a very great writer, but I physicalize the characters and I have a great feeling for her sensibility."

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omlin, who recently turned 60, remains undaunted by the glut of teenyboppers who now occupy center stage in Hollywood. "I've always had to create my own opportunities, even when I was at the age of an ingenue. The typical ingenue is Gidget or Sandra Dee or someone like that, and that wasn't me. I've always been self-starting, selfmanaging. Jane and I are a team who can write and perform — the model we use isn't dependent on other people." And as someone who's not afraid to be sentimental — she cried when "Murphy Brown" ended, collected cigarette butts from her Tea with Mussolini costars as souvenirs — Tomlin is less concerned with Hollywood's obsession with youth than with its resistance to sincerity. "Feeling gets so debased because you have to be so edgy and mean-spirited before you can come around to anything with any sentiment," said Tomlin, who's got Jedediah Purdy's antiirony tome, For Common Things, on her to-read list. "It makes the sentiment corny, because the preamble to it is so harsh and decadent and negating. I'm overstating it now, but it's all designed so you can come around to a sappy ending, rather than something that demands a deeper exploration — and so people don't know how to react to honesty. "When Clockwork Orange came out, I sat in the audience and watched kids cheer the hoodlums," Tomlin marveled. "Then I saw Fresh a few years ago, about a kid involved in dope dealing; whenever he showed vulnerability, the audience would scream with laughter. I hope it turns around." ®

The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, performed by Lily Tomlin, written by Jane Wagner. Flynn Theatre, Burlington, November 30 & December 1, 7:30 p.m.

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House Speaker come January 2001, waved an enormous carrot in front of Bernie's nose — the promise of a seat on the powerful House Appropriations Committee. Lets face it, Bernie Sanders is a political prize, a seasoned player, a known and very effective quantity. T h e m o m e n t of truth is fast approaching. What's our best guess? House or Senate? Final answer? Final answer. House. Stay tuned. Media Notes — W h e n Ch. 22's brand new news team hit the bricks in August, one of their first attention-grabbers was a three-part series on "Heroin in Burlington." Some competitors scoffed, but time marches on. Last week Ch. 3 did a four-part series on heroin. T h e week before, Seven Days ran a huge feature on the subject. But Ch. 3 s heroin report had something the others didn't — a paid consultant. W C A X - T V contracted the services of James Bradley, the recently retired Special Agent-in-Charge of the DEA's Vermont shop. According to News Director Marselis Parsons, W C A X paid Bradley to help them buy heroin and to also serve as "security" for the C h . 3 crew doing the series. "We paid for his knowledge of the street," said Marsillyiss. Bradley also was a guest on Ch. 3's Sunday morning interview program, "You Can Q u o t e Me." Parsons does not think Ch. 3 had an obligation to disclose on-air the station's business relationship with the former DEA agent. Interesting. By the way, the W C A X heroin series ran at 11 and early in the morning, but not on the six o'clock news. W h y not? "We wanted to boost our ratings at 11," replied Marsillyiss. This save-it-for-the11 strategy appears to be the latest trend in the T V ratings game. It's always something. O n another matter, congratulations to C h . 3 s founder and owner Stuart "Red" Martin, 86, who was in Boston last week to receive the Silver Circle Award from the folks w h o give out the


f '

Emmys. Red was honored for his contribution as a television pioneer in the Green Mountains. Hear, hear! Chairman and Jeopardy Champ! — Boy, oh boy, a few of the star leaders of the Vermont Republican team sure have impressive pasts. Last week it was the executive director's sterling duty as a key advisor in 1984 to Democrat Sen. Gary Hart when he took his shot at the White House. This week its the G O P state chairman, himself. Actually, it should be phrased in the form of a question, as in, "Who is Patrick Garahan?" Patsy's the gentleman who wrote the snappy little letter in the New York Times the other day defending George W. Bush in the wake of Bush's pop-quiz disaster in Boston. "I recently had the opportunity to spend more than eight hours with Governor George Bush of Texas," he wrote, "I was present during many public and private discussions among Gov. Bush, two United States senators, a representative and many other people. Mr. Bush showed a remarkable grasp of the concepts and details of dozens of issues relating to both foreign and domestic policies.

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"I am a former 'Jeopardy' champion," declared Garahan, "but I also appreciate the difference between recall of trivia and presidential leadership. Nonetheless, I have formed a new political organization: 'Jeopardy' Champions for Bush." The year was 1971. Richard Nixon was in the White House. The U.S. war in Vietnam was raging at home and abroad. Garahan was an ensign in the U.S. Coast Guard. He won "Jeopardy" twice, and even had the Final Jeopardy answer correct the third time, but didn't bet enough. Patsy walked away with "about $6000," a home "Jeopardy" game and an encyclopedia.

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t's not that much of a stretch to give thanks for Chicken Biryani and basmati rice this week. After all, the "Indians" who graciously welcomed our European foremothers and fathers to dinner — and introduced the Pilgrims to maize, pudding, turkey and the trimmings — were so erroneously monikered because Columbus thought he had reached the land of curries.

I say, let's give the real East Indians their due. If you tire of turkey and pigskin at home this Thanksgiving, I can recommend a few outstanding restaurants in Montreal. As a part of the British Commonwealth, Canada inherited a sizable population of immigrants from elsewhere in the Empire, including India, the "Jewel of the Crown." Sikhs came to British Columbia at the turn of the century to build the railroad, but racism and restrictive immigration policies kept numbers low for decades. In the latter half of this century,

though, an influx of Indian professionals and entrepreneurs helped to build a community some 30,000 strong in the Montreal area. A number of social clubs, service agencies, newspapers, community radio programs and religious organizations serve this diverse and growing community. And so do plenty of wonderful restaurants. One of the oldest is Restaurant Asha at 3490 Avenue du Pare (one block north of Sherbrooke), which has been in continuous operation since 1982. The house specialty here is Dhansak, a Persian dish combining meat or chicken, lentils and vegetables, flavored with a masala curry concoction. The lentils give a smooth, hearty texture to this filling sweet-sour dish, which is slow-cooked and served with a topping of crisply fried onions. For an appetizer, try the vegetable pakura — deep-fried fritters of shredded vegetables bound with graham flour. Tangy dipping sauces are provided. The decor at Asha is plain and the service quiet and competent. The room is very narrow,

allowing just two rows of tables with a central aisle. The combination of dim lighting and deep red linens gives the place a quiet, cozy atmosphere. Prices are very reasonable — as low as $12.50 for combination platters, $7.50 to $10.50 for the biryanis and dhansaks. The location, across the street from the three-screen repertory film palace Cinema du Park, promises a great two-punch evening out, and a cheap date at that. Probably the best known Indian restaurant in Montreal is Bombay Palace, at 2051 SteCatherine Ouest. The menu's tagline calls the restaurant "India's Culinary Ambassador, Gateway to Superb Indian Cuisine." Certainly the decor is a step up from Asha — all dark woods, brass fixtures and frosted glass globe lamps, like a catalogue from the Bombay company. Here the specialty is Pukht, a stew-like casserole cooked and served in a sealed pot. The Dum Pukht Biryani ($12.95) combines lamb and basmati rice with spices, cooked in the sealed pot .

...» -4 . J

v .1


to blend the flavors beautifully. A great appetizer is the onion bhajia — chopped onion and green chili bound together with chick peas and then deep fried — served with a refreshing green chutney of coriander and mint. The Red Snapper "Konkani" sounded great to us: boneless cubes of snapper in a chilicoconut sauce. However, we found the fish too fishy, and the chili overpowered the delicacy of the coconut. The Raita, a cooling drink of yoghurt 1 with cucumber, tomato and cumin, almost

tar paneer (spinach and homemade cheese) and sag aloo bhaji (roasted potatoes and spinach) are just a few examples of the vegetarian delights available. The crispy pappadum is fresh and perfumed with cumin seeds, but the real bread show-stopper is the N a n — fresh, steaming, puffed with air from its quick bake in the tandoor oven. It arrives shiny with buttery ghee and simply melts in your mouth.

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made up for it, though. The yoghurt was sharp and fresh. Appetizers and entrees for two, including tax, totalled less than $40. Our favorite Indian restaurant, to which we've returned a dozen times and sent many friends, is Ganges — a bit of a haul -< at 6079 Sherbrooke Ouest, about five blocks past Decarie. What is unique and surprising about the place is that dishes are apparently cooked to order. How else to explain tomatoes and green peppers that still hold shape and color, sauces that haven't been reduced to muck by hours on a back burner? Ganges features some unusual appetizers. Rashmi kebab, sheek kebab and machi kebab are, respectively, chicken, beef and fish, ground into a fine paste and mixed with garam masala and other curry spices. A must-order for us is the Chotpotti, creamy yellow peas and potato flavored with tamarind and sprinkled with fresh, chopped coriander. It's served with crisp chips of pappadum for dipping. We've never had a disappointing entree at Ganges, and the mild biriyanis and spicy dhansak are outstanding, as is Chicken Rejala — another sweet-sourand-spice preparation of cubed, marinated chicken — and the mildly spiced Lamb Koorma, garnished with almonds and raisins. The eggplant bhaji (eggplant, tomato and onion), mut-

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I make another suggestion?" Ganges is also the prettiest of the Indian restaurants we've visited — full of exposed brick and white stucco, varnished light woods, carvings, mobiles of filigree metals and bright-colored yarn and the requisite paintings of Hindu deities. The service is outstanding — gracious, efficient and helpful without condescension. During one visit a waiter gently commented, "We wouldn't eat those two dishes together... Could I make another suggestion?" We gladly took his advice, delighted that he picked up on our interest in learning about the food. From that visit forward we've ordered one dish that sounded good and asked the waiter to select the second. All appetizers are under $3, vegetarian main dishes start at $4.95, and curries run about $8.50. Tandooris are slightly higher — at $12.95, the shrimp tandoori is the most expensive item on the menu. All these prices are Canadian, though, so think 67 cents on the dollar. You can see what a value these terrific meals are, even for a family.

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deadline: monday, 5 pm • phone 802.864.5684 • fax 802.865.1015 LINE ADS: 25 words for $7. Over 25 words: 300 a word. Longer running ads are discounted. Ads must be prepaid. DISPLAY ADS: $14 per col. inch. Group buys for employment display ads are available with the Addison Independent, the St. Albans Messenger, the Milton Independent and the Essex Reporter. Call for more details. VISA and MASTERCARD accepted. And cash, of course.

E M P L O Y M E N T OUT OF SCHOOL? UNEMPLOYED?

JOB CORPS

is the answer. Receive FREE hands-on vocational training, GED, Driver's Ed, $$$. Must be 16-24. Call 1-800-97-BEGIN www.nejobcorps.org

Essential Partners in a Complex W o r l d

HELEN

DAY

STOWE,

ART

CENTER

VERMONT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Visual Arts Center with strong community and membership base seeks Executive Director to lead and manage this non-profit organization. Experience in managing a growing organization required. Experience working in a gallery setting, developing educational programs and managing volunteers desired. Background or degree in visual art or arts administration preferred. Demonstrated skills in personnel management, financial management, fundraising, public and community relations required. Salary: $30K - 32K. Send cover letter, resume, and 3 references to: SEARCH Committee, Helen Day Art Center, P.O. Box 411, Stowe, VT 05672. (EOE)

City of Burlington Ski/Snowboard Program Staff T h e Burlington Recreation D e p a r t m e n t is seeking staff for the Youth Ski/Snowboard Program. Duties include supervising children and volunteers. Experience in skiing/snowboarding necessary. T h e s e are temporary, part-time seasonal positions starting in early January t h r o u g h February. Salary range is 8 - $ 15/hourly. For m o r e information, contact Tami Molitor/ Recreation C o o r d i n a t o r at 8 6 4 - 0 1 2 3 . Applications are available t h r o u g h the City

Do you live to work or work to live? You can do both at TMG, where hard work and fun go hand in hand. We seek energetic, creative and open-minded individuals to join our ever-growing team. Here at TMG we develop world-class multimedia training courseware and materials for clients in the U.S. and Europe.

Graphic Designers:

Related degree •ee ana 3+ years experience in print, multimediaa and/or web-based design. Proficiency in Photoshop, Quark, Pagemaker, Illustrator, or Freehand.

Multimedia Developers: Related degree and 3+ years experience in multimedia development. Director/Lingo, Database (SQL), and Visual Basic. Please send resume to: The Media Group Attention: Ericka Bryce 600 Blair Park Road, Suite 280 Williston, VT 05495 (802) 879-2702 FAX ebryce@contact-tmg. com

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the media group, inc.

Essential Partners in a Complex World

Other career opportunities listed i

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SURVEY INTERVIEWERS Macro International Inc. is seeking SURVEY INTERVIEWERS for a variety of government-contracted research studies. The primary responsibility is to collect accurate survey data via computer-assisted telephone interviews. Interviewers create their own work schedules. Weekend and evening shift availability a priority. Paid training provided. Must be 16 years old or older and a student in good standing, or possess a high school diploma or GED. $7.oo/hr. to start. Call 863-8970 for information or apply in person immediately at Macro International Inc., 3rd floor, 126 College St., Burlington, VT 05401. EOE/M/F/V/D

MACR( I N T E R N A T I O N A L

I N C .

ACCOUNTANT 16-24 flexible hours with excellent pay. Minimum 2-yr. Accounting degree & 2 yrs. accounting experience. Quickbooks and tax experience preferred. Please send or fax resume to:

SALES REPS

Business-to-Business marketing via phone. Exc. salary & commission. Exc. communication skills & flexible hours a must. Call 879-7000

of Burlington H R D e p t . ,

AA A

R o o m 33, City Hall, 8657 1 4 5 . W o m e n , minorities and persons with disabilities are highly encouraged to apply. E O E .

RWR, Inc. 100 Dorset St., Ste. 19 So. Burlington, VT 05403 Fax: 862-0103

ICErestaurant: HOUSE Waitstaff & Bartenders Full- & Part-time Fun & Motivated Apply in person at 171 Battery St., Burlington

A

R

T

SUPERMARKETS Shelburne Rd. Store in Burlington Full-Time and Part-time Positions Available on All Shifts Cashiers Office Clerks Grocery Clerks Floral Designers/Clerks Seafood Clerks Meat Clerks/Cutters

• • • • • •

Produce Clerks Deli/Food Service Clerks Customer Service Clerks Cart Retrieval General Merchandise Clerks Bakery/Bagel Clerks

INSTRUCTORS

CHECK O U T WHAT W E HAVE TO OFFER:

Painting, drawing, sculpture teachers sought for adult & children's summer classes. Craftspeople with creative class ideas welcome, too. 3 yrs teaching experience (MFA preferred for adult classes). See www.svac.org for organization info.

COMPETITIVE WAGES PAID HOLIDAYS EMPLOYEE PROFIT SHARING PLAN MAJOR MEDICAL COVERAGE PAID VACATION 401K PLAN

Course outline and c.v. to SVAC, PO Box 617 Manchester,VT 05254 S o u t h e r n A r t

V e r m o n t

TO APPLY CALL 1-888-670-5627 ANYTIME FOR A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW OR APPLY IN PERSON TO THE STORE MANAGER. For full-time and management positions, send resume to Price Chopper Supermarkets, Human Resources, Attention: Mark Seber, P.O. Box 1074, Schenectady, NY 12301 EOE

C e n t e r

JSSSeHKSWSHSI!^ even so, mistakes can occur, report errors at once, as seven days will not be responsible for errors continuing beyond the first printing, adjustment for error is limited to republication, in any event, liability for errors (or omissions) shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error (or omission), all advertising is subject to review by seven days, seveny days reserves the right to edit, properly categorize or decline any ad without comment or appeal. -: : ' '' ,'. -• fflfm . t - t - v V * . V.V. V V : i 4Wtb.

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E M P L 0 Y M E N T PICK & PACK ORdeRS & dO OTheR MISC. OFFfce Job's. APPRox- t G n hOURS PeR We€K, A Few hOURS e*ch d/^y, soMe FLexrbrUry is possible. sGNd LgrreR: dUGNAP/ 184 ChURCh STReeT/bURLiNGTON V T. 054 01 ffa.oO AN hOUR.

Americorps VISTA Promise Fellow We need a highly motivated individual for this newly created position? O u r .':" Promise Fellow will b e i^||onsiible ; for planning and conducting outreach to ensure more famages have access to health care. F o r this positive social change to occur^ our candidate must l a v e 5 strong organizational and communication skills along^with a desire to. work w i t f j a culturally a n d socially diverse population. T h $ Promise JPsIlow will receive a living stipend a n d benefits, along with an education award at the end; of their service. M u s t commit t o onei . year of community serviced Please send resumes to Personnel, f h e ; Community Health Center of Burlington, 617 Riverside Avenue, Suite 200, Burlington, V T 05401. E.O.E.

o m m u n i t y Health Center o f Burlington, Inc.

^ \ v e r e d o y o u see

yourself}SM

If you see yourself taking on the challenges that come with working for one of the leading financial companies in N e w England, we may have the job for you:

O N

C A L L TELLERS

Howard Bank is seeking outgoing individuals with demonstrated extraordinary customer service skills to work in our branch offices. Previous experience is not necessary, we w i l l provide training. We are looking to bring on board five On-Call Tellers. Three w i l l be based in Burlington to cover our Chittenden County branches. Two w i l l be based in Montpelier to cover our Central Vermont branches. These positions will be On-Call to cover vacations and sicknesses. Work P/T or F/T during school breaks! Work F/T or over the summer! Banknorth Group provides competitve salaries and a comprehensive benefits package. Applications are available at any of our locations or by calling our Job Hotline at 1-800-462-1943. Interested candidates should forward their resume to:

Banknorth Group, Inc. Human Resources Department PO Box 366 Burlington, VT 05402-0366 An Equal Opportunity Employer

3 Howard Bank

ARCHITECTURAL CAD DRAFTSPERSON for designoriented architectural firm. Call Lee at Edgcomb Design Group, 496-5240. CARPENTER: Experienced carpenter to work with architecture firm on design-build projects. Call Lee at Edgcomb Design Group, 469-5240. CHRISTMAS HELP NEEDED: Outdoor retail cart on Church St. Part- &/or full-time, all hours available. Stress-free work, extra Christmas spending money. Call Aviva or John, 872-7069. ENTERTAINERS; One of VT's finest entertainment services seeking lingerie models & dancers. No exp. necessary, will train. To apply, call Nicole, 863-9510, 7-11 p.m. MARKETING/CUSTOMER RELATIONS SPECIALIST: Busy photography studio seeking responsible person looking for a challenge. Fulltime w/ benefits. Salary negotiable. Interested individuals send resume to The Finest Image, 53 Main St., Colchester, VT 05446. MODELS WANTED: Building photography portfolio: indoor & outdoor. Typical female model types, outgoing, 18+. $ 12/hr. Please page 802749-1724.

PAID & UNPAID VOLUNTEER positions available at local corrections facility. Opportunities for teaching classes, tutoring, leading sports, and coordinating tournaments are currently available. Call Gary, 8637356 for info.

'TroppTcmiity J&wfge Join our team and get Great Benefits, Competitive Pay and a Fun place to work...

6>

Exceptional People Needed! Work with teenage boy with special needs in a new and innovative residential setting at Northeastern Family Institute. Full-time, part-time weekend and fill-in positions available. Contact Scott at 985-3584.

conditions, attention to details required. Part or Full time drivers needed for day or night shifts. License, Insurance, & Reliable Vehicle.

Call for details or apply in person:

Four Star Delivery

203 No. Winooski Ave. Burlington

865-3663

Television Production/ Operations Assistant Will assist in duties critical to daily functions of RETN's educational cable television channels. Television production experience, computer skills, customer service skills, and interest in technology and communications are essential for this job. Ability and willingness to work hard as part of a successful small team necessary. Requires flexibility in scheduling and reliable transportation. Fulltime with health benefits. Send letter of interest, resume and references to RETN, P.O. Box 2386, So. Burlington, VT 05407, no later than December 10, 1999. No phone calls please.

Qualities desired include strong customer service skills, positive attitude and team player. Computer data base and inventory experience required: Some knowledge of accounting needed. Please fax resume to 802-860-5073 or mail to 2026 Williston Road, So. Burlington, VT 05403.

Northeastern Family Institute

Relaxed working

Apply to: Trapp Family Lodge, Human Resources, P0 Box 1428, Stowe, VT 05672 Ph: 802.253.5713 fax: 802.253.5757 EOE

SEASONAL RETAIL SALES help wanted. 1st Season Greenhouses, Shelburne. 985-8456.

We are looking for a Case Manager with a Bachelor's degree for our St. Albans CAP program. Responsibilities include service coordination, and working one on one and in small groups with seriously emotionally challenged children and teenagers. Strong communication skills and experience working with children w h o have emotional difficulties preferred. Bachelor's degree with at least 2 yrs. experience. Master's preferred. Please send resume to Northeastern Family Institute, Joey McNabb, CAP Director, 35 Catherine Street, St. Albans, VT 05478. Fax: 802-524-1777.

$10-$14/hr.

Must have valid Drivers

RESIDENTIAL MANAGER: Spectrum Youth & Family Services provide support and independent living-skills training to teens in a co-ed program. Plus enjoy free rent in a beautiful home downtown. Send resume to SJ at SY&FS, 3 1 Elmwood Ave., Burlington, VT 05401.

CASE M A N A G E R

potential

fcs* EXCELLENT BENEFITS pkg. available for full-time, YR employees. All employees get free shift meals, skiing, use of fitness center, discounts...and more.

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•RECEIVING CLERK- FT, YR, Must be able to lift 50lbs. & have good math and organizational skills. •NIGHT CLEANER-YR, 3 nights/week, flexible schedule, must have a valid driver's license • HOUSEKEEPERS-YR, Saturdays only • WAITSTAFF/BARTENDER- PT

PART-TIME STAFF MEMBER: one full day/week. Will train. Great working environment, some experience required working with adults recovering from psychological illness. Part-time Van Driver: up to 20 hrs./wk. Will train. Positions can be combined for the right person. Call Martha ThilbourgChaplin at Evergreen House, a division of The Counseling Service of Addison County, at 802-388-3468, or send resume and cover letter to 24 Washington Street, Middlebury, VT 05753. EOE.

Northeastern Family Institute

Drivers Wanted

f

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED HEALTHY MALES Ages 18-45 needed for

STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF COMMONLY USED MEDICATIONS Must be available weekdays during working hours.

MONETARY COMPENSATION OF $790 OR MORE. Conducted at UVM Call 656-9620

Bus Drivers Needed!

CCTA, Vermont's largest public transportation agency, wants YOU to join their team. CCTA offers a complete benefits package, which includes: • Competitive salary - more than $19,000 a year to start! • Full health, dental and vision coverage • 2 weeks paid vacation and 11 paid holidays • Free CDL training and uniforms Join now and you'll be making $20,600 a year by January - more than $29,000 by January 2001! Join CCTA today! Call 864-CCTA or stop by 15 Industrial Parkway for an application.

Ask about our signing bonus!

CHITTENDEN COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

A Banknorth Financial Resource M

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Classifieds * 864.5S84 EMPLOYMENT START YOUR CAREER IN T H E MUSIC BUSINESS: Signal to Noise, he journal of improvised & experimental music seeks account executive with interest in creative music to sell ads on commission. Experience, enthusiasm, confidence & determination essential. Call 9511140 or fax 863-4665.

RED MEAT

m o x cannon from the secret files of

hell hole s w a n dive

I watched this movie about Ben Hur on the TV last night. It reminded me about when I was a kid I used to like to play "gladiators!'

I used a big cooking pot for a helmet, an' a toilet plunger for a sword, an' me and the neighbor kids used to have these wars.

Man...it takes a lot of work to kill a kid with a plunger.

BUSINESS OPP. BURLINGTON RESIDENTS! If you have Internet access, you can help me with my Internet business and make excellent money! A friendly and reliable sales person type is needed. Toll free, 877-244-0548. AroundBurlingtonVT.com. DRAPERY & WINDOW SHADE business seeks partner. Our custom work includes a full line of decorating accessories. Well established in greaterBurlington area. Can be home-based. 862-2032. ENTREPRENEURS! Start your own business. High-tech product that everyone needs. No competition, low start-up costs. Will train, Crisp Air, 802-244-8344. OFFICE SPACE TO SHARE with massage therapist in diverse, supportive collective in private practice in old Victorian house in Shelburne. 2 days/wk. available. Prefer established body or energy worker. Other therapists considered. Affordable rent & expenses. Awakening Center, 985-2346, voice mailbox 3.

RESEARCH STUDY UVM RESEARCH STUDY: Marijuana users and nonusers, 18+, needed for 1.5-2 hrs. for a research study on memory, thinking & attention. $25 compensation. Call 656-9570, M-F, 12-3 p.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS GREEN MT. INSTITUTE OF Oriental Medicine now accepting applications for Spring semester starting 1/2000. Programs include acupuncture & Oriental medicine, Oriental bodywork therapy, Chinese massage & auricular therapy. For more info, call 295-6629. YOUR CLASSIFIED AD printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $950! To run your ad in papers withs a total circulation exceeding 6.5 million copies per week, call Glenn at Seven Days, 802-8645684.

T REAL ESTATE WANTED: PROPERTY TO purchase. Expanding service business seeks multi-unit apartment building or commercial rental spaces in Burlington or So. Burlington. Must have garage & storage space. Call 863-5397 or 355-0025. HOMES FROM $5,000. Foreclosed and repossessed. No or low down payment. Credit trouble OK. For current listings call 1-800-3115048 ext. 3478.

APT/HOUSE FOR RENT

APT/HOUSE FOR RENT

HOUSEMATES WANTED

BURLINGTON: Attractive, 3story, downtown townhouse, 3 Ig. bdrms., 1.5 bath, dishwasher, W/D, storage, parking, gas hot water/heat. No pets. Avail. 12/18. $l,200/mo + utils., 658-2578.

BURLINGTON: Clean, responsible non-smoker to share apt. downtown. $350/mo., incl. all + washer. 862-1341.

BURLINGTON: 3-bdrm, 2 bath townhouse (borders Oakledge Park), quiet, sunny, pool, tennis, energy-efficient, non-smokers preferred. Lease/purchase option. $925/mo. + refs. Avail. 12/1. 862-3719.

BURLINGTON: 2-bdrm. apt., downtown, lots of windows, quiet. $565/mo. + utils. Avail. 1/1. 865-4317.

BURLINGTON: Clean, bright 2-bdrm. apt., near downtown, off-street parking. No smokers/pets. Avail. midDec. $800/mo. + utils. 2295733.

BURLINGTON: Efficiency, gas heat, off-street parking, W/D, garden spot, 4 blocks to UVM. No dogs. $450/mo. + utils. 657-2019.

BURLINGTON: No. Champlain St., 2-bdrm. apts. $550-$575/mo. Lease & references. Avail, now. Call 658-2906.

BURLINGTON: 3-bdrm. apt., Intervale Ave. Off-street parking, dishwasher, washer, hdwd. firs. Avail. 12/1. $800/mo. 482-3653.

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BURLINGTON: Room for rent in house of 4 young men & 1 young woman. No more pets. $225/mo. + util. + dep. Pager: 657-5640. Will return local calls only.

Go get her, Tiger!

BURLINGTON: 2 females seeking mature & responsible 3rd roommate — prof./grad, non-smoker. Very close to downtown. $275/mo., heat incl. Avail. 1/1. 860-7116. BURLINGTON: Seeking housemate to share charming 4-bdrm. with 3 female young profs., close to downtown, yard, W/D. $300/mo. + utils. + dep. Must love animals. 652-0796. BURLINGTON: 3 motivated, healthy, fun females seek 4th, preferably female nonsmoker. Convenient location, hdwd. firs., parking, W/D. Avail 1/1. $375/mo. + elec. Sara, 864-4185.

1-900-370-7127 to respond

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THE FURNITURE WAS GUfTE NICE So SHE PEClPEP To KEEP IT ALL.

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AUTOMOTIVE MITSUBISHI EXPO WAGON, '94: black, 4-dr., 93K mi., a/c, cassette, very clean. $6,400 o.b.o. 658-5989. SOLD MY SATURN: 4 P165/85R15 winter Cooper Weathermasters in really good shape. $90 takes all 4. 863-1216.

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7DClassifieds • 864.5884 HOUSEMATES WANTED

HOUSEMATES WANTED

DATING SERVICES

BURLINGTON: Room avail, in cheerful 2-bdrm. on quiet street, close to downtown, porch, garden, one mellow cat. Kindness essential, smoker OK. $325/mo. + utils. 860-9562.

NO. FERRISBURGH: Nonsmoking prof, wanted to share spacious 2-bdrm. apt. w/ same and her dogs. $400/mo., incl. heat + 1/2 utils. + $400 dep. 4255593, leave message.

N.E. SINGLES CONNECTION: Dating and friendship network for relationshipminded single adults. Professional, intelligent, personal. Lifetime membership, newsletter. Call for free info, (800) 775-3090.

COMPUTER SERVICES

COMPATIBLES: Singles meet by being in the same place as other singles. We've made this the best time to connect you. Details, 863-4308. www.compatibles.com.

BURLINGTON: Roommate wanted for Ig. downtown 2bdrm. apt. Pets OK, offstreet parking. No smokers. A great deal! $320/mo. + 1/2 utils. 863-3382. CHARLOTTE: Great location. Share this unique apt. w/ hdwd. firs. & spectacular views. Non-smoker, no pets. 425-4557. HINESBURG: Room j n contemporary home in nice wooded setting. Dog friendly. Seeking mature, responsible person. $400/mo., incl. all. Avail. 1/1. 482-2394. MONTPELIER: Non-smoking male, meditator for 2 rooms in quiet vegetarian house (cold cuts, take-out OK). $350/mo. + heat. Avail. 1 2 / L

J c e n t tion. 223-0726.

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DHuber Computer Support User-Friendly Help When You Need Us Technical Support - System Maintenance - tutoring - Problem Solving - Repair On Site: Your Home or Small Business Win 95/98 & Mac OS 802-660-2672

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PAINTING SERVICES PROFESSIONAL PAINTING: CJ Paints — Interior/exterior, jnsured Free estimates. References. Call Chris Jones, 877-2279.

PERSONAL CHEF CHRISTOPHER SLOANE, Personal Chef," available for private, elegant dinner parties. Classically trained, 20yrs. exp., extensive portfolio. Specializing in Contemporary American and Traditional New England cuisine. Private instruction also available. 859-9040.

TELEPHONE SERVICES PRE-PAID TELEPHONE CARDS: 3.90/min. $10 card = 243 minutes; $20 = 500 minutes. 802-773-5014.

TUTORING SERVICES FRENCH LESSONS: Elementary to Grad level by a native French speaker. Call Marjorie, 859-3411. MATH, ENGLISH, WRITING, Science, Humanities, Proofreading — from elementary to graduate level. Test Prep for GRE, LSAT, GMAT, SAT I & SAT II, ACT, GED, TOEFL... Michael Kraemer, 862-4042. SAT SPECIALIST IS NOW offering in-home lessons at reasonable rates. Also GRE & high school subjects, especially essay writing. Jeff, 660-8026.

Car

BRAKE DUST DILEMMA

Dear Tom and Ray: I purchased a new 1997 Mercury Cougar. After driving for two weeks, the hubcaps were covered with black brake dust. I went back to the dealer and the service manager said, "That's normal. All Fords have brake dust. Look in the owner's manual and it'll show you what to do. "I looked in the manual, and there's no mention of brake dust! So I wrote to the CEO of Ford Motor Co. at the time, Alex Trotman, and related my story. I told him the removal of brake dust with a toothbrush every two weeks was not acceptable maintenance to me. He never replied. I checked with another Ford dealer, who

recommended PAM or silicone spray The PAM attracted flies, and the silicone left a black smudge. I tried Castrol Super Clean for brake dust, and it was no better than soap and water. Any suggestions? —Dick T O M : Well, I can't u n d e r s t a n d w h y Alex T r o t m a n never got back to y o u . I k n o w he was trying to r u n a m u l t i n a t i o n a l corporation a n d all, b u t brake dust is i m p o r t a n t ! RAY: It's an absolute scourge, isn't it? It's related to the design of the wheels a n d h o w the brakes are ventilated. It's i m p o r t a n t to keep air m o v i n g over the brakes so they cool off. B u t if the air is d r a w n o u t t h r o u g h the wheels, it also draws o u t d u s t f r o m t h e brake pads.

HOMEBREW

MUSIC

MAKE GREAT BEER AT HOME for only 500/bottle.

AD ASTRA RECORDING. Got music? Relax. Record. Get the tracks. 20+ yrs. Exp. from stage to studio. Tenure Skyline Studios, NYC. 24track automated mixdown. lst-rate gear. Wide array of keyboards, drums, more. Ad Astra, building a reputation of sonic integrity. 872-8583.

Brew what you w a n t when

you. want! Start-up kits & prize-winning recipes. Gift certifs. are a great gift. VT Homebrew Supply, Rt. 15, Winooski. 655-2070.

BUY THIS STUFF DINING ROOM SET: Cherry wood, 12 pc., 92" double pedestal table, 8 Chippendale chairs, lighted hutch & buffet, sideboard/ server. Never opened, still in box. Cost $11,000. Sacrifice for $3,800. Keith, 658-4955.

SEE LIVE LOCAL MUSIC PHOTOGRAPHS from Burlington, VT online at www.bigheavyworld.com, made possible in part by Burlington City Arts.

MATTRESS & 2 BOXES: king-size, orthopedic pillowtop w/ frame. Brand new, still in plastic. Cost $1,295. Sell $495. 658-5031.

MUSIC INSTRUCTION BANJO: Old time style. After 4 lessons, you will be pickin' and strummin' traditional Appalachian tunes. Emphasis on rhythm, technique and musicality. Call Mara,,862-3581. BASS: Do you need a big bottom? All levels, any style. Learn bass techniques & theory. Focus on becoming a bassist, not a 4-string guitarist. Jeff, 660-8026. GUITAR: All styles/levels. Emphasis on developing strong technique, thorough musicianship, personal style. Paul Asbell (Unknown Blues Revue, Kilimanjaro, SklarGrippo, etc.). 862-7696.

WOLF TANNING BEDS TAN AT HOME BUY DIRECT & SAVE! COMMERCIAL/HOME UNITS FROM $199 LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS FREE COLOR CATALOG CALL TODAY 1-800-711-0158

MUSIC EMERGENCY: Experienced bass player needed immediately for regular work and great-paying holiday gigs for Burlington-area band, Empty Pockets! Vocals a plus. Call Glad or Dave, 482-5230, Right Now! THE NOBBY REED PROJECT seeks full-time bass player into the groove and playing original blues-rock tunes and be willing to travel. Must be dedicated. Call 868-2187, or email revreed@sover.net. BOTTOM END NEEDED: 2 guitarists w/ diverse material looking for a bassist w/ taste & subtlety to fill out our sound. Call Eric or Greg, 434-6491. POKER HILL STUDIO: 8994263. 16-TRACK ANALOG RECORDING. Dogs, Cats & Clocks Productions. Warm, friendly, prof, environment. Services for: singer/songwriters, jingles, bands. New digital mastering/recording. Call Robin, 658-1042.

T O M : A n d if you leave that dust on the wheels — particularly alloy wheels — it can eventually react with the metal and cause pitting. RAY: S o m e car companies are solving this themselves by redesigning their wheels. T h e y obviously got tired of having their C E O s s p e n d i n g f o u r days a week r e s p o n d i n g to letters a b o u t brake dust. So you m i g h t check w i t h your M e r c u r y dealer to see if the wheels have been changed since 1 9 9 7 to correct this p r o b l e m . T O M : O t h e r than that, your only choice is to clean t h e m every v/eek. If you keep u p w i t h it, the spray-on soaps — like Castrol's or the f o a m cleaner m a d e by Kiwi — w o r k pretty well. But if you let it sit for m o r e t h a n a week, you'll probably have to get on your h a n d s and knees w i t h the t o o t h b r u s h . RAY: T h a t ' s w h a t m y wife does. Hey! I w o n d e r if that's w h y I've been getting that f u n n y taste w h e n I'm b r u s h i n g m y teeth?

WINOOSKI to SO. BURLINGTON: I'm looking to share driving or be a passenger on my commute. My hrs, are M, T, W, F 9 - 5 : 3 0 & T H 128. (3222)

CHARLOTTE to MONTPELIER: I'm hoping to share driving with someone to help cut down on travel costs. My hours are 8 - 4 : 3 0 , M-F. (3208)

BURLINGTON to MONTPELIER: I am hoping to travel to Montpelier once a week at 8 p.m., returning to Burl, the next morning at 8 a.m. ( 3 2 1 9 )

BURLINGTON to RANDOLPH: I'm temporarily seeking a ride while my car is being repaired. My hours are 8:155, MWF. ( 3 2 1 1 )

WATERBURY CTR. to WINOOSKI: I am looking for a ride. My hours are M, W, TH 8-4, TU 8-5, & F 8-3. (3217) SO. BURLINGTON to WATERBURY: I would like to share driving with someone to Waterbury. My hours are M-F, 8-5. (3216) BURLINGTON to WILLISTON: I am looking for a ride for my short commute to work. My hours ara M, T, TH, F, 8-5. (3220) BURLINGTON to ESSEX: I'm a UVM student looking for a ride to Essex on Sats. Work 8-Noon, & need a ride both ways. Please call even if you can take only one way. (3214)

WILLISTON to CAMBRIDGE: Do you work 2nd shift at IBM? I'm looking to ride with someone who works until 11 p.m. ( 3 2 1 3 ) MILTON to COLCHESTER: I would like to take a job working evenings and am hoping someone can help me out with a ride. My hours are 6 p.m. to 10:30 a.m., M-F. (3209) BRISTOL to ESSEX JCT.: My car is very unreliable, so I'm hoping to start riding with someone else who works in Essex Jet. My hours are M-F, 8-5. (3131)

VANPOOL RIDERS WANTED

Route from: Burlington & Richmond Commuter Lot To: Montpelier Monthly Fare: $85 Work Hours: 7:30 to 4:25 p.m. Contact: Carl Bohien Phone: 828-5215

Dear Tom and Ray: In a recent column, you said you've had some success with a product called "Restore. " Under what conditions do you recommend it, and where can I find it? —.Bill T O M : U n d e r "desperate" c o n ditions, Bill. Restore is o n e of those "ring-job-in-a-can" p r o d ucts. But it h a p p e n s to b e the only o n e we've ever h a d a n y occasional success w i t h . RAY: S o m e t i m e s a c u s t o m e r will c o m e in w i t h an old beater that's b u r n i n g oil. H e m a y need it to last a n o t h e r six m o n t h s while he finishes graduate school — or till h e can k n o c k off his m o t h e r - i n - l a w a n d inherit her C o u p e DeVille. A n d if he's got n o t h i n g to lose (if the alternative is j u n k i n g t h e car or rebuilding the engine), we'll o f t e n r e c o m m e n d a can of Restore. T O M : A n d even if it doesn't w o r k , n o h a r m is d o n e because he's g o i n g to rebuild t h e e n g i n e

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BURLINGTON to WILLISTON/ BLAIR PARK: I'm looking for a ride one way to work. I work at 10 a.m., M-F. (3205) CHAMPLAIN COLLEGE to SHELBURNE RD.: I'm looking for a ride during winter months. I work 8-2, T&TH. Please call even if you can only take me one way. (3200) VERGENNES to BARRE: I am looking to share driving on my commute. Willing to meet anywhere along the way—Williston, Monkton, etc. Hours are 4 p.m. to 1 a.m., M-F. (3172) WILLISTON to VERGENNES: l a m looking to share a ride 2 days a week. I work M, 9 - 4 and W, 9-7. (3194) BURLINGTON to SHELBURNE: I am looking to share driving to and from Shelbume. I need to be in Shelburne by 8 : 3 0 a.m. and would like to return around 3 p.m., but the afternoon is flexible. (3193)

Vermont

Rideshare

or j u n k it anyway. RAY: So it's a last resort, in o u r opinion, and not recommended for y o u r ' 9 8 C a r a v a n , for instance. T O M : T h e Restore folks say it's sold in m o s t W a l - M a r t a n d K m a r t stores, as well as a u t o parts stores. A n d if y o u can't f i n d it locally, y o u can call t h e m at (954) 5 6 3 - 7 0 0 1 . Keep your car on the road and out of the repair shop by ordering Tom and Ray's pamphlet, Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It! Send $3 and a stamped (55 cents), self-addressed, No. 10 envelope to Used Car, PO Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or e-mail them by visiting the Car Talk section of cars.com on the World Wide Web.

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Classified

wellness

wellness

AROMATHERAPY

MASSAGE

STAR ROOT: Specializing in fine custom blending for your aromatherapy, beauty & bodycare needs. Carrier oils & supplies avail. We stock over 100 therapeutic- grade pure essential oils. Ask about bulk pricing. 174 Battery St., Burl. 862-4421.

ASTROLOGY THE ESOTERIC ASTROLOGY of A.A. Bailey: 30 years experience. 223-0726 or email Ft .3w4kuba@sover.net.

FITNESS YMCA: 862-9622. See display ad.

GENERAL HEALTH WILL POWER IN A BOTTLE: Lose 20 lbs. fast! All-natural herbal formulation. Free samples. Money-back guarantee. $38. Call now! 800-213-2801.

JHERBS PURPLE SHUTTER HERBS: Burlington's only full-service herb shop. We carry only the finest herbal products; many of them grown/produced in VT. Featuring over 400 bulk dried herbs/itnctures. 100 Main St., Burl. 865-HERB. Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10-6.

MASSAGE EXPERIENCE T H E ULTIMATE massage! Treat yourself or a friend to the incredible relaxation & effectiveness of exquisite Oriental massage w/ JinShin Acupressure. Assists in stress relief, injury recovery, renewed vitality. Fantastic gift! Gift certifs. avail. $5 discount w/ ad. Acupressure Massage of VT, J. Watkins, 425-4279.

LEGALS CITY OF BURLINGTON In the year One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-nine

MASSAGE THERAPIST NEEDED for busy salon/spa in Middlebury. Must be experienced in giving great service. Knowledge in spa services a plus. Lovely space for rent. 388-1177 for details.

An Ordinance in Relation to Appendix A, Zoning #95-01B Institutional Core Campus Overlay (ICO): University of Vermont

THERAPEUTIC BODYWORKS: 425-2688. See display ad.

It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows:

TRANQUIL CONNECTION Massage: peaceful get-away for you or someone special; unravel your nerves, stress melts away. 1.5 hr. = $65. Energizes, ideal for pregnancies. Private, serene setting. Opt. spa pre-massage relaxation. Certified therapist, 654-9200 for appt (10-7 p.m.). or leave message.

That Appendix A, Zoning, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended by amending Sec. 3.2.8, Institutional Core Overlay (ICO) thereof to read as follows.-

TREAT YOURSELF TO 75 MINS. OF RELAXATION. Deep therapeutic massage. Sessions: $50. Gift certificates. Located in downtown Burl. Flexible schedule. Aviva Silberman, 872-7069. WILLIAM COIL: 658-2390. See display ad.

PSYCHICS BERNICE KELMAN: 8993542. See display ad.

REIKI KATIE NAYLOR: Reiki Master. Manisfestation healing, peaceful & transformative, at Spirit Dancer, Tuesday, 1-6 p.m. Walk-ins, or 660-8060.

Article 3: Zoning Districts & Zoning Map Section 3.2.8 Institutional Core Overlay (ICO) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Institutional Core Overlay district is intended to provide reasonable future growth for institutions within their existing core campuses without further intrusion into surrounding residential neighborhoods. This overlay district shall, in no manner whatsoever, affect the use requirements in the underlying UC district. (a) The ICO district boundaries shall be as delineated on Maps 3-5C and 3-5E Institutional Core Overlay. (b) Lot Coverage: (1) Lot coverage within the ICO district shall not exceed 60% inclusive of bonus provisions, except for the bonus provided in Paragraph (3) below. (2) Maximum lot coverage shall be applied to the aggregate of all lots owned by an institution and located within the ICO district.

LEGALS (3) Transitional Buffer: (a) The Transitional Buffer is defined as all land owned by an institution as measured from the centerlines of Colchester Avenue, East Avenue, Main Street and South Prospect Street frontages only and extending 150 feet into the ICO district. (b) If the lot coverage within the Transitional Buffer is less than 40%, the maximum lot coverage for the entire tract of land owned by an institution within the ICO district may be increased by one percent for each one percent that the Transitional Buffer coverage is less than 40%, up to a maximum of 65%. (c) All exterior changes, additions to existing structures and all new structures within the ICO district shall require zoning permit and shall be subject to the provisions of Article 6, Design Review. (d) The minimum side and rear yard setbacks shall not be applicable within the ICO district south of Colchester Avenue. (e) In the ICO district, the restrictions on residential density set forth in Article 5, Part 2, Density Requirements, shall not apply to dormitories/rooming houses, as defined in Chapter 18 of the Burlington Code of Ordinances. The restrictions on the nonresidential density equivalent set forth in Article 5, Part 2, Density Requirements, Section 5.2.4 shall not apply in the ICO district. (f) No new outdor surface parking spaces shall be permitted in the ICO district unless the number of the

LEGALS

LEGALS

new outdoor surface parking spaces is offset by the corresponding removal of outdoor surface parking spaces in the ICO district existing as of January 1, 1999 and the Planning Commission has approved such offset in issuing a certificate of appropriateness for the new parking spaces under Articles 6, Design Review and 7, Site Plan Review.

features as per Sec. 5.3.13 (d). the height of existing structures locate in the UVM ICO parcel (Map 3-5E). for the purpose of applying the exceptions to height limits contained in Sec. 5.3.13 shall be the lesser of:

(g) Unless replaced on site, no housing unit in a residential structure located within the Transitional Buffer shall be demolished or converted to a nonresidential use, except for housing units which are exempt from the provisions of Article 15, Housing Preservation and Replacement/Demolition and Conversion. (h) Height [in the ICO District shall be measured under height related provisions of Article 5]. (1) Additions and new construction mav be built to a height that does not exceed the greater of thirty-five feet (35') or. subject to design review, the height of existing structures located within the ICO district. (2) For the purposes of height calculations, parcels shall be as depicted on ICO Maps 3-5C. and 3-5E. (3) Building height shall be considered in the context of other buildings in the vicinity as required under Sec. 6.1.10 (a) Relate development to its environment. (4) In measuring height under Sec. 3.2.8 (h). the general provisions regarding height contained in Article 5 shall apply. (5) Except for ornamental and symbolic architectural

1. The actual height of the existing structure measured from finished grade to roof in accordance with the rules set out in Sec. 5.3.19: or 2. The elevation of the plane running parallel to sea level and defined bv the roof of the highest structure on the parcel. * Material underlined added. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are hereby enacted as amendments to the City of Burlington Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Motor Vehicles and Traffic, by the Burlington Public Works Commission. Sec. 27. No parking Except with Resident Parking Permit or a valid guest pass and clearly identifiable service or delivery vehicles on any street designated as "Residential Parking." (a) Streets designated for residential parking at all times include: (1) Through (29) As Written. (30) South side of South Prospect Street from Robinson Parkway to entrance of Henderson Terrace. (b) through (e) As Written. Adopted this 27th day of October, 1999 by the Board of Public Works Commissioner.

ATt-


70Classifieds • 864.5684 LEGALS

LEGALS Attest Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 10/27/99; Published 11/24/99; Effective 12/15/99. Materials in [brackets] delete. Materials underlined add.

CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to the City of Burlington's Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Traffic Regulations: Sec. 12. No parking daytime or weekdays except by trucks loading or unloading. No vehicle other than a truck actually engaged in the loading or unloading shall, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., except Sunday, and for no more than thirty (30) minutes, use the following parking spaces: (1) through (44) As Written. (45) The second space on the [north] south side of Bank Street 40 feet west of Church Street. (46) through (53) As Written. Adopted this 27th day of October, 1999 by the board of Public Works Commissioners. Attest Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 10/27/99; Published 11/24/99; Effective 12/15/99. Materials in [brackets] delete. Materials underlined add.

CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to the City of Burlington's Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Traffic Regulations: Sec. 7.A. Handicapped Space Designated. No person shall park any vehcle at any time in the following locations, except automobiles displaying special handicapped license plates issued pursuant to 18 V.S.A. 1325, or any amendment of renumbering thereof: (1) through (3) As Written. (4) The designated 121 [space] spaces in the College' Street municipal parking lot. (5) through (35) As Written. (36) on the [south] north side of Bank Street in the first space west of Church Street. (87) [On the west side of Battery Stret in the first space north of Maple Street] Reserved. (127) The space in front of 189 Battery Street. (128) The space in front of 64 North Street. Adopted this 27th day of October, 1999 by the board of Public Works Commissioners. Attest Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 10/27/99; Published 11/24/99; Effective 12/15/99. Materials in [brackets] delete. Material underlined add.

Straight

Dope

ment and get back to the truly gut questions of our time. Although I gotta tell you, dealing with the feds was a piece of cake compared to this one. We consulted with numerous clock manufacturers, clock engineers and clock buffs and amassed the following theories: (1) Focus groups found that people preferred a snooze delay of eight to 12 minutes. Okay, but then why not a 10-minute interval? (2) Engineers believe their bosses come to check on them every 10 minutes. f |JJ

f f '

Dear Cecil, When my roommate's alarm goes o f f , he invariably presses the snooze bar. This continues in nine-minute cycles until I have to rouse him myself. All the alarms I have seen have a nine-minute snooze interval. Is this a standard number, and if so, where did it come from? — Matt Mc, Indiana, Pennsylvania W h a t a relief to quit dealing with the federal govern-

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(3) Physiologists have found that a sleeper who doesn't want to get up will fall back into a deep sleep if left for longer than nine minutes. Yeah, right. (4) Five minutes seems too short and 10 minutes seems too long. Nine minutes may seem better than 10 while not being significantly different. Bah. Nine minutes does not seem better; it seems stupid.

(5) O n L E D (the old red display) clocks, the snooze function will work for only 60 minutes, so you want to fit the greatest possible number of snooze periods into that time. Nine minutes gives you six snooze periods with a minute's leeway each time for pressing the snooze bar. "Nonsense," one engineer commented. (6) "I figured it was actually 512 seconds (2 9 )," one informant speculated. " O r maybe, since the clock is counting (typically) the power cycles from the wall socket, it's because nine minutes is 32,400 cycles, very close

to 2'5 (32,768)." Clocks don't count that way, bub. (7) General Instruments, one of the first designers of the chip used in L E D clocks in the late '60s, set the chip logic to allow a nine-minute delay. Others continue to use this chip or copied the idea without changing the interval (e.g., National Semiconductor's type M M 5 3 7 0 digital alarm-clock chip — I tell ya, do we research this stuff or what?). Fine, b u t why nine? (8) O n a digital clock, nine is the greatest interval obtainable by advancing some sort of "snooze counter" on the ones column. But why mess with the ones column? W h y not put the snooze counter on the tens colu m n and advance that by one? (9) In the days of dial clocks, the snooze interval was originally intended to be 10 minutes max, but precision was unimportant and engineers were content if they could make the interval nine minutes and change. W h e n the industry switched to digital, clock designers figured the standard snooze interval was nine minutes; "and change" went out the window. N o w we're getting somewhere. Partial confirmation of this view comes from Jay "Pappy" Kennan, a clock collector who took apart an old G E electromechanical clock with one of the earliest snooze buttons. (Pappy helpfully posted photos of the clock's innards on his Web site; see the links at the b o t t o m of www.ma.ultranet.com/-jayman.) T h e clocks snooze-gear mechanism was not precise; the snooze interval could be anywhere from nine to nine and a half minutes. Pappy's opinion, seconded by a clock engineer, was that the original, none-too-ambitious designers wanted a clock with a snooze interval in the nine-to-10-minute range. So what may have happened was, some early chip designer inspected an old mechanical clock with a v . . snooze button, figured that a nine-minute snooze interval had been ordained by the clock gods, and built it fv into his chip — and we've been stuck with it ever since. That's my theory, and I'm sticking to it. — CECIL ADAMS

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Write Cecil Adams at the Chicago Reader* 11 E. Illinois, Chicago, IL 60611, or e-mail him at cecil@chireader.com,


Nov25 - Dec. 1 ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19):

Imagine that by the time you're in

your eighties, our culture will have transformed into a place where old folks are treated with veneration and called on to provide a sage

m

a <yyrn I n a v ci

u

1

«

tion. Now visualize the wise guy or years before you die. Look back on your life with mountaintop eyes. Tell the late-1999 version of yourself what turned out to be the most important goals you ever pursued.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May

20): To celebrate the arrival o f the wealth-building phase o f your astrological cycle, here are four rituals that might stimulate the financial zones o f your imagination, thereby speeding up your cash flow: 1) Tape a $20 bill to your belly and wear it secretly under your clothes; 2) glue a small, oval photo o f yourself onto the center o f a $ 1 0 bill; 3) using shreds o f a ripped-up dollar bill, fruit, yogurt and honey, make a smoothee in a blender, and drink it as you brainstorm with a

attain atonement for

&Jf

QUARIUS (Jan

JO-Feb. 18): I wish your

'ereal came in a box deco-

sense o f perspective and proporwise gal you'll be in the last few

love you, seeking thereby

rated with paintings by Matisse and Chagall. I wish you only had

out o f shape. Instead you'll enjoy a

They often serve as excellent atten-

bumpy grace period: Your soul will

wickedly interesting game produce

tion-getting devices, and can be

get prodded and squeezed in all

a win-win or a lose-lose? It may all

great fun to complain about. They

the right places.

depend on whether you realize that

may even garner sympathy and

the supposed adversaries are as

CANCER (June 21 -July

affection from people you long to

dependent on each other as lovers.

when you made a brave move to

be closer to. If you're an artist or

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.

destiny, the important people in

22): I'll never forget what hap-

writer, your predicaments can be

pened to my innocence on that

handy for inspiring creative mas-

fateful day in first grade. On the

terpieces. In the right circum-

wall next to the sink, some cynic-

stances, your difficulties can win

22-Dec. 21): As I was meditating on your fate, I dozed off. I

dreamed you were an astronaut in

in-training, probably a sixth-grad-

you money in a lawsuit or pay-

er, had scrawled, "Humpty

ment as a guest on a T V talk show.

Dumpty was pushed." That was

Last but not least, they can force

the dawning o f many cruel (but

you to grow when you've become

ultimately welcome) realizations:

perfectly numb to the dull ache of

that things aren't always as they

mediocrity.

your helmet, your face looked

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

you'd escaped every limitation.

seem; that the official explanation is often an attempt to disguise the failings o f those in power; and that "behind the scenes" is usually 10 times bigger than "in front o f the scenes." Keep all these themes close to your conscious awareness this week, Cancer.

a ship orbiting the Earth. Clad in a silver spacesuit and attached by a tether, you opened the big metal doors and floated out into the clear blackness. Through the glass o f shocked yet exultant, as if you felt

six shampoos to choose from at the store, not 30. I wish you knew how beautiful you are. I wish that follow an unexpected fork in your your life greeted it with excitement and curiosity, not fear and resistance. And I wish you would let your imagination burble and rave as you dream o f all the fantastic innovations you might wish for during this, the Aquarian Wishing Season.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Calling all you big fishies in small

There's just one standard by which

When I woke up, you were doing

ponds, all you closet geniuses

your success this week can be

cartwheels as you passed over the

who're weary o f being legends

measured: Will you understand

Himalayas below. Now here's my

merely in your own minds, all you

yourself better at the end than you

dream interpretation: You will

temperamental actors who've

do at the beginning? It's true that a

soon have a brush with a dizzying

locked yourselves in your dressing rooms: Three million years o f

new privilege may fall into your

liberation. It'll imprint you pro-

lap, as well as a connection that'll

foundly. T h e entire rest of your life

rehearsal is probably long enough,

a money shrine in your bedroom.

L E O

(July 23-Aug. 22): When I

boost your status, and maybe even

will be freer because o f what hap-

don't you think? Get the show on

pens this week.

the road before I award you an

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-

Starring Role." You say you're

Capricorn or fellow Taurus about how to get richer quicker; 4) create Stock it with thrilling images and

was young and amoral, back before

a proposition that'll encourage you

objects that will fire you up with a

I got into the legitimate end o f the

to temper your love of harmony

righteous longing to have more o f

magic business, I had a spell-cast-

with greater self-assertion. But

the rich experiences money can

ing service. In return for a fee, I'd

they'll all be irrelevant unless you

buy.

perform the juju necessary to tip

heed my new, improved version o f

the cosmic scales in my clients'

Socrates' best soundbite: Know

behalf. To celebrate the 15 th

thyself — or else.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Getting yourself sandwiched in between a rock and a hard place won't be bad at all if you're willing to take on a melt-in-your-mouth consistency. So be as pliable as a claymation character, Gemini. Be as absorptive as a sponge. Be soft and cool and sweet in the way that ice cream is. Study the Libran tribe's genius for tickling opposite extremes without being crushed in the middle. I f you take my advice, there's no way you'll get all bent

anniversary o f the last time I prostituted my wizardry, I'll be casting a lusty (though scrupulously ethical) romantic spell for you this week — absolutely free. To be honest, though, you don't really need it. Under your own power, you're quite likely to stir up a firestorm o f tender intimacy.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

Jan. 19): Ten minutes ago I kissed my stuffed Tyrannosaurus rex and welled up with loving thoughts about your inner monster. Next I took stones from a big pile and

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Cancerians are hiders.

SCORPIO

hurled them in the direction o f

Sagittarians are seekers. You

all the bureaucratic screw-ups up

heaven, protesting, in your behalf,

Scorpios are hide-and-seekers.

there. And now I'm sucking my

Sometimes you stalk life's tantaliz-

thumb and breaking a raw egg on

ing secrets like a feral cat toying

my head and wearing a sign that

with a mouse. At other times you

says "Kick Me," hoping in this

devise ingenious tactics for eluding

way to distract you from feeling

life's tantalizing secrets — as if you

sorry for yourself. My last task,

felt you were their prey. But I've

which I have not worked up the

Shall we count all the fabulous

never seen you trying to imperson-

courage for quite yet, will be to

ways your problems can be turned

ate both hunter and hunted at the

whip my shoulders with a leather

into opportunities? Let's see, now.

same time — until now. Will this

belt while crying out how much I

Oscar for "Most Excuses in a waiting till your knees stop shivering and your heart stops palpitating? I've got good news for you: T h e greater your stage fright, the more moving your performance will be. ® You can call Rob Brezsny, or night for your

expanded w

e

e

k

l

y

horoscope 1-900-903-2500 $1.99 per minute. 18 and over. Touchtone phone. c/9 912/373-9785 And don't forget to check

out Rob'm Web mite at yuwnn.reala9trology.com/ Updated Tuesday night.

last week's answers

ACROSS 1 Zhivago's love 5 Touch up the text 9 It should be square 13 "Don't — it!" 18 Act like Etna 20 Birdbrain 21 Garfield's pal 22 Fragrance 23 Tennessee cry of denial? 25Shuffle" ('77 song) 26 Long walks 27 Pleasant 28 Jeroboam contents 29 Way up 30 Vend 31 Get — (be successful) 32 Mikita and Musial 33 Find the sum . 36 Spring holiday 39 TV's "— Sharkey" 40 Mature 44 North Carolina cry of encouragement? 47 Seizes suddenly 51 Join the

52 Item for 95 Illinois cry 37 Down of surprise? 53 Live on 97 Sampras lettuce and Rafter 55 Coasted 98 Weeding 57 Texas cry of tool sympathy? 100 Duration 58 Feel 102 Chemical wretched suffix 59 Writer Rand 103 Buy off 60 Second 106 See Triumvirate 129 Across member 108 Orient 62 EMTs skill 112 Uproar 64 Everything 113 Mr. Diamond 65 Dickens 114 Least character liberal 66 Yak 119 Gravel69 Pennsyl voiced vaniacryof 120 Thailand, disgust? atsgu formerly 73 — MAoines, c 121 Michigan IA cry of 74 He'll bend chagrin? over 122 Senator backward Kefauver for you 123 Cultural grp. 76 Grazing 124 Nautical ground adverb 77 Permit 125 Concluded 78 Witch 126 Hackneyed doctor 127 Big man on 79 Hoopsters' campus org. 128 Cunning 80 Exec's 129 With 106 deg. Across, legendary 82 Utah cry of drummer revulsion? 88 Chihuahua dough DOWN 89 Chihuahua 1 Home or snack Oliri 91 ItaljanporK 2 "He's -r92 Dwell * • . Picker ('14 93 "Scat!" song)

SEVE]

3 German valley 4 Church areas 5 Fit to feast on 6 Barbie or Ken 7 Unemployed 8 Sock part 9 "Le Misanthrope" playwright 10 Minneapolis suburb 11 Helped 12 Composer Delibes 13 Massachusetts cry of contempt? 14 Author Jong 15 Symbol 16 Forebodings 17 "Boss" Tweed's nemesis 19 What you used to be 24 Actor Kilmer 28 Baby basset 29 Egyptian viper 31 Playwright Fugard 33 Taj town 34 Sleuth Nancy 35 Kids connect them 37 Jockey giant 38 Darjeeling dress

39 Revolution- 87 Hawaii's ary Guevara state bird 41 Drollery 90 Veneration 42 Psychic 91 Freeway Geller sounds 43 Inclination 94 Idaho cry of 45 Tennyson excitement? tale 96 Jack of "The 46 — rummy Odd 48 About Couple" 49 Bank 99 Poetic deposit? preposition 50 Burn a bit 101 "Hiroshima" 54 Quiet author 56 Colors 103 Good 59 Maugham's time "Cakes 104 Dreadand — " locked one 61 Pro-gun grp. 105 Set in 63 Saucepan motion 64 Drillers' org. 106 Kevin of "In 65 TV's & Out" "Murder, — 107 Range Wrote" rope 66 Huff and 109 Actress puff Meyers 67 Feels sore 110 Seafood 68 Impertinent selection 69 Cops' org. 111 Accent 70 — grease feature 71 Indeed 112 Mus. 72 Grievance directive 75 "Typee" 114 — c o n sequel tendere 79 Sgt. or cpl. 115 Summit 80 — Carta 116 "The Never81 Improve Ending oneself, in a Story" way author 83 Turn right 117 WWII gun 84 DDE's 118 T h e — I s predecessor High" ('80 85 Tiny coin hit) 86 Genesis 120 Crestfallen setting 121 Lummox

day


r

to respond to a personal ad call I-900-370-7127

• ®• * «

• « ¥ § • • • « #

we're open 24 hours a day! $1.99 a minute, must be 18+.

p m guidelines: A n y o n e

seeking a | healthy, non-abusive relationship may advertise in • • T O PERSON. Ad suggestions: age ran "s, • lifestyle, self-description. Abbreviations may be used to indicate • I g e n d e r , race, religion and sexual preference. SEVEN DAYS reserves t h e | right to edit or reject any advertisement. Personal ads may be submitted for publication only by, and seeking, persons over 18 years of age. •

IF YOU WANT ROMANTIC, SINCERE AND FUN. take a SWPM, 42, ND/NA, fit active ISO feminine fun S/D/Ma(?)F. I have a place just for you in my heart. LTR. 1406 IRISH M, 20, SEEKS A PSYCHO F, 18-24, FOR a psycho relationship. 1409 18, WILD BUT TAME LOOKING FOR S A M E SWF, NS, 18-24, for close, loving relationship. Must love sex. 1413 TALL, DARK AND MAYBE HANDSOME DWM, 40, built well, can be dressed up, ISO confidant lover/best friend. Should be slim, 2545, D/SF. Possible white-picket fence. 1414

_

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I CAN GO FROM BOARD MEETINGS TO BINGO halls, B.B. King to Dixie Chicks, and silk to denim. Can you? DWF, 49, seeks SWM, NS. 1247 EVOLVING HIPSTER WITH LOTS OF INTEGRITY, spark and passions seeking fun, love & hormony in the woods, at the ocean, over food & watching films. Ages 37-53. Work.

1255 SPF, 24, SEEKS ATTRACTIVE, FIT PM, 24-30. Can't live with mother, and have own vehicle! Must love the outdoors, good beer and music. Must like children. 1148 HI, I'M A 32 YO, SBF LOOKING FOR A SENSItive, loving man who is family-oriented, wants to settle down and spirit-filled. Please, all serious inquiries only. Can't wait to hear from you! 1149 A PACKAGE DEAL: SWPF, 32, 5'2", W/ SENSE of humor, wishes to meet a SWM, 29-39, to share romance, candle-light dinners, movies, travel and dance. 1191

III, fJJjl »77,

Aookinq mm

CALL THIS BEAUTIFUL SWPF, 38. ISO REAL man. Sweep me off my feet. 1395 SNOW PRINCESS, 20-SOMETHING, SEEKS cohort for winter's outdoor and indoor activities. 1407 YOUNG 40, FIT, ATTRACTIVE DWPF. Together, secure; looking for same. 1396 ICONOCLASTIC PARFAIT BEAUTY, SWF, 47, seeks tall, gorgeous, fun SWM for mischievous repartee, langorous lingerings, effete cultural interludes. Be brave. 1398 DWP, 39, POET, SEEKS PARTNER FOR sharing present moments to LTR. Spirituality, sensuality, sensitivity and evolution a must. Long walks and talks and exploration, inner and outer. 60 sweetly deep. 1323

IVORY GIRL, 34, WITH GREEN-EYED GAMINE charm seeks partner for life's simple joys and adventures. I'm the oudoorsy, bookish sort, are you? Letters welcome. 1201

Afxkuiqwamsun SWM, 37, SEEKS ATTRACTIVE, STARRY-EYED dream interpreter. I'm not a Bud drinker who likes to shoot animals, nor do I drive a pickup. Enough said? 1392 ARE WE COMPATIBLE? DWM, young 37, smoker, good looks/build, seeks a slender woman, 32-40, who enjoys the sun, camping, rock music, dancing, nights out, quiet intimate time. Much more. Call. 1394

MY BEAUTIFUL FRIEND SARA NEEDS A DATE! 24 YO blonde enjoys snowboarding, music, white Russians. ISO SPM, fit and attractive with similar interests. Haevy drinkers encouraged to respond! 1359 EXTRA, EXTRA, READ ALL ABOUT IT. Wanted: young man, single and free. Experienced in love preferred, but will accept a young trainee. 1268 DWF, 45, ATTRACTIVE, ECLECTIC, WHIMSICAL, yet down-to-earth. Enjoys books, travel, X-country skiing. Seeks creative, affectionate M, 45+, NS, to share Sunday papers, fine wine, long walks and laughter. 1308 LONG-LAYERED LANDSCAPE INSPIRES ME TO kayak, camp, bike, drive, photograph and paint. I'd love a good-natured, perceptive, appreciative, middle-aged companion in my search for aesthetics, synchronicity & communion with nature. Active DWPNSF. 1317 ATTRACTIVE, INTELLIGENT, ACTIVE DWPF, 31, mother of 2, ISO sensitive, down-to-earth, honest, gentle, attractive D/SPM, 28-40, with similar likes/lifestyle to share good conversation & candle-light dinners. 1203 SWF, 36, NS, ND, PHYSICALLY FIT, CRAFTS person, musician, dancer, loves gardening, lively conversation over a healthy homecooked meal. ISO articulate, honest, 32-42, hard-working, with similar interest. 1243

1312 SEEKING ADVENTUROUS PARTNER. DWM, 40s, 5'9", 150 lbs., appealing, engaging, sexy, youthful, open-minded, proportionate. Love to travel, laugh and create new possibilities. Into sunsets, photography, movies, love and whatever. 1260 ROMANTIC SWPM, FUNNY, LOVING, FIT, enjoys dancing, biking, dining out, good conversation, walking, love letters. Seeking active, fit F, 35-45 to share same and lots more. 1320 WHEREFORE ART THOU? SM, 42, fit, educated, sense of humor, seeks romance, passion, someone to confide in. Enjoy rock and blues, outdoors, movies, travel, time together. 1322 SM, 20. OUTGOING. FRESH, WITTY, LIKES TO party, honest, sincere, ISO SWF, 18-22, for quality times, partying, sex and fun. 1325 M, 42, LONG HAIR, BLUE, S'IO", 170 LBS., looking for women who enjoy outdoors, quiet bars, 4-wheel drive and making love while looking me in the eye. Mad River Valley. 1331 SLIGHTLY USED M ISO BEST FRIEND. WIT, humor, dining, dancing, exercise, water skiing, music, bicycle. Fixer-uppers encouraged to call. I'm 41 and 5*9". 1356 A MOST KIND AND TENDER MAN! Tall, educated, athletic, humorous SWM seeks attractive, articulate and unassuming SWF, 35-43, NS, to share warmth, whimsy and wisdom. 1361

ABSOLUTELY AVERAGE IN APPEARANCE, physique, intelligence, humor and all else. Emotionally & financially comfortable SWPM, 43, ISO SWF for dinner, noontime coffee rendezvous, movie, conversation. 1312 SWM WHO IS SENSITIVE, KIND, SINCERE, romantic. Looking for SWF, 20-30, who has similar interests, career-minded and gorgeous smile. 1313 IF YOU CAN IMAGINE YOUR IDEAL LOVER AND soulmate, intuit that you might find him here. Kindly consider this in-shape, goodlooking SWPM who seeks a pretty woman, 27-37, for everything. 1316 THE WHOLE LOAF THIS TIME? Creative, handsome, successful, very fit. Simply single, 43, honest, with strong inner voice. Please be authentic, attractive, available, fun and want kid(s) someday. Serious replies only. 1239 TAKE A CHANCE. Genuinely kind DWM, 37, of short stature, likes music, art, positive attitudes, many other interests. ISO open-minded, happy, easy-going, interestingly creative, humorous, petite lady, 27-37, for companionship, fun times, possible LTR. 1240

QUESTIONS? NOTHING TO HIDE DWM, 39, 6', 175 LBS., quiet, smoker, social drinker, decent-looking, independent. You break it, I fix it. What you see is what you get. ISO nice lady. 1397 WANTED: ATTRACTIVE, SLIM, HAPPY, educated, open, honest, passionate mom and recreational athlete, 34-45, ISO similar dad for romance, family, adventure, fun and LTR. Reward: last piece of the puzzle. 1399 KIND SWPM, 36, TEDDYBEAR LOOKING FOR SWPF, 30-38, who is honest and sincere for friendship and quality times; also has a childish and playful side. 1401 GENUINE NICE GUY SEEKING OFFBEAT S/DWF for friend, companion, maybe LTR. Youthful 50s guy who prefers women a few years younger, not as round as tall. I'm 6\ blue eyes, good kisser. 1402

Simply call 800-710-87a<* When prompted, e n t e ^ y o ^ q ^ d | f card #. Use the s e r v ^ l o r a s l o n g as you like. When you hang up, your credit card will be directly billed $1SB per min.

DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT LOVE IS? I'm 33, tall, attractive, professional, high IQ, creative, sincere, relationship-oriented. If you're 25-32, have a life, and do know, let's meet. 12§3 WPCM, 37, LOVER OF UFE AND ITS MANY blessings, seeks companion who is able to see past the M.S. ISO WPCF, 30-40, for friendship, possible LTR. One of the true nice guys... well-educated and good looking, too. You won't be disappointed. 1264

crush

I'M 42 AND A NICE GUY LOOKING FOR someone special. I enjoy dancing, dining, ocean, almost everything. I do treat ladies with a touch of old-fashioned quality. 1245

scope out which

BERT THE CHIMNEY SWEEP SEEKS MARY POPPINS. Affectionate, gentle, creative, clever, witty wizard, 37, ISO graceful, intellectual, magical musician. Bring your umbrella so we can fly away together. 1246

over my lunch. I always

VIRTUAL MAGICIAN LOOKING FOR LOVELY SWF assistant who would be willing to discuss mutual magical fantasies and would be kind-hearted and understanding if an illusion or two goes wrong. 1248

comes by my table, and I

SUPERIOR-QUALITY HUMAN: DWM, 47, humor, music, photography, original thinking, adventurous, fit father, high-spirited, intellectually challenging, quick-witted dullard imperfectly attaining excellence sometimes. Seeking pleasure only soulmate can provide.

SEASONED, SECURE AND DEPENDABLY energetic. Communicative, well-travelled, lean SWPM, 42, is simply single. Intentionally open to kindling that special relationship with earthy, attractive, independent woman of style and substance. 1253 . EDUCATED, FUNNY, CASUAL GUY ISO BRIGHT, beautiful, sexy woman for laughing/dancing, dinners/movies, long conversations, time together, outdoors. I'm 30s, tall, fit, handsome, adventurous, many interests, lots to share. 1142

SWM, 25, ISO F RUNNING MATE, 19-32. I'M 5'u", 157 lbs., hazel eyes, ISO active F who likes to be fit, hikes, likes to talk, cuddle & have lots of fun w/ life in general. 1152

800/710-8727

I've got a major

on a waiter. I 50 to the

JUMP ON MY HOOK. SWM, 24, ISO REAL, responsible, honest, caring SF, 21-30, for life's adventures. I'm casting my line! 1151 in S E V E N D A Y S

Dear Lola,

RETRO COOL: interesting guy, very young 56, artsy, litsy, moderately outdoorsy, sociable, broad cultural interests. ISO attractive, intelligent, kind woman with open and resiliant heart, for friendship, romance, possible LTR. 1241 _ _

PRIOR TO MY HECTIC UFE NOW, I once made time for romance. Now it's time to prioritize all that (back into my life for good). 1251

I With Instant Access y o u can respond to | Person <To> Person a d s 24hrs. a day, i seven days a w e e k from a n y touch i t o n e phone including pay phones and s phones w/ 900 blocks.

SHY SWF, PAGAN, 26, ISO SM, 5*10"+, 28-36, w/ sense of hiifnor. My interests include: Tae Kwon Do, long walks & reading, plus various and sundry others. 1328 " '

SWPF, LATE-30S, INTELLIGENT MIND, CARING soul, attractive, humorous, genuine, emotionally/physically healthy and fun. Seeking someone to grow with and share with in a meaningful, respectful friendship/companionship/relationship. 1330

QUIET, SENSITIVE, NURTURING SPM, 33, physician. Into camping & hiking. Seek younger SF with similar interests/qualities.

INSTANT ACCESS

WARM-HEARTED, LIVELY SPF, 36. SEEKS grown-up who enjoys growing things, building fires, playing outside and dancing to the beat of his own syncopated drum. You can lead...(sometimes). 1326

CAN YOU APPRECIATE? PETITE LADY, 37, W/ good communication skills, hard-working, faithful, emotionally and financially secure, . loves music, fast cars, ocean, mountains, sports, fishing, camping and loving a great man. 1329

LOOKING FOR ROMANCE. SWP, DARK CURLY hair, blue eyes, 5'7", busy and bashful, seeking attractive, positive, spontaneous woman, 25-35, with sense of humor & beautiful smile. Let's talk. 1415

LEAVES FALL & THOUGHTS OF THIS FIFTH decader turn toward a fireplace and snowy walks in the woods with one who considers herself warm, attractive, sensual, open, clear and progressive. 1307

restaurant

where he

works almost every day, he's working, and

SWM, YOUNG-LOOKING 33, INTERESTED IN meeting woman who's secure, preferably older, for companionship, possible LTR. 1199 WSM, 40, LIKES OUTDOORS AND NONmaterialistic women, 30-45. I'm hard-working, brown hair, green eyes, 165 lbs., med.small build and kind-hearted. Single mothers good. 1200

SWM, 39, FAT, BALDING, ALCOHOLIC smoker, enjoys candle-light dinners (no electricity), long walks (no car), travel (hiding from psycho ex's), cuddling (no heat), the arts (Hustler magazine), educated (thru 5th grade). All replies answered. 1265

Or respond t h e old-fashioned way: CALL THE 9 0 0 NUMBER.

Call 1-900-870-7127 $1.99/mfn. must be 18+

linger

make a point of looking him in the eye when he think up little pleasantries to keep him there a little longer. I give him generous

tips, and

leave without

never

flashing

him my friendliest

smile,

thajiking him warmly and saying

good-bye.

Moat people consider attractive,

me

and I'm the

right age for him, but his attitude towards me is consistently

profession-

al. How can I move beyond a business

rela-

tionship with him? — Bedazzled in Burlington

ENGUSH, SHAGABLE STUD SEEKS WOMAN for fun, love and a great time, baby. 5'n", 170 lbs., dark and handsome. 1153 SWM NUDIST LOOKING TO MEET 40ISH F who enjoys people, the sun & outdoors, is open, honest & adventurous, to enjoy life. Minimal baggage—clothing and tan lines optional. 1192

tables

Dear

Bedazzled,

you're going to have to be a little less subtle. If you don't have the nerve to come right cut and tell him what you have in mind, how about slipping him a note the next time you pay your bill? If he respond, start

doesn't bag it and

brown-bagging

your

lunch.

Love,

^D

J j j m

t


dont want a charge on your phone bill? call 1-800-710-8727 and use your credit card. 24 hours a day! $ i . minute, must be 18+. 99 a

li/L'JJ, AQ&kinq

uxumn

GWPM, 38, SEEKS MASCULINE G/Bi MALES in Ctrl. VT for friendship, possibly more. Sports, movies, outdoors and quiet nights at home. NS, casual drinkers preferred. Help me pass the winter. 1412

GF, 23. VEGETARIAN, LOVES ROADTRIPS, exploring, long walks, talks, laughs. You: G 20-31, no games... wants someone who's loving to hold hands with and stumble through life'. 1261

WHERE ARE ALL THE GOOD MEN? BiWM, 46, 5*10", 185 lbs., red hair, clean, discreet, D&D-free, looking for other BiWM, 18-46, D&D-free, for casual relationship. Burl. & Rutland areas. 1321

ME: TALL, DARK, FEMME DYKE. I LOVE KIDS art, spirituality, kitsch, exercise and home. You: playful but mature, gentle femme dyk with similar interests? Then, say hello. 1144

ATTRACTIVE GUY SEEKS SAME: 23, 6', 155 lbs., brown hair, blue eyes, fit. Looking for short- or long-term. Likes outdoors, movies, music. Honesty a plus! 1259

CREATIVE, ADVENTUROUS WRITER LOVES friends, literary fiction, foreign films, jazz, NYC, long walks, other cultures. Hates formula fiction, muzak, suburbia, shopping. Seeks NS lesbian, 50+. No married or part nered women. 1190

GWM, 35, 6 ' i " , 250 LBS., SHAVED HEAD, straight-acting, body hair, goatee. New to Burlington. ISO GWM, 18-30, up to 175 lbs., for fun and possible relationship. Call soon. 1267

NEW TO VT: GWF, 35, NOT INTO BAR SCENE Outdoors type with many interests, ISO GF friends, 32-37. Help mend a broken heart. 1197

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MAX ERNST SEEKS RENE MAGRITTE. I'd like to feel your brush strokes and see if we might not stick together. You bring the paint and I'll bring the glue, and let's make an assemblage. 1366 LONG WINTER COMING. Mature, masculine M seeks companionship with real men interested in travel, conversation, indoor sports, having sense of humor, feel for adventure and curiosity in sensual matters. 1367 BIWM, 50s, 5*9". 220 LBS., MOSTLY TOP, ISO Bi/GMs for daytime fun and adult play. Clean & discreet. Come visit, let's see what happens. Rutland area. Call me. 1400 ALPHABETIZED: BIKE RIDER, BISEXUAL, FILM fan, geek, hacker, liberal (duh), non-smoker, sci-fi nut, twenty-seven Y0, will respond... guarantee. 1404

MaWBi-CURIOUS MALE: ATTRACTIVE, healthy, friendly and sensual. ISO someone similar to help me explore my more feminine side, through role-playing, a little cross-dressing, etc. Friendship would be nice, too. ND. 1303 SUBMISSIVE MALE, 37, SEEKNG KINKY, stinky, ripe and raunchy, "in-charge" kind of guy. Can I please you? 1254 SPIFFY, CUTE, GAY, FIT, SMART (MOST OF the time) professional 20-something seeking similar man for LTR only. Likes include: cooking, exotic travel, reading in bed, and generally being silly. 1146 MASCULINE, LATE-20S, IN SHAPE WM. NOT into: lisps, limp wrists, snappy dressers, or too much hair gel. Just a regular guy seeking same: WM, 25-35, casual, discreet, or whatever. 1196

AWESOME PLEASURE. BiWM SEEKS OTHER Bi or GMs to discover the stimulating and exciting, wonderful world of enemas and adult toys. All races welcome. 1391

: SBIF, 36, INTO OPEN RELATONSHIPS, SEEKS | WBiM or straight for fun and friendship. > Available days, honest and sincere a must. ;

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WCU (F 26, M 29) SEEKING ATTRACTIVE, clean BiFs, 18-29, for some unforgettable nights of pleasure. Discretion assured and expected. 1360

MEN SEEKING MEN

; SWM, 27. GOOD-LOOKING, SEARCHING FOR F ; or Fs, 18-30, good-looking, for erotic encounters. Not looking for a relationship, just : good sex!! 1324

Personal of the Week receives a gift certificate for a FREE Day Hiker's Guide to VT from

MAX ERNST SEEKS RENE MAGRITTE.

ARE YOU LONELY? BETWEEN 21-60? WANT TO meet and see what happens? Cut the tape and meet me at Gallagher's, Sunday night, and let's start something in Waitsfield. 1327 MaWCU, YOUNG, ATTRACTIVE & EAGER TO experience new things. Looking for a male w/ similar qualities, plus a little something extra, to help fulfill fantasies. If you feel that you have that something extra, leave message. ND. 1304

I'd like to feel your brush strokes and see if we might not stick together. You bring the paint and I'll bring the glue, and let's make an assemblage.

BiWM, 5*8", 150 LBS., 45, SEEKS CU w/ BiM for threesome. Must be clean, safe and discreet. 1310 HOUSEBOY TO COMMAND. YOU: HIP, DOMINANT F. "Men are toy things to use." Me: attractive WM, 40, weekend houseboy to use—dishes, cleaning, massage. Let me massage your tired feet, madame. 1314

• The Outdoor Gear Cxchargs • used • closeout • new 191 Bank St., Burlington 860-0190

and a $25 gift certificate to

1366

THE DOG TEAM TAVERN Dog Team Rd., Middlebury 388-7651

WHERE ART THOU, MY TRANSGENDERED goddess? SWM, 38, easy-going and open heart ISO special lady who will share her passion, aspirations and all the joyful gifts of life. Ctrl. VT. 1315 DO I DARE TO EAT A PEACH? SPF, 27, strong, adventurous, reflective and out-spoken ISO edifying fire. Long for intelligent, witty, passionate conversation, perhaps more. Be 2745, M or F, NS. 1256 STRAIGHT SWM, 35, s'9", 160 LBS., HEALTHY & fit, seeking ladies and CUs to warm up these cool evenings, and fulfill fantasies, and become good friends. 1198

10/21, UNCOMMON GROUNDS: If it is indeed you, let my heart gallop free from my breast, and rescue you from this tempest of modern life, for you are the story of a million years.

1365 SWIMMER AT FIRST IN FITNESS, 11/10, 8:30 p.m. You: WWR cap. Me: WWR cap, next lane. Want to swim together sometime? 1364 YOU LOOK EASTERN EUROPEAN, STUNNING, dark hair pulled back, black outfit. I am slim, tall, white sweater, blue jacket. Crossing Church St., our eyes met, your features softened. 11/13. 1403

WPM, 30S, LOOKING FOR Fs, CUs. I'm goodlooking, well-built, discreet, respectful. Looking for talk, coffee, erotic encounters, whatever. Call or write. Not into games. 1416

I'M LOOKING FOR CONTACT WITH "LETTERS Only" #s 622 and 627. Your ads were gone before I could respond, but I'm still very interested. Please contact me. I'm extremely curious. 1393 _____ ADAM, THURSDAY NIGHT, DANCING AT Nectar's, Yankees/Red Sox game, women in the office listen to country. I had fun, did you? 1405

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to respond to a personal ad call

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tag*0eV!iWiMtSlIy?

I-900-370-7127

$1.99 a mlnirte must be 18 or olden

ITS NOT JUST THE BOOTS, BABY. Beth: good hug, happy birthday, Red Square. Wanna read Gray's Anatomy together? Or maybe just go to a movie? M. 1408 ATTENTION TOM, TECHNICIAN AT FLETCHER Allen: I came in 11/7. You held my hand and brought me to CAT scan. Me: dark hair, needed IV. You made me laugh. Interested? 1410

Where else can you find that these days?

JIMTTOO COLD FOR ANOTHER INNING OF baseball, but not too late to get together again. A year is much t o o long! Let's have a rematch. Fireman's friend. 1411

The easiest hack-to-basics personals system ever!

CAT, I WOULD LIKE TO TALK FURTHER, BUT technical difficulties preclude Internet contact. Please call. Bubba. 1318

Now that we have your attention.... We'd like to explain a few of the new features.

ALL SUMMER IN STOWE AND BURUNGTON? 2 blondes, one big silver Bronco, one red tandem kayak right on t o p . Have the 2 beautiful wild ladies found a great time elsewhere?

1358 SWEATRONOME, 11/6: TIED AT WAIST flannel, saw y o u — b l a c k hair and tall with blonde f r i e n d — f e n d off ferocious bar predators. I am not a bar guy. Where can I meet you? 1362

To respond to Letters Only ads:

Seal your response in an envelope, write box # on the outside and place in another envelope with $5 for each response. Address to: PERSON TO PERSON c/o SEVEN DAYS, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402

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RED HEAD, 5 7 " . 140 LBS., SWF, 32, photographer/writer, adventuresome, ultra fit, sharp wit, diabolical sense of humor seeking friendship, fun and winter sports with other high-energy lions, 27-4oish. Box 648 SWF, 52, CANCER/SAGITTARIUS, 5'8", SIZE 18, NS, ND, offbeat, creative, utilitarian, musical, books, museums, concerts, animals, long walks, ticklish, fanciful. Enjoys Bach to rock, dancing. ISO soul mate, tall, sweet, masculine guy. Box 643 SYMPATICO, INTELLIGENT, LEFT-LEANING F, fit for indoors & outdoors, seeks similar, unattached M companion, 40+, for food, film, conversation, serious piffle & possible LTR. No narcissists need apply. Box 639 DWPF, 49, 5'3", 110 LBS, SEEKS ENERGETIC Ms to cruise the tress and moguls with., Leave past lives behind and have some fun with me. You wouldn't normally answer any ad. Go for it! Box 637 COUNTRY WOMAN, INDEPENDENT, WITH varied skills and interests, seeking urban M, 5565, with same for shared travel, adventure and romance. What are you wishing for? Box 6 3 4

2. Your birthdate will be needed only for the 1. You will now he asked to provide your phone purpose of providing you with a personal number FOR VERIFICATION PURPOSES ONLY. This fWx* AFTER-HOURS access code in case you lose u numberisrequiredforustoplaceyourad.lt your box number or security code. It will be will be kept STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL kept STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL All information will be kept strictly confidential

SWPF, 33, 5*2". MO LBS, LONG NATURALblond hair, blue eyes, educated, passionate, w o r k hard/play hard, love animals. Will you hike, bike, Rollerblade, ski, camp, cook, read, talk with me? Send photo. Box 630 SWF, 49, FRISKY, EDUCATED, CONTEMPLATIVE, seeking artist/monk/mountain man. Love Merton, Picasso, dogs. Value intelligence, integrity, compassion, simplicity, zaniness, passion. Box 632 RED WINE, LADYBUGS, DAISIES, OLD MOVIES, walks and good conversation. 5 ' y " , mid-40's SWPF NS. Artistic, wide variety of interests. Intelligent, passionate, financially secure, sense of humor. Seeking similar gentleman for LTR. Box 633 THOUGHTFUL, FIT, WELL-EDUCATED DPF, 49, seeking companion to share hikes, runs, laughter, music, books, ideas. My nest is emptying and it's time t o move on. Box 629 ATTRACTIVE, UPBEAT WIDOW SEEKS gentleman, 55 +, w h o shares love of the arts and nature, for true friendship. Box 619 ARTIST/ACADEMIC SEEKS M, 40 +, W/ fondness for humor, oceans, books, gentle music, conversation, travel, country club activities, gifted children, philanthropy, attractive brunettes. Box 620 FULL-FIGURED SWF, 18, 5 ' i o " , enjoys hanging out, movies, having fun. ISO SWM, 1822, w/ similar interests, honest w/ good sense of humor, for friendship/LTR. Box 624 FULL-FIGURED SWF, 19, 5'2", 210 LBS., enjoys movies, dining out, walks at night, hanging out arid cuddling, ISO friendly, honest, humorous SWM, NS, 18-24, w/ similar interests, for friendship/LTR. Box 625

BEYOND THE REBOUND: PWDF, TALL, 44. ISO tall, thoughtful, happy, smart, engaging, cycling & XC skiing enthusiast for great com panionship while moving forward. 40s, bearded, rugged, Lamoille Co. a +. Box 618

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40 YO SPM IN DENIAL, ATHLETIC, MASTER of repression, self-centered, loner type w / big heart ISO hardy New Englander who loves starlight, chilly nights and contemplating life's sweet beauty. Box 650 MID-LIFE CRISIS LOOMS. KIND, HEALTHY, reasonably attractive SWM, 5 ' 6 " , 155 lbs., craves the rejuvenating attentions o f a compassionate/passionate young F. Box 644 LOOKING FOR LOIS LANE TO ENJOY SUPERMAN adventures. You: F, 25-32, fit, NS, educated, no baggage. Me: 6', 32, 175 lbs., blue eyes. A dream come true... Box 645 SWM, 35, SEEKING FULL-FIGURED & PLUSsize women who like to do fun things. This M will make sure you feel wanted and totaliy pleased. I am for real! Box 646 ACTIVE, PROSPEROUS, WELL-EDUCATED, jewish, intellectual, 50s, trying to meet lighthearted, warm, intelligent, sensual women. I am open to any age or background. Intrinsic, engaging qualities are the heart of the matter. Box 647 v PROFESSIONAL, 31, 5'6", 140 LBS., GOODlooking, athletic, hard-working SWM ISO SWPF w/o children, NS, open-minded, who likes sports, movies, travels and to have fun. For LTR. Box 641

GAELIC MYSTIC: attractive, intelligent, vivacious, compassionate, green-eyed ecowoman sought. Adirondack ecoradicat, SOH, handsome, passionate, steel sculptor, seeks kindred spirit, 37ish, needing wilds, dreams, home, romance, uplifting endeavors. Box 642 LETS REINVENT HAPPY TIMESl 70 YO widower, 5 ' n " , 185 lbs., sense of humor, enjoy life & all worthwhile pursuits. Looking for a lady with similar qualities for friendship. Box 636 TALL, FIT DWM, MID-40S, PRO PHOTOGRAPHER, seeks tall, fit PWF, under 40. & knows who she is, for dates, possible LTR. Prefer Ctrl, or NE VT areas. Box 631 ROMANTIC SWM COLLEGE PROFESSOR interested in travel, photography, astronomy, theater, museums, Trivial Pursuit, more! I'm 51, 5 ' i o " , 245 lbs. Seeking F, 21-50, NS, interested in sharing life's joys. Box 628

Bi-CURIOUS WF, 23, LOOKING FOR SOME fun and frolic. ISo BiF, 20-30, w h o is intelligent, attractive and discreet. Herb friendly. Come play w i t h me. Box 627 GPF CU, 35 & 37. SEEKING GF CU FOR friendship. We dine o u t , play pool/cards, hike, fish, or just sit and chat. Interested? Montpelier area. Box 623

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GMCU LOOKING TO MEET NEW FRIENDS FOR dinners, going out, playing cards and other fun things to do. Both o f us in our 30s. Please write us. Box 615 SLENDER, HEALTHY GWM, 55, SMOKER, bottom w i t h endless libido, seeks t o p w/ same for m o n o g a m o u s , lasting LTR. Write. Tell me a b o u t yourself and I'll respond. Box 612

WELL-EDUCATED, INTELLECTUALLY ACTIVE, entrepreneur, 50s, funny, assumes that most things simultaneously are & are not what they seem. Seeking robust, outspoken but kind partner w h o can tolerate paradox. Any age. All answered. Photo apprec. Box 626

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DWPM, MID-50S, EXCELLENT WORKING condition (phys., emot., finan.), seeking older F, buxom & ravenesque, for occasional gentle, intimate encounters. Note & p h o t o appreciated. Box 6 4 0

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GWF LOOKING FOR SOMEONE IN THEIR MID305 to enjoy life with, because life is t o o short, and it w o u l d be nice to have someone special to share it with. Box 638

SWM, 22, ATTRACTIVE, HORNY, KINKY ISO horny, kinky F, 18-60, w h o likes to wear French-maid uniforms, garter belts, sexy stockings, strap-ons for erotic adult fun. Will answer all. Box 649

CU (F, 22 & M, 30) ISO EROTIC BIF TO pleasure our needs. F, 22 — first time. M/F threesome. Show us the way t o happiness. Any exhibitionist o u t there? Box 635

4 digit box numbers can be contacted either through voice mail or by letter. 3 digit box numbers can only be contacted by letter. Send letter along w/ $5 to PO Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402 LOVE IN CYBERSPACE. POINT YOUR WEB BROWSER TO HTTP://WWW.SEVENDAYSVT.COM TO SUBMIT YOUR MESSAGE ON-LINE. how to place your FREE personal ad with Person to Person

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• FILL OUT THIS FORM AND MAIL IT TO: PERSONALS, P . O . Box 1 1 6 4 , BURLINGTON, V T 0 5 4 0 2 OR FAX TO 8 0 2 . 8 6 5 . 1 0 1 5 . PLEASE CIRCLE APPROPRIATE CATEGORY. YOU WILL RECEIVE YOUR BOX # 8T PASSCODE BY MAIL. DEADLINE: FRIDAYS AT NOON.

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• FIRST 3 0 WORDS ARE F R E E WITH PERSON TO PERSON, ADDITIONAL WORDS ARE $ 2 EACH EXTRA WORD. • FREE RETRIEVAL 2 4 HOURS A DAY THROUGH THE PRIVATE 8 0 0 # . (DETAILS WILL BE MAILED TO YOU WHEN YOU PLACE YOUR AD.) IT'S SAFE, CONFIDENTIAL AND F U N !

How to respond to a personal ad: •CHOOSE YOUR FAVORITE ADS AND NOTE THEIR BOX NUMBERS. •CALL 1 - 9 0 0 - 3 7 0 - 7 1 2 7 FROM A TOUCH-TONE PHONE. 1 - 9 0 0 # BLOCK? CALL 1 - 8 0 0 - 7 1 0 - 8 7 2 7 . FOLLOWING THE VOICE PROMPTS. PUNCH IN THE 4-DIGIT BOX # OF THE AD YOU WISH TO RESPOND TO, OR YOU MAY BROWSE A SPECIFIC CATEGORY.

Confidential Information ( W E N E E D T H I S TO R U N Y O U R A D )

CALLS COST $ 1 . 9 9 PER MINUTE. YOU MUST BE OVER 1 8 YEARS OLD. • ADS IN L E T T E R S O N L Y SECTION (3-DIGIT BOX # ) CAN BE CONTACTED THROUGH THE MAIL. SEAL YOUR RESPONSE IN AN ENVELOPE, WRITE THE BOX # ON THE OUTSIDE AND PLACE IN ANOTHER ENVELOPE WITH $ 5 FOR EACH RESPONSE. ADDRESS TO : PERSONALS, C / O P . O . BOX 1 1 6 4 , BURLINGTON, V T 0 5 4 0 2 .

NAME ADDRESS. STATE.

CITY ZIP

PHONE.

PLEASE, A VALID ADDRESS. A N D PLEASE WRITE CLEARLY.

SPONSIBILITY FOR CLAIMS MADE IN

^ A Y S ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY I ERTISERS ASSUME( C ^ M P L E T E ^ ^ I L I T Y ^ F O R T H E COIJ RESULTING FROM°OR° I ANY REPLY TO A PERSON TO PERSON ADVERTISEM

GUIDELINES:

FREE PERSONAL A O . ARE AVAILABLE FOR PEOPLE

SEEKII

EOIYOR REFUSE ANY ' AOTYOO V

ELATIONSHIPS. ADS

"

SCEKINO

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Two FREE weeks for:

Four FREE weeks for:

* I F A D E X C E E D S 3 Q W O R D S . S E N D $ 2 PER E X T R A W O R D . N T S IS

SOLELY

.O S. T. .3 E8X P8E?N SSEVEN ES

ISEMENT AND VOICE

WOMEN MEN

SEEKING

WOMEN MEN

SEEKING

WOMEN

SEEKING

SEEKING

I SPY '• V JUST FRIENDS , OTHER

MEN WOMEN •

MEN

november 24, 1999

;

CHECK

^ R ^ F ^ ^ P B E F E R

SEVEN DAYS

page 5 5


Christmas Sale EAT Original

Sale Price

Bennington Chip & Dip Set

$32.00

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Set of 3 Votives

$2700

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$13.98

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Family 5 pc. Pasta/Salad Set Holiday Dish Towel Set of 3

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Seven Days, November 24, 1999  
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