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LOCK STOCK

VT stores and sells seized guns

VE RMO NT ’S IN DEPE NDEN T VO ICE OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019 VOL.25 NO.06 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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Lighting the Way Burlington maker Steve Conant keeps evolving his business — and the South End BY KEN PICARD, PAGE 28

CREEP SHOWS

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Two frightful local podcasts

SPIRIT MOVES

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On the case with paranormal PIs

MARKET TRENDS

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How farmers fared on BTV’s Pine Street


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW OCTOBER 23-30, 2019 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO COURTESY OF CITY OF BURLINGTON

GHOULISH BEHAVIOR

Unidentified attendees at a Haunted Rail Trail event in Danville attacked several volunteer actors. Be careful out there...

HOOP DREAMS

DOWNSIZED T

he developers behind the long-stalled CityPlace Burlington project unveiled on Monday a redesigned concept for the downtown pit that was once home to a mall. Gone are the soaring 14-story structures originally proposed — and approved. In their place would be two towers: One, on the Cherry Street side of the downtown parcel, would rise 10 stories and hold 280 to 300 apartments — the same as the original proposal. Twenty percent would be “affordable,” as required by Burlington’s inclusionary zoning ordinance. A 175-room hotel of similar height would occupy the Bank Street side of the property. Retail space would fill the first floor of each building. The new plans would also incorporate the former Macy’s building, which would house retail, commercial and office space. The remnants of the Burlington Town Center mall, which fronts Church Street and extends west, would remain intact. Presenting at a Burlington City Council meeting, executives from Brookfield Asset Management pledged to start construction next year. “What you’ve laid out tonight represents the poten-

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tial of achieving all the major goals the city laid out as we sat down to this process years ago,” Mayor Miro Weinberger said, listing housing and job creation among the benefits. “This represents a step in the right direction toward fixing a part of the downtown that has long been problematic, but we certainly [have] a long way to go,” he added. The update was the most substantial in months and came after Weinberger demanded that the developer provide some insight into the long-delayed project. Back in 2016, minority project partner Don Sinex said CityPlace would be open by January 2019. He demolished the former mall in 2017, but little has happened at the site since. City councilors welcomed Brookfield’s plans, saying the heights of the proposed structures are more to scale with Burlington’s downtown — a major sticking point with opponents of the project. Councilor Max Tracy (P-Ward 2) thanked Brookfield for the update but said the developer has much to do to restore public trust. Listening to residents’ concerns about the new version is “crucial,” Tracy said. Read Courtney Lamdin’s full story and keep up with developments at sevendaysvt.com.

PAY NAY

A national payroll snafu tied up paychecks for workers at more than 200 Vermont companies. For some, that made for a rough weekend…

JET SET

A contingent from Madison, Wis., a city that could get its own F-35s, visited Burlington to hear about the impact of the planes here. Earmuffs, anyone?

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “After 25 Years, Burlington’s Uncommon Grounds to Close” by Sally Pollak. The Church Street coffee shop will shutter its doors by the end of the year. 2. “Foreskin House for Sale: Burlington Landmark Hits the Market” by Molly Walsh. The Colchester Avenue home that doubles as an anti-circumcision billboard is listed at $325,000. 3. “Uncommon Grounds Manager to Open Café and Bakery in Essex” by Sally Pollak. Maya Crowley will open a coffee shop next spring in the space formerly occupied by Under Armour. 4. “Dealer.com Lays Off Several Employees at Burlington Campus” by Courtney Lamdin. The company said the job cuts eliminated “fewer than 15” workers in Burlington. 5. “Rock On: Essex Woman Belts Out Jethro Tull Tune to Protest Merger” by Sasha Goldstein. Irene Wrenner adapted the lyrics to “Locomotive Breath” to weigh in on proposals to merge Essex and Essex Junction governmental departments.

tweet of the week @MaireadCOReilly Why of course I’ll have a large piece of leftover unicorn birthday cake for my second breakfast. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

DEEP CUTS S

COURTESY OF PHILLIP PETERSON

UVM retired the uniform numbers of men’s basketball greats Taylor Coppenrath and T.J. Sorrentine. A slam dunk.

That’s the percentage of Vermont children who are obese, according to a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation report — the highest rate in New England.

Sarah Bangs and Padric Hartnett competing in the carving contest

ome folks really went all in this Halloween. Twenty-two divers gathered over the weekend at Perkins Pier in Burlington to jump into Lake Champlain and carve a pumpkin — underwater. Donning wetsuits and oxygen tanks, the competitors headed into the depths with hollowed-out gourds and came up with their spookiest creations. The only rule? Stay submerged the whole time. Past winner Kacey Clougher described the struggle. “The hardest part, I found, was being able to keep myself in a stable position to cut straight lines,” said Clougher, an employee at the Waterfront Diving Center, which hosts the annual event. “The trick is to put a weight in it so it stays down, because a hollow pumpkin will float.” Clougher didn’t participate in this year’s edition but instead stayed on land to judge the contest. Though 22 divers participated, there were only nine jack-o’-lantern

entries; each carver had a “buddy” diver or two for safety, Clougher said. The groups were allowed to dive to a maximum depth of 12 feet in the 52-degree water and use any carving equipment they wanted. University of Vermont students Connor Stack and Laurel Taylor took home the top prize with a carving of a fish. Each won two free charter dive trips out to a shipwreck of their choice in Lake Champlain. The event, which has been held annually for at least 15 years, raised more than $1,000 for cystic fibrosis research. Both daughters of Waterfront Diving co-owner Jonathan Eddy have the lung disease, according to Clougher. The Halloween competition is just one of several offseason Waterfront Diving events. After a New Year’s Day dive, the one in February requires a chain saw to cut a hole in the ice. Not recommended for pumpkin carving. SASHA GOLDSTEIN SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

MURAL COINCIDENCE

[Re “American Vandal”; “A Greta Thunberg Mural Is Defaced and Rebooted in Rutland,” October 23]: I couldn’t help but notice the strikingly similar mind-set and tactics shared by Burlington mural vandal Eric Maier and the unknown perpetrator who vandalized the Greta Thunberg mural in Rutland. At first glance, Maier, a self-described leftist, and the Rutland vandal, who is likely a right-leaning climate change denier, appear to be political polar opposites. However, they share a common belief: that, as the self-appointed art police, they have the right to deface artwork they find objectionable in our communities. Self-righteous persons such as Maier and the Thunberg mural vandal, who both resorted to criminal activity in order to destroy and thereby censor public art, pose a danger to an open-minded society. Doug Kallen

JERICHO

IN DEFENSE OF ACTIVISTS

As a proud fellow political prankster described in Dan Bolles’ commendable and desperately needed “American Vandal” article [October 23], I’d first like to express unconditional solidarity with Eric Maier’s act and its underlying motivation. There are always people eager to tell activists that they go too far too fast. I’m sure Boston’s Sam Adams heard the same advice from “supporters.” Does anyone remember their names? More importantly, what Bolles did was challenge thousands of Vermonters, particularly Burlingtonians, to consider the politics of whose narrative should dominate the public square. His article clearly laid out the pay-to-play intersectionality of racism and capitalism behind “Everyone Loves a Parade!” and the unending efforts of Mayor Miro Weinberger’s administration to protect a white supremacist arrangement that put

CORRECTION

Last week’s cover story, “American Vandal,” incorrectly described Eric Maier’s status at the Community Justice Center. While Maier’s CJC contract has been created and signed, he has yet to complete it, so his case remains open.


WEEK IN REVIEW

TIM NEWCOMB

corporate advertising expenditures over human decency on Church Street. The only anti-racist thing to do is remove the shameful mural now and not in 2022. Albert Petrarca

BURLINGTON

‘DISPLAY OF INTOLERANCE’

[Re “American Vandal,” October 23]: Must say, Seven Days, you have our attention! The irony of musical artist Eric Maier not accepting the artwork of another to the point of destroying that artwork?! Allowing his own political interpretation of the “Parade” mural to prevent others from seeing and interpreting it for themselves?! What’s next? Join Maier in an evening of book burning? Or how about a trip to the Louvre or the Smithsonian, where he can choose which art is acceptable and which should be destroyed for future generations? The “Parade” mural was meant to be a historical celebration timeline of sorts, illustrated with local pols and celebrities, with no intent to misrepresent our local history. There was never any racial or otherwise evil intent. I would think fellow artists and the general public should remain outraged by Maier’s display of intolerance. Robert Devost

JERICHO

TWO SIDES, TWO MUNICIPALITIES

I’m writing about your article last week about Irene Wrenner’s performance at our recent selectboard meeting [802Much: “Crazy Train,” October 23].

While it’s definitely fun to point out the creative ways people participate in local government, I think your article was one-sided. You probably could tell from your conversation with Wrenner that the subject of a merger in Essex has a long and contentious history. I would like to invite you to explore the matter further and consider that Wrenner’s performance reflects only one perspective. There are many others. The fact that your article does not include commentary from either municipal staff or elected officials is concerning. The next 12 months in Essex will see a robust public process as we begin to develop a merger plan and a new charter. It would be really good material for Seven Days to cover. Your paper’s reporting on local politics is very good but tends to focus on Burlington and the legislature. I think gaining a deeper understanding of what’s happening in Essex would be of interest to your readers. Elaine Haney

been strongly opposed for 20 years. We need to take real action on what is now a climate crisis. Burning local wood at the McNeil Generating Station is very different from shipping U.S. wood to Europe. The plant may not be perfect, but it gets biomass from within 60 miles. One hundred percent of the $10 million goes back into the local economy. Burning oil or gas to make power sends $7.8 million out of the state. Most of it goes to other countries. The carbon cycle for wood is very short. It is called renewable because it regrows. Even if we want to avoid quibbling and say it takes 100 years to grow, that is still better than digging half-billion-year-old fossil fuels out of the ground, which will never regrow and never recapture the carbon released. Remember that in a mature forest there are old trees that fall and rot. They release their carbon without producing any power. Reduce coal, oil, gasoline and gas use. Make McNeil more efficient with district heat. Buy electric cars. Create electricity from regrowable Vermont wood. Save the oil for lubrication. Bill Calfee

BURLINGTON

FOREST ECONOMICS

“Carbon Quandary” [October 9] looks at the varying opinions on forest carbon storage and sequestration. Forest, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Mike Snyder does a great job explaining the broader issues. What is missed or unrecognized by University of Vermont researchers and the anti-biomass advocates is that human socioeconomic systems are the biggest influence on forests. The best way to maximize forest carbon storage and sequestration is to have lots of forests. We are lucky to have a heavily forested state. Vermont forests are 85 percent privately owned, and Vermont has very high land taxation. Successful

ESSEX JUNCTION

Haney is chair of the Essex Selectboard.

FEEDBACK

» P.19

SAY SOMETHING! CLIMATE TO-DO

[Re “Carbon Quandary,” October 9]: The term “climate change” was coined in 1956 and has been on my mind since the 1970s. I grew up burning wood. It is still very inexpensive, low-carbon heat, especially now with the new advanced wood heaters. We all want electricity to power our society, and we have to choose the source. Wind and solar could have been built to supply Vermont with power, but they have

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Benefitting Feeding Chittenden

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Friday, February 21

SHELBURNE VINEYARD oS F pu ria A i e Ty iD tr ts aS la se H lli el F e na mu aB e s o lb b lB yr ra e m eM P e tt na uL a i C d e s'e P k 'azi h e T a s se ba eg H se el aC mo ef me a ed itW h oL ev

Thursday & Friday, November 7 & 8

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

fresh

OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019 VOL.25 NO.06 32

12

NEWS & POLITICS 12

Sow Much Hemp

A large harvest prompts fears of oversupply

ARTS NEWS 22

BY KEVIN MCCALLUM

12

Threat-Detection Company Social Sentinel Lays Off 19 Employees

BY AMY LILLY

23

BY KEVIN MCCALLUM

13

Government Gun Shop

24

BY PAUL HEINTZ

Media Note: Seven Days Hires Colin Flanders, Discontinues Political Column

FEATURES 28

Montréal by Vélo

Vermont officials take a two-wheeled “learning journey” in Québec BY COURTNEY LAMDIN

17

Quick Lit: Heads or Tails BY CHELSEA EDGAR

BY PAUL HEINTZ

16

Cold Comfort: Howard Coffin Talks About the Year Vermonters ‘Froze to Death’ BY DAN BOLLES

How the State of Vermont became a firearms dealer

14

Mozart Meets The Princess Bride in Youth Opera Workshop Concerts

Lawyer and Farmer John Klar to Challenge Phil Scott From the Right BY KEVIN MCCALLUM

35

38

Culture: Two teams of Vermonters create creepy podcasts BY DAN BOLLES & MARGARET GRAYSON

Anomaly Detected

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

Halloween: Vermont paranormal investigators bust your ghost assumptions

26 27 41 67 71 80 89

Serving Shakespeare

Theater review: Much Ado About Nothing (*at Dinner), Middlebury Actors Workshop

40

Radical Ramen

11 20 40 46 61 66 74 80 84 88 C1

To Market, To Market

Food: Burlington Farmers Market vendors assess their first year on Pine Street BY JORDAN BARRY

66

He’s Got Rhythm

Music: Ben Patton’s latest album, Our Follies, is a pop-jazz throwback

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Food + Drink Calendar Classes Music + Nightlife Art Movies Fun Stuff Personals Classifieds + Puzzles

74

Rock of Places

reg. $8.99 lb

2.99

lb

Art: A new public sculpture by Sean Hunter Williams honors diversity in Barre’s stone-cutting community

reg. $4.99 lb

GOLDEN RUSSET FARM

Organic Locally Grown Shallots

Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast

Online Thursday

LOCK STOCK

VT stores and sells seized guns

COURTESY OF SEAN HENNESSY

Stuck in Vermont: Artists Niki Frankenstein and Jim DuVal share an unusual abode whose pieces seem to be Frankensteined together. The weekend before Halloween, they offered the Stuck crew a tour.

VER MON T ’S I N DEPEN DEN T VOI CE OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019 VOL.25 NO.06 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PAGE 13

Underwritten by:

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lb

BY JORDAN ADAMS

BY SUSAN LARSON

VIDEO SERIES

available while supplies last

SECTIONS

Food: A noodle bar opens in the Mad River Valley BY SALLY POLLAK

44

OCT 30 - NOV 12

Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Movie Reviews Ask the Reverend ADVICE

BY ALEX BROWN

Lighting the Way

Tales From the Script

40

BY MEGAN FULWILER

Business: Burlington maker Steve Conant keeps evolving his business – and the South End BY KEN PICARD

32

35

Lighting the Way

1

Save $

reg. $7.49 (Veg) reg. $8.49 (Beef)

Burlington maker Steve Conant keeps evolving his business — and the South End

SHERPA FOODS

Vegetable & Beef Momos 9.5 oz

BY KEN PICARD, PAGE 28

CREEP SHOWS

PAGE 32

Two frightful local podcasts

SPIRIT MOVES

PAGE 35

On the case with paranormal PIs

COVER IMAGE LUKE AWTRY COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

MARKET TRENDS

PAGE 44

How farmers fared on BTV’s Pine Street

Downtown

South End

82 S. Winooski Ave 207 Flynn Ave Open 7am - 11pm daily Open 7am - 9pm daily

www.citymarket.coop SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019 Untitled-7 1

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Independent, Assisted & Memory Care Living 10

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LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK

FRIDAY 1-SUNDAY 3

The Beat Goes On Burlington-based Jeh Kulu Dance and Drum Theater’s annual Dance & Drum Festival marks a major milestone this year by turning 25. Movers and shakers get into the groove with dance and percussion classes led by master teachers from Guinea and Senegal at Burlington City Hall Auditorium. Not rhythmically inclined? Members of the public are welcome to observe classes and browse an African marketplace. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 50

COMPI L E D BY K RI ST E N RAVIN

SATURDAY 2

Get the Goods ’Tis the season for preholiday bazaars. Franklin County shoppers get a jump on gift buying at the Fall Craft Show held at St. Albans City Hall. More than 40 vendors offer everything from jewelry to knit items to maple goodies at this benefit for the Relay for Life of Franklin County Wellness Warriors team and the American Cancer Society in Vermont. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 51

SATURDAY 2

A Song Comin’ On The September release of the biopic Judy starring Renée Zellweger as Judy Garland has sparked a renewed interest in the late cinema legend. Plattsburgh, N.Y., movie buffs get on board with a screening of I Could Go On Singing, Garland’s final film, released in 1963, in which she plays a singer struggling to mend a family relationship. See it on reel-to-reel 16mm film at the Newman Center. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

FRIDAY 1

OLD FASHIONED WITH A TWIST Liz Simmons, Flynn Cohen and Lissa Schneckenburger are Low Lily, the two-time New England Music Awardnominated, Brattleboro-based folk trio. Ahead of the release of the band’s 2015 self-titled EP, PopMatters touted the group’s “incredible knack for putting a little pop twist on a traditional folk/Americana sound.” Low Lily serenade fans at Town Hall Theater in Middlebury.

FRIDAY 1

Singing for Supper The first Farm Aid concert was held in 1985 as a benefit for United States family farmers. Inspired by the annual bash, Salvation Farms Aid crops up at Burlington’s ArtsRiot to raise funds for Vermont nonprofit Salvation Farms. The concert features local musicians covering the music of past Farm Aid performers — think Marie Claire singing Bonnie Raitt and the Bill Mullins Band doing the Kinks. SEE CLUB DATE ON PAGE 70

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 51

THURSDAY 31

© GORANJAKUS | DREAMSTIME.COM

Under Your Spell Two sisters from a magical family resurrect a dead boyfriend. What could possibly go wrong? Nicole Kidman and Sandra Bullock portray sibling witches in Practical Magic, a fantastical 1998 film shown on Halloween at the Woodstock Town Hall Theater. A costume party with eats, drinks and prizes primes viewers for the spooky-but-funny feature. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

WEDNESDAY 30-SATURDAY 2

Rock On Sean Hunter Williams knows stone. On his website, the second-generation Barre-based stone carver shares photos of his creations, including a praying Madonna marble relief carving and a multiton granite grizzly head. In addition to showing work in “Rock Solid XIX,” Studio Place Arts’ annual showcase of stone sculptures and assemblages, Williams shares “Culmination,” a new public granite sculpture in downtown Barre. SEE STORY ON PAGE 74

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11


news

MORE INSIDE

NEW FACE AT SEVEN DAYS PAGE 14

BUSINESS

MONTRÉAL IS FOR BIKERS PAGE 16

Threat-Detection Company Social Sentinel Lays Off 19 Employees

A GOP CANDIDATE RUNS FOR GOV PAGE 17

AGRICULTURE

B Y K EV IN M C C A LLU M

Burlington-based Social Sentinel, which alerts school districts to potentially threatening public social media posts, laid off 19 people this week, shrinking from 45 employees to 26. The company said 12 people lost jobs based in Burlington, while seven remote workers were let go. The cuts affected 42 percent of the workforce. The company had been growing fast in the wake of the epidemic of school shootings around the country. But now it says it needs to shift to other markets, and the layoffs are necessary while that transition takes place. It characterized the cutbacks as temporary.

Steve Querrey hanging trimmed hemp to dry

Sow Much Hemp A large harvest prompts fears of oversupply

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ast week, Sam Markowski pulled his pickup truck into a field where he once planted 10 acres of feed corn. Instead of neat rows of corn stalks, however, thousands of dark green hemp plants dotted the landscape. Markowski, wearing a fleece and a baseball cap bearing the name of his family’s excavation company, threaded his way through the pungent plants toward a lone worker in the distance, framed by hills of fading fall foliage. Chris Teitsma gently squeezed the flower-laden stalk top of a hemp plant, known as the cola, and explained how he knew the time for harvesting had arrived. “You want them fat and firm like this,” Teitsma said, showing off the crop. “The flowers are really dense and packed in there.” Teitsma said the buds should fetch top dollar — perhaps hundreds per pound — as the ingredient for organic hemp cigarettes, a product people smoke to get their fix of cannabidiol, or CBD. He snipped off the cola with his pruning shears, held it up in the sun for one 12

S T ORY & PH OT OS BY KE V I N M C C AL L U M

last look, then laid it gently in a plastic bin before continuing down the row. A few miles away, at the family farm in Florence where Markowski grew up, a higher-volume mechanized harvest operation was well under way. Mike Markowski, Sam’s nephew, drove a John Deere tractor hauling a load of freshly cut hemp plants toward a processing area. Workers fed plants by the ton through a custom-made de-stemming machine. The contraption’s rotating tubes sliced the branches from the fibrous stalks and spit them onto a table. Workers yanked the branches through special V-shaped channels, removing the leaves and flowers. This was the biomass from which CBD and other products would later be extracted. The harvest at Sam Markowski’s farm reflects the fast-growing, diverse and increasingly risky hemp industry statewide. Stung last year by a problematic hemp crop he couldn’t sell, Markowski, 65, doubled down this year, increasing his acreage to 90. That’s a respectable

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

size by Vermont standards but small-fry compared to industrial-scale growers in places such as Colorado and Montana. Even as he’s trying to perfect harvesting hemp for CBD, Markowski is striking partnerships he hopes will help develop the hemp products of the future. “Up until this point, we have just been sinking money into this thing,” Markowski said. “People come and see what we’re doing and say, ‘You’re ahead of the curve,’ but it doesn’t feel that way sometimes.”

MARBLE, MILK AND CBD

Like many Vermonters, Markowski understands that making a living in rural areas often requires diversification. His grandfather, a Polish immigrant who came to the United States a century ago, quarried marble around Pittsford, milked cows on the family’s Florence dairy and cut timber off the surrounding hills. SOW MUCH HEMP

» P.14

“While the education industry has been our top priority, we believe that a focus on other markets will both create more opportunities for public safety and mental wellness support, and also help position Social Sentinel for future growth,” the company said in a statement. “As we reposition ourselves internally, we are scaling back our team in order to scale up.” Spokesperson Alison Miley provided the statement but declined to offer additional details about the changes. Company offices in the South End Innovation Center were dark shortly after 4 p.m. Tuesday. Founded in 2014 by Gary Margolis, the former chief of the University of Vermont police, the company just last year was touting its growth rate and prospects. In an October 2018 press release about the hiring of Rick Gibbs, the former CEO of Dealer.com, as its new president, Social Sentinel claimed “triple-digit” growth and an 80 percent increase in staffing in 2018. At the time, it was predicting it would double in size in 2019. Social Sentinel’s algorithms scan social media platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, to identify phrases by users that could indicate a threat, such as “kill” or “shoot.”  Contact: kevin@sevendaysvt.com

MATTHEW THORSEN

Gary Margolis in 2018


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A handgun in state storage

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hris Cole is used to hocking trucks, fuel pumps, filing cabinets and office chairs. As commissioner of the Vermont Department of Buildings and General Services, he’s responsible for selling off the state’s surplus property. “We’re the Kmart for state government,” Cole said. These days, he has a new line of products on his shelves: hundreds of seized and abandoned firearms. Among them are two particularly unusual items: World War II-era rifles bearing the Nazis’ Reichsadler emblem — an eagle clutching a swastika in its talons. For decades, these and other guns piled up in police evidence rooms around the state, with no clear process for their disposal. Some of the weapons had been used in the commission of a crime, while others were temporarily confiscated and never reclaimed. A new law signed in April 2018 empowered Cole’s department to take possession of the firearms and tasked him with selling them. “This is surplus property, but it’s surplus property that is a little bit unusual for us,” Cole said last week as he showed off a drab, windowless room retrofitted to store the weapons. The room’s location is a secret to all but a few state employees. Cole agreed to show it to this Seven Days reporter on the condition that he not reveal its whereabouts — even to his editors. The

The Nazi Reichsadler emblem on a rifle that the state is selling

commissioner initially suggested that a blindfold might be in order. There’s not much to see. The room’s concrete walls are lined with metal shelves and wooden gun racks. Each weapon is labeled with a white tag bearing its serial number and has been disabled with an orange zip tie. Two authorized state employees must be present to enter the room, which is secured by combination and key locks, an alarm system, and video surveillance. Though Cole has taken every precaution to keep the weapons from walking away, he’s not too concerned that thieves would target his merchandise. “They’re not worth anything, really,” he said, noting that most 25-gun lots have been selling for just $3,000. “Some are good, some not so good. So [buyers] are rolling the dice.” GOVERNMENT GUN SHOP

» P.18

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news MEDIA

Media Note: Seven Days Hires Colin Flanders, Discontinues Political Column BY PAUL H E I N TZ

Seven Days has hired Vermont journalist Colin Flanders to join its state government and politics team. Flanders, a 2015 graduate of Saint Michael’s College, spent four years covering Chittenden County for the Essex Reporter, Colchester Sun and Milton Independent. Last year, he helped uncover an embezzlement scheme at a Milton youth football program, resulting in the arrest of the nonprofit’s president. The series earned him and cowriter Courtney Lamdin — also now a Seven Days staff writer — a first-place award in investigative reporting from the New England Newspaper & Press Association. According to Seven Days news editor Matthew Roy, Flanders is “a talented, ambitious journalist who has been punching above his weight” at the Chittenden County weeklies. Flanders said he’s eager to join what he called “the best newsroom in the state” and, in particular, to cover the Vermont Statehouse. “Where else are more things going on?” he said. “I’m hoping to tell the biggest stories of the day, but also to tell stories that nobody’s talking about and really shed light on what’s happening in Montpelier.” Flanders replaces former Fair Game columnist John Walters, who left the newspaper in August. Seven Days has published a weekly political column since it was founded in 1995, first with the late Peter Freyne’s Inside Track. But according to Roy, the paper has decided to discontinue the column — at least for now. “At one point, it was the newspaper’s only real news content, but over the years our news team has grown up around it, and our abilities to report on the state have expanded,” Roy said. The paper will deploy three writers to the Vermont Statehouse this winter, as it has since the 2015 legislative session, Roy said. Though Seven Days may one day revive the political column, Roy said, the newspaper has chosen to invest in straight news for now. “In our world, there’s too much opinion and not enough plain old facts,” he said. “We’ll be trading more in the latter.” m Contact: paul@sevendaysvt.com

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So Much Hemp « P.12 His father, Peter, added trucking to the mix in an effort to provide for his family of eight and hold on to 475 acres. The heifers eventually gave way to bulldozers, dump trucks and a fleet of earthmovers, a business Sam Markowski and his brothers grew into one of the largest excavation contractors in Vermont. To preserve the family farm for future generations, however, Markowski knows it must stand on its own economically. So he started farming organic corn on the side, quickly growing his venture into a 300-acre operation. When corn prices plunged a few years ago, he sought another cash crop. “That’s when this hemp thing came along, and we just said, ‘Let’s try something different,’” Markowski said. Vermont is in the midst of a bountiful hemp harvest, the result of a dramatic expansion in the number of farmers seeking to capitalize on the emerging market for products derived from marijuana’s nonintoxicating cousin. Following the federal reclassification of hemp as a regular agricultural product in 2018, the prospect for profits has quickly drawn both experienced farmers and amateurs. Nationwide, the number of acres registered to grow hemp in 2019 quadrupled from 2018 to more than 511,000, according to advocacy group Vote Hemp. The number of registered acres in Vermont also blossomed, from 3,290 in 2018 to more than 8,800 this year, easily making it the state’s fastest-growing agricultural product, according to the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. The number of entities registered to grow and process hemp — 942 — has more than doubled in a year. “We have individuals who are veggie growers who have done it for many years and are succeeding,” said Stephanie Smith, chief policy enforcement officer for the Agency of Agriculture. Others, however, are struggling, which will become clearer as this year’s harvest winds down, Smith said. One of many hurdles: Growers must test plants before they harvest, to ensure that they don’t exceed the 0.3 percent of THC content allowed by law. Some have “hot crops” that exceed the limit, meaning they might have to be destroyed. With so many people learning hard lessons, observers wonder whether the current boom is sustainable. “There are so many new producers, it feels a bit like a wave,” said Nicole Dehne, certification director for Vermont Organic Farmers. “I’m not sure how long it will last.” Her organization has certified more

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

than 100 hemp growers in the state as organic. In their rush to get plants in the ground, some farmers may not have lined up buyers — a risky proposition, Dehne said. “I’m concerned that there are so many producers that there won’t be a market to handle all their products,” she said. “But I’m hoping I’m wrong.”

GROWING PAINS

Markowski’s first attempt at cultivating hemp was a bust. He and his brothers planted about 40 acres with seed he’d purchased from contacts made at an Oregon trade show. They modified a seed drill to inject the hemp seeds into soil as a tractor pulled the contraption along. Unbeknownst to Markowski, however, the mixture contained seeds for both male and female plants. When the male plants

to Vermont, and opted to plant seedlings instead of seeds — a more expensive option they hoped would pay off in healthier crops. Markowski plowed cash into specialized planting equipment that allowed them to snuggle their seedlings in raised, drip-irrigated mounds while covering the soil with black plastic to keep down weeds and retain moisture. The additional investment appeared to be in jeopardy earlier this month when, just as they were preparing to harvest, a fierce nor’easter packing 40 mph winds blew through the state, dousing the area with three inches of rain. Several days later, many of the plants listed precariously. The storm gave Markowski a fright, but the crop came through fine. “It’s a good, stout, hardy plant,” he said. Sunny weather soon returned, and

Chris Teitsma harvesting hemp flowers

matured, they began releasing pollen that fertilized flowers on the surrounding females. That’s great for someone trying to grow hemp seeds, but it was bad news for the brothers’ goal — raising plants for CBD. They uprooted some male plants, but the damage was done. The CBD content in their crop was too low, and they couldn’t find a buyer. “We pay the highest prices for the best lessons,” said Markowski. This year, they have made significant changes. They partnered with VT-CBD Labs, a hemp processing and extraction company that had a reliable source of feminized seeds. The brothers also selected a hearty hemp strain, Jupiter, that’s well suited

CBD levels continued their steady ascent. Weather permitting, he hoped to wrap up the harvest of some 100,000 plants by Thanksgiving. Well aware that the industry is in its Wild West phase, Markowski is doing everything he can to differentiate his hemp from his competitors’, such as getting organic certification and diversifying the types of products he sells. Most growers are selling hemp for CBD extraction. Markowski is one of several Vermont growers looking for the next big thing. Hemp is known to have more than 100 cannabinoids, of which THC and CBD are just the two best known. Groups such as Florence-based Northeast Hemp Commodities are trying


Sam Markowski preparing to send hemp through a de-stemmer

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to grow the market for lesser-known drops,” which users can add to water cannabinoids with possible health pipes during a smoking session, retails for $90. benefits, such as CBG, or cannabigerol. Markowski sees great promise in To demonstrate a different applicaterpenes, organic compounds that give tion, Markowski drew clear liquid from hemp its aromatic qualities. He and his a mason jar with a syringe, poured a few partners have developed a proprietary ounces of Long Trail Brewing’s Green technique to extract terpenes without Blaze IPA into a plastic cup and added a harmful chemicals as the plant dries. few drops of the terpenes. A shipping-container-size structure The liquid imparted a subtle citrus next to the former dairy barn is where flavor to the popular local beer while that magic happens. The leaves and flow- softening its hoppy edge. The team is ers are fed into the top, exploring a variety of and oil- and water-based terpenes-infused beverterpenes are extracted ages, such as beer, seltzer and collected in foodand tea, Querrey said. grade containers. Markowski said he The extraction has never been interprocess is the brainchild ested in marijuana but of Dan Querrey, an came to see the value industrial engineer from in CBD after he tried it Pittsford who claims his a few years ago to treat technique — which he SAM MARKOWSKI chronic knee pain. A few would describe only in days after taking it orally, broad strokes — is one of he noticed a difference in a kind. “This is research and develop- his knee, and he still takes a modest dose ment. You don’t just go to the corner twice a day, he said. market and buy a hemp dryer,” Querrey While he has sunk hundreds of thousaid. sands of dollars into the crop to date, Markowski and Querrey have estab- Markowski expects his investment lished a side venture to market organic will pay off. While many farmers are terpene products under the brand VT using temporary workforces to plant Terps. The company website claims and harvest by hand, Markowski is “terpenes and cannabinoids work betting that his diversified, mechanized together to produce a number of thera- operation will give him a leg up on the peutic effects.” competition if — or more likely when Chris Porter, sales and marketing — oversupply swings the hemp boom manager of VT Terps, likened cannabi- toward bust. noids to the engine of a car and terpenes “We like to think we’re in this for the to “the steering wheel that drives them long term,” he said. m down the pathways.” A one-ounce vial of the company’s best-selling “bong Contact: kevin@sevendaysvt.com

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Montréal by Vélo

( ( (DISPATCH

Vermont officials take a two-wheeled “learning journey” in Québec S T O RY & PHO TO S B Y C OURT NEY L AMDIN

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wenty cyclists careened down a paved pathway under a canopy of yellow foliage last Friday. In a parade-like procession, the riders pedaled over speed bumps and past a fountain and a pond, drawing attention from locals in Montréal’s Parc La Fontaine. “Bixi boys, Bixi ladies!” a man riding a red moped exclaimed in a thick Québécois accent as he motored by. “Bixi party, you Bixi posse!” The “posse” in question included this reporter and a group of officials from Vermont, who sat astride bicycles from public bike-share program Bixi. Organized by Burlington bike enthusiasts Andrea Todd and Drew Pollack-Bruce, the group was there for an 11-mile, two-wheeled “learning journey” through the streets of Québec’s largest city. In Todd’s view, its transportation infrastructure is worth imitating in Vermont’s largest city. “In Burlington, I think you have to have some steel nerves to jump in traffic on a bicycle and get from point A to point B,” said Todd, who rides a bike through all four seasons. Montréal, she continued, is “a northern city doing something really smart with their streets.” When it comes to Burlington’s roads, officials have long struggled to balance the interests of motorists and cyclists. Drivers were outraged in 2016 when the city eliminated a vehicle travel lane on North Avenue to make way for bikes, a change one city councilor said “divided the neighborhood.” The following year, the city stripped 10 parking spaces from North Union Street to build a bike lane, another divisive move. While those projects garnered plenty of critics, the Montréal bike trip attracted many who already embrace alternative transportation. Nearly all of the attendees were practiced cyclists; some, including City Councilors Max Tracy (P-Ward 2) and Jack Hanson (P-East District), don’t own a car. Councilor Joan Shannon (D-South District) and city parks director Cindi Wight regularly bike around Burlington. The others weren’t newbs, either. Among them were employees of Burlington’s parks and public works departments, an engineer from the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission, the Vermont Agency of Transportation bike and pedestrian program manager, and 16

The group stopping outside of Vélo Québec

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Andrea Todd

a staffer from cycling advocacy group Local Motion. The group convened at Burlington’s public works garage just as the sun rose last Friday and traveled by van 95 miles north to Montréal City Hall. Across the street, the group met the day’s tour guides: progressive city councilor and cycling advocate Marianne Giguère and François Gosselin, the head of public works in Le Plateau-Mont-Royal, the city’s most densely populated borough. The Montréalers soon made clear their position on bike lanes and pedestrianfriendly infrastructure: Both should be a priority, even if they eliminate precious

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parking spots. Since she was elected in 2013, Giguère has successfully pushed for better cycling conditions in the Canadian city, and she was proud to show the results to her Vermont visitors. A flatbed trailer packed with Bixi bikes, courtesy of the Montréal delegation, waited nearby. Grinning happily, Todd strapped on her helmet — equipped with a camera that records 360-degree video — and offered up extra layers and gloves to her fellow bikers on the crisp fall day. Throughout most of the ride, the group traversed two-way bike lanes that were cushioned from traffic by grassy medians, or, in some cases, plastic bollards like those on Burlington’s North Union Street. The design keeps riders safe and eases snow removal, according to Gosselin. When it snows, Montréal clears bike and car lanes at the same time, to great effect: Winter

bike travel increased 160 percent between 2015 and 2017, soon after the policy was implemented, he said. While a worthy goal, some of the Queen City participants complained that it’s hard to keep bike lanes clear when people push snow from their driveways right into them. Burlington plow truck driver Lorand Codrean told the Canadians that he struggles to avoid hitting bollards and cars parked on narrow streets. “What if you took off parking?” Gosselin suggested — a question the Burlington contingent responded to with laughter. The group peddled east on Boulevard René-Lévesque, a wide street with plenty of space for bikes, cars and pedestrians, some of whom called “Bonjour!” to the passing Burlington bike parade. “The biggest hill is coming up!” called David Beitel, who tagged along for the ride and works for Eco-Counter, a Montréal company that monitors bike lane usage with underground sensors. “It’s not a Depot Street hill, is it?” Todd asked with a laugh, referring to Burlington’s very vertical street, which connects the Old North End with the waterfront. “If anyone needs to walk up, no shame,” Beitel said. A handful took the out, dragging the heavy Bixis up the hill into Le Plateau, the hip, artsy neighborhood northeast of downtown. The borough’s brightly painted row houses gave a San Francisco vibe to an otherwise European-inspired city. The protected bike lanes were steps from residents’ front stoops, many of which were decorated with pumpkins and cobwebs for Halloween. The two groups converged at Rue de Brébeuf, in front of Vélo Québec, a bike advocacy group that is the Montréal version of Burlington’s Local Motion. There, Councilor Tracy quizzed his Canadian counterpart on how local businesses react when the city removes parking spots. In the 10 years since several bike-centric campaigns began, Giguère said, the resistance has lessened because those opposed to the changes have realized “it’s not killing them. “What helps also is to show them how much parking that’s left around,” she added. “It takes time and a lot of talk, but it’s changing.” The tour continued at a good clip as the group took only short rests to wait for


POLITICS

traffic signals or for stragglers to catch up. The hosts showed off Montréal’s “bike boulevards” — stretches that are open to cars but allow cyclists to ride down the center of the street along with them. As one might expect, drivers slow down when bikes have an equal right-of-way. The group paused at an intersection as a pedestrian strolled by. Todd called out to him, asking what he thought of the bike boulevards. “There’s less traffic, and it’s ecological,” the man replied. Two hours and many miles later, the journey started its last leg, which was, mercifully, mostly downhill. The cyclists passed a park where teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg captivated half a million people during last month’s worldwide climate march. The climate emergency is precisely what motivates Councilor Hanson to push sustainable transportation in Burlington, he said on the van ride home. Drivers will resist proposals to remove parking, but “if we don’t, the consequences are much greater than the discomfort of making that change,” Hanson said. Tracy, who chairs the council’s transportation committee, agreed. “We don’t really, in my mind, have a choice but to reinvent our streets to address climate change,” he said, suggesting that if Burlington builds better bike lanes — and plows them — people will use them in place of cars. Is that an idealistic view? Maybe. Burlington’s streets are only so wide, after all. But by the day’s end, the journey-goers appeared to agree that they could find some ways to emulate their neighbors to the north. As the van pulled onto Pine Street, again under the cover of darkness, there was a palpable buzz as the group debriefed about their adventure and cracked up at plow driver Codrean’s tales from the road. Before the trip, Codrean said, he assumed the folks at city hall were just “obtuse politicians” who create policies that make his difficult job even harder. “Now I see that … there’s an interest in fixing the problem the right way. And that pleases me,” Codrean told the councilors. “I feel so connected with you guys, it’s unreal. For me, that was the best part.” m

Lawyer and Farmer John Klar to Challenge Phil Scott From the Right BY K E VI N MCCALLUM

A Republican lawyer and farmer from Brookfield who announced Monday he will challenge Gov. Phil Scott in next year’s race immediately came under fire for his positions on abortion and transgender people. At a campaign kickoff and later interview with Seven Days, John Klar, 56, outlined a brand of fiscal conservatism that he says is exactly what the state needs to stave off financial ruin. High taxes are driving businesses and people from the state at the same time pension debt is soaring, meaning that if the economy sputters, the state could find itself in real trouble, he asserted. “If that happens, we’re looking at bankruptcy,” Klar said. “If we don’t fix this, the state is going to have its credit rating downgraded again.” But his views on social issues, not fiscal ones, earned the former pastor swift condemnation from the political establishment. Klar, who has never held public office, is opposed to abortion. He referred to it in an interview as “extermination” of babies, then quickly revised that to “termination.” He said his “compromise” position was to call for a state ban on thirdtrimester abortions, which he likened to “infanticide.” He also published an op-ed last month titled “Transgender Surgery Is the Lobotomy of the 21st Century” on the website American Thinker. He stood by the piece in an interview. The Vermont Democratic Party denounced his “archaic stances” and further called his positions evidence of the “growing decay within the Vermont Republican Party.” Klar said that he didn’t mention transgender issues at his press conference and instead focused on gun rights, economic development, keeping schools open and tackling teacher pension debt. The challenge isn’t yet on Scott’s radar, his spokesperson, Rebecca Kelley, said: “The Governor is only 11 months into his term, and he remains solely focused on achieving real results to improve the lives of Vermonters, grow the economy, make Vermont more affordable and protect the most vulnerable.” m Contact: kevin@sevendaysvt.com

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news Government Gun Shop « P.13 Until 2018, the Department of Public Safety was charged with storing seized and abandoned firearms, and the state treasurer was responsible for their disposal. But according to Sen. Dick Sears (D-Bennington), no treasurer in recent memory had embraced the task. “So all those guns for years and years and years accumulated,” said Sears, who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee. In January 2018, Sears introduced legislation to address the backlog and allow the Department of Buildings and General Services to sell the weapons to federally licensed firearm dealers. Those dealers would have to complete criminal background checks on any potential retail buyers. According to Sears, his committee never seriously contemplated destroying the guns, rather than putting them back in circulation. “At the time, we were just trying to solve a storage problem,” he said. The bill was uncontroversial at first, earning support even from the state’s uncompromising gun-rights groups. But after a mass shooting the next month at a high school in Parkland, Fla., and the exposure of an alleged plot to shoot people at Fair Haven Union High School, lawmakers loaded up the legislation with more controversial measures, including universal background checks and a ban on high-capacity magazines. Sears, its original sponsor, ended up voting against the bill, but Gov. Phil Scott signed it into law that April. It took more than a year for Cole to open up shop, which frustrated lawmakers. Rep. Maxine Grad (D-Moretown), who chairs the House Judiciary Committee, said she was particularly concerned that the growing backlog might be discouraging local police departments from making use of another new law allowing them to seize guns from those cited or arrested for domestic abuse. According to Sarah Robinson, deputy director of the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, the storage issue had also become “a primary barrier” to consideration of yet another bill, which would require the confiscation of guns from those served with a restraining order for alleged acts of domestic abuse. “There are certainly folks who would like a storage process that is moving more swiftly before they support it,” Robinson said. Cole insisted at the time that he was working on it. “It’s a lot easier to pass a law than it is to actually implement it,” he later explained. In June, the Department of Public Safety transferred 366 guns to the new secure storage room, and the email bidding process for 18

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Rifles in state storage

NOBODY KNOWS HOW MANY GUNS ARE IN STORAGE IN THE STATE. C O MMIS S IO NE R C H R IS C O L E

the first 25-gun lot began. In the months since, Cole’s department has completed nine sales and off-loaded 225 firearms, bringing in $31,514. Given the costs of administering the program, Cole expects it will still end up costing the department money. The 10th lot, which is now in the bidding process, includes just one gun: the first of two 8mm Mauser K98 bolt-action rifles in the state’s possession. A description on the Buildings and General Services website notes that it includes “Nazi symbol w/ harness, bolt action, no scope.” The second Mauser features the same swastikaadorned eagle and is expected to go up for bid at a later date. Cole appeared uneasy discussing the first gun’s provenance as he showed it to a reporter. “It’s more of a German

infantryman [rifle], but I think they put the symbol...” he said, his voice trailing off. According to Deputy Public Safety Commissioner Christopher Herrick, the Vermont State Police obtained the first Mauser during a 2013 arrest for cultivation of large amounts of marijuana. Because the owner had previously been convicted of assault and robbery with a firearm, he was prohibited from possessing it, and the cops seized it. Herrick did not explain how the second Mauser came into his department’s hands. Informed of the pending state sale of Nazi guns, Sears said, “I would suggest that they destroy those, but it’s up to them.” Now that Cole has sold off nearly twothirds of the state’s excess firearms, he’s turning his attention to county and local law enforcement collections. In the coming months, he plans to write each of the state’s 14 county sheriffs and roughly 50 municipal police departments to offer to take the weapons off their hands — and determine the quantity in their possession. “Nobody knows how many guns are in storage in the state,” he said. Cole is hoping to work with the Montpelier Police Department as he develops a system for acquiring the county and local weapons. Earlier this month, Cole’s department met with Sgt. Jeff Pearson, who oversees the Montpelier PD’s evidence room. According to Pearson, it’s currently storing 87 firearms. “I think I can safely say that some of them date back to the ’90s,” he said. Pearson said he’s grateful that the state is willing to take them off his hands, but he has some concerns. The Department of Buildings and General Services is unwilling to accept guns used in homicides or suicides, as well as those that are illegal to sell under state law. “That, to me, is a real sticking point because, unfortunately, suicide by firearm is very common,” Pearson said, estimating that 10 to 15 percent of the guns in Montpelier’s possession came from families of suicide victims who do not want them back. “I think being selective is not the right approach. I think there needs to be some kind of mechanism in place to take all of them — or give us another alternative.” Both sides say they expect to work out any disagreements. And others in local law enforcement say they are eager to clear out their stores. The problem is especially acute for the smallest of police departments, which often have the least space to spare in their evidence rooms and the least time to deal with the guns, according to Vergennes Police Chief George Merkel, who heads the Vermont Association of Chiefs of Police. “I’ve got enough to do without selling firearms,” he said. m Contact: paul@sevendaysvt.com


Feedback « P.7 forest stewardship is best achieved when landowners can afford to keep the land forested. Landowners need good forest product markets for this to work. Lowgrade wood markets such as pulp, firewood and biomass are critical to long-term forest management and ownership. They also help achieve the type of careful forestry most common in Vermont. Discouraging biomass markets, and/or setting too much land off-limits to harvesting, damages the forest economy. This will lead to the conversion of forests to other uses. Let’s support the landowners who keep Vermont forested. Abundant, well-managed forests — supported by a diverse mixture of local forest product markets — are the best tool for long-term forest and carbon conservation. It is not complicated. Good forest management is good carbon management. Commissioner Snyder’s leadership and integrity on this issue are greatly appreciated. Jonathan L. Wood

CAMBRIDGE

Wood is a certified and licensed forester.

RECLAIMING CHRISTIANITY

[Re “Good News?” September 25]: I was disturbed by the fact that Seven Days would afford a seven-page spread to a naïve story about evangelical churches in Vermont. Certainly everyone has a right to practice their own religion — but to imply, as this article did, that these churches represent Christianity is misleading. As opposed to the churches profiled, there are many Christian churches in Vermont that welcome people of all sexual orientations and do not try to “cure” them — churches where both LGBTQ people and women are respected and honored as leaders and ministers, and where the ministers are held accountable by their peers and the church structure to prevent abuses of power. When a church is totally independent, as many of the “evangelical” churches are, the power of the minister can be seen as absolute, giving him unchecked access to sexual and power abuses. None of the church groups profiled in your article, including the Southern Baptists, accepts the fact that LGBTQ people can be whole and healthy and called to ministry. Most see them as sinful, an attitude that causes much harm to the human spirit and psyche. It was sad to read about the young woman who found a new life in the church by rejecting her own sexuality. We know that these kinds of “conversions” can lead to self-hate, denial and suicidal tendencies.

I hope that anyone who is attracted to the message of love, acceptance and community in Christianity will seek out a church that states clearly a policy of being welcoming to all, regardless of gender or sexual orientation. Nancy Kilgore

BURLINGTON

WOOD WISE

[Re “Carbon Quandary,” October 9]: Energy impacts are situational. Every factor in a complex equation matters when determining the carbon impact of our energy choices, including fuel source, transportation, processing, delivery, combustion, the near- and long-term impacts on the source environment, and repercussions such as oil spills, gas leaks and wildfires. So let’s focus on our situation in Vermont and the rest of the northern forest, where we need to heat our buildings over the long, cold winter. We have an abundance of trees that will release their carbon someday, whether they die of old age or are harvested to produce wood products, including chips and pellets made from the low-grade wood. The high-quality wood made into construction lumber, furniture and other long-lasting products will sequester its carbon for generations. The wood chips and pellets reduce our use of fossil fuel.  In 2015, the Northern Forest Center commissioned a study to understand one specific situation: the greenhouse gas impacts of using wood pellets for heat in our four-state region. The life-cycle analysis concluded that pellets — sourced, produced and used in the northern forest — immediately reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 54 percent compared to oil and 59 percent compared to natural gas. Over time, the results get even better. We need to use every available option to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. In Vermont and the northern forest, using wood pellets instead of fossil fuels to heat our homes, schools and buildings is a huge step in the right direction, readily available at every scale.  Rob Riley

CANTERBURY, N.H.

MISSING MAGS

A few weeks ago, the Burlington coffee staple Maglianero Café decided to close up shop [Bite Club: “Maglianero Café to Become Kestrel Coffee Roasters Café,” September 18]. This wasn’t just a place where you could get some drip and move on to your day; it was a hybrid gallery, coffee shop and community space. The

coffee was among the best in town, but Mags also served a very organic air of freshness and community feel — very Burlingtonesque. It was a place where you could count on having a casual meeting with someone, where you could go and crank out some work, or perhaps you just wanted a cup of coffee with a friend — this was the place. It was more than just a business; it was a community-fueled space with the combination of coffee rituals, interesting conversations, work habits and lots of dogs. I wish the best of luck to the new coffee roasters taking over, but I also find it extremely hard to believe that Mags’ magic could be replicated. Walking in there, where they even have the same chairs — it doesn’t feel right. That was the beauty of Mags: It perfected whatever it was not trying to be.

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SERVING DINNER In a recent letter to Seven Days, Ron Tuesday-Saturday Jacobs pointed out the larger picture kitchentablebistro.com behind homelessness in Burlington and elsewhere [Feedback: “Homeless Need Help,” September 25]. There is also a larger picture behind our health care 10/25/18 system for low-income individuals in8V-KitchenTable103118.indd 1 general. Actual treatment, for example, is relegated to a surfeit of “all-purpose” social workers, whether licensed or not. Doctors with medical degrees who’ll take Medicare/Medicaid payments for their services are more rare, and those who have some years of experience are rarer still. You’ll most likely find those in the marketplace. Are you homeless and sick? See you in the ER! The old canard of “Sweden can have universal health care because they’re a small, homogenous country” doesn’t hold water. With more immigrants now being registered in that country, possibly putting some strain on the economy, day-to-day health care still hasn’t disappeared. And though the Swedes pay high taxes for this and more necessities, they’re hardly bankrupt. What about the size factor? In how many other small countries is it a virtual roll of the dice to see the doctor at all? On the other hand, suppose we have a local, fresh, original comparable-size state in the U.S. getting universal coverage. If the experiment is good, we can spread it throughout the country. Not that easy? Hmm, how did those other large countries do it? What’s the larger picture there? 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

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READ, POST, SHARE + COMMENT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LIFELINES

lifelines OBITUARIES

Joann Moulton Stanfield 1940-2019

Joann Moulton Stanfield passed away at her home on October 22, 2019, to join her beloved Bob. Joann was born on November 22, 1940, in Marietta, Ohio, the daughter of David and Grace (Morrison) Moulton, who were officers in the Salvation Army, and the younger sister of her muchadored brothers Arthur and Alan. As officers, her parents moved often with their family to various ministries. Joann and her brothers would eventually work as camp counselors at Ashford Hills Salvation Army Camp. In 1955, at the age of 15, Joann met a fellow counselor and friend of her brothers who would become the love of her life. They were married on June 11, 1960, at the Brooklyn SA Citadel by her father, David Moulton. They would build a life and support each other unconditionally over the next 55 years, until his passing on September 28, 2015. After marrying, Joann and Bob moved to Cambridge, Mass., where Joann

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

supported them by typing papers for students while Bob pursued his PhD from Harvard University. Upon graduation in 1963, Bob accepted a position at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where they expanded their family. In 1969, they moved to Vermont with their three children when Bob accepted a position at the University of Vermont. Vermont would become their forever home. Joann worked as a full-time mother and part-time nursery school teacher at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Burlington, where the family had begun going to church every Sunday. In 1974, Bob and Joann went to see a live performance of How to Succeed in Business Without Even Trying at the Flynn Theater by a newly started theater group called Lyric Theatre. They were two of only 200 people enjoying the show in a 1,500-seat theater. Sitting there in the theater, they had no idea how important this theater group and the Flynn would become to them. After Bob was cast in the second show, Gypsy, by Lyric, Joann decided that she wanted to have as much fun as he was having and was cast in their third show, Pajama Game. They would continue to perform in numerous shows over the years. Upon joining Lyric in 1975, they made new friends whom, 44 years later, they still called friends … and many joined them in 2010 to help them celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. They opened their home over the years to the cast and crew for parties during the rehearsal process, as well as a place to warm up after caroling on Church Street during the Christmas season. During the early years of Lyric, they were the location for many a strike breakfast at 5 a.m., after the set was struck following

the final show and the Flynn was turned back into a movie theater. They were widely respected in the Lyric community as JOBOB productions, when Bob decided he wanted to direct and Joann was his producer for six shows — some of which sold out that 1,500-seat theater! As one Lyric member said upon hearing of her passing, “Well, it will definitely be impossible to get cast in a JOBOB production now!” Before his passing in 2015, Bob told Joann that when she got to heaven, she should make sure she entered from downstage right, as that is where he would be waiting for her. Since live theater was new to the Burlington area in the ’70s, a ticket booth was set up in a closet of the lobby of the Flynn Theater, where Joann began her career in ticket sales. She would volunteer her time standing in this closet with a cash box, a calculator as a register, and a large shelving system — created with cubicles for all the rows in the Flynn — that would hold the tickets. Eventually, Lyric would be a major supporter in the creation of the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, where a real ticket office now is located. Joann holds the record for longest-running continuous volunteer as the ticket chair for 40 years, from 1976 to 2016, without missing a single show. She and Bob both served on the Capital Campaign Committee for the new creative space, and she helped cut the ribbon at the official dedication of the building on Green Tree Drive in South Burlington in 2017. The Joann Stanfield Ticket Window is located there. She could always be found twice a year sitting in K1 and K3 with Bob or her granddaughter Victoria on opening night of a Lyric show. When she could no longer get backstage to see

Lyric friends, they would come out to the audience to give her a huge hug either before the show or during intermission. The outpouring of love and tributes of Lyric friends of 40 years during the days following her death have meant so much to her family. Both Bob and Joann were honored recipients of a “lifetime membership” with Lyric Theatre for their years of dedication. Joann’s experience creating and chairing the ticket committee for Lyric would eventually lead to a career as the ticket manager for the newly created UVM Ticket Store. Joann worked for more than 20 years in the lobby of the old UVM bookstore, managing work-study students at the university and helping to expand the ticket store to what it is today. Upon her retirement from UVM, Joann and Bob were able to take her dream vacation to Italy. She and Bob — along with her brother Alan and his wife, Yvonne — traveled to England, as well as to her mother’s homeland of Scotland. When Joann wasn’t vacationing in Myrtle Beach with her family, she loved to take cruises; she visited almost every island in the Caribbean and took an Alaskan cruise. Joann has been a dedicated member of St. Paul’s Cathedral, where she served on the vestry committee, helped with the wreath fundraising project and sang with the choir. For many years, she gathered every few months with her church friends, whom Bob always referred to as “the ladies who lunch.” She cherished those friendships, especially in this last year, as Rebecca and Maureen always checked in with her or provided rides to her so that she continued to feel connected as her health declined. Family was always the foundation of who Joann was, and she was so proud of her children and grandchildren. She especially loved watching her granddaughter Alyssa perform as an actress, singer and, especially, a dancer.

Joann is survived by her daughter Kathleen Stanfield Richards (Chris Murphy) and their children Christopher and Nickoli Stanfield; her daughter Cheryl Stanfield Zajan and her daughters Victoria and Alyssa Zajan (Ben Hiller); and her son Paul Stanfield. As an only daughter, she is survived, through her marriage, by her sisters Mary Moulton, Dorothy Stanfield and, most especially, Yvonne Moulton, as well as brother-in law Don Gibson. She will be missed and loved by many nieces, nephews and cousins. She had a very special bond with her niece Charlene and nephew Kevin Moulton of Kentucky, who began visiting her every summer after the family vacation in Myrtle Beach that began back in the early ’70s with her parents, Alan’s family and, eventually, Art’s family. Every week she would send out a mass email to family titled “Yo From Jo,” letting them know all the family news. Knowing that Joann was ready to reunite with her beloved Bob made it easier for the family to say goodbye. Joann was also predeceased by her son-in-law Mark Zajan in 1997, her brother Arthur Moulton in 2005, her brother Alan Moulton in 2017, her sister-inlaw Joan Gibson in 2010, and her brother-in-law Theodore Stanfield in 2019. The family would like to thank the Residence at Quarry Hill for their wonderful care of our mother over the last year, as well as Jen with the Bayada Hospice Team in the last few weeks. Mom formed many friendships with the residents of Quarry Hill, where she was fondly referred to as the “Giraffe Lady,” due to her love of giraffes. The family would also like to thank

Angeline Ali, who showed us just how much she loved our mother by her amazing care and thoughtfulness during the last few months. You will always be a part of our family. Mom had been in and out of the hospital over the last few months, but we feel blessed that with their help she was able to be home when the time came, knowing she was loved and that her family would take care of each other when she was gone. Visiting hours will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. on Friday, November 1, at Corbin & Palmer Funeral Home, located at 71 Pleasant St., Essex Junction. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, November 2, at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 2 Cherry St., Burlington. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Lyric Theatre, 7 Green Tree Drive, South Burlington, VT 05403. Arrangements are in the care of Corbin & Palmer Funeral Home, corbinandpalmer.com.

BIRTHS Carl Joseph DeRoberts On October 19, 2019, at Porter Medical Center, Elaina Goodin and Carl DeRoberts welcomed a boy, Carl Joseph DeRoberts.

Walden Arthur Hescock On October 27, 2019, at Porter Medical Center, Chelsea (Purinton) Hescock and Judson Hescock welcomed a boy, Walden Arthur Hescock.

Want to memorialize a loved one in Seven Days? Post your remembrance online and in print at sevendaysvt.com/lifelines. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020, ext. 10.

Mark your family’s milestones in lifelines. sevendaysvt.com/lifelines 20

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PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Mozart Meets The Princess Bride in Youth Opera Workshop Concerts

OPERA

B Y AMY LI LLY

A

t a recent rehearsal for an EMMA GREENWOOD, a senior at Harwood upcoming performance of Union High School in Moretown; and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s ISABELLA DUNN, a recent graduate of Essex The Magic Flute, the energy and High School. Greenwood and another focus were palpable. In the small South Youth Opera Workshop trainee, SAMUEL Burlington studio, voice teacher and THOMPSON, also did role studies of Pamina soprano SARAH CULLINS observed closely as and Tamino. (That is, they learned the three soloists, singing the parts of Pamina, parts in full without the understudy’s presTamino and Sarastro, sang a trio to pianist sure of being ready to play them onstage.) MARY JANE AUSTIN’s direction from an elecFor the Youth Opera Workshop productric keyboard. tion, actors ALLAN NICHOLLS and JOHN BUCK Austin suddenly interrupted one singer will serve as narrator on separate nights. to point out that her character would They’ll read to JACK GREENWOOD, Emma’s never soften her last declaration with an 13-year-old brother. Lane, Greenwood extra grace note. Cullins and Dunn will reprise urged another to correct their roles as Spirits, and a single vowel. Just as Greenwood will also share quickly, Austin had the the role of Pamina with group back on track to MAGNER AMSBARY, a junior at singing Mozart’s lyrical Champlain Valley Union melodies as written. High School in Hinesburg. The intensity was Lane and Dunn will do akin to that of a profesdouble duty as Papagena sional group, but these and the Priestess, respecopera singers were high tively. Thompson sings schoolers. They are part Tamino, and his fellow SARAH CU LLIN S of the YOUTH OPERA WORKsenior at Rice Memorial SHOP OF VERMONT, a satelHigh School, FRED POHLEN, lite program of the MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY is Papageno. THOMAS BUCKLEY, a sophoMUSIC CENTER. The group will present public more at Colchester High School, will sing performances of The Magic Flute in abbre- Sarastro. viated English translation in Middlebury During a phone call on his return from and Waterbury this weekend, followed by a rowing event, Thompson — a coxswain three school performances. with the LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM The production is sure to be a crowd- rowing team — said the production will pleaser. As imagined and costaged by be his first experience singing opera. The JOSHUA COLLIER, founder-director of BARN tenor had sung leads in Rice’s musical OPERA in Brandon, Youth Opera Worktheater productions and in its chorus, shop’s Magic Flute recasts the story using led by tenor KEVIN GINTER, before the latter the framing device of The Princess Bride, suggested he audition for the Youth Opera the 1987 hit movie in which a man reads a Workshop. fractured fairy tale to his grandson. The Now, as a result of studying classical format enables the cast of seven teenage voice with Ginter and witnessing professingers to tell Mozart’s story without sionals pulling together the Barn Opera needing to fill such roles as the Queen production, Thompson is applying for of the Night, her attendants or the evil college music programs as an aspiring Monostatos. vocal performance major. Collier’s company inaugurated a longer “Oh, gosh, I love it,” he said of opera. “I version of the production in September love every part of this process.” using a full cast of professional singers Greenwood, too, has decided to major and three Youth Opera Workshop sing- in voice next year. Part of the inaugural ers as the Spirits: GRACE LANE, a sophomore at U-32 High School in East Montpelier;

ONCE YOU STRIP ALL THAT POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE AWAY,

IT’S JUST A SIMPLE STORY.

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MOZART MEETS THE PRINCESS BRIDE

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Sarah Cullins directing the Youth Opera Workshop of Vermont rehearsal of The Magic Flute

Samuel Thompson during rehearsal


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Cold Comfort: Howard Coffin Talks About the Year Vermonters ‘Froze to Death’ B Y DA N B O LLES

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ne of Vermont’s strangest years on record was 1816. It was also one of the coldest. That year the state endured snowstorms in June and a frost every month. The skies were perpetually dark, and locals reported everything from failed crops to mysterious lights. Those dire and seemingly inexplicable oddities led some to suspect supernatural causes, including an angry and vengeful God. The real explanation was slightly more mundane: A volcano had erupted in Indonesia in 1815, spreading ash around the globe. But rural Vermont in the 1800s was an isolated place. News traveled there slowly, if at all. According to historian HOWARD COFFIN, most Vermonters of the time were in the dark, literally and figuratively. The apocalyptic weather left them frantically searching for answers. “Volcanic ash was blocking the sunlight,” Coffin, 78, says. “But the people of that age had no idea what was going on. They were terrified. And it led to a religious revival.” Coffin is best known for his writings on the Civil War and his stint as late senator Jim Jeffords’ press secretary. For the past several years, though, he’s been researching the curious events of 1816 in Vermont and throughout New England. In the process, he’s uncovered bizarre historical gems that he has compiled into what he says is the most popular lecture of his 25-year speaking career: “Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816.” As part of a VERMONT HUMANITIES COUNCIL lecture series, Coffin presents that talk on Friday, November 1, at the HIGHLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS in Greensboro. Seven Days spoke with Coffin by phone about Vermont’s “year without a summer.”

HISTORY

SEVEN DAYS: So what the hell happened in 1816? HOWARD COFFIN: [Laughs.] All of a sudden, the weather turned cold, and there was a frost every month in Vermont. A volcano had erupted in Indonesia, and it cooled the world as the mass of ash spread around the globe and made it

THE PEOPLE OF THAT AGE HAD NO IDEA WHAT WAS GOING ON.

THEY WERE TERRIFIED. HO WAR D C O F F IN

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Presents

difficult to grow crops. It was a bad time, particularly for Vermont. SD: How did you come to be interested in that year? HC: I grew up hearing about 1816 from my grandmother, who grew up on a farm in Pomfret. If it was a really cold morning, she’d say, “Boy, Howard, it feels like 1800 and froze to death.” I never paid much attention to it until, one day, I asked her, and she told me about 1816. “The year without a summer,” she always said. Then, in 2015, my wife was dying. I had been an off-and-on churchgoer my whole life, not steady by any means. But I knew I was gonna need a church. The United Church of Bethel is presided over by an old friend of mine, TOM HARDY, who is the best preacher I’ve ever heard. So I called Tom and asked him if he minded if my wife COLD COMFORT

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QUICK LIT: HEADS OR TAILS In his introduction to the Richard Wilhelm and Cary Baynes translation of the I Ching, psychologist Carl Jung wrote, “Even to the most biased eye, it is obvious that this book represents one long admonition to careful scrutiny of one’s own character, attitude, and motives.” For Essex Junction poet Anna Blackmer, that scrutiny has taken the form of Hexagrams, a collection of poems based on the 64 hexagrams of the I Ching that forms an impressionistic, opaque memoir. The I Ching is an ancient Chinese divination tool that, like tarot cards and tea leaves, generates meaning out of apparent randomness — in this case, the outcome of a three-coin toss, which determines the configuration of six stacked lines. Each of the 64 possible line arrangements, or hexagrams, corresponds to a particular reading that, ostensibly, addresses the question at the top of the coin tosser’s mind. In the Wilhelm and Baynes edition — whose introduction by Jung lends it the most street cred of any Western translation — these interpretations contain such inscrutable Germanic gems as: “Thus the superior man receives people by virtue of emptiness. The superior man is compared to the mountain, the people to the lake. The relation is formed through the initiative of the mountain, the superior man.” Blackmer composed Hexagrams in response to the Wilhelm and Baynes translation, using the 64 hexagrams as an organizing principle. Each chapter consists of a six-line stanza and its mirror twin, the inverse of its original — a mimesis of the bottom-totop direction in which the I Ching’s hexagrams are meant to be read. Blackmer, a California native, moved to Vermont after dropping out of the University of California, Berkeley in 1972. Eventually, she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Vermont and earned an MFA in poetry from Goddard College, where she studied under Stephen Dobyns, Faye Kicknosway and Barbara Greenberg. For a time, she

BOOKS

Cold Comfort « P.23 and I started coming to church. I found out right after I got there that they were about to celebrate their bicentennial — the church was built in 1816. I started looking into the history, and the creation of the church was connected to the bad weather. SD: So it was part of a religious revival in Vermont? HC: It was. The year is progressing, your corn is dying and the skies are dark and the weather is getting worse and you can’t figure out what’s causing this. There 24

wrote arts reviews for the local altweekly Vermont Vanguard Press and owned a used bookstore. Most recently, she taught writing, literature and feminist studies at Burlington College, until it closed in 2016. Hexagrams, published by Burlington-based FOMITE PRESS, is Blackmer’s first book. Part autobiography, part homage, her poetry, like the I Ching, doesn’t describe situations so much as juice them for metaphysical content. In “Limitation,” Blackmer writes from a vantage point that feels both apocryphal and specific: “There’s more water in the sky than in the lake. / More money in heaven than in the bank. / You sat in the booth drinking rum and looked at me / without measuring from here to there. / I was laughing like a fool — well, wasn’t I a free spirit? / Hadn’t I learned what looking and looking could do?” The “you” to whom Blackmer refers never coalesces into a recognizable character, nor does the consciousness narrating her poems assume a stable form. She often shifts pronouns in the mirror poems, which begin with the last line of the original and end with the first, creating a parallel universe of sorts: “I” becomes “we,” “their” becomes “our.” It’s frequently unclear who, or what, she’s talking about, which creates a strange intimacy: Are we supposed to understand the symbolic vernacular of her brain? Does it matter if we don’t? Blackmer’s language has a sibylline randomness, which makes everything she writes seem dreadful, important or both. One of the more delightful examples of this tendency occurs in the first line of “Modesty.” Here, she writes: “The hooligans limited themselves to three kinds of squash.” Has there ever been a more tantalizing portrait of hooligan selfrestraint? To which varieties of squash did they limit themselves, and why only three? Of course, examining those particulars would break the spell. Like the head-exploding insights into the human condition you might scribble on a napkin while stoned at 3 a.m., Blackmer’s verse makes the most sense from just outside your skull. But the real power of her work lies in the way it

probably were some newspaper accounts of a volcano exploding in the South Pacific, but there was no connection made until the 20th century. Even the governors of the states put out proclamations urging people to pray, to try to get God’s favor. Because the common diagnosis was that God was angry, so start building churches! It’s a fascinating story. SD: What was the explanation for the weird lights? HC: Late in 1816, the weather began to go back to normal. But then, in January

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

BLACKMER’S VERSE MAKES THE MOST SENSE

FROM JUST OUTSIDE YOUR SKULL. confronts its own reflection. By turning her poems literally upside down, she exposes the tenuous relationship between language and meaning — and how, with a heads-or-tails flip, everything could suddenly get weird.  C HE LS E A E DGAR

Contact: chelsea@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Hexagrams by Anna Blackmer, Fomite Press, 154 pages. $15.

of 1817, a weather phenomenon called St. Elmo’s Fire came. And steeples lit up, fence posts lit up, cattle lit up. And then people’s hair began to flame — not catch fire, but have a flame-like glow around them. Of course, that scared the hell out of people. Like, “Now He’s really after us.”

the farmers had already sheared their sheep. So the ones who hadn’t already shipped off their wool wrapped it back around their sheep. They made coats for them. 

SD: Without giving too much away, do you have a favorite anecdote from your research? HC: The weather was pretty normal in Vermont until June of 1816. Then, on the sixth of June, there was more than a foot of snow in the Northeast Kingdom. Some of

Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

INFO Howard Coffin presents “Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816” on Friday, November 1, 7 p.m., Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. Free. highlandartsvt.org


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Mozart Meets The Princess Bride « P.22 group of singers when Cullins founded the Youth Opera Workshop a year ago, the soprano enjoyed the experience of working among professionals. “I had so much fun, and it was really cool to work with people who had their master’s in singing,” she enthused. Both young singers are excited to bring opera to the public and their peers, who, Thompson said, “have a lot of opinions about opera, but either they’ve never done it or they’ve never seen it.” They hope to dispel disparaging stereotypes about the art form. “It’s not about the fat lady with the horns,” Greenwood said. Thompson added, “You don’t have to wear a tuxedo and opera glasses.” Costumes will not get much more complicated than pajamas for the bedtime-story-like production, and sets will include only “what I can fit into my Jeep,” Cullins said. Instead, the focus is the story, she continued. A professional soprano, Cullins

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started Youth Opera Workshop in part to make opera more accessible and enjoyable for teenagers and general audiences alike. “Once you strip all that pomp and circumstance away, it’s just a simple story,” she averred. As a teenager, Cullins recalled, she saw “lush, expensive” opera productions in New York City and Montréal that put her to sleep every time. “I think it was because they didn’t actually focus on the story,” she said. “It was about how many horses and extras were onstage.” After training at the New England Conservatory and Mannes School of Music, Cullins spent 10 years in Bogotá, Colombia, where she started Central University’s undergraduate voice program and the Opera Workshop. In the latter, she began experimenting with story-focused productions using minimal sets and costumes. When she returned to her hometown of Burlington, Cullins was delighted to find that telling stories was the primary

focus of DOUG ANDERSON’s OPERA COMPANY OF MIDDLEBURY. Collier modeled Barn Opera on the Middlebury company, and Cullins is now spreading the word among teens through the Youth Opera Workshop. She started the program after learning from Buckley — her Sarastro — that the VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA ASSOCIATION was terminating its choral program. As a result, those “one or two star singers” per school had no opportunities for development beyond soloing in their choirs and, when available, in musical theater. The Youth Opera Workshop identifies those singers through Cullins’ connections to school choral directors in Chittenden, Addison and Washington counties. Such singers already study with voice teachers, so Cullins’ role is to offer “the same kind of intense, high-energy, high-expectations training for singers” that teen athletes receive. “Even if that’s not your career goal, it’s this great reward,” she noted. The program is also highly impactful. Buckley is a seasoned chorister — he

began singing in the ESSEX CHILDREN’S CHOIR in second grade — but said he hadn’t heard of The Magic Flute until joining the Youth Opera Workshop production. Now he’s learning his part in German for New England Music Festival Association auditions. “I became familiar with the opera through Josh’s interpretation. He has a pretty novel take on it,” the bass singer said in a phone call. “It’s a very small production. It focuses on the singers and on the story and doesn’t let anything else get in the way. I think it will be fun.” m Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Mozart’s The Magic Flute, Youth Opera Workshop of Vermont, Saturday, November 2, 7:30 p.m., at Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society in Middlebury; and Sunday, November 3, 3 p.m., at Waterbury Congregational Church. Donations. mcmcvt.org

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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EM SAUTER

is the founder of the award-winning website Pints and Panels, which has been making beer adorable since 2010. She’s also a beer judge, public speaker and advanced cicerone (like a sommelier, but for beer). Her first book, Beer Is for Everyone! (of Drinking Age), was published in 2017 by One Peace Books. Sauter loves dark lagers.

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HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

The Window

I

t’s been a gorgeous fall, hasn’t it?” My customer, Jane Gembart, was conversing with me from the shotgun seat of my taxi. She was easy on the eyes, but I mostly managed to keep mine on the road. When I did glance over, I noticed that her wavy, gray-streaked hair was fashioned into two loosely fastened braids, an insouciant look I found fetching. She wore retro wire-rimmed glasses that sweetly framed her brown eyes. I guess I’ve always had a thing for the librarian look. If I play my cards right, maybe she’ll shush me, I fantasized. Returning to my right mind, I replied, “Yup, I’d say it’s been the best in years. The weather’s been mostly sunny and mild for weeks, and the foliage colors have been outstanding throughout the state.” I was driving Jane to a drug rehab facility located in Orange County. A number of conditions, none of them great, can land a person in rehab. I was curious, but for me to broach the subject with her would have been intrusive. “It’s kind of ironic to be checking myself into rehab,” she said, self-broaching, as it were. “In my work, I dealt with these issues all the time.” “What was your job?” I asked. “I worked for child protective services in Maine for 20 years. I retired just over a year ago. These kids I dealt with, so many of the adults in their lives struggled with substance abuse.” Jane paused for a moment. She seemed to be reflecting on her time

on the job. I could only imagine the heart-wrenching situations she had confronted, probably on a daily basis. “I was a fierce defender of my kids,” she continued, “and often ran afoul of my supervisors. It was amazing that I lasted as long as I did. Anyway, I broke my back in an accident a couple of years ago and began to use alcohol to cope with the pain, even after the worst of it subsided. It was an odd thing, because

YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN AND WHERE

JESUS MIGHT SHOW UP.

I had never been a drinker before this. Finally it dawned on me that I had a real problem, and that’s why I’m going into this program.” “Good on you,” I said. “I know it takes guts to face up to something like this. How’d you end up working for the State of Maine?” “Well, my life has taken some interesting paths. I grew up in a French Canadian family in rural Maine. My father was an alcoholic and violently abusive, and I spent time in foster homes. I married my first boyfriend, Dan, at age 16, believe it or not, and had four kids in short order. All this while my husband and I worked at a local shoe factory. “Well, the factory closed, and we got divorced. Dan is a good man and now lives in Naples, down in Florida. We’re still close, and he remains a positive person in our kids’ lives. After we split up, Dan was good about sending the

knowledge at all because I didn’t want any pressure on my kids. In rural Maine, folks can be pretty narrow-minded. So I waited until my youngest was out of school and then came out to everyone.” “How’d your four kids take that startling piece of news?” “They were all great about it; I’d even say relieved. Their old mom’s life suddenly made more sense to them. And, actually, I have just the three. My last child, Brian, was born with congenital problems and died after six days.” “Oh, I’m so sorry. What a thing to go through. Have you ever had any sense of Brian’s spirit? Like, how he’s doing?” “Oh, it was my younger daughter, Eileen, who eased my mind about that. A few months after he passed, we were sitting in the living room, and Eileen — she was barely 5 years old — she yelled, ‘Momma, look out the window, look out the window!’ I got up and looked but saw

only our snowy front yard. So I asked her, ‘What do you see, honey?’ “She said, ‘It’s Jesus holding baby Brian in his arms. Brian is so happy, Momma! He’s OK now.’” “Wow, what a vision,” I said. “Out of the mouths of babes, right?” “Yes, and the first thing to know is that we weren’t particularly religious! I grew up in an observant Catholic home — church every week and Sunday school, the whole nine yards — but I only took my kids to services on the holidays, if that. So, I don’t know where she got it from. The only explanation is that she indeed saw Jesus holding the baby in our front yard, and I can’t tell you how much that eased my grief.” “Well, then,” I said, feeling the spirit rise within me, courtesy of Eileen, Brian and Jesus. “When you get to your rehab room, remember to check outside your window. You never know when and where Jesus might show up.” “Amen, brother,” Jane said, and not jokingly. Rehab is serious business, and she was humble enough to accept all available support, divine and otherwise. “I’ll keep my eye out for him,” she added. m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

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child support, but I still had to make some real money. So I went back to school, got my degree and secured the job with the state.” “And you never remarried? I bet you had offers.” Jane chuckled and said, “Thanks for that, but here’s the thing. At age 40, I realized I was gay and finally understood why I really left my marriage with Dan. Anyway, I didn’t act on this self-

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Lighting the Way I n the 1980s and early ’90s, Burlington craftsman and entrepreneur Steve Conant kept in his car a small brass thermometer he’d picked up at a garage sale or antique store. By then, Conant already had a reputation around the Queen City for refurbishing and selling old metal goods and crafting the funky, unique light fixtures that adorned many downtown restaurants and bars. He had acquired, polished and resold many brass objects in his travels, but this one he chose to keep. In the thermometer’s classic, utilitarian design — a simple glass tube with a brass holder — he saw potential for a new product with broad consumer appeal and an opportunity to take his business in a new direction. By 1992, Conant Custom Brass, as the business was then called, had landed an order from retail giant L.L.Bean to make 12,000 replicas of that thermometer. Soon Smith & Hawken, a national mail-order company, was placing orders for thermometers, too. “It absolutely took off,” Conant said. “I thought I must be a wizard, because people liked what I liked.” This wasn’t the first time Conant had remade his company, and it wouldn’t be 28

the last. That little brass thermometer is emblematic of his business acumen. A consummate maker and entrepreneur, Conant has an intuitive ability to gauge changing consumer tastes and shifting market forces that helps him chart a course out ahead of the trends. The evolution of Conant and his company, today called Conant Metal & Light, could be taught in business schools as a case study in nimble entrepreneurship. Arts programs and trade schools could also use it as a model of how to make a living as an artist or craftsperson. Over four decades, Conant’s creations have become fixtures of Burlington’s South End Arts District. Among the most prominent is the 6,000-pound, steampunk-inspired rocket ship pointing skyward outside the Soda Plant, the warehouse-turned-business-incubator that Conant owns at 266 Pine Street. He also crafted the rhinoceros head that juts out of the clapboard at 270 Pine Street, above the craft boutique Thirtyodd. If you’ve ever spotted a white MINI Cooper zipping around Burlington with a jet engine strapped to its roof, that’s Conant’s doing, too. The engine actually shoots flames at the push of a button.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Burlington maker Steve Conant keeps evolving his business — and the South End BY KEN PICARD What inspired Conant to make that and other oddball items he’ll most likely never sell? “I just love the concept of putting something out there that gets people’s attention and makes them happy,” he explained with a smile. Conant and co.’s more functional works can be found far beyond Burlington. The business has restored light fixtures that hang in the Shelburne Town Center, the Vermont Statehouse, the governor’s mansion in Maine and Edith Wharton’s onetime home, known as the Mount, in Lenox, Mass. The shop’s custom fixtures illuminate such prominent Manhattan eateries as Balthazar in SoHo and Sardi’s in the Theater District. Conant’s individual clients have included fashion designer Ralph Lauren, television actor and producer Bob Keeshan (aka Captain Kangaroo), former Beatles drummer Ringo Starr, and actor and puppeteer Jim Henson. (Conant made the remote-control eyes used in a Muppets stage production.) Arguably, however, Conant’s most important works aren’t his celebrity sales or his blinking Muppet eyes. For 40 years, Conant has forged lasting business and mentoring relationships with young artists

Julia Irish at Pitchfork Farm & Pickle


and entrepreneurs whose work continues to reshape the look and character of Burlington’s postindustrial, ever-evolving South End. For attendees of the annual South End Art Hop, the Soda Plant — a warren of art studios, offices, a gallery, and food and beverage enterprises — has become “the gateway to the South End,” in the words of one tenant. Conant not only contributes to the Hop’s marketing and advertising but often can be seen standing on a ladder during the event, painting walls or hanging lights. “Steve’s awesome! I love his vision,” said Julia Irish, a farmer and fermenter at Pitchfork Farm & Pickle, a Soda Plant tenant as of last January. “And he’s never walking by without a giant smile on his face.”

WHERE THE SOUTH END MEETS

double its size in newly renovated quarters on the north end of the building. Conant has been more than a landlord; he took an interest in the Wisniewski brothers’ business back when it was a solo operation based in a Generator cubicle in Memorial Auditorium. One day, Wisniewski recalled, Conant approached him and said that whenever he was ready to “graduate” from Generator, Conant would have commercial space available for him. In 2018, when Conant renovated part of the Soda Plant, he enlisted the architecture firm co-owned by Aaron’s dad, Michael Wisniewski. “He played a major role in my personal and professional success,” Aaron Wisniewski added, echoing the sentiments of other Soda Plant tenants. “I certainly wouldn’t be where I am today without Steve, that’s for sure.”

BRASS TRACKS

When Conant sat down for an interview in a company meeting room, the tall, bespectacled and gregarious 63-year-old chose a high-top table crafted from a large kerosene drum. The room’s quirky light fixtures were made from repurposed plumbing supplies. Conant is a natural storyteller, and his path to becoming a Burlington fixture is as colorful and varied as the setting where he related it. He grew up in Glastonbury and East Haddam, Conn., with parents whose occupations prefigured his own career of blending industry and artistry. Conant’s father, a mechanical engineer, worked as a traveling machine-tool salesman and had an extensive workshop in the family’s basement. His hobby was building boats. Conant’s mother, a fine artist, painted portraits of hunting dogs and jumping horses for wealthy patrons. After graduating from high school in 1974, Conant attended Southampton College FILE

Bruce Seifer was the first director of Burlington’s Community Economic Development Office. Hired in 1983 by then-mayor Bernie Sanders to run a small-business loan fund, he was charged with projects that included revitalizing the South End. Though Conant was not the first or only business owner to assist that effort, he became one of the most influential, Seifer said. “Steve did practically everything that the city’s strategic plan called for,” he recalled. “He reinvested back in the community. He invested in his employees [with livable wages]. He bought his own equipment. He was innovative. And he was constantly thinking about the next big thing.” Conant has long volunteered on community boards, including those of Burlington City Arts, ReSOURCE, and the South End Arts and Business Association; currently, he’s a board member of Generator, the city’s maker space and business incubator. Chris Thompson is a Generator cofounder who will step down from the executive directorship at the end of this

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year. When he and his colleagues launched the maker space in 2014 in the basement of Memorial Auditorium, they immediately knew they wanted Conant on their board, he recalled. Two years later, Conant and fellow board member Michael Metz led a successful $300,000 capital campaign to relocate Generator to its current home on Sears Lane. “Steve’s an incredibly positive person. He’s totally enthusiastic about all things creative and making. And he’s one of the reasons the South End is what it is now,” said Thompson, who’s lived in the hood for 25 years. “There are tons of businesspeople in the South End. What’s unique about Steve … is that he’s always been very connected and very concerned about the community around him.” Seifer recounted an incident that underscores that concern: In the 1990s, Conant and Marty Feldman, founder and owner of Light-Works, attended a city council meeting dressed in Tyvek suits. It may have been an attention-getting stunt, but it was no joke: Their mission was to protest the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s plan to dig up the Barge Canal Superfund site on Pine Street and entomb its toxic sludge in the biggest building ever constructed in Vermont. According to Seifer, the duo’s “street theater” led to the establishment of a local coordination council that gave neighbors more say over how waste was managed. Conant and Feldman helped change the EPA’s approach not only to that Superfund site but to others like it around the country. As a landlord, Conant has helped dozens of local artists and budding entrepreneurs gain a foothold in Burlington’s creative economy. They include Aaron Wisniewski, cofounder and “mad scientist” at Alice & the Magician, a “cocktail apothecary” that sells aromatic mists and flavored elixirs to high-end bars and restaurants around the country. Last year, Wisniewski and his cofounder and brother, Sam, moved their business from a 550-square-foot space in the Soda Plant to one more than

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on Long Island. Because he loved the ocean, enjoyed sailing with his father, and excelled in science and biology, he initially planned to become a marine biologist. During his first year, Conant took a course on scientific illustration that he loved. He recalled that his instructor visited hospitals and drew anatomically accurate illustrations of surgeries that were later published in medical textbooks. For a time, Conant considered a similar path — until he learned he’d need to get a degree in science and another in art, and then build a portfolio. Instead, he transferred to the University of Vermont and pursued a degree in wildlife biology. Looking to earn extra cash while attending UVM, Conant got a job doing custom renovations at the Déjà Vu Café, which is now home to Three Needs Brewery & Taproom on Pearl Street. He spent his last two years of college helping the owner renovate the restaurant, restoring the bar rails, coatracks, plant hangers and other fixtures. “It was so much fun,” he recalled. “Then the restaurant opened, I graduated and my phone started ringing.” In the meantime, Conant had fallen in love with Margaret, aka “Mags,” Caney, an art teacher who worked at Burlington High School. The pair would marry in 1980. Together, they rented and then bought a 19th-century cottage on Mansfield Avenue, where they raised two daughters and still live. Daughter Molly owns the jewelry studio Rackk & Ruin at 270 Pine. Conant initially used a garage behind their home as a workshop. He printed business cards that read, “Steve Conant, craftsman,” then pounded the pavement on pre-Marketplace Church Street. “Mostly, I starved,” he said. The couple survived on Mags’ teaching salary. In 1979, Conant’s father called him from Mystic, Conn., to discuss a local business called the Brass Shop whose owner, an aging metalworker, was restoring brass and copper items. Conant, then 23, phoned the man and offered him $50 a day to work there for a week and learn the trade. “I was pretty entrepreneurial back then, and it sounded kind of crazy, so he said, ‘Sure, come on down,’” Conant recalled. The metalworker, whose name Conant can’t remember, was “a grumbly old guy who smoked like a chimney and drank too much.” Still, he took Conant under his wing for a week. Customers arrived with andirons and candlesticks that needed polishing, and the owner handed them to Conant and charged the client $15 for 15 minutes of work. LIGHTING THE WAY

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

» P.30 29


Lighting the Way « P.29 Recognizing the potential to earn $60 an hour for himself, Conant returned to Burlington to open his own shop. He stopped at the Bank of Vermont and opened a business checking account for Custom Brass. When he got home, Mags reminded him he should probably have his name in the title. He called the bank back to amend the name, and Conant Custom Brass was born. “At the time, I didn’t realize I was learning about different business models. [Refurbishing metal] just happened to be something that was in great demand,” Conant said. Though he’d set out to be a craftsman doing custom metalwork, “It was the polishing that basically kept the lights on and taught me how to make a dollar.”

THE ALLEY CATS

In 1981, Conant moved his metal shop into a tiny warehouse space behind what’s now Speeder & Earl’s Coffee on Pine Street. His neighbors in the back alley included Homer Wells, a sign painter and metal artist; Tom Drake, who ran a machine shop and later founded Midtown Machine & Tool in Colchester; Tim Colman, a blacksmith; Richard Loveless, a woodworker; and Roger Borys, a guitar maker. The “Alley Cats,” as they called themselves, hung out together, helped solve one another’s mechanical and business conundrums, and occasionally closed up for the afternoon to smoke weed on the roof. “Magical times,” Conant recalled. Unbeknownst to him, “I’d stepped into an incubator space,” he said. “The experiences I had in my twenties being a young entrepreneur were so compelling [that] they just never left me.” Conant quickly recognized that, if he wanted his business to grow, he needed a presence on Pine Street. He began eyeing a small building at 270 Pine, once home to the Burlington Venetian Blind Company, which had made the original blinds for the Empire State Building. In 1982, Conant stopped in and asked the tenants if the building was for rent. No, they told him, but it was for sale, and they were moving out. So, at 24, he approached the owner, Dan Drumheller, about purchasing the building. The price: $50,000. Conant confessed to Drumheller that he didn’t have that kind of money. So the landlord made him a deal: He would rent 270 Pine to Conant for $1,000 a month for three months. If Conant could raise $50,000 in three months, Drumheller 30

would put the rent toward the purchase and do-it-yourselfers. As the retail side price. grew, Conant adopted a tagline: “The best Conant convinced an uncle in Atlanta brass shop in the world.” to loan him $25,000, which he took to the “I was ballsy as a youngster,” he admitbank and used as collateral for a mortgage. ted, “but there were no other brass shops It was his first foray into commercial real in Vermont.” estate. More custom design work came his way The building was in rough shape. through connections with contractors, One day, Conant picked up a hitchhiker builders and architects. By the late ’80s, named Bruce MacDonConant Custom Brass ald, who’d recently was venturing into moved to Burlington contract manufacturfrom Philadelphia to ing, too. Rather than become a woodworker. polishing or crafting The two became friends, single items for indiand Conant hired him viduals, the company to help renovate the manufactured parts in storefront. MacDonald bulk for other compabecame Conant’s first nies. It began by making employee at Conant shiny brass trim for the Custom Brass, and the cast-iron woodstoves two worked together put out by Vermont through much of Castings in Bethel. the ’80s. “That was huge,” Today, MacDonConant recalled. “We ald, 60, is a successful had tractor-trailer metal artist and owner trucks dropping off of HAVOC Gallery in 3,000 pounds of brass the South End; he sells bar that we would brushed-metal wallbend and cut and drill hung pieces primarily and polish and sell in to private collectors sets. And it went on for around the country. years.” But in the early 1980s, But not forever. S TE VE C O NANT he was a woodworker When the economy with “zero” metalworktanked in the early ’90s, ing experience, he said. Conant’s specialty suppliers began selling Working beside Conant, MacDonald their wares to lumber yards and generalrecalled, “was like grad school.” Because he purpose hardware stores, and he lost his had grown up around tools and machinery, exclusivity. As the fixture business dried Conant was “intuitively mechanical” and up, he looked for the next thing. could figure out how to build practically “Coincidentally, at that same time I anything. MacDonald said he wouldn’t be was seeing that other people were making the artist or businessman he is today if not [consumer items], and we were selling it,” for his former boss. Conant noted. “I wanted to make things “Being around Steve’s energy from that other people would sell. I wanted to eight to five, all day, every day, was … for be a maker.” me, [a lesson in], if you want to build a Enter the small brass thermometer business, this is how you do it,” he said. business. Conant Custom Brass had “Steve goes 90 miles per hour. He doesn’t expanded from its compact headquaramble his way through anything.” ters at 270 Pine Street into a much larger warehouse behind the building. Conant dubbed the new facility “Thermoland.” From 1992 until 2008, Conant Custom Brass manufactured brass thermometers and other weather instruments, Throughout the 1980s, as the trend of such as rain gauges and barometers, historic restoration grew nationwide, as well as clocks and bird feeders. Conant’s retail business thrived. He At its height, the company had ventured into selling cabinet knobs, door more than 30 employees and hinges, bathroom fixtures and anything annual sales in excess of $2 else made of finished metal, especially million, he said. shiny brass, which was in vogue. While the thermometers Conant Custom Brass evolved into a were a hit, Conant admitted specialty hardware business, selling big- that not all of his ideas were as name fixtures to contractors, architects successful. He once designed a

I just love the concept of putting something out there that gets people’s attention and makes them happy.

‘THE BEST BRASS SHOP IN THE WORLD’

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

door knocker with a gargoyle face. It didn’t sell. Nor did his letter opener in the shape of a bird’s foot and a feather, or the dustpan he designed for sweeping up ash around woodstoves. Why did some designs succeed while others flamed out? Looking back at his failures, Conant said, he understands why they didn’t catch on: They were niche items in the days before internet retail. In contrast, the thermometers told people the temperature, which everyone wants to know. They were guaranteed for life. And their classic design looked good outside any home, regardless of style. Those three traits — universal function, lifetime guarantee and classic design — defined Conant’s business model for the next 15 years. In the 2000s, however, “China started knocking us off like crazy,” Conant said. No copyrights could protect his company’s designs, which were essentially antique reproductions. The knockoffs competed with his thermometers, the most lucrative component of Conant’s business, and “I knew the future wasn’t bright,” he said. So, in April 2008, he sold Conant Custom Brass to Weems & Plath of Annapolis, Md., which makes fine surveying, weather and nautical equipment. Some of the employees moved to Maryland, but m o s t s t a ye d . Conant downsized and changed the name of his


FILE PHOTOS: LUKE AWTRY

FIZZ IN THE SODA PLANT

Steve Conant at the Soda Plant

Alice & the Magician

remaining operation, which made custom light fixtures, to Conant Metal & Light. Conant’s employees in those days included Christy Mitchell, a South End artist who’d previously worked in the Lamp Shop on Pine Street. Mitchell, who’s now executive director of SEABA, had a passion for making lamps out of found objects, such as old cameras and radios. “He would hand me objects to turn into light fixtures,” Mitchell recalled. “I’m a creative person; I came in there, and he kind of gave me free license to be creative. And it just happened to work.” Over the following decade, Conant Metal & Light continued to evolve, capitalizing on the trend toward energyefficient lighting. With internet commerce burgeoning, the company could buy materials from anywhere in the world. Rather than crafting a one-off fixture made from, say, a rusty farm implement, Conant could

buy scores of antique blue canning jars or telephone pole insulators and turn them into lamps. The sale of Conant Custom Brass had opened up a lot of space in the building. At the time, Mitchell dreamed of combining studio spaces with a gallery. She proposed the idea to Conant and opened the S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in 2009. The venue, which includes an exhibition area and small studios for 12 artists, just celebrated its 10th anniversary. “That’s kind of the theme of how he works. You can pitch stuff to him, and if it works, he’d be like, ‘Go for it!’” Mitchell said. “It’s kind of nice to have a landlord who lets you come up with ideas and run with them.” Conant Metal & Light now has 18 employees and has become the contract manufacturer for a line of high-end light fixtures sold by OCHRE, a company based in New York and London. It’s a strong relationship, Conant said, and he’s still passionate about what his business makes. “But even that could slip away. Anyone can be replaced,” he added. “That’s just the nature of any business today.”

Conant acquired the Soda Plant, adjacent to his headquarters, in the era of Conant Custom Brass’ expansion. But while his need to occupy all that space has since dwindled, the role of the Soda Plant in anchoring the South End has only grown. By the late 1990s, Conant was renting warehouse space in the former bottling facility for Venetian Ginger Ale. In 1999, landlord Phil George, who also founded Leonardo’s Pizza, agreed to sell to Conant. The Soda Plant wasn’t just a wise investment, Conant said. It meant business security and a new palette. “I could get to play to my heart’s content,” he added. “The future was bright, and I knew we could fill this building with people making things.” Conant had long envisioned creating an incubator space similar to the alley he’d originally occupied behind Speeder & Earl’s: a haven for hardworking and creative entrepreneurs. And he wanted to contribute to their success. Before buying the property, Conant had joined the board of the nonprofit Recycle North, now called ReSOURCE. Over years as a fellow tenant, he’d watched the poverty-relief organization grow, with a mission of job creation and environmental reclamation that he saw as similar to his own. ReSOURCE acquired items that many considered junk, taught people how to fix them, sold them and reinvested the proceeds back into the enterprise. Thomas Longstreth is the founder and executive director of ReSOURCE. Shortly after launching the nonprofit in 1996, he said, he recruited Conant for his board, on which Conant served in various positions for years. Whenever operational challenges arose at ReSOURCE, Longstreth said, Conant was someone he could go to for insight. Conant left the board in 2017, around the same time that ReSOURCE moved from his building to Williston. “I really enjoyed working with Steve,” Longstreth said. “He’s just a smart, agile thinker who is always reinventing things and can figure out what will work.” Five years ago, Conant informed Longstreth that he wouldn’t renew ReSOURCE’s three-year lease in the Soda Plant. But Longstreth said this development occasioned no hard feelings between them, and Conant actively helped the nonprofit find its new home. “We had a long run there, and it just wasn’t the right space for us anymore,” he said of the Soda Plant. “And, to be honest, Steve was giving us a really discounted rate.” After ReSOURCE moved out, Conant had 20,000 square feet of vacant space to rent. In early 2018, he borrowed against his

equity and subdivided. He threw himself “whole hog” into renovating the space, which opened earlier this year. Conant could have torn down the warehouse, erected a hotel and made a killing. But he felt both an obligation to create new business spaces and a passion for doing so. Because he’d charged ReSOURCE such low rent, he could continue charging below-market rates to his new tenants while making his mortgage payments, thereby creating a lower barrier for those businesses to grow. “So it’s worked out beautifully,” he said. On a recent weekday afternoon, the north end of the Soda Plant bubbled with entrepreneurial fervor. At Tomgirl, a cluster of diners munched on salads, which featured pickles and microgreens provided by Pitchfork Farm & Pickle just across the hall. In an adjacent room, customers checked out CO Cellars, a collaboration of Shacksbury cidery and ZAFA Wines. Earlier this year, the newly opened tasting room made Time magazine’s prestigious list of “World’s Greatest Places 2019.” Down the hall, in a section of the Soda Plant that still looks like a warehouse, artist Aaron Stein was incorporating old license plates into one-of-a-kind sculptures and jewelry. Around the corner, artist Moe O’Hara, aka Recycle Moe, used found objects to create “upcycled” works of art, including magnets, notebooks and switch plates. O’Hara, who owns Thirty-odd, said she’s pleased with the recent improvements to the Soda Plant. “It’s a great place to work. There are a lot of creatives around, which is awesome,” she said. “And there’s now coffee in the building.” Conant now has 35 tenants in 50,000 square feet. Though he knows he could charge higher rents, he sees no reason to. “I don’t have to make a pot of money on this building,” he said. And if he lost working-artist tenants like O’Hara and Stein, “it wouldn’t be the same place.” For about a year after buying the Soda Plant, Conant recalled, he didn’t sleep well at night, worrying about whether he could make his monthly mortgage payments. With age has come wisdom, he said, and less fear about what the future holds. “My personal passion is still being creative and making things,” he said. “I recognize that this business will evolve, as it always has. But I picture dying in the house we bought and working in a workshop ’til I’m 90.”  Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at conantmetalandlight.com and thesodaplant.com.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

31


COURTESY OF TAYLOR K. LONG

Tales From the Script

CULTURE

Two teams of Vermonters create creepy podcasts B Y D A N BOL L ES & MARGARET GRAYSON

P

ossibly the biggest trend in commuting right now? Listening to stories of chills and mayhem via our phones. It’s been five years since Sarah Koenig reshaped true-crime reporting with her podcast Serial, whose imitators are legion. The wildly popular My Favorite Murder, in which two comedians discuss killings, netted its makers a high-profile book deal. Fictional podcasts have also thrived, reviving the old radio serial format, and many are equally creepy. From the cultural phenomenon Welcome to Night Vale (currently being developed for TV by FX) to The Black Tapes (purchased by NBC), unsettling tales have never been easier to stream into your headphones. Compared with films and TV, podcasts are cheap to produce, which makes them a magnet for grassroots creators. (They’re also free to consume, so many creators monetize them by selling ads, tickets to live shows, or memberships on the crowdfunding platform Patreon.) While Vermont can’t currently boast its own S-Town or The Magnus Archives, locals are busy at the mic spinning tales of horror, both historical and fictional. We got an earful of two of them. 

INFO

JIM D

UVA L

Listen to These Dark Mountains on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or Stitcher; and to Pulp! From Beyond the Veil on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and SoundCloud. Find episodes, transcripts and more at thesedarkmountains.com and pulpfrombeyond.com.

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Cody Sullivan (left) and Zach Husband

SPOOKY CHILLS AND THROWBACK THRILLS

Most horror fans can tell you the first scary movie or book that sank its hooks — or fangs or claws — into them. Much like sci-fi and comic-book die-hards, horror nerds love a good origin story. But few can claim an introduction to creep shows quite like that of Cody Sullivan of Windsor. “My grandmother gave me The Evil Dead when I was 7 or 8 years old,” he said with a ghoulish grin over wings and beers at the downtown Windsor Station Restaurant & Barroom. For ’fraidy cats, The Evil Dead is widely regarded as one of the most influential and flatout scariest horror movies of all time. Owing to its gore and other viscerally disturbing elements, Sam Raimi’s 1981 supernatural masterpiece carries an NC-17 rating. You could argue that it should never be shown to anyone, let alone a kid. Fortunately, Sullivan seems to have turned out OK — though in this case, “OK” means “totally twisted.” “Fast-forward 20 years later, and I’ve got a horror podcast,” he said. Sullivan, 28, is the host, creator and mastermind behind Pulp! From Beyond the Veil, an anthology series of original short horror and sci-fi stories. Along with his 31-year-old neighbor, writing partner and coproducer, Zach Husband (pen name Gustav Grift), Sullivan has been creeping out fans for more than a year. Think spine-tingling

tales of murderous scarecrows, sinister insurance salesmen, malevolent pottery and, in one especially grisly episode, a slacker warlock/pizza delivery boy. Pulp! currently has 10 episodes; its season finale, which concludes a two-part cliff-hanger, comes out on Wednesday, October 30. Typically composed of two to four shorts interspersed with cheeky fake advertisements, Pulp! evokes the feel of an old-time radio play. Sullivan, who largely engineers the episodes by himself, has become increasingly adept at weaving sound effects and moody music around the performances of his voice actors, most of whom also hail from Windsor. But the multifaceted podcast’s true inspiration comes less from radio than from another vintage medium: pulp comics. “I wanted to have an audio format that was like an old pulp magazine,” Sullivan said. “So, instead of just throwing a couple of stories up, we could do a bunch of different things — fake ads, serialized stories, reviews.” Pulp! is also influenced by classic eerie TV anthology series such as “The Outer Limits,” “The Twilight Zone,” “Are You Afraid of the Dark?” and HBO’s “Tales From the Crypt.” The last is an especially relevant touchstone, as it was based on a pulpy comic-book series. Sullivan’s stories — such as “The Vile Goblet,” about a fortune-telling chalice whose prescience comes at a bloody cost — tend to have a gothic bent. “His approach is a bit more like ‘The Twilight Zone’ — uncanny happenings in familiar settings,” said Davis McGraw, a Windsor musician who’s voiced roles in several Pulp! episodes.


D. B.

A LANDSCAPE OF BEAUTY — AND CRIME

Hinesburg writer Daniel Mills launched These Dark Mountains, a true-crime podcast about Vermont history, this summer. The first episode, “The McCaffrey Murders,” opens with a young woman’s disappearance: On a winter morning in 1906, Tressa Dustin went missing from her room in Brattleboro. In the first few minutes, listeners follow Dustin’s tracks through the snow to a nearby river and discern the cause of her death to be suicide. Next, like a camera slowly panning out to reveal a larger scene, narrator Mills carries the reader back in time to Dustin’s origins. We learn she was the daughter of Matthew McCaffrey, who committed two horrifyingly brutal murders. MARGARET GRAYSON

Husband, by contrast, unnerves with more of a bizarro aesthetic that often winks at Robert E. Howard, creator of stories featuring Conan the Barbarian and other sword-and-sorcery classics. “Zach’s sensibility is a little more farout and wacky,” McGraw said. “He hits more of those [H.P.] Lovecraft beats.” “Nerd shit,” Husband joked. “They find ways to tell stories that are interesting but don’t lean into trope-y scary things,” said another Windsor musician, Chris Goulet. He cohosts his own Shiny Podcast and masters each episode of Pulp! in addition to providing occasional voice work. Goulet and McGraw both play in the Pilgrims, a band that’s part of the Windsor record label and musicians’ collective What Doth Life. Several members of What Doth Life turn up in Pulp! episodes, along with other community members, underscoring that the podcast takes a village (of the damned?) to produce. “Cody and Zach are both extremely talented,” Goulet said. “But they take that and create something that other people can’t help but want to take part in.” Among those people — albeit serving as an adviser and not a performer — is Windsor author and supernatural folklore expert Joe Citro. Sullivan said he regularly meets with Vermont’s “Ghostmaster General” for advice. “I like to tell people I’m the second spookiest guy in Windsor,” Sullivan said. While Pulp!’s first season is spooky, entertaining and, especially in more recent episodes, well produced, it’s perhaps best viewed as an experiment. Sullivan has an acting and literary background, and Husband is a talented writer, but neither had previous experience with the podcast format. They concede that it took several episodes and a lot of trial and error for Pulp! to hit its stride. “I always tell people to go backwards,” Sullivan said. “Start at the end and work back to the pilot.” Most of Season 2 of Pulp! is already written, and it’s slated to begin airing biweekly starting in spring 2020. As part of the second season, Sullivan and Husband hope to record a live performance in front of an audience, among other goals — including increasing their revenue via Patreon. But the overall mission will remain the same: scary stories, told well. “We love these kinds of stories, and this has just become such a fun creative outlet,” Sullivan said of Pulp! “At this point, I can’t imagine not doing it. And if other people enjoy it, too, that’s even better.”

telling of the McCaffrey murders, he notes parallels between the harsh Vermont winters and McCaffrey’s descent into madness as his family grew. “Winter came. The snows drifted round the house, penning the family inside like so much livestock. Inside, the atmosphere, surely, was poisonous. The house was small, too small, and home now to 11 persons,” Mills says. Later, the weather theme recurs: For 15 years he reared his children, raised his cattle, plowed his acres of stones into pastures. Meanwhile, the winters stretched, longer each year, and Matthew was alone and drowning, his mind like a current turned inward, drawing him down. Mills said he wants to correct the idea that Vermont is, and has always been,

THERE’S THIS DESIRE TO WANT TO

UNDERSTAND THE HORROR THAT IS OUT THERE. D ANIEL M I L L S

People familiar with Vermont crime history might have heard of those murders, Mills said in an interview, but he hadn’t seen anyone delve into the effects they had on McCaffrey’s children. So he decided to cover them on the first episode of his monthly-to-bimonthly podcast, which is now on its seventh episode. Mills is best known as the author of two historical novels (Moriah, Revenants) and a story collection (The Lord Came at Twilight), all of which he classifies as “gothic fiction” or horror. In his new venture, he tells true Vermont crime stories in a voice made for public radio, accompanied by equally soothing music by his brother, Jon Mills. Daniel Mills excels in drawing the Vermont landscape into his tales. In his

pastoral and perfect. Rural life can be difficult and isolating. Raised in Hinesburg, Mills chose to raise his own family there, a choice he called “economically challenging.” “Vermont has a very turbulent landscape history,” Mills said, referring to the heyday and subsequent collapse of industries such as lumber and agriculture. “I do, at least, know these places ... That’s something that I can bring that’s very relevant and unique.” As a kid, he populated the land around him with imaginary characters. Today, Mills finds stories by poring over old newspapers for mentions of crimes. Some of the cases are more commonly known, like the story of Clarence Adams, which Mills covered in Episode 2. He

credits his discovery of this case to a book by Vermont author and folklorist Joe Citro. While Citro hasn’t heard the podcast, he said in a message, he offered a glowing assessment of Mills: “Daniel is a wonderful writer and an all-around creative guy.” Mills researches his podcast in spare moments between his job in grant management at the University of Vermont and parenting two young daughters. He said the bus rides between Burlington and Hinesburg offer a great opportunity to squeeze in moments to work. He has no real plans to monetize the podcast and isn’t sure how many people listen to it. Listening to These Dark Mountains is akin to walking through an old cemetery and realizing how many of the gravestones mark tragically short lives. It’s far more sad than spooky. Mills said he’s drawn to reading and writing stories that are like puzzle boxes, and that some critics have called his writing not “scary” enough to qualify as horror. “I find sadness, and a certain kind of beauty in sadness, to be what the [horror] genre is about,” Mills said. “It’s human drama, and it’s tragedy … It’s universally arresting.” He resists the urge to sensationalize his stories, leaning instead toward giving the listener a sense of conclusion. The simplest answer is often the right one, Mills said. Himself an avid listener to true-crime podcasts, Mills said he often finds their structure unimaginative. He disapproves of the “cottage industry” that has grown up around speculation about what happened in crime cases, such as the 2004 disappearance of Maura Murray in New Hampshire, which spawned online rumors, TV episodes and even books. But Mills understands how people can be so morbidly enthralled by true crime. “You’re seeing people placed under unimaginable pressure and responding in ways that are surprising,” he said of the genre. “We live in a time of great anxiety … There’s this desire to want to understand the horror that is out there.” These Dark Mountains suggests that the very landscape Vermonters treasure can sometimes draw out the horror within our communities. The hills and valleys that make the state so postcardworthy are also home to shadows. M.G.

Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com, margaret@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

33


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JAMES BUCK

Anomaly Detected Vermont paranormal investigators bust your ghost assumptions BY M EGAN FULWILER

Betty Miller

I

t started with rattling doors and shaking beds. Then Jennifer Dunbar smelled smoke and heard heavy footsteps when no one else was home. Twice, when she was sleeping, she was pushed into her pillow until she couldn’t breathe. She moved to a different bedroom. Then she saw the little boy in a white, puffy-sleeved shirt standing in the corner. He was blue and wet. Dunbar, who lives in an 1850s-era house in St. Albans, was used to odd creaks and cracks, but when she found an old photograph in her attic of that same little boy, she called the Paranormal Investigators of New England. PI-NE investigates all aspects of the paranormal, from ghost sightings to cryptozoology — including Lake Champlain’s legendary monster, Champ — to UFOs. “It’s anything that can’t be explained by science,” said PI-NE director Betty Miller. “Tell us what you have, and we’ll go check it out.” Miller’s team investigated Dunbar’s home multiple times using a video camera and a digital voice recorder to capture electronic voice phenomena. On their third visit, they experienced what they call an “acknowledgment” during a questionand-answer session when the flashlight in the middle of the floor turned on and rolled away. In their final report, Miller’s team recommended a cleansing of the

home; Dunbar chose to bring in a minister to perform it. After the cleansing, the more serious problems stopped, Dunbar reported. “Now it’s just doors slamming and people whispering, but nothing violent,” she said. “You get used to hearing things. When I hear a rattling door, I just give it a few minutes and then go on with my day. It doesn’t bother me anymore.” Miller said that it’s not uncommon for activity to go quiet for a while but then return. The best thing is for the homeowners themselves to cleanse the space of any bad energies, acknowledged Miller: “You want them to declare their space and reclaim it.” Burning sage is a good start (Miller recommends white sage over green for its better burn quality), but palo santo wood — which is native to South America and means “holy stick” in English — is even better. “We’re in the process of helping [Dunbar] get more support,” Miller noted. Based in Essex Junction, PI-NE is composed of nine volunteers who travel the region tracking down unusual activity. Most of their investigations take place in private residences, but they’ve also investigated businesses and institutions including the Swanton Public Library (“substantial evidence of activity”); the Adirondack History Museum in Elizabethtown, N.Y. (“possible activity”); and

the Community Center in Jericho (“no evidence of activity”). Their services are free of charge and, just as importantly, free of judgment. Finding volunteers who are a good fit for the team is important to Miller. “We only take on good team players,’” she explained. New volunteers meet with Miller to talk through the team’s code of ethics and sign waivers. Then, though most have studied paranormal activity and already have their own equipment, they shadow different investigators to gain exposure to a range of approaches. “They have to find their own style,” said Miller. Her own experiences with paranormal activity started when she was 19 years old and living in a Victorian-era apartment in Exeter, N.H. After weeks of unexplained phenomena — finding shades drawn when she got home even though she’d left them open; previously unplugged fans plugged in and blowing; sudden severe drops in temperature — she saw a full-bodied apparition of an old man in an overcoat at the foot of her bed. Years later, when her children were older, Miller decided to become an investigator. She joined PI-NE in 2008 and became the director two years later. Miller said that for a long time she didn’t talk openly about her paranormal investigations, but as television shows such

HALLOWEEN

as “Ghost Hunters” and “Ghost Nation” became popular, they became easier to talk about. “People have been pretty accepting of it and don’t mock me, so that’s been nice,” she said. “I’m out there doing what I do and having fun.” Still, being a paranormal investigator isn’t easy. Members of Miller’s team have been pushed, scratched and even burned by mysterious sources while investigating. Plus, there’s the time commitment — all investigations take place on weekends — and the expense: Investigators buy their own equipment, pay their own travel fees and contribute dues to maintain the website. Currently, the PI-NE team includes one medium (who sees apparitions) and many sensitives (people who can feel energy in any form), but everybody brings a different skill and perspective. “I don’t want everyone thinking the same way, because then you only get one result. I want lots of results,” said Miller. “I don’t want tunnel vision on my team.” By the time people call PI-NE, a situation in their home “is usually severe,” Miller went on. “We’ve had clients so distraught that they can’t be in their house and are sleeping in their car.” As the self-identified “techie” on her team, she is all about measurement: of ANOMALY DETECTED

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

» P.36 35


36

Paranormal Investigators of New England equipment

WE’RE ALL PROFESSIONALS;

WE’RE NOT SOME GOTH GROUP IN THE BASEMENT.

BE T TY MIL L E R

Video camera footage from a recent investigation

COURTESY OF BETTY MILLER

electromagnetic fields, fluctuations in temperature and acoustic anomalies. An unexplained electromagnetic field, as well as sudden changes in temperature, are considered evidence of paranormal activity. The investigators’ job is to go in, use their equipment and produce a report. “We don’t claim to take care of it. We can’t cleanse it. We don’t promise to get rid of it,” Miller said. “We’re there to answer one question: Is there something in your home? “We’re equipment-based and datadriven,” she continued. “We don’t chant. We’re all professionals with day jobs; we’re not some goth group in the basement.” Miller would like to banish the misinformed image of paranormal investigators sitting around a Ouija board. And don’t call her a ghostbuster. “I’m not busting any ghosts. I’m not hunting any ghosts,” she said. “We’re trying to detect the energies in the surroundings, no matter what they are.” Anyone who thinks they are experiencing paranormal activity in their home or workplace can fill out a contact form on PI-NE’s website or Facebook page, Miller explained. The team’s case manager schedules initial interviews; all cases are vetted with extreme caution. “There are a lot of crazy people out there!” she said with a laugh. The investigators conduct a thorough phone interview with, and run a background check on, a potential client. Then they schedule a site visit to assess the conditions of the space itself — the team has encountered hoarding, rats and even domestic-abuse situations — before they return with their equipment. One of the worst cases PI-NE has investigated involved a house in northern Vermont in which the residents routinely found knives jammed into their kitchen walls underneath messages scrawled in red ink. “This case is on the down-low to protect the clients’ privacy,” Miller said. “And a lot of the investigators got injured.” Her team spent three years working on this house, and even helped the owners bring in priests, a shaman and a medium (a step they don’t normally take with clients). “But in the end, it was something that was never going to be removed,” Miller said with a sigh. “It was like Amityville of Vermont,” she added, referring to the subject of the 1977 book (and later films) The Amityville Horror. Recently, Miller’s team investigated Jerilyn Langsdon’s 1930s home in Brandon. Langsdon has experienced mysterious things there for 12 years — the TV suddenly turned on, her stepfather’s urn moved, the sound of heavy footsteps — but

JAMES BUCK

Anomaly Detected « P.36

because she worked a night shift, she chalked it up to fatigue and coincidences. When her boyfriend and his three children were about to move in, however, Langsdon wanted to make sure her home was safe. So she turned to PI-NE. She’s currently awaiting the team’s final report, but, she told Seven Days, the investigators think the spirit of her late husband could be responsible for the activity. “Whatever is here isn’t malevolent, but more like a warning or a concern,” Langsdon said. “That’s comforting, so I hope [PI-NE] comes back to do more digging.” “They’re really professional,” she added. “They don’t ever tell you your feelings are wrong. They just listen and take it all in. And then they analyze it scientifically.”

HOUSE CALL

I was curious to see a paranormal investigation in action, especially because my partner and I had recently moved into a new house that seemed to have some strange sounds at night. Miller agreed to demonstrate her equipment, with the assurance that she wouldn’t “stir up anything unwanted.” On a recent Sunday afternoon, she visited me in North Ferrisburgh, toting three hard-backed suitcases.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

If you’re picturing, say, a jump-suited Kate McKinnon from the 2016 Ghostbusters remake, stop right there. Miller, a demure grandmother from Jericho, was wearing jeans and driving a BMW. A standard investigation setup always includes multiple video cameras and a digital audio recorder, but Miller relies on a range of additional tools to establish “a basis of validity.” She handed me a pair of headphones to put on and plugged them into what looked like a small megaphone — called a parabolic amplifier — that investigators use to detect hard-to-discern sounds such as whispers. Silence, it turns out, has many layers of sound. Another common tool, the Spirit Box, resembles a transistor radio and is used to scan AM/FM frequencies. Miller toggled the dials back and forth as static filled the room. “Everything exists on a frequency, so we’re trying to give the spirit tools to communicate,” she explained. “You can use this for a simple question-and-answer session. I’m not talking about a radio station, but listening for the voices in between.” Other tools include a simple flashlight and a 360-degree periscope that detects static electricity. “It’s hard to see during the day,” conceded Miller. The PI-NE team has learned that night investigations are better. “We’ve tried to investigate during the day, but it’s always failed,” she said. “You can’t see shadows, and there’s a lot of extra noise like traffic or kids playing. We’ve had to throw out all our audio from day cases.” Next, Miller pulled out a K-II EMF meter that investigators use to detect electromagnetic energy fields. It looked a bit like a TV remote. She walked around my kitchen looking for energy pickup; when she approached the microwave, the red lights flashed. “It’s very basic,” she said. The last tool was Miller’s favorite: a Kinect SLS camera (also known as a

“digital dowser”) that maps bodies in 3D. Developed first for video gaming, the Xcam SLS software uses an algorithm of temperature, light and distance to detect a presence (such as a spirit or my partner who happened to walk through the room). Red dots appear on the screen with the message “anomaly detected.” When the camera locks in on a body, red lines connect the dots (think of the classic game Hangman) and reports “anomaly acquired.” As Miller explained, “It’s one thing to think you have a spirit, but it’s something else entirely to see it mapped.” She’s especially excited about a promising new tool designed by the PI-NE team’s inventor, Carlton Sheldon. The prototype involves inducing hypnotic trances to tap into the subconscious mind to better communicate with spirits. “It’s our responsibility to investigate, but we also need to bring the field forward,” Miller commented. The new equipment is still in the research and development phase, so details must be withheld. But Miller had just tested it for the first time at an investigation. “Did we make a breakthrough? We’re not sure yet — it needs further evaluation — but it blew our minds.” At the close of Miller’s demonstration, I breathed a sigh of relief. Nothing in my house had registered on her equipment. She nodded in agreement: “Whatever’s here is pretty benign.” As she packed up her equipment to leave, she warned me that a lot of paranormal groups “are in it for themselves and not for the client.” Miller is critical of investigative practices she considers reckless, such as provoking a spirit by “demanding” that it show itself, or issuing open “invitations” by asking, “Is anything here?” She stressed the importance of choosing words carefully. “You don’t want to invite just “anything” in with this equipment. After a period of time, something’s going to answer your knock, you know?” Numerous books, movies and TV shows feed our fascination with the unknown and unexplainable. The investigators of PI-NE take that curiosity to the next level, trying to understand it by studying it, looking for evidence and asking what — or who — is there. “Is there life after death? There’s something going on — we don’t know what it is — and when we die, we’ll all know the answer,” Miller said. “But we want to know now. With this new equipment, we’re getting closer all the time.” m

INFO Learn more at pi-ne.org. A list of Vermont paranormal societies can be found at paranormalsocieties.com.


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Serving Shakespeare Theater review: Much Ado About Nothing (*at Dinner), Middlebury Actors Workshop B Y A L E X BROW N

T

THEATER

LOURIE KEEPS THE ACTORS IN CONSTANT MOTION BUT

STAGES THE MOVEMENT TO FEEL LIKE EFFORTLESS DANCE.

38

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

with the inner fervor of a great English domestic. As Dogberry, the constable who spews malapropisms, Small becomes a sheriff in over his head, balancing incompetence with a courtly gait and quickly doffed hat. Ethan Bowen plays the half brothers Don Pedro and Don John, the former an amiable prince and the latter a literal and figurative bastard. Bowen lets their similarities show, using the same fierce gaze to play them both with eyes glowing like coals, but gives John a sneer and a slouch, and Pedro a regal bearing. Lindsay Pontius is a warmhearted Leonata. Her big emotions almost toss her about as she plays the perfect dinner hostess with operatic gusto. Maren Langdon Spillane shines in a host of roles, especially as a chatty, enthusiastic ladies’ maid to Hero. Costume designer Jenny Fulton uses a strict black-and-white palette, the better to show off the main characters in dreamy evening wear and to apply simple accents for character changes. The goofy members of the watch sport black raincoats and Groucho Marx glasses, easy to don and doff. The men’s tuxedo shirts show well with jackets or on their own with suspenders and cummerbunds. Beatrice wears a show-stopping black cocktail gown and Hero a heart-melting white dress. Period music sweeps viewers into the postwar setting, from the energy of jitterbug to the smooth pleasure of big-band numbers. At its best, comedy bubbles over and sweeps reason aside, leaving an audience powerless to resist. In the opening-night performance at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater, prior to shows at Burlington’s FlynnSpace, the fine cast executed a deception of its own by concealing the effort beneath an acrobatic, soaring show. m COURTESY OF PETER LOURIE

he endlessly witty Beatrice and actors in constant motion but stages the all the more impressive executed in a cockBenedick in William Shake- movement to feel like effortless dance. tail dress. She doubles as the reprobate speare’s Much Ado About Nothing Choreographer Elisa Van Duyne adds Conrade, with a wise guy’s cigar stub, hat have taught decades of Holly- several ballroom and dancehall pieces, but and delivery. wood screenwriters how to use bickering as even during dialogue the graceful actors Craig Maravich is a keen-eyed Benedick, prelude to a swoon. Setting the play in the twirl and sweep to engage each other. letting his eyes dance over a room in search 1940s suits these precursors of Hepburn Though Lourie worked out a conceit of fun. When they light on Beatrice, he and Tracy, and the Middlebury Actors for a setting limited to a dining room, the teases her peevishly, the flip side of flirtaWorkshop production does a hilarious job rationale is unimportant the moment tion. Doubling as Don John’s shady henchof exploding their romantic nihilism. the play begins. The program tells us it’s man Borachio, Maravich slits his eyes and The play is about deception, used for to be a play within a play, performed by sucks in his cheeks to pout. Physically, good and ill. A love affair is launched when an acting company that’s reunited after Maravich is a joy to watch as he dances, well-meaning friends play a trick on lovers the war. That frame never asserts itself glides, hops up on furniture and scuttles who won’t woo without some encourage- because these performers don’t address into hiding. ment. Another romance is torn apart when a villain deceives a young man about his fiancé’s fidelity. But the play is a comedy from start to finish, and the villain’s work is foiled by yet another deception, augmented by hapless citizens serving on the city’s night watch. Comrades in arms Claudio and Benedick have distinguished themselves in a war and are now set to relax with Prince Don Pedro at the wealthy Leonata’s estate. She’s mother to young, marriageable Hero and aunt to the motherless Beatrice, marriageable but for her suitor-repelling sarcasm. Claudio falls for Hero in a heartbeat, while Benedick trades barbs with Beatrice. Shakespeare put them in the Italian city of Messina sometime in the 16th century. Director Melissa Lourie parks the play in Leonata’s dining room right after World War II. An elegant dinner party lets the aristocratic characters shimmer in tuxes and gowns, dance to big-band swing, and even don masks for anonymous wooing. Lourie summons the romantic style of Bogart and Bacall and the From left: Craig Maravich, Madeleine Russell and Chris Caswell musical energy of Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington. The original play has about 20 speaking roles. Lourie’s adaptation retains nearly all of them, structuring the each other as actors, nor do they need As Hero, Madeleine Russell lights up action so eight actors can switch into all of scripts or even a director to enact some the stage, brimming with youth. She’s the roles. It’s a feat of theatrical organiza- pretty stupendous effects. affecting as the victim of cruelty, then tion, but it takes no toll on the play. Every Lourie’s adaptation makes painless cuts humorous as a member of the watch. scene is preserved, and the actors have to the text and yields a perfectly paced Eric Reid-St. John is a bright, bold just enough time to don the hat, coat or two-and-a-half-hour running time. Claudio, ready to revel in peacetime and mannerism used to identify a particular Chris Caswell, as Beatrice, shows o holding his wine glass with expansive character. ff the character’s bravura wordplay by ease. As Verges of the watch, his old-man Staged in the round, the show makes a slyly checking that the other characters walk is priceless. virtue of the difficulty in blocking for all are getting the jokes and admiring their Steve Small plays a butler who handles points of the compass. Lourie keeps the author. Caswell’s funny physical gags are all stray exposition and serves Leonata

Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Much Ado About Nothing (*at Dinner), by William Shakespeare, adapted and directed by Melissa Lourie, produced by Middlebury Actors Workshop, Friday, November 1, 8 p.m., and Saturday, November 2, 2 and 8 p.m., at FlynnSpace in Burlington. $26-30. flynntix.org


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food+drink

Radical Ramen A noodle bar opens in the Mad River Valley B Y S A LLY POL L AK

T

he first time I ate at Stoke Ramen Bar in Waitsfield, I showed up for a late lunch and took a seat at the bar. Chef Colby Miller, who works in an open kitchen, walked over to talk to me. As I considered building my own ramen bowl, he suggested

an alternative: On my inaugural visit, I should eat from the “curated” side of the menu, featuring meals designed by the chef. I took Miller’s advice and ordered the Staff Meal ($14), an option I assumed Miller not only created but also eats. (The

menu offered a hint: “Not gonna lie, we eat pretty darn well.”) Within five minutes, Miller delivered a delicious meal in a deep ceramic bowl. It was essentially brothless ramen: a layered and lovely tangle of noodles, Napa and purple cabbage, duck fat, and

toasted garlic, all tossed with tamari and maple syrup. It was served with pickled daikon and topped with chopped scallions and a splash of chile oil. Living it up for no reason except a RADICAL RAMEN

» P.42 JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

FIRST

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Considerable Bummer AWARD-WINNING CHEESE PRODUCER TO CEASE PRODUCTION CONSIDER BARDWELL FARM of

West Pawlet has announced that it will stop all manufacturing and selling activities after 15 years in business, citing financial fallout from a recent recall. The award-winning raw cow’s- and goat’smilk cheese producer made the announcement last Thursday on its social media channels, explaining that its “current funds do not allow us to continue manufacturing and selling our cheeses.” On September 30, Consider Bardwell announced a recall of its Dorset, Slyboro and Experience cheeses because of possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes — “an organism that can cause

serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems,” according to the recall announcement posted by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Listeria contamination is unusual in Vermont, which has a robust rawmilk cheese industry. The bacteria were found during “routine testing of finished products and the manufacturing environment,” the report said. No illnesses had been reported in connection with the company’s cheeses at the time of the recall, which was a “voluntary and precautionary recall initiated by Consider Bardwell Farm,” the report noted. In response, Whole Foods Market issued its own voluntary recall for stores that carried the affected cheeses throughout the Northeast.

Consider Bardwell cheese was also sold at farmers markets in Vermont and New York City. Consider Bardwell owner ANGELA MILLER is also a New York literary agent who has represented food-world celebrities such as Mark Bittman. Miller signed Thursday’s announcement, which said that, based on a financial review, “We simply do not have the cash flow and resources to recover from the recall and sustain our business to move forward.” Attempts to reach Consider Bardwell Farm have been unsuccessful. In other local cheese news, the VERMONT CHEESE COUNCIL announced that seven Vermont producers won medals at the World Cheese Awards,

SIDE DISHES

» P.43

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sunny fall day in the Mad River Valley, I drank a couple of shot glasses of sparkling sake. I was stoked, pun intended. Miller and his wife, Mimi Bain, opened Stoke Ramen in late July in the Village Square Shopping Plaza, south of the center of town. The strip mall is anchored by Mehuron’s Supermarket, a family-run store that’s been in operation for nearly 80 years. On one side of Mehuron’s is the original Mad Taco, a Mexican restaurant that opened in November 2010; on the other, Canteen Creemee Company, a snack shack that’s been serving roadside fare since the spring of 2016. Stoke Ramen stands across the parking lot from Canteen Creemee, in the space most recently occupied by Sol Juice Bar. The restaurant got its name after Bain and Miller spent three weeks kicking around ramen puns such as “Holy Ramen Empire” and “Ramen With the Devil.” Finally, Miller had had enough. He recalled saying, “I don’t care what its name is. I’m just stoked that we’re doing this.” Stoke stuck. The restaurant’s central feature is a simple wooden bar lined with high chairs. A couple of wrought-iron tables flank the front door, and a side lounge area offers a colorful couch, coffee table and bookshelves. Paintings by Bain’s late mother, Mary Duffy, hang on the wall — and their color and composition inspire guests to look again. The noodle bar is an easy place to feel comfortable, equipped with a Wi-Fi password that’s humorous and ramen-appropriate. Bain (front of the house) and Miller (on-view chef ) are behind the bar five days a week. Miller, 39, grew up in Granville and has been “gigging around” in restaurants for about 20 years. He was a chef at Mad Taco for five years and has worked at Hostel Tevere in Warren. “I’ve always liked ramen, ever since I was a kid,” he said. “On past menus, I’ve had a ramen dish as one item.” Bain, 31, studied in the Addison Repertory Theater program at Middlebury Union High School and has worked in various aspects of theater, including direction, costume design and production management. This last role, she said, proved a useful experience for running a restaurant. Before the couple opened Stoke Ramen, Bain spent three and a half years as a manager at the Pitcher Inn in Warren. Last winter, she also bartended at Hostel Tevere. Owning her own restaurant is a “more intimate 42

PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Radical Ramen « P.40

Mimi Bain and Colby Miller

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

AT THE END OF THE DAY,

IT’S NOODLE SOUP. COL BY MIL L E R

experience” than working at someone else’s, she said. “We’ve got this child that we have to tend to in so many different ways,” Bain went on. “It was almost like daycare working for other people. We were babysitters, and now we’re the parents.” When I returned to Stoke Ramen for a second meal — dinner — the “parents” had the TV on above the bar, playing muted reruns of “The Golden Girls.” While waiting for its full liquor license, the restaurant is offering a selection of wine and beer. Bain’s mixing “fun wine cocktails,” she wrote in an email, including Into the Mystic, a Nigori (sake) mojito; and This Is Just to Say, a plum wine sour with egg whites. My friend and I, seated at the bar, shared a small bottle of sake and split a pair of appetizers. The Eggs n’ Bacon ($12) was exactly as it sounds: a mini breakfast-at-dinnertime delight. The seven-minute egg was marinated in tamari and sake; the pork belly was fatty and thick. We combined these with our other starter, a dish called Et tu Bruté? ($9) that presented a mélange of cabbage, pea shoots, garlic and braised daikon, popping with flavor from added bonito flakes. For my main course, I again opted for a curated ramen bowl. The Sports Ball ($20) was a spicy and creative meal built on noodles in chicken broth with tare (ramen’s main seasoning) that was flavored Buffalo-style. In the bowl were eggs, pork belly, chopped cabbage, pea shoots, scallions and a thick slice of blue cheese. Melting into the soup, the cheese gave the broth a creamy heft. The Buffalo heat, I learned later, came from Frank’s RedHot. (This had to be the first time I’d driven 40 miles for a shake of Frank’s.) “That’s kind of a play on hot and sour soup,” Miller told me about the Sports Ball by telephone. “In that tare, Frank’s gives it the character, the tamari gives it the seasoning, and mirepoix rounds out the broth.” Miller changes the menu often. At my request, he emailed a list of ingredients he has in mind for upcoming ramen bowls, including short ribs, confit duck, apples, housemade pork sausage with ginger, and birch syrup. He combines his bold and playful approach to making ramen with a pretty chill attitude. “At the end of the day,” Miller said, “it’s noodle soup.” m Contact: sally@sevendaysvt.com

Eggs n’ Bacon appetizer

INFO Stoke Ramen Bar, 5081 Main Street, Waitsfield, 496-5081, stokeramen.com


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Side Dishes « P.41 judged on October 18 in Bergamo, Italy. Gold medals were awarded to Bayley Hazen Blue and Moses Sleeper from Greensboro’s CELLARS AT JASPER HILL FARM. Other entries from Jasper Hill received silver and bronze medals. PARISH HILL CREAMERY in Westminster West, CABOT CREAMERY COOPERATIVE, SPRING BROOK FARM in Reading and VON TRAPP FARMSTEAD in Waitsfield also took home medals, as did collaborations of

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Double Duty MARK BBQ TO OPEN NEIGHBORING EATERY

About a year after opening MARK BBQ in Essex Junction, chef-owner DARRELL LANGWORTHY

will launch a second restaurant in the same building. HEART N SOUL BY MARK BBQ will open in December at 34 Park Street, he said. Heart n Soul will serve “inspired comfort food,” including chicken-fried steak, fried chicken, crab cakes and a grilled portobello mushroom burger. Entrées will come with a choice of starch — creamy risotto, creamy polenta or truffle mashed potatoes — and a vegetable of the day. Specials will include vegetarian and vegan options. The 35-seat

Darrell Langworthy

restaurant, with additional outdoor seating in warm weather, will have full table service. Mark BBQ, which opened in October 2018, grew out of a food truck that Langworthy had launched the previous spring. “We’ve just had such great outpouring from the community for the barbecue,” he said. “A lot of people said they miss some good old-fashioned comfort food, down-home food. We decided to give the people what they want and open a comfort-food restaurant.” Langworthy, 40, will serve as chef of both restaurants. His chef de cuisine at Heart n Soul is SHAUN TREPANIER, whose

experience includes co-owning Berda’s, a now-closed restaurant at the Essex Experience. Heart n Soul will serve beer and wine and be open for lunch and dinner Thursday through Saturday; its hours will expand to five days a week in the spring, Langworthy said. “I can literally walk out one door and into the other and be at both places,” he noted. Heart n Soul will occupy the space that was recently vacated by LAZY FARMER, a restaurant and caterer. Efforts to reach the Lazy Farmer on Monday were not immediately successful.

CONNECT

Sally Pollak

EVERY WEEK AT HOTEL VERMONT VISIT FOR OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR 41 Cherry St - Burlington Untitled-24 1

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80 Church Street Burlington, Vermont

Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: Seven Days: @7deatsvt; Jordan Barry: @jordankbarry. Untitled-10 1

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To Market, to Market Burlington Farmers Market vendors assess their first year on Pine Street B Y J O R D AN BAR RY

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undled in layers for the 50-degree weather, vendors carefully stacked bins of leftover delicata squash and beets, packed up unsold pastries, and disassembled their tents. It was a classic farmers market scene — and the final one of the season at Burlington’s market on Saturday, October 26. But, as the vendors reassured curious customers throughout the day, this wouldn’t be their last appearance on Pine Street. “Dealer.com has assured us another year as Saturday tenants at 345 Pine Street, and our steering committee has decided we will be in that lot for 2020,” Mieko Ozeki, the market’s general manager, told Seven Days. According to Ozeki, the City of Burlington had approached the market with a proposal to return downtown next year, offering to host it on St. Paul Street between College and Maple while City Hall Park remains under construction. That park, currently in the midst of a twoyear renovation, had been the market’s summer home for nearly 40 years. “We didn’t feel comfortable with that proposal,” Ozeki said. “We’ve invested so much in the lot on Pine Street, and Dealer .com has been very generous to us.” On weekdays, the lot is used for overflow parking for Dealer.com employees; this year, the company charged the farmers market just $60 to use it on Saturdays. “It’s not simple to move,” said Ozeki, who became the market’s GM in September, taking over for outgoing executive director Chris Wagner. “The farmers market is a whole community; it’s an experience that we’re shipping to a location.” Market goers and vendors have now “experienced” the Pine Street site for a whole season — 25 consecutive Saturdays from mid-May through October. The reviews are mixed. The South End location is a trek for customers used to the market’s central spot downtown. Limited parking — along Pine Street, in the nearby Maltex Building lot and at Dealer.com — has been a continual complaint. But did those issues actually keep shoppers away? The market does not require vendors to report their sales but does collect optional, anonymous data; the aggregate of this

George van Vlaanderen serving a grilled sausage sandwich at the Doe’s Leap Farm booth

year’s reporting will be shared with the vendor community at the market’s annual meeting. So, to answer our question, we spoke with vendors across the market’s categories — agriculture, prepared foods and crafts — who represent a range of prior market experience and occupy various locations around the lot (chosen based on seniority). They shared their perspective on the benefits and disadvantages of being on Pine Street and how the past season has affected their businesses. “I approached the new location with a lot of trepidation,” said George van Vlaanderen, owner of Does’ Leap Farm. His diversified organic farm in East Fairfield has long sold goat cheese, pork and grilled-sausage sandwiches at the Burlington market. Like many vendors, van Vlaanderen worried that it would be a struggle to draw tourist traffic and regular downtown customers to the South End. His fears were somewhat justified: Van

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Vlaanderen said his sandwich sales were down 30 to 35 percent from previous years. In response, he added, “I upped my social media game, sharing videos and pictures of what we do behind the scenes — the stuff people don’t know goes into sausage.” Despite the income hit, van Vlaanderen understands the steering committee’s decision to stay on Pine Street for another year. “Now we have an opportunity to build on the potentially new clientele in the South End,” he said. “Even at this location, it’s the best market in Vermont.” Jane Pomykala, owner of Pomykala Farm in Grand Isle, said she misses the park but thinks vendors and market staff have made the most of being in the parking lot. “We were very fortunate, because it’s not easy to move a group that big to one location,” she said. “The steering committee searched long and hard, and I’ve been really proud that everyone’s made the best of a hard situation.” Katharine Montstream echoed that optimism. The Burlington painter owns

Montstream Studio, which has been a regular at the market for 23 years. “We have a brick-and-mortar [shop] outside City Hall Park,” Montstream said. When the market was also there, one person — often her husband, Al Dworshak — could handle sales in both locations. “At first I said, ‘I’m not going to do the market on Pine Street,’” Montstream said. “But I realized very quickly that was a mistake, and we were lucky to get a spot and be part of it.” Spending her Saturdays at the market proved inspiring for the artist, who said she had forgotten how it felt to connect directly with patrons. “It’s been a surprisingly good year for us here,” she said. The layout and physical attributes of the parking lot on Pine Street differ radically from grassy, tree-lined City Hall Park. Everyone had to adjust. Alexx Shuman, owner of the smallbatch marshmallow confectionery Nomadic Kitchen, was new to the


food+drink Burlington market this year. She quickly learned the hazards of rain on a hardpacked gravel lot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first day, I had a moat around my tent, and I had to build a bridge,â&#x20AC;? Shuman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was actually a great talking point with my customers, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know this was in the job description!â&#x20AC;? Despite some puddle-filled days â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the dust stirred up on hot, dry ones â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shuman liked the lotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking and ease of setup and breakdown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a vendor, that makes your life a lot easier,â&#x20AC;? she said. Ian Bailey, another first-time market vendor with his Winooski-based Vivid Coffee Roasters, appreciated the openness of the space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It felt like you had breathing room to walk through the market and really look at everything,â&#x20AC;? he said. Bailey applied for a spot at the market after learning that Northern Bayou Cold Brew â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous cold-coffee vendor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was moving to Maine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ben [Lee, of Northern Bayou,] openly shared what the market had been for him,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sales are not as good as I expected, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a profitable experience.â&#x20AC;? Both Bailey and Shuman plan to be back next year, if the market will have them. The bylaws of the Burlington Farmers Market designate both businesses as â&#x20AC;&#x153;provisional vendors,â&#x20AC;? meaning they were granted a one-season trial and will need to reapply for membership. According to Ozeki, the market currently has about 75 vendor members, each of whom is guaranteed an annual spot as long as they follow the rules. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about the Burlington Farmers Market,â&#x20AC;? Bailey said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has momentum: mass times velocity. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a cool, unique thing that Vermonters will show up wherever it is.â&#x20AC;? For Shuman, the market has been a business incubator. She tracked data all season: the number of visitors to her booth, each person who sampled her wares, each purchase. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m basically figuring out what my conversion rate is,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taught me that the way I feel about a market at the end of the day has no correlation with what actually happened.â&#x20AC;? Bailey Hale, who owns and operates Ardelia Farm & Co. in Irasburg with his husband, Thomas McCurdy, found the highs and lows less predictable in the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thomas has a real gift: to look at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales, the weather and whatever event might be in town, and bake exactly what we need so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re selling out just before two oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock,â&#x20AC;? Hale said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was harder to gauge this year.â&#x20AC;? In addition to McCurdyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pastries, Hale sells flowers that he grows on their Northeast Kingdom farm. Flowers have always been a smaller part of their market sales, but this year that aspect of the business is just breaking even.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much easier to adapt the bakery side of the business than the agricultural side,â&#x20AC;? Hale noted, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making decisions one or two years prior about what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be growing.â&#x20AC;? He calculated that Ardelia Farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total Burlington sales were down close to 20 percent in the new location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first few weeks were huge for us and well above what we generally made in the park,â&#x20AC;? Hale said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I think, once people came to check it out, they got their fill.â&#x20AC;? Even with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lower overall sales, he believes the market is worth the two-hour trip from and to the NEK. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Burlington market has changed our lives, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the majority of our livelihood

EVEN AT THIS LOCATION,

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE BEST MARKET IN VERMONT. GEORGE VAN VL AAND E R E N

now,â&#x20AC;? Hale said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those of us who farm are used to the unexpected. That adaptability means that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just keep on adapting.â&#x20AC;? Hale plans to ship more flowers to wholesale markets in New York City to make up for the summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss in Burlington â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest market in Vermont. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No winter vacation this year,â&#x20AC;? he joked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Or maybe for a week instead of a month.â&#x20AC;? In contrast, the summer was bountiful for Full Moon Farm, an organic operation in Hinesburg run by Vermont Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman and his wife, Rachel Nevitt. Full Moon had some of its top markets of all time this year, Zuckerman told Seven Days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For us, selling weekly consumptive produce and meat products, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had quite robust sales here,â&#x20AC;? he said of the Burlington market. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was a really solid growing year, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to maintain a wide range of products for the full season.â&#x20AC;? Full Moon Farm occupies four market blocks, a unique double-deep and -wide setup that encourages customers to pass through its tent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were trying to figure out how customers would walk around the market and how to get them to walk through our stand and see something they otherwise wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have seen,â&#x20AC;? Zuckerman explained. That structure, along with market pickup for the farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CSA members, helped to draw in customers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel so fortunate to live in this area, because people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t solely require convenience as their bottom line,â&#x20AC;? Zuckerman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This [Pine Street location] is a little less convenient for a lot of people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; parking is a little tricky â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but everybody has made the adjustments to make it work.â&#x20AC;?

Ozeki is responsible for the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-term logistics (including location issues), running the event each week and managing the nonprofit as an indepenOCTOBER SPECIAL dent entity. She believes this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transition has shown that customers will follow 1 large, 1-topping pizza, the Burlington Farmers Market. 12 boneless wings, 2 liter Coke product â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big mind-set Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working to relay to the vendors: to remind people that they are the destination,â&#x20AC;? she 2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product said. Ozeki and the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steering commitPlus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 10/31/19. tee are already planning how to improve Limit: 1 offer per customer per day. the lot for both vendors and customers Order online! next year. She hopes to revamp the layout We Cater â&#x20AC;˘ Gift Certificates Available to make sure no vendors are â&#x20AC;&#x153;hiddenâ&#x20AC;? and 973 Roosevelt Highway, Colchester to distribute the flow of foot traffic more 655-5550 â&#x20AC;˘ Order online! evenly. threebrotherspizzavt.com Despite its previous long-term location on city property, the market is not 9/30/19 1:24 PM a municipally supported endeavor, and12v-threebros100219.indd 1 operating it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cheap. The approved budget for May 2019 to April 2020 is $126,755, though Ozeki expects the actual figure to be higher, due to unanticipated expenses resulting from the move. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget was $150,090. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be seeking sponsorships to support everything from bike parking to waste management,â&#x20AC;? Ozeki said. Stepping into a leadership role during a transitional time hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fazed Ozeki. LOCAL INGREDIENTS, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taking on a model that has existed FAMILY RECIPES & OUR VERY OWN for decades,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has its systems, and vendors have their understandings CRAFT BEER of how it all works, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much modernization that can happen and so much awareness we can build.â&#x20AC;? Some vendors link â&#x20AC;&#x153;modernizationâ&#x20AC;? to the notion of permanence. Asked what improvements could be made to the Pine Street lot, Ardelia Farmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hale said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In an ideal world, it would be wonderful if a lot like this could be owned by the market.â&#x20AC;? Ozeki stopped short of seconding  Haleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suggestion. But she did allow that   the market may not return to City Hall Park if the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s redesign canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accommodate its needs: 1,200 linear feet of frontage for a minimum of 85 vendors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a production and an entity that requires the right space. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about finding a long-term future,â&#x20AC;? Ozeki said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good place to do that, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Hall Park or some other lot, pit, plot or whatever that may be, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where we want to be.â&#x20AC;? m

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INFO Burlington Farmers Market, 345 Pine Street, Saturdays, May through October. The indoor Winter Farmers Market returns to the University of Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dudley H. Davis Center on Saturday, November 9. For the schedule and vendor info, visit burlingtonfarmersmarket.org.

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 Â  SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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O C T O B E R

WED.30 agriculture

FARM-TO-SCHOOL REGIONAL GATHERINGS: Locavores gather to build connections with peers and farm-to-school practitioners. Refreshments are provided. Willing Hands, Norwich, 4:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@vermont farmtoschool.org.

business

BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: In a 10-week class presented by the Center for Women & Enterprise, aspiring entrepreneurs gain the confidence and knowledge to launch a small business. Rutland Economic Development Corp., 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870. ONRAMPS, UPRAMPS & OFFRAMPS: DEVELOPING TALENT ON THE ROAD TO SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: More than 150 business people gain new tools for unbiased recruiting, supporting retention and developing employee leadership skills from this Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility fall program. Killington Grand Resort Hotel, noon-5:30 p.m. $60-75. Info, 862-8347.

cannabis

EDIBLE WELLNESS: A Q&A demystifies the benefits of consuming cannabidiol. Attendees treat themselves to sweet CBD delights. RabbleRouser Chocolate & Craft Co., Middlesex, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090.

3 0 - N O V E M B E R community

COMMUNITY DISCUSSION: Steps to End Domestic Violence representatives and local officials come together to learn about domestic violence. Area residents are welcome. Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School, South Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 6583131, ext. 1063.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Creative types get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746. KNITTER’S GROUP: Needles in tow, crafters share their latest projects and get help with challenging patterns. All skill levels are welcome. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

dance

KINETIC LIGHT: ‘DESCENT’: Inspired by Auguste Rodin’s sculpture “Toilette de Vénus et Andromède,” contemporary choreographer Alice Sheppard’s wheelchair-dance work revels in the sensuality of connection, trust, risk and effort. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15-45. Info, 863-5966. SQUARE DANCING: Swing your partner! Dancers foster friendships while exercising their minds and bodies. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-3 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

environment

YOUR REFRIGERATOR WILL SAVE THE WORLD: Learn how

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND DAN BOLLES. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

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ordinary household appliances can be transformed into valuable energy storage resources. Generator, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0761.

etc.

QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199 Main St., Burlington, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 324-5467.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. CINEMA CASUALTIES: ‘NIGHT OF THE DEMONS’ & ‘DR. BUTCHER M.D.’: A film series dedicated to old-school horror movies presents back-to-back screenings of gory ’80s flicks. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8-11 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406. ‘FOOD EVOLUTION’: Taking viewers from Hawaii to Uganda and beyond, this 2016 documentary focuses on the controversy surrounding genetically modified organisms. Ronald B. Stafford Center, Clinton Community College, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 6 p.m. Free. Info, 518-846-7121.

Poetry Party “Rebecca Starks’ Time Is Always Now unfolds against a backdrop of nature, often permeated in unexpected ways with the human dynamics of family, neighborhood and nation.” This is how Able Muse Press describes the latest poetry collection by Richmond scribe Rebecca Starks, to be released by the publisher on November 1. The local writer and cofounder/ editor in chief of Mud Season Review, a literary journal run by Burlington Writers Workshop members, has shared her work in publications such as the Baltimore Review and the Tahoma Literary Review. Starks shares passages and signs copies of her new book at a reading, complete with light refreshments.

REBECCA STARKS Monday, November 4, 7 p.m., at Richmond Free Library. Free. Info, 434-3036, richmondfreelibraryvt.org.

‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: Some of the Pacific Ocean’s most beautiful islands and marine national monuments grace the screen. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.5014.50; admission free for WED.30

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FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT,, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

NOV.4 | WORDS


The Undead Northern Vermont University-Lyndon’s Twilight Players take full advantage of Halloween weekend to stage a theatrical adaptation of one of the most influential horror films of all time: George A. Romero’s 1968 classic Night of the Living Dead. Student actors Victoria Rose and Talon Pace portray siblings who, upon visiting their late father’s grave site, are pursued by zombies starving for human flesh. This production features a minimal set with enhanced sound design for an immersive audience experience. Costumes are encouraged on opening night, with prizes for the best individual, couple and group.

‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’ Thursday, October 31, through Saturday, November 2, 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, November 3, 2 p.m., at Alexander Twilight Theatre, Northern Vermont University-Lyndon. Donations; free for NVU students. Info, 626-3663, northernvermont.edu.

NOV.2 | WORDS

Ghost Stories

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ould the spooky season really be complete without a reading of some of Edgar Allan Poe’s most famous works? In Edgar Allan Poe: Prose & Poetry, MAC Center for the Arts member Bradleigh Stockwell brings the 19th-century author’s words to life with dramatic readings of short stories such as “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Oval Portrait.” Fans of the writer often called the Master of Macabre can also expect poems including “The Raven,” “Annabelle Lee” and “The Haunted Palace.” A man of many talents, Stockwell also performs a musical interlude on his handmade theremin accompanying a screening of a 1928 silent film based on Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

OCT.31-NOV.3 | THEATER Firsthand Accounts Military veterans in Rutland, Caledonia and Chittenden counties have the chance to connect with community members during three town hall gatherings on Sunday. Those who have served their country are invited to speak on what their service means to them — sharing anything from a story to a letter home to the meaning behind a photograph. The meetings are inspired by author Sebastian Junger, who suggests that the focus of each gathering be on the individual experience of war. Nonveterans are invited to listen and learn but should refrain from responding to what they hear.

VETERANS’ TOWN HALL Sunday, November 3, 1 p.m., at Rutland Free Library; Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury; and McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, in Colchester. Free; preregister. Info, kristen.eaton@gmail.com.

EDGAR ALLAN POE: PROSE & POETRY Saturday, November 2, 2-3:30 p.m., at MAC Center for the Arts in Newport. $5 suggested donation. Info, 334-1966, maccenterforthearts.com.

NOV.3 | COMMUNITY SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: Advanced filming techniques expose the planet’s top hunters on land, under the sea and in the air. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

Want to memorialize a loved one?

‘LEONARDO: THE WORKS’: A 2019 documentary provides a close-up look at Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings and paintings. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 11 a.m. $8-13. Info, 382-9222. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: Actor Kate Winslet narrates a virtual odyssey into the largest and least-explored habitat on Earth. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon, 2 & 4 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

We’re here to help. Our obituary and in memoriam services are affordable, accessible and handled with personal care.

‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: An immersive film reveals the astonishing lives of the smallest of animals — think chipmunks and grasshopper mice. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

Share your loved one’s story with the local community in Lifelines.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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holidays

HALLOWEEN MOVIE: Cinephiles have a scream watching a spinetingling picture. Refreshments are provided. See jaquithpublic library.org for title. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. ‘SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK’: Attendees don costumes for a one-day-only showing of this new horror flick about a menacing book of stories. Marquis Theatre & Southwest Café, Middlebury, 5:30 p.m. Donations of money or nonperishable food items. Info, 388-4841.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

MAH JONGG IN BARRE: Fun, friendship and conversation flow as players manipulate tiles. Barre Area Senior Center, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

9/12/19 3:05 PM

YOGA4CANCER: Meant for anyone affected by the illness, this class aims to help participants manage treatment side effects and recovery. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

food & drink

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722.

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SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Nonresidents are welcome. Grandway Commons. Cathedral Square Corporation, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

language

games

Post your obituary or in memoriam online and in print at sevendaysvt.com/lifelines. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020 ext. 10.

RESILIENCE FLOW: Individuals affected by traumatic brain injuries engage in a gentle yoga practice. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

VERMONT FOLK HORROR ROADSHOW: The Vermont Folklife Center presents two spooky films set and made in Vermont: Transformations and The Animal. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-4964.

OWEN ROE WINE PAIRING DINNER: A five-course menu prepared by executive chef Jason Bissell is expertly paired with Owen Roe wines. Edson Hill Dining Room & Tavern, Stowe, 6:30 p.m. $150. Info, 253-7371.

lifelines

CHAIR YOGA: Whether experiencing balance issues or recovering from illness or injury, health-conscious community members drop in for a weekly low-stress class. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

ALL-LEVELS ACROYOGA CLASS: The mindfulness and breath of yoga meet the playful aspects of acrobatics in a partner practice. No partners or experience required. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 798-2651.

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

montréal

‘MYTHIC’: Audience members bop along with the North American premiere of new poprock musical about the Greek goddess Persephone, presented by the Segal Centre for the Arts. Sylvan Adams Theatre, Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 8 p.m. $53-67. Info, 514-739-7944. ‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’: An all-star Montréal cast stages the cult-classic sci-fi musical. MainLine Theatre, Montréal, 8 p.m. $20-50. Info, 514-849-3378.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: Be they accomplished or beginner musicians,

young players find harmony in the traditional music of Burlington’s past and present immigrant groups. Boys & Girls Club, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 881-8500. STUDENT PERFORMANCE RECITAL: Students perform solos and duets by composers such as Bach and Mozart on various instruments. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC CHORUS REHEARSALS: Experienced singers prepare for annual recitals of Handel’s Messiah. Bethany United Church of Christ, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, vpchorus@vermont philharmonic.org.

talks

RACHEL GRIGORIAN: Appearing as part of the Yestermorrow Speaker Series, the landscape architect outlines effective techniques in “Gardening for Storm-Water Management.” Yestermorrow Design/Build School, Waitsfield, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5545. RICHARD TAYLOR: “Quantifying Labile Organic Carbon Dynamics in Antarctic Peninsula Sediments: A Radiocarbon Approach” engages learners as part of the Current Topics in Science Speaker Series. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@north ernvermont.edu. SPOTLIGHT ON WOMEN’S SCHOLARSHIP IN ARTS & SCIENCE: Associate professor Deborah Altamirano and assistant professor Breea Willingham present “Navigating Austerity: Women Immigrant Care Workers in Greece” and “Doing and Living Prison Research: Reflections of a Black Woman Prison Scholar With Incarcerated Relatives,” respectively. Mowry Conference Room, Redcay Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., noon-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-5049. TIMOTHY MORTON: Hailing from Rice University, the Being Ecological author delivers a public keynote talk. Top of the Hop, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-6693.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO HTML5 & CSS3: Tech-savvy students in this three-part workshop learn the base language supporting all web pages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘JORDAN’: Northern Stage presents the world premiere of Brenda Withers’ hauntingly relevant play examining how much humans give away online and


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

what they risk in the technological age. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $19-59. Info, 296-7000.

words

WRITING CIRCLE: Words pour out when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.31 etc.

MEMORY CAFÉ: People experiencing memory loss and their caregivers connect in a relaxed atmosphere. American Legion Post 20, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-3369. QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: See WED.30.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘THE HOUSE THAT DRIPPED BLOOD’: Spines tingle at the sight of four horror stories centered on a spooky rental house. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30. ‘THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW’: Costumed audience members screen this overthe-top cult classic complete with quirky props. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8 p.m. $10; preregister; limited space. Info, 356-2776.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

COMMUNITY LUNCH: Gardengrown fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. HIGH/LOW THURSDAYS: Imbibers take their pick of classy and lowbrow beverages, ranging from sparkling wine to White Claw Hard Seltzer. Stonecutter Spirits Highball Social, Burlington, 4-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 540-3000.

games

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Shaw’s, Shelburne Rd., South Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-5403. CRIBBAGE: Friends connect over a fun-spirited card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: Seniors rise and shine with an exercise program meant to increase bone density and muscle strength. Barre Area Senior Center, 8:309:45 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512. BEGINNING QIGONG & TAI CHI: Beginners and interested advanced players focus on various breathing and movement practices. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. CHAIR YOGA: Comfortable clothing is recommended for this class focused on balance, breath, flexibility and meditation. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512. CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. FALLS PREVENTION TAI CHI I & II: Students improve their ability to stay steady on their feet. Barre Area Senior Center, 3:45-4:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512. SEED CLINIC: Small magnetic beads taped to acupressure points offer support for those experiencing difficult or stressful times. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, clinicseed@ gmail.com. YANG-STYLE TAI CHI: Slow, graceful, expansive movements promote wide-ranging health and fitness benefits. Wright House, Harrington Village,

Shelburne, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

holidays

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HALLOWEEN CHORAL & ORGAN Richmond, VT CONCERT: David Neiweem conducts the Concert Choir, GET MORE INFO OR Catamount Singers and organWATCH ONLINE AT ists in this seasonal favorite VERMONTCAM.ORG featuring spooky classical music, CONSIGNMENT poetry readings and more. Ira Allen Chapel, University of FRIDAY NIGHT NOV. 1 • 6-8:30PM Vermont, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Interior Painting 16t-vcam-weekly.indd 1 10/28/19 3:16 PM Free. Info, 656-3040. Season Pass Rate $295 Exterior Painting

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HALLOWEEN IN DOWNTOWN MONTPELIER: Downtown trickor-treating, a game night, live music and a dance party make for an entertaining holiday for all ages. See montpelieralive. com for details. Downtown Montpelier, 4:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-9604.

Commercial and Residential

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‘PRACTICAL MAGIC’ & COSTUME PARTY: A ghoulish gathering with treats, drinks and prizes for best costumes gives way to a screening of a 1998 picture starring Nicole Kidman and Sandra Bullock as sister witches. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 6-8:45 p.m. $5. Info, 457-3981.

montréal

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‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’: See WED.30.

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music

SERIES 10/18/19

Find club dates in the music section. É.T.É: Élisabeth Moquin, Thierry Clouette and Élisabeth Giroux offer a dynamic and modern vision of Québécois traditional music. Vermont Violins, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. $20; preregister; limited space. Info, mark.sustic@ gmail.com.

RANKY TANKY #1 Album on the Billboard, Amazon and iTunes Jazz Charts!

“soulful honey to the ears” - NPR

BRYAN BLANCHETTE: A concert of contemporary and traditional songs in the Abenaki dialect and English educates and entertains listeners. Moore Community Room, Academic and Student Activity Center, Northern Vermont University-Lyndon, 11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 626-6418.

2:22 PM

SAT 2 STAR WARS READS 1-3PM WITH GALACTIC VISITORS! Costumes encouraged. Free.

TUE 5 SAM BRAKELEY: 7PM SKIING WITH HENRY KNOX Book launch! Free.

SAT 9 SHARON MARCUS: 4PM THE DRAMA OF CELEBRITY A bold new account of how celebrity works.

THU 14 JON CLINCH: 7PM MARLEY

outdoors

A reimagining of Dickens’s classic A Christmas Carol.

SLOW & EASY HIKING: Walkers enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the forest while moving at a gentle pace. Ilene Elliott leads this public Barre Area Senior Center outing. Barre Town Forest, Websterville, 10:10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

TUE 19 PAUL LAUD: 7PM THE HOUSE THAT SANTA ALMOST MISSED Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

Fri., November 1, 7:30 pm Barre Opera House sponsored by:

theater

‘THE BACCHAE 2.1’: Michole Biancosino directs Charles Mee’s THU.31

10/16/19 4:44 PM

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For tix, call 802-476-8188 or order online at barreoperahouse.org

AT ESSEX November THU 7 MEGAN PRICE 7PM & BOB LUTZ: VERMONT WILD Phoenix Books Essex events are free and open to all. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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calendar THU.31

adaptation of the classic Greek play in which the ruler of Thebes refuses to acknowledge Dionysus as a god. Seeler Studio Theatre, Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. $6-15. Info, 443-3168.

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FANTASYFEST: Thespians interpret 10-minute fantastical plays by 10 local playwrights. Valley Players Theater, Waitsfield, 7 p.m. $10-12. Info, 583-1674. ‘JORDAN’: See WED.30, 2 & 7:30 p.m.

You Jan. opens in0. 202

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10/28/19 10:29 AM

‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’: Theatergoers sit white-knuckled as the Twilight Players interpret a 1968 horror film about a group of characters fleeing flesh-eating monsters. See calendar spotlight. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Northern Vermont UniversityLyndon, 7:30 p.m. Donations; free for NVU students. Info, 626-3663.

words

MARGIE SIMS: Childcare, coffee and light refreshments are provided at a reading, Q&A and book signing dedicated to the former Essex Junction resident’s book Launch: Preparing Your Kids for Takeoff. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 373-9127.

FRI.1

agriculture

OCTOBER FARM FRIDAYS: Participants get their hands dirty during a weekly work party on the college’s farm. Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Singles, couples and beginners are welcome to join in a dance social featuring waltz, tango and more. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, 8-9:30 p.m. $10. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Inspired by the 5Rhythms dance practice, attendees move, groove, release and open their hearts to life in a safe and sacred space. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com.

etc.

CIRCUS ARTS TRAINING JAM: Daring individuals perfect skills ranging from juggling to tight-rope walking with CAMP Burlington members. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, burlingtoncamp@gmail.com. VIVA LAS ARTES!: An international-themed buffet dinner whets appetites for live and silent auctions at this fundraiser for the nonprofit community art center. River Arts, Morrisville, 6 p.m. $75; preregister; limited space. Info, 888-1261.

50

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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fairs & festivals

25TH ANNUAL DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL: Artists from Guinea and Senegal join Burlington’s Jeh Kulu Dance and Drum Theater for three days of classes open to the public for observation. Shoppers browse an African marketplace in the lobby. See jehkulu.org for details. Various Burlington locations, 3:45-8:45 p.m. Free; additional cost for classes. Info, 859-1802.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. THE GOLDEN AGE OF HOLLYWOOD MUSICALS: Highlights from 12 classic films made between 1933 and 1960 feature Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, Gene Kelly, and others, with words and music by the likes of Irving Berlin and Cole Porter. Adamant Community Club, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 454-7103. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. MADE HERE SHOWCASE: A juried selection of motion pictures from Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, New York and Québéc grab cinephiles’ attention during three days of screenings. See wrif.org for details. Briggs Opera House, White River Junction. $5-10. Info, 478-0191. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30. ‘ONE TOWN AT A TIME’: This documentary film trains the lens on the 251 Club of Vermont — a group dedicated to visiting each of the state’s 251 towns and cities. Hay Loft, ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 7 p.m. $10. Info, onetownatatimevt251@ gmail.com.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

10/29/19 12:13 PM

‘THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW’: Hot patootie! Props in hand, costumed fans have a rocking good time with this 1975 film about newly engaged lovebirds who encounter an unconventional scientist. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, Havoc Mead tasting, 11 p.m.; movie, midnight. $13. Info, 324-5467. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

GIN AUSTEN: At a costumeoptional cocktail party hosted by local author M.T. Anderson, lit lovers sip specialty drinks from the book Gin Austen: 50 Cocktails to Celebrate the Novels of Jane Austen, prepared by Caledonia Spirits bartenders. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 229-0774. PUBLIC CUPPING: Coffee connoisseurs and beginners alike explore the flavor notes and aromas of the roaster’s current offerings and new releases. Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-6641.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA: Students with limited mobility limber up with modified poses. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. GONG MEDITATION: Sonic vibrations lead to healing and deep relaxation. Yoga Roots, Williston, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $18. Info, 318-6050. MEDITATION PROGRAM: Stress, be gone! Students in this bimonthly gathering unlock a sense of calm through breath work and balancing chakras. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. REI FREE WEEKEND: COMPLIMENTARY YOGA CLASSES: Practitioners take their pick from three days of sessions devoted to developing strength, balance and flexibility. See yogarootsvt.com for details. Yoga Roots, Williston. Free. Info, 206-833-2380. YOGA & WELLNESS WEEKEND: Six classes and a Saturday evening celebration memorialize Jenn Morey, a Vermont yoga teacher who died of cancer in 2017. All proceeds benefit Vermont yoga4cancer programs. See theyogabarnstowe.com for details. The Yoga Barn, Stowe. $20-100; preregister. Info, the yogabarnstowe@gmail.com.

holidays

HALLOWEEN LATTE ART THROWDOWN: Boo-ristas compete head to headless to see who can conjure the spookiest caffeinated creations. Costumes are highly encouraged. Nomad Coffee — South End Station, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 860-1111.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

PEACHAM CORNER GUILD CHRISTMAS SHOW: Small antiques, handcrafted gifts, specialty foods and holiday ornaments beckon buyers. Peacham Town Hall, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. Info, 592-3332.

montréal

‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’: See WED.30. SOUTH ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL OF MONTRÉAL: Cinephiles take their pick of 24 thoughtprovoking films from Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, the United States and Canada shown with English subtitles. Cinéma de Sève, Webster Library, Concordia University, Montréal. Prices vary. Info, info@centrekabir.com.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BRETT HUGHES & THE HONKYTONK CROWD: A band of Burlington-area country singers and players gets boots a-tappin’ as part of the monthly Live From Dibden music series. Dibden Center for the Arts, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 635-1476. DURHAM COUNTY POETS: Whether they’re rocking out or playing unplugged, the Canadian quintet captivates with a mix of sounds ranging from folk to blues to gospel to rock. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. GILLIAN BOUCHER & BOB MCNEILL: Two award-winning Celtic musicians infuse contemporary and traditional songs with percussive guitar and deft fiddle stylings. Private residence, Braintree, 7 p.m. $8-20. Info, 728-6351. LOW LILY: The Brattleboro trio has drawn global acclaim in folk music circles, including from Folk Radio UK, which called the group’s 2018 debut album, 10,000 Days Like These, “an absolute stunner.” Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $20-25. Info, 382-9222. RANKY TANKY: The Charleston, S.C., quintet spreads the timeless music of the Sea Islands’ Gullah culture — think playful game songs, ecstatic shouts and heartbreaking spirituals. Barre Opera House, 7:30 p.m. $22-36. Info, 476-8188. SAM REIDER & THE HUMAN HANDS: The virtuosic accordionist and his six-piece band blend klezmer, folk and gypsy jazz into a complex and lively style all their own in this Lane Series concert. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, preshow talk, 6:30 p.m.; show, 7:30 p.m. $5-30. Info, 656-3131.

seminars

GENEALOGY: Using their memories, the internet and a library card, folks work with Carl Williams to record their own family history. Barre Area Senior Center, noon1:30 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

talks

EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: Champlain College adjunct faculty member Ben Dangl examines “Venezuela Today.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, coffee hour, 1:15-1:45; talk, 2-3 p.m. $5; $45 for the series. Info, 658-6554. HOWARD COFFIN: In “Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816,” the aptly named historian recounts one of the coldest and strangest years on record in the Green Mountain State. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 533-2000.

theater

‘THE BACCHAE 2.1’: See THU.31. ‘DEATH AND THE LADY’: Delia Robinson presents a cranky show for a minor-key ballad tied to two distinct art movements emerging from social disorder. Ecstatic dance follows. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 6 p.m. $15-20. Info, fearnessence@ gmail.com. FANTASYFEST: See THU.31. ‘JORDAN’: See WED.30. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: Take a chance on this Paramount Players production of Catherine Johnson’s acclaimed jukebox musical based on the songs of ABBA, with music composed by former band members Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7 p.m. $20-30. Info, 775-0903.

cultivation, invasive plants, and ending food waste. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $60-70 includes lunch and access to museum grounds and Pizzagalli exhibits. Info, 656-8407.

bazaars

BAZAAR: Handcrafted goods complement homemade jellies, pickles and fudge at this benefit for the United Church of Fairfax. Baptist Building, Fairfax, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 849-6313. COCHRAN’S SKI & RIDE SALE: Snow sports enthusiasts stock up on new and used gear. Camel’s Hump Middle School, Richmond, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, cochran skiclub.info@gmail.com.

SAT.2

agriculture

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crafts

COZY NOOK CRAFT FAIR: Baked goods beckon as people peruse treasures from crafters and artists. Essex Elementary School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

BOSTON BALLET II: Dance devotees lose themselves in an evening of world-class movement by the Boston Ballet’s second company. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $13-28. Info, 760-4636.

WRITER’S BLOCK: Scribes bring essays, short stories, one-act plays and poems to be critiqued by a supportive audience. Barre Area Senior Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

Tire & Service

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OPEN HOUSE: Potential residents open the door to shared housing with a tour, a potluck dinner and an open-stage variety show. Burlington Cohousing East Village, 4-9 p.m. Free. Info, 399-2459.

‘NEWSIES’: Extra! Extra! Performed by the Trumbull Hall Troupe, this musical about a group of spunky New York City newsboys is based on the beloved 1992 Disney movie and features a Tony Award-winning score by Alan Menken. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 603-448-0400.

BOOK SALE: Bibliophiles browse thousands of gently used pageturners, CDs, DVDs and puzzles. Rutland Free Library, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860.

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community

FALL CRAFT SHOW: More than 40 local creatives put jewelry, knit items, maple goodies and more on display. St. Albans City Hall, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 868-7886.

words

DONT BE SPOOKED

HARVEST BAZAAR & COUNTRY STORE: Jewelry, furniture, collectibles and white elephant items attract hundreds of shoppers. Newark Union Church, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 345-1243.

‘MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (*AT DINNER)’: Is not that strange? The Middlebury Actors Workshop presents an update on Shakespeare’s classic comedy, set entirely around a dinner table. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 8 p.m. $30. Info, 863-5966.

‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’: See THU.31.

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dance

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CONTRA DANCE: Nils Fredland calls the steps at a traditional social dance with high-energy music by Polaris. Capital City Grange, Berlin, introductory session, 7:45 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $5-15. Info, 225-8921. RDDI NEW ENGLAND NOW PRE-LAB COMMUNITY FORUM & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP: Regional dance makers come together to advance their understanding of the New England Foundation SAT.2

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South Burlington 1877 Williston Rd.

658-1333 1800-639-1901 Untitled-11 1

VERMONT

10 IS DUE

FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY HOURS: Mon-Fri. 7:30-5 Sat. 8-4 Not responsible for typographical errors

Montpelier 90 River St.

229-4941 1800-639-1900

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for the Arts’ Regional Dance Development Initiative. Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 617-951-0010, ext. 520. THE SHINDIGS: 4PLAY: Seventies and ’80s classic rock selections propel a high-energy dance party. Tunbridge Town Hall, 7:30-10:30 p.m. $10. Info, 738-9602.

10/21/19 2:23 PM

World-class ballet comes to stowe AN EVENING OF DANCE WITH BOSTON BALLET II

INSTANT DECISION DAY/OPEN HOUSE: Prospective students tour the campus and apply for on-the-spot admission. Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1219.

environment

fairs & festivals

CARING FOR OUR HOME GROUNDS: A COMMONS CONSERVATION CONGRESS FOR VERMONT’S CENTER-WEST ECOREGION: Vermont Family Forests hosts a lively conversation centered on what Green Mountain State residents can do to nurture shared air, water and wildlife. Mount Abraham Union High School, Bristol, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Donations. Info, 453-7728.

25TH ANNUAL DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL: See FRI.1, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

etc.

GENEALOGY FAIR: Members of the Barre Genealogy Group, in cooperation with the Barre Historical Society, offer resources for those looking to trace their ancestries. Old Labor Hall, Barre, 10 a.m. Free. Info, mkotch731@ gmail.com.

ATHENA GALA AWARDS CEREMONY: The ATHENA Leadership Award and the ATHENA Young Professional Leader Award honor Vermonters who demonstrate excellence in community service and business. Capitol Plaza Hotel & Conference Center, Montpelier, 5:30-10 p.m. $60; $480 for a table. Info, 229-5711. CENTRAL VERMONT COMEDY & MUSIC SHOWCASE: Lilith, Carter Glass and the Larkspurs get toes tapping, and comics Liz Thompson and Kathleen Kanz elicit big laughs. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 533-2000. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118.

November 2, 2019 - 7:00pm

SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Tickets from $13-$28 | Available online at SprucePeakArts.org Presented in Partnership Between

STOWE, VT

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TARTAN BALL: From food to music and dancing, Scottish traditions take center stage at this annual St. Andrews Society of Vermont soirée. Delta Hotels Burlington, South Burlington, 5 p.m. $55. Info, 985-3903. VERMONT SKI & SNOWBOARD MUSEUM HALL OF FAME INDUCTION CEREMONY & BENEFIT DINNER: John Broadhead, John “JG” Gerndt, Peggy Shinn and others are recognized for their success on and off the slopes. The Lodge at Spruce Peak, Stowe, 5 p.m. $95; cash bar. Info, 253-9911, ext. 202.

education

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and suggestions for equipment, sporting locations and more. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030.

BOLTON COMMUNITY & ENERGY FAIR: Among other highlights, Efficiency Vermont offers free workshops on reducing home heating costs at this fest featuring businesses from Bolton, Richmond and Waterbury. Smilie Memorial School, Bolton, noon. Free. Info, 434-3064.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘I COULD GO ON SINGING’: In her final film, Judy Garland portrays a world-class singer struggling to mend a family relationship. Shown on reel-to-reel 16mm film. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. MADE HERE SHOWCASE: See FRI.1.

PRAY FOR SNOW PARTY: Libations, live music and a retro skiwear fashion contest drum up excitement for the winter season. Burton Snowboards, Burlington, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 206-833-2380.

MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR: Adventure seekers view documentary films celebrating mountain culture, outdoor sports and the environment. Big Picture Theater and Café, Waitsfield, 6-10 p.m. $12-60. Info, 496-3372.

ROBERT SCHUMANN’S ‘WOMAN’S LOVE AND LIFE’: Choreography by Erika Schmidt complements mezzo-soprano Beth Thompson and pianist Gary Schmidt’s performance of the celebrated classical song cycle. Dinner and dessert round out this fundraiser for Stone Valley Arts. Slate Valley Arts at Fox Hill, Poultney, 6 p.m. $30; preregister. Info, 325-2603.

‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30.

STUNT KITE FLIERS & ARCHERY HOBBYISTS MEETING: Open to beginning and experienced hobbyists alike, a weekly gathering allows folks to share information

‘PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON FIRE’: Set in 1770 France, this 2019 documentary follows a painter as she produces a portrait of a reluctant bride — without the bride knowing. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

CHICKEN PIE DINNER: Neighbors catch up over this cold-weather comfort food. Takeout is

available. Essex Junction St. Pius X Parish, 5:30 & 6:15 p.m. $6-10; preregister. Info, 879-6989. CHOCOLATE TASTING: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on-site. Rabble-Rouser Chocolate & Craft Co., Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. GERMAN DINNER: Friends and neighbors sit down to a traditional spread of bratwurst and chicken sausage, sauerkraut, potato salad, homemade applesauce and desserts. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Jericho, 5 & 6:30 p.m. $5-15; preregister. Info, 899-3932. HARRY POTTER GREAT WINTER BALL: Mary’s Restaurant joins forces with Stonecutter Spirits to serve food and cocktails pulled from the pages of J.K. Rowling’s best-selling series. Costumes are encouraged. Mary’s Restaurant, Bristol, 6-8 p.m. $50-76; preregister. Info, 453-2432. ROSEMARY GLADSTAR: Folks become familiar with the worldrenowned herbalist’s new book, Fire Cider!: 101 Zesty Recipes for Health-Boosting Remedies Made With Apple Cider Vinegar. Craftsbury Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 586-9683.

health & fitness

INTRO TO STUDIO CYCLING: Beginners hop in the saddle for a 20- to 30-minute ride with an instructor demonstrating each position. Alpenglow Fitness, Montpelier, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 279-0077. NEWBIE NOON HOT YOGA: First-timers feel the heat as they get their stretch on in a (very) warm environment. Hot Yoga Burlington, noon. Free; preregister. Info, 999-9963. REI FREE WEEKEND: COMPLIMENTARY YOGA CLASSES: See FRI.1.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

YOGA & WELLNESS WEEKEND: See FRI.1.

holidays

HALLOWEEN PARTY: A cocktail hour and golf ball drop set the stage for a holiday bash boasting a dessert bar, a costume contest and DJ’ed tunes. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The Barn at Lang Farm, Essex Junction, 5-10 p.m. $20; additional $20 for golf ball; cash bar. Info, 233-0014. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Fifty creative vendors sell their wares at this festive annual bazaar. St. John Vianney Parish Hall, South Burlington, 9 a.m. Free. Info, 233-0289. PEACHAM CORNER GUILD CHRISTMAS SHOW: See FRI.1, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

language

ARMENIAN LANGUAGE: Singing, dancing, drama and games promote proficiency. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. BIBLIO CAFÉ: A conversation group helps Francophones maintain their language skills. North Hero Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 372-5458.

lgbtq

PRIDE YOGA: LGBTQ individuals and allies hit the mat for a stretching session suited to all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

montréal

‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’: See WED.30. SOUTH ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL OF MONTRÉAL: See FRI.1.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BURLINGTON CIVIC SYMPHONY: Daniel Bruce leads the orchestra in a performance of Schubert’s “Rosamunde” overture and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7 in E major. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $5-20. Info, 863-5966. CATAMOUNT ARTS BLUEGRASS NIGHT: Pete’s Posse and Bob Amos & Catamount Crossing are the featured performers during an evening chock-full of traditional tunes. Masonic Hall, Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 748-2600. DARTMOUTH COLLEGE WIND ENSEMBLE: Led by new director Brian Messier, the student-community band honors anniversaries including Dartmouth’s 250th. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7:30-9 p.m. $12. Info, 603-646-2422. ‘GOAT SONGS OF THE REGIME OF MONSTERS’: Featuring characters such as Michelle Obama and President Donald Trump, a bold new oratorio scored for a

12-part chorus employs words spoken publicly by politicians. Seven Stars Arts Center, Sharon, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, bathory@ bathory.org. IAIN MACHARG & IAN GAUTHIER: Members of the Vermont ensembles Prydein the Catamount Pipe Band, the two musicians use their bagpipe mastery to raise funds for youth services. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. $8-10; free for kids. Info, 426-3581. MICHELE FAY BAND: Elements of folk, swing and bluegrass blend in understated originals and traditional covers. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. MOORS & MCCUMBER: Following an open mic, two talented multi-instrumentalists dole out original numbers as part of the Ripton Community Coffee House series. Ripton Community House, 7:30 p.m. $10-15; preregister for open mic. Info, 388-9782. OLEO ROMEOS: Whether playing folk, blues, country or rock, this veteran group is sure to get toes tapping. Funds raised support the Fairfield Food Shelf. Meeting House on the Green, East Fairfield, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 827-6626. SATURDAY KARAOKE: Amateur singers belt out their favorite tunes. Burlington VFW Post, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Info, 864-6532. SOCIAL BAND: Burlington’s lively vocal ensemble explores dreams through song and poetry in its new program “Measure of the Stars.” Richmond Free Library, 7:30 p.m. $15-18. Info, info@ socialband.org. TRIO SOLISTI: Hailed as “one of the most exciting piano trios in the business” by the New Yorker, the ensemble charms classical connoisseurs with renditions of works by Haydn, Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and Chausson. See nekclassicalseries.org. South Church Hall, St. Johnsbury, 7-9 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-9309.

outdoors

TAYLOR LODGE VIA NEBRASKA NOTCH HIKE: A leisurely outing with the Green Mountain Club Burlington section covers 4.5 miles of ground. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 373-8613.

sports

IMPULSE PRO WRESTLING LIVE: Impulse Pro Wrestling Champion the Masshole Mike McCarthy defends his championship in a high-octane match. Owen Brody, Kalvin Strange and Mac Daniels are also in action. Windsor Recreation Department, 6:309:30 p.m. $10-29. Info, impulseprowrestling@gmail.com.

theater

‘THE BACCHAE 2.1’: See THU.31, 2 & 7:30 p.m. FANTASYFEST: See THU.31. ‘JORDAN’: See WED.30, 2 & 7:30 p.m.

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See FRI.1. METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘MANON’: Soprano Lisette Oropesa and tenor Michael Fabiano star in a broadcast production of Massenet’s classic tale of passion, excess and the consequences of each. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 1 p.m. $1024. Info, 382-9222. ‘MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (*AT DINNER)’: See FRI.1, 2 & 8 p.m. ‘NEWSIES’: See FRI.1. ‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’: See THU.31. RUSTY DEWEES: The Vermont performer known for his persona the Logger brings his signature blend of music, comedy and acting to the stage. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $20. Info, 728-9878.

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words

BOOK & MEDIA SALE: Lovers of the written word bag bargain titles. This month’s inventory includes many mysteries. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

Visit uleva.com/kinneydrugs for a location near you.

BOOK SALE: See FRI.1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. EDGAR ALLAN POE: PROSE & POETRY: The MAC Center’s Bradleigh Stockwell gives voice to such well-known written works as “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “Annabelle Lee” and, of course, “The Raven” in dramatic readings. See calendar spotlight. MAC Center for the Arts, Newport, 2-3:30 p.m. $5. Info, 334-1966. POETRY EXPERIENCE: Writers share original work and learn from others in a supportive environment open to all ages and experience levels. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

N OW AVA I L A B L E AT K I N N E Y D RU GS !

SUN.3 bazaars

ANTIQUES MARKET: The past comes alive with offerings of furniture, glassware, jewelry and more at this ephemera extravaganza. Canadian Club, Barre, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. $2-5. Info, 751-6138. COCHRAN’S SKI & RIDE SALE: See SAT.2, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

community

BURLINGTON TENANT SUMMIT: Renters share their experiences and learn what tenant unions are doing around the country. Childcare and a meal are available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 12:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-0183. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 SUN.3

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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SUN.3

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p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com. VETERANS’ TOWN HALL: Those who have served their country share what their past service means to them. Nonveterans are invited to listen and learn. See calendar spotlight. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester; Rutland Free Library and Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, kristen. eaton@gmail.com.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3:30-6:30 p.m. $6; free for firsttimers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. DARTMOUTH DANCE ENSEMBLE: Choreographers John Heginbotham and Rebecca Stenn reveal works in progress. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., noon & 1 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

Come Learn What We Have to Offer!

ISRAELI FOLK DANCE: No partner is required for a beginnerfriendly session of circle and line dances. Wear shoes with clean soles. Social Hall, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 7:309:30 p.m. Free. Info, 864-0218.

Call Erin Knox today to schedule a Personal Tour at 802-861-4003 or visit our website: gazeboseniorliving.com 1510/1530 Williston Road | South Burlington 1t-explorecomm(quarry hill)103019 1 Gazebo_Personal_7_Days_4.75 x 5.56.indd 1

calendar

10/24/19 10:54 AM 10/21/19 5:24 PM

SALSALINA SUNDAY PRACTICE: Salsa dancers step in for a casual social. Salsalina Dance Studio, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. $5. Info, eingelmanuel@hotmail.com.

etc.

CHILDREN’S MEMORIAL SERVICE: Families honor the memory of youth who have passed away. Ira Allen Chapel, University of Vermont, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 847-4800. DELECTABLE WORDS: Sweets by dessert chefs Nancy Davis and Dianne Schullenberger pair perfectly with readings by writers Luke Shullenberger and Stuart Morigeau. Proceeds benefit the Committee on Temporary Shelter. Dianne Shullenberger Gallery, Jericho, 4 p.m. $25 minimum donation; preregister. Info, 899-4993.

fairs & festivals

25TH ANNUAL DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL: See FRI.1, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. SELF-CARE WELLNESS FAIR: Services ranging from tarot readings to massage make for a relaxing afternoon aimed at nourishing the mind and body. Shelburne Square, South Burlington, noon-4 p.m. Free; $20 for services. Info, 662-1682.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. BEST OF VTIFF 2019: ‘NONFICTION’: A controversial writer invites romantic and emotional fallout when he mines his

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real-life love affairs for material for his explosive new novel. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 533-2000. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. ‘LEONARDO: THE WORKS’: See WED.30, Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $10-15. Info, 603-646-2422. MADE HERE SHOWCASE: See FRI.1. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.2.

health & fitness REI FREE WEEKEND: COMPLIMENTARY YOGA CLASSES: See FRI.1.

SEED CLINIC: See THU.31, 5:30-7 p.m. TECH-ASSISTED MEDITATION MEET-UP: Mobile devices and headphones in tow, participants explore digital tools and techniques for achieving deep focus. Satori Float & Mind Spa, Shelburne, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 498-5555. YOGA & WELLNESS WEEKEND: See FRI.1.

language

‘DIMANCHES’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlez-vous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, steve norman@fastmail.fm.

montréal

‘MYTHIC’: See WED.30, 2 & 7 p.m. SOUTH ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL OF MONTRÉAL: See FRI.1.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CHAMBERWORKS: ARKA QUARTET: Compositions by Haydn, Debussy and David Balakrishnan come to life courtesy of violinists Letitia Quante and Brooke Quiggins Saulnier, violist Stefanie Taylor, and cellist John Dunlop. Top of the Hop, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. COMMUNITY SONG CIRCLE: Singers of all ages and abilities lift their voices in selections from the Rise Up Singing and Rise Again songbooks. Center for Arts and Learning, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 595-5252. DARTMOUTH COLLEGE GLEE CLUB: The vocal ensemble finds perfect harmony in a program pairing Vivaldi’s “Gloria” with contemporary works for chorus and strings. Rollins Chapel, Dartmouth College,

Hanover, N.H., 2 p.m. $12. Info, 603-646-2422. MICHAEL ARNOWITT: A colorful and diverse piano program including the world premiere of “Threads” by Brookfield composer Erik Nielsen. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 4-6 p.m. $5-15. Info, 498-3173. NORTHEAST FIDDLERS ASSOCIATION MEETING: Lovers of this spirited art form gather to catch up and jam. Morrisville VFW Post, noon-5 p.m. Free; donations of nonperishable food items accepted. Info, 565-7377. SCOTT ALARIK: The host of the WUMB radio program “Folk Tales” proves why the Boston Herald called him an “expert weaver of tales, and a droll comic between songs.” Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4962. SOCIAL BAND: See SAT.2, Charlotte Congregational Church, 3 p.m.

outdoors

TILLOTSON & BELVIDERE HIKE: Outdoor adventurers join members of the Green Mountain Club Burlington section for a difficult 8.5-mile trek. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 899-9982.

sports

PUBLIC SKATING: Active bodies coast across the ice. Plattsburgh State Fieldhouse, N.Y., 12:45-2:45 p.m. $2-3; additional cost for rentals. Info, 518-564-4270. REI FREE WEEKEND: PETRA CLIFFS INDOOR CLIMBING: In celebration of the outdoor outfitter’s new Williston location, athletic individuals reach new heights at the indoor climbing center free of charge. Petra Cliffs Climbing Center & Mountaineering School, Burlington, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free; cost of rental gear and classes. Info, 206-833-2380.

theater

FANTASYFEST: See THU.31, 2 p.m. ‘JORDAN’: See WED.30, 5 p.m. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See FRI.1, 2 p.m. NEW WORKS WEEKEND: ‘NATIVE AUTHORS’: A staged reading of a play by Erik Brogger transports audience members to a small town in Nebraska trying to get on the map during the Great Depression. Weston Playhouse Second Stage at Walker Farm, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 824-8167. ‘NEWSIES’: See FRI.1, 3 p.m. ‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’: See THU.31, 2 p.m.

words

BURLINGTON WOMEN’S POETRY GROUP: Female writers seek feedback from fellow rhyme-and-meter mavens. Email for details. Private residence, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, jcpoetvt@gmail.com.


Have you seen or heard the ads asking ‘Can your pharmacy do ________?’

LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

MON.4

Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, clara@pathways vermont.org.

FEMALE FOUNDERS SPEAKERS SERIES: Jules Pieri, cofounder of the Grommet, shares her entrepreneurial experiences. Networking, appetizers and a cash bar round out the evening. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. $15; limited space. Info, 651-0080.

games

business

community

COMMUNITY FORUM: CELLULAR & BROADBAND SERVICE IN THE NORTH COUNTRY: Lawmakers and community leaders weigh in on improving cell coverage in rural and remote areas of New York, including the Adirondacks. Mountain Lake PBS, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 518-563-9770.

crafts

HANDWORK CIRCLE: Friends and neighbors make progress on works of knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch and other creative endeavors. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

FIRST MONDAY MEAL COMMUNITY DINNER: Friends, neighbors and staff members strengthen relationships over a complimentary supper. The

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 6:30 p.m. CORN HOLE: Competitors vie for points in this popular lawn game during 10 weeks of league play. Barre Elks Lodge, registration, 6 p.m.; games, 6:45 p.m. $10; cash bar. Info, 479-9522. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 7-11 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498. PITCH: Players compete in a trick-taking card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Heineberg Senior Center, Burlington, 10:45-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: Supervised clinical interns offer guidance and support to those looking to care for themselves using natural remedies. By appointment only. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, and Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; additional cost for herbs; preregister. Info, 224-7100. GUIDED GROUP MEDITATION: In keeping with the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, folks practice mindfulness through sitting, walking, reading and discussion. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:158 p.m. Free. Info, 505-1688.

language

PLATTSBURGH CONVERSATION GROUP: French speakers maintain their conversational skills in a weekly meet-up. Plattsburgh Public Library, N.Y., 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, ajobin-picard@ cefls.org.

montréal

‘MYTHIC’: See WED.30, 7 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Burlington’s own samba street percussion band welcomes new members. No experience or instruments required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

seminars

SO YOU WANT TO TAKE SOME PICS ... WHERE TO START?: From cost to equipment, the basics of astrophotography come into focus. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

talks

YES.

STATE OF THE WORLD COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS: Activist Sandy Baird leads an open forum reflecting on and analyzing current events in a nonjudgmental setting. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

YES, WE CAN.

theater

METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘MANON’: See SAT.2, Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600.

words

REBECCA STARKS: Selections from the poet’s latest collection, Time Is Always Now, find eager ears. Light refreshments are served. See calendar spotlight. Richmond Free Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

Rutland Pharmacy 75 Allen St., 802-775-2545 Ludlow Pharmacy Okemo Marketplace, Rte. 103, 802-228-2500

River St. Pharmacy Springfield Health Center, 100 River St., 802-885-6800 Springfield Pharmacy 262 River St., 802-885-6400

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Special celebrations are always in season.

TUE.5 business

BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: In a 10-week class presented by the Center for Women & Enterprise, aspiring entrepreneurs gain the confidence and knowledge to launch a small business. Center for Agricultural Economy, Hardwick, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

Hosting special events, holiday parties and your dream wedding anytime of year.

community

Enjoy a romantic winter getaway in one of our guest rooms with a wood burning fireplace.

COMMUNITY DROP-IN CENTER HOURS: Wi-Fi, games and art materials are on hand at an open meeting space where folks forge social connections. GRACE, Hardwick, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 472-6857.

Book Now!

crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

dance

BOLSHOI BALLET IN CINEMA: ‘RAYMONDA’: When her beloved leaves to join a crusade led by the king of Hungary, the title character in choreographer Marius Petipa’s dance work is pursued by a foreign night. Shown on screen. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-2600.

53 Park Street, Brandon 802-247-5463 | lilacinn.com 6H-lilacinn100919.indd 1

10/8/19 4:54 PM

Fall Conference 2019

Searching for Home: Journeys, Quests and Migrations

Kiese Laymon & musician Kinan Azmeh

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy Hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

with author

November 15 & 16 University of Vermont

etc.

CULTS & CULTURE: A brief presentation of the day’s topic paves the way for an open discussion of the harmful effects of misused power. TUE.5

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Morristown Centennial Library, Morrisville, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, gerette@dreamhavenvt.com. SOUND OF SOUL: People of all faiths lift their voices in chanting “HU” as a spiritual exercise followed by contemplation and conversation. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390.

fairs & festivals

RESOLVING WORKPLACE BODY PAIN (PART 1): A two-part talk delves into reversing discomfort related to prolonged sitting, gait abnormalities and postural dynamics. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

Get your tickets today at: flynntix.org | 802 86FLYNN 6H-lyric102319.indd 1

film

10/22/19 10:47 AM

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

T:7”

‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

TUESDAY LUNCH: An in-house chef whips up a well-balanced hot meal with dessert. See barreseniors.org for menu. Barre Area Senior Center, noon. $6; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 7 p.m. MAKE A BOARD GAME: In celebration of International Games Week, creative thinkers of all ages craft their own tabletop pastimes. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

FOMO? T:10”

Exhilarating in every way, Performance around every corner. including the price.

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

The 2019 Mercedes-Benz GLC. High performance meets higher intelligence thanks to 20 or

more driver assistance systems, includingThe Active Assist, to help detect and prevent The 2016 GLA, starting at just $32,500. GLABrake delivers thrills from the moment youcollisions hit the ignition button. LEASE AND FINANCE WILL BE The Automaster BMW FINANCIAL SERVICES. ahead, and DYNAMIC SELECT, which lets you choose the driving mode that best suits you. And, with A SPECIAL racing-inspired dual-clutch transmission makes forOFFERS smoother shifting, while itsTHROUGH advanced engineering delivers film its 9-speed transmission, no thismatter SUV doesn’t cut corners. conquers breathtaking SUV performance what road you’re Iton. All thatthem. insideMBUSA.com/GLC of a sleek, muscular design makes See what’s playing at local the 2016 GLA one extraordinary vehicle—for an equally extraordinary price. MBUSA.com/GLA theaters in the movies section The Automaster BMW and at sevendayst.com/movies. 3328 Shelburne Road STARTING STARTING AT AT THE 2019 music + comedy Shelburne, VTAND 05482 SPECIAL LEASE FINANCE $$ OFFERS WILL ** BE THROUGH The Automaster BMW FINANCIAL SERVICES. GLC Find club dates at local venues in 802-985-8411 the music + nightlife section and www.theautomaster.com The Automaster BMWAND FINANCE OFFERS WILL BE THROUGH The Automaster BMW FINANCIAL SERVICES. SPECIAL LEASE

THE 2016 GLA

32,500 40,700

at sevendaysvt.com/music.

3328 Shelburne Road Shelburne, VT 05482 802-985-8411 The Automaster BMW www.theautomaster.com

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

3328 Shelburne Road Shelburne, VT 05482 802-985-8411 www.theautomaster.com

3328 Shelburne,Vermont Vermont05482-6849 05482-6849 3328Shelburne Shelburne Rd. | Shelburne,

802.985.8482 | TheAutomasterMercedesBenz.com 802.985.8482 | TheAutomasterBMW.com 2016 GLA250 shown in Polar Silver metallic paint with optional equipment. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See Authorized Dealers *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation For more information, calldealer 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com. 2019 GLC 300dealer shownforindetails. Cardinal©2015 Red designo paint Mercedes-Benz with optional equipment. charge and prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details.

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200 Varick St. New York, NY 10014 : Phone 212-805-7500

MR2_GEN_MPNY-P00002066_A

Client: MERCEDES-BENZ USA, LLC RDA

WO: MY19 GLC Toolkit

7/10/19 11:00 AM

Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

health & fitness ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: See THU.31.

COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: See MON.4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments foster physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. SUN-STYLE LONG-FORM TAI CHI: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise for intermediate and advanced players. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. TAI CHI FOR FALL PREVENTION: Beginners boost their strength and balance through a gentle, guided practice. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. TUESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Participants learn to relax and let go. Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-8605.

holidays

NEW DESIGNS WITH HOLIDAY GREENS: Using unconventional textures, flowers and fruit, as well as traditional holiday greenery, participants create unique winter arrangements with help from Valley Flower Company owner Morgan Perrone. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 1-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 649-2200.

language

ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Parla Italiano? Language learners practice pronunciation and more in an informal gathering. Hartland Public Library, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 436-2473. ‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners say it all in French at a social conversational practice. Red Onion Café, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652.

montréal

‘MYTHIC’: See WED.30.

music

Find club dates in the music section. COMMUNITY LULLABY WORKSHOP: Scrag Mountain Music’s Mary Bonhag and Evan Premo lead an exploration of childhood music as part of the

Lullaby Project, a national program that pairs professional musicians with new and expecting parents to create unique songs for their babies. Brown Public Library, Northfield, 7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 377-3161. MILTON COMMUNITY BAND REHEARSAL: New musicians may join the ensemble as its members hone their skills in preparation for their holiday concert. Cornerstone Community Church, Milton, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 578-3467. PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA & CHORALE: Projected images and commentary by Italian Jewish scholar Francesco Spagnolo and PBO’s music director Nicholas McGegan enhance sacred and secular music by 17th-century composer Salamone Rossi. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $30-60. Info, 603-646-2422.

outdoors

SLOW & EASY HIKING: See THU.31.

sports

FREE AIKIDO CLASS: A one-time complimentary introduction to the Japanese martial art focuses on centering and finding freedom while under attack. Open to prospective students. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:157:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

talks

CURRENT EVENTS DISCUSSION GROUP: Sandy Baird moderates a forum for lively and courteous expression of views on the issues of the day. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. PATRICIA ARAUJO: A slide-show presentation titled “Ghost Town Travelogue” transports listeners to deserted Arizona locales. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT WINDOWS: Let’s get technical! Students learn to use the mouse, keyboard and operating system components. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

theater

METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘MANON’: See SAT.2, Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 5:30 p.m. $10-23. Info, 775-0903.

words

BARNES & NOBLE BOOK CLUB: Bibliophiles read into Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. BURLINGTON FREE WRITE: Aspiring writers respond to prompts in a welcoming atmosphere. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 999-1664.


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

SAM BRAKELEY: The scribe launches Skiing With Henry Knox: A Personal Journey Along Vermont’s Catamount Trail, his memoir about traversing a route once traveled by a young American Revolutionary soldier. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. STORYTELLING VT: Locals tell true tales before a live audience. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, deena stories@gmail.com.

WED.6

business

PRACTICE SESSION: INTERRUPTING HATE & ADDRESSING UNINTENDED BIAS: Have you ever wished you knew how to respond to racist comments and jokes? Join Central Vermont Showing Up for Racial Justice to hone effective reactions. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 223-7861, ext. 2.

JUMP/START BUSINESS OF ART: NONPROFIT EXHIBITION MODEL: CURATOR, ARTIST & GRANTOR: Burlington City Arts curator Heather Farrell, creative Elliott Katz and Vermont Arts Council director Karen Mittelman weigh in on their experiences in the world of mission-driven art. Generator, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0761.

BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: See WED.30.

activism

conferences

VERMONT DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE: Discussions of growth, permitting, economic trends and other topics are on the agenda at a gathering of development and real estate professionals. Hilton Burlington, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. $170; preregister. Info, 862-1225. VERMONT REGIONAL WORKFORCE SUMMIT: One of a dozen summits taking place around the state provides actionable solutions for employers and

promotes partnerships among regional and statewide service providers and educators. Sugarbush Resort, Warren, employer session, 9 a.m.-1:45 p.m.; service provider and educator session, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4654.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.30. KNITTER’S GROUP: See WED.30.

dance

SQUARE DANCING: See WED.30.

environment

RETHINK RUNOFF POP-UP: Environmentally conscious community members stop by an information table where they learn to make water-friendly changes in their homes and lives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

etc.

CHITTENDEN COUNTY STAMP CLUB MEETING: First-class WED.6

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. Y T I N U T R O R OPP

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calendar

.org

WED.6

11/1 FR

MIDDLEBURY ACTORS WORKSHOP

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING SETH CASHMAN

Flynn Space (11/1-2)

SAM REIDER AND THE HUMAN HANDS UVM Recital Hall 11/2 SA

RACHEL NEVILLE

BRIAN MCCARTHY NONET Flynn Space (11/7-8)

NTL: HANSARD

Palace 9 Cinemas (2 & 7 pm) Flynn Main Stage (11/7-10) 11/9 SA

GREEN MOUNTAIN CABARET Flynn Space

AURORA CHAMBER SINGERS

College Street Congregational Church 11/10 SU MERZ TRIO WITH

CAROLINE COPELAND Flynn Space

11/11 MO JOE BONAMASSA

Flynn Main Stage

11/13 WE MERCY CONNECTIONS PRESENTS:

JAZZ JAM 2019 FlynnSpace

11/14 TH SWAN LAKE

Flynn Main Stage

11/15 FR STEVEN WRIGHT

Flynn Main Stage

MODIGLIANI STRING QUARTET UVM Recital Hall

11/16 SA THE CASHORE MARIONETTES

11/21 TH RUDOLPH THE

RED-NOSED REINDEER

Flynn Main Stage 11/22 FR STAND UP,

SIT DOWN, & LAUGH Flynn Space

DAR WILLIAMS UVM Recital Hall

11/23 SA BURLINGTON

CHORAL SOCIETY College Street Congregational Church

11/26 TU STUNT NITE

Flynn Main Stage (4 & 8 pm)

11/30 SA 2019 JINGLE

BELL EXPRESS

Departs from 1 Main St, Burlington (11/30-12/1)

Flynn Space (2 & 8 pm)

ABB’S

FREE FAMILY SATURDAY SERIES

Flynn Main Stage (11/30-12/1)

RED KITE GREEN MOUNTAIN Main lobby of the Main Stage

KINAN AZMEH CITYBAND UVM Davis Center, Grand Maple Ballroom

11/20 WE DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM

Flynn Main Stage

THE NUTCRACKER

JUST ANNOUNCED Masters of Illusion Greensky Bluegrass Vermont’s Own Nutcracker Celtic Woman VT Burlesque Festival

802-863-5966 l 153 Main St., Burlington 58

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See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.30.

RED KITE GREEN MOUNTAIN

LYRIC: THE ADDAMS FAMILY

film

‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.30.

Flynn’s Chase Studio (11 am & 2 pm) 11/7 TH

collectibles provide a glimpse into the postal past at this monthly gathering. Williston Fire Station, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 660-4817.

‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.30.

BURLINGTON CIVIC SYMPHONY Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester

11/3 SU

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‘THE POLLINATORS’: Following migratory beekeepers around the United States, a documentary film reveals the flaws in the country’s chemically dependent agriculture system. Marquis Theatre & Southwest Café, Middlebury, 1, 4 & 7 p.m. $8-10. Info, 388-4841. SENEGALESE FILM FESTIVAL: ‘HYENAS’: Shown in French with English subtitles, a 1992 comedic drama centers on a once-prosperous Senegalese village and the return of a newly wealthy former resident. Room 101, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, lclerfeuille@smcvt.edy. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.30.

food & drink

COOKBOOK CLUB: Home cooks bring and discuss dishes prepared from The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook by Nancy Harmon Jenkins. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30. MAH JONGG IN BARRE: See WED.30.

health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS ACROYOGA CLASS: See WED.30. CHAIR YOGA: See WED.30. RESILIENCE FLOW: See WED.30. SEATED TAI CHI: See WED.30. YOGA4CANCER: See WED.30.

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: See WED.30. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.30.

montréal

‘MYTHIC’: See WED.30, 8 p.m. and 1 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: See WED.30. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC CHORUS REHEARSALS: See WED.30.

seminars

PAMELA JORDAN: The speaker, of the Netherlands’ HEADGenuit-Foundation, analyzes the implications of the soundscapes on each side of the Berlin Wall. Room 125, Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. PAUL SEARLS & AMANDA GUSTIN: The conversation “Repeopling Vermont: How We Got to Where We Are” addresses the changing face of the state, as well as efforts to bring muchneeded development while preserving rural values. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

HAVE YOU HAD A SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE?: Members of Vermont Eckankar host an open discussion for those who have had moments of strong intuition, déjà vu or past-life recall. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390.

RICHARD WRIGHT: Emerging patterns of diversity and segregation on national, state and local levels come to light in “The Racially Fragmented City?,” presented by the Dartmouth College professor. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

REAL ESTATE INVESTING WORKSHOPS: Local professionals provide resources and up-to-date information when sharing their experiences with investment properties. Preferred Properties, Williston, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 862-9106.

SUZANNE BROWN: In “Immigration Restrictions Then and Now: Short Stories of Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far),” the speaker examines the effects of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

talks

TYLER DOGGETT: “The Ethics of Raising Children” examines parenthood from a philosophical standpoint. Norwich Congregational Church, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184.

AARON KUNTZ: Hailing from the University of Alabama, the education scholar and author of The Responsible Methodologist: Inquiry, Truth-Telling and Social Justice schools listeners with a public lecture. Farrell Room, St. Edmund’s Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. ARTHUR MAKARIS: “Sparks of Life: The Concept of Qi in Chinese Medicine and Naturalist Philosophy” engages learners as part of the Current Topics in Science Speaker Series. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@north ernvermont.edu. ELLIOT BURG: The Middlesex photographer shares stories and images from his time documenting the work of sea turtle conservationists Javier Mayo Huerta and Lucy Carmona Liborio. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6206. JIM BALLARD: Dedicated students of local history join the Milton town historian for the talk “Milton’s Societies, Service Groups and Fraternal Orders.” Milton Historical Society, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1604. JOSIE LEAVITT: In “So This Happened: A Comic Confronts Cancer,” the Green Mountain State storyteller walks audience members through her journey of illness and treatment. Goodrich Memorial Library, Newport, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 334-7902.

tech

IDENTITY THEFT IN THE DIGITAL WORLD: AARP representative Bill April details different types of scams and how to avoid them. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.30.

theater

‘THE NORMAL HEART’: When Ned Weeks’ lover dies of AIDS, the gay activist fights to awaken the world to the global health crisis in Larry Kramer’s acclaimed drama. Royall Tyler Theatre, University of Vermont, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10-22. Info, 656-3131. ‘THE SLEEPOVER — A COMEDY OF MARRIAGE’: Six couples attend an overnight marriage retreat at a remote, run-down ski lodge — what could go wrong? Presented by Girls Nite Out Productions. Black Box Theater, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $23-25. Info, 393-4667.

words

MICIAH BAY GAULT: Fiction fans file in for an appearance by the local author of Goodnight Stranger. Chaplin Hall Gallery, Northfield, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 485-2000. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.30. m


2 019 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

CASTING CALL!

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISING STARS SPONSORED BY:

Auditions held Saturday, November 9, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage. Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act. 1T-Spectacular-1019.indd 1

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(802)864-9197

www.earlsbikes.com

BRING IT HOME

HE SAID WHAT? For breaking local news and political commentary, go straight to the source:

We Build it. We Deliver it. We Service it. sevendaysvt.com/blogs/offmessage Untitled-30 1

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

BCA Studios

Burlington City Arts Fall Class Registration is now open! Find these classes and many more at burlingtoncityarts.org. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS: Prerequisite: Basic proficiency with manual camera settings and Adobe Lightroom. Do you shoot digital images or scan color film and have a project idea to explore? This eight-week class will challenge you to edit and refine your photographs to

Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY ADULT WHEEL OPTION 7: Curious about the pottery wheel? Spend a Friday night with our pottery instructors at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket includes a wheel-throwing demonstration at the beginning of class, access to a wheel, and time to try making a bowl or cup. There is a $5

create the portfolio of work you envision. Organizing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom, printing on our Epson largeformat printers and more will be covered, tailored to individual student interests. This class will also explore ideas in contemporary photography through select readings and will discuss the technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of your work through supportive weekly critique sessions. Class price includes darkroom and digital lab access during open lab hours. Bring a selection of recent images to the first class. Maccompatible external hard drive or flash drive required. No class November 11. Mon., Nov. 4-Dec. 16, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $240/ person; $216 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405

DON’T STOP the presses!

JEWELRY OPTION 3: Learn the basics of creating metal jewelry. Techniques covered will include sawing, piercing, filing, annealing, soldering, texturing, cold connections, basic hollow construction, ring sizing and more, so that students can create at least two completed pieces. Students will also be encouraged to explore different styles of contemporary and historical jewelry, design process and the use of alternative materials through the studio library, the internet and on their own. The class includes copper and brass and use of all basic tools, as well as studio access during the weeks of your class. No class November. Tue., Nov. 5-Dec. 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info: BCA Studios, John Flanagan, 8657166, JFlanagan@burlingtoncity arts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org.

additional fee per clay piece to be fired and glazed by the studio. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Fri., Nov. 1, 2019, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/participant; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY FAMILY CLAY OPTION 7: Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to join the fun and either hand build or use a wheel of their own. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. Finished pottery will be available for pick-up three weeks after visit. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Fri., Nov. 1, 5-7 p.m. Cost: $10/per participant; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405

Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. BCA STUDIOS

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THE CELTIC SPIRIT CONCERT & WORKSHOP

WELCOME THE DARKNESS, GIVE THANKS TO THE LIGHT CELTIC MUSIC, POETRY, AND STORY IN PRAISE OF THE NATURAL WORLD

OWEN & MÍCHEÁL MOLEY Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN

Two of Ireland’s finest singers, presenters, and story tellers Concert: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2019 AT 7:00 PM Ticket: $25

Workshop: Saturday, November 16, 2019, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Ticket: $125 before November 1st (includes lunch and concert), $150 after November 1st. Register here: https://conta.cc/2JQcF6M or call 802-595-5395

Keep this newspaper free for all. Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684. 4t-dontstop-SR18.indd 1

ALL SOULS INTERFAITH GATHERING 291 Bostwick Road, Shelburne, VT 4/3/18 5:02 PM

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes BCA STUDIOS

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LIFE DRAWING OPTION 7: Purchase a drop-in card and get the sixth visit for free! Spend the evening with other local artists drawing from one of our experienced models. Bring your drawing materials and paper. Purchase a ticket to hold your spot, and drop ins are welcome if space is available. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Fri., Nov. 1, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/ participant; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. SCREEN PRINTING OPTION 2: This introduction to screen printing class will show you how to design and print T-shirts, posters, fine art and more. Discover a variety of techniques for transferring and printing images using handdrawn, photographic or borrowed imagery. Students will learn how to apply photo emulsion, how to use an exposure unit and how to print on a variety of surfaces. Class price includes the use of studio equipment, emulsion, transparencies and ink, as well as open studio access during the weeks of your class. Students can bring their screens or rent one through the studio. No experience

necessary. No class November 27. Wed., Oct. 30-Dec. 11, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50 for BCA members. Location: BCA

Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@burlingtoncityarts. org, burlingtoncityarts.org. SUNDAY FAMILY PRINTMAKING: Spend a morning with teaching artist Kate McKernan in BCA’s print studio. Using our printing plates, inks and press, your family will create beautiful works of art. All supplies are provided, no experience needed. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to make their own work. Ages 6 and older. Sun., Nov. 3, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $10/person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: John Flanagan, 865-7166, JFlanagan@burlingtoncityarts. org, burlingtoncityarts.org.

culinary MODERN ISRAELI CUISINE WORKSHOP AND FEAST : Join chef Oren Luxenburg for this unique “all vegetarian and mostly vegan” modern Israeli cooking workshop and feast. Learn and enjoy 15+ recipes along with Israeli wines, cocktails and mocktails. Workshop is hands-on, and each student will be provided with a take-home recipe booklet. Sat., Nov. 9, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Cost:

gardening

$79/person includes meal & drinks. Location: Toast and Eggs Cafe, 4752 Main St., Waitsfield. Info: Oren Luxenburg, 646-2846323, orenluxy@gmail.com, tinyurl.com/letscookfood.

ADIRONDACK BASKET MAKING: Weave your own Adirondack pack basket with Alexa Rivera of Wovn. Country. Register at gardeners. com/vermont-gardening-workshops-and-seminars. Sat., Nov. 9, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $155/. Location: Gardener’s SupplyBurlington, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: Meredith White, 660-3505, meredithw@gardeners. com, gardeners.com.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes: nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@ salsalina.com.

drumming TAIKO & DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: New sessions start in November! Classes for adults, kids and parents. Parade and conga classes, too. Intermediate Taiko, Mon., 6-8:20 p.m. Taiko for Adults, Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m. & Wed., 6:30-7:50 p.m. Djembe for Adults, Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Kids and Parents World Drumming, Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Kids and Parents Taiko, Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums

language

provided. Schedule/register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko. org.

fitness PILATES MATWORK: Drop-in classes for all levels of ability. Tue. & Thu., 5:15-6:15 p.m. Cost: $18/ single class. Location: Burlington Acupuncture, 215 College St., Burlington. Info: Sharon McIlwaine, 522-3992, shmci56@icloud.com, burlingtonacupuncture.com.

LEARN SPANISH & OPEN NEW DOORS: We provide high-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Our 13th year. Small classes, private lessons and online instruction with a native speaker. Also live, engaging, face-to-face online English classes. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

MARTIAL ARTS

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IN A WORLD WHERE WE OFTEN DISAGREE, DISCOVER LETS AGREE ON ONEMUSIC... THING... NEW

GOOD MUSIC GOOD MUSIC IS GOOD GOODMUSIC MUSIC IS 2H-ThePoint032719.indd 3

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes LANGUAGES

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tai chi

martial arts VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and selfdefense life skills to avoid becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF and CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation: weeknights, 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu., noon-1 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington.shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795.

NEW BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASS IN BURLINGTON: We practice Cheng Man-ch’ing’s “simplified” 37-posture Yang-style form. The course will be taught by Patrick Cavanaugh, longtime student and assistant to Wolfe Lowenthal, student of Cheng Man-ching and founder of Long River Tai Chi Circle. Patrick is a senior instructor at LRTTC in Vermont and New Hampshire. Starts Nov. 6, 8-9 a.m.; open registration Nov. 27. Cost: $65/mo. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Long River Tai Chi Circle, Patrick Cavanaugh, 490-6405, patrick@longrivertaichi.org, longrivertaichi.org.

shamanism EXTRAORDINARY REALITIES: Evidence of shamanic practice goes back 50,000+ years all around the world. Learn how to journey into the spirit realms to meet with compassionate helping spirits. The session will include an overview of shamanic divination and healing. Meet your power animal and spirit teacher in a core shamanic introduction. Sat., Nov. 23, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Cost: $123/9-hour class. Location: Shaman’s Flame Workshop Center, 644 Log Town Rd., Woodbury. Info: Peter Clark, 456-8735, peterclark13@gmail. com, shamansflame.com.

SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 363-6890, snake-style.com.

well-being 200-HOUR AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: Join us in learning and immerse yourself in the oldest surviving preventative health care system. This program is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, bodyworkers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists, etc. VSAC approved and payment plans available. Can transfer hours to Kripalu’s Ayurveda Health Counselor program. More information at ayurvedavermont. com/classes. 2020 schedule: Feb. 8-9, Mar. 7-8, Apr. 4-5, May 2-3, Jun. 6-7, Jul. 11-12, Aug. 15-16, Sep. 12-13, Oct. 17-18, Nov. 14-15. Cost:

$2,795/person. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, 34 Oak Hill Rd., Williston. Info: Allison Morse, 872-8898, ayurvedavt@ comcast.net.

women WHOLISTIC WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN: Re-Empower Self Care in this Wholistic Workshop for Women. Succulent Self Care for Sacred Sisterhood. This is your moment to enter consciously into your sexuality. You are beautifully and wonderfully cocreated. This course includes guided coaching into self care through visualizations, journaling, meditation and more. You will also receive yoga/ Pilates therapy to awaken, relax and tone the pelvic floor. Samples and introduction to yoni eggs, herbal tonics, essential oils and chocolates from local VT vendors. You will leave with tools and techniques to heal and enhance your womanhood. Sat., Nov. 2. Cost: $180/7-hour intensive workshop. Location: Be Well Massage, 782 Mountain Rd., Unit A, Stowe. Info: Gianna Skates, 683-1361, bewellmassagevt@gmail.com, wellnesswithgianna.com.

LAUGHING RIVER YOGA: Located in a beautiful setting overlooking the Winooski River. We offer high-quality classes, workshops and trainings taught by experienced teachers who honor the beauty and wisdom of the yogic tradition. Learn more about our Teacher Enhancement Program and ongoing workshops, including Yin Yoga, December 6-8. All bodies and abilities welcome. Daily classes, workshops, 200and 300-hour yoga teacher training. Cost: $49/first month of unlimited classes; workshop & training prices vary. Location: Laughing River Yoga, Chace Mill, Suite 126, Burlington. Info: 3438119, laughingriveryoga.com.

WSANGHA STUDIO |: NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/ month and practice as often as you like! Daily classes. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. & 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, info@sangha studio.org, sanghastudio.org.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. All are welcome. Try our Beginners Series, Tuesdays, November 5 to December 17. We are all beginners. This is your invitation to enjoy learning the basics and start exploring the benefits of a yoga practice. Daily drop-in classes including $10 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice! $10-$15/class; $140/10-class card; $10/community class. New students $100/10-class card. New! Student Monthly Unlimited just $55/mo. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com.

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LUKE AWTRY

music+nightlife

He’s Got Rhythm Ben Patton’s latest album, Our Follies, is a pop-jazz throwback B Y JORD A N AD A MS

Ben Patton

B

en Patton is an old soul. on Thursday, November 7, at Lake Clad in trousers and a Champlain Access Television in fine shirt, the singerColchester. songwriter has a dapper But Patton’s latest album, a appearance and genteel, deliberpartnership with Indonesian ated cadence reminiscent of a singer Michelle Sudarsano called bygone time and place. He almost Our Follies, departs from the offcomes off like a character from a kilter style for which he’s mainly golden-era Hollywood drama. known. The pair presents a collecHis eloquence is matched only by tion of pitch-perfect pop-jazz his humbleness. The 36-year-old pastiches. Largely sourced from a composer and multi-instrumenmusical revue Patton wrote in the talist probably doesn’t think of early 2000s, the album’s 13 tracks himself as the musical genius he is. are nearly indiscernible from the Over nearly two decades, the works of legendary songwriters Vermont native has written and such as Cole Porter, Frank Loesser recorded a series of left-of-center INFO and George and Ira Gershwin. Our pop-rock albums. Much of his Ben Patton performs on Thursday, November Follies confirms that Patton is a work recalls the bouncy Britpop 7, 7 p.m., at Lake Champlain Access Television debonair talent with a wide range. boom of the 1990s and, by exten- Studio in Colchester. $10 suggested donation. “I’ve always loved writers sion, the British Invasion of the AA. lcatv.org of that era and to borrow their 1960s that introduced Americans Our Follies is available at bpattonmusic.com. idiom,” he says. to the likes of Herman’s Hermits, Patton grew up in Bakersfield the Zombies and, of course, the and was largely homeschooled. Beatles. In past reviews of his albums, more than one “I was utterly miserable in [public] school,” he recalls, Seven Days music scribe has likened Patton’s sound to that noting that he was a “weird kid before it was fashionable of the Fab Four. He’ll perform a short set of such material to be a weird kid.” 66

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Creative influences, such as old movie musicals and classic rock and roll, arrived early in Patton’s life. His father, Will Patton, is a well-regarded local instrumentalist primarily known for playing hot club jazz. Ben Patton says he has “managed to squeak by in life” without ever having had a “real job,” meaning that he’s only ever worked as a musician and recording professional. A world traveler, he’s lived in Boston and New York City as well as abroad in places such as Germany and the Philippines. At an early point in his career, he happened to encounter former tech entrepreneur and musician Jaye Muller and former Beach Boys manager Jack Rieley. They stumbled upon Patton performing at a Brattleboro farmers market in 2002. “Jack and I were amazed at his talent,” Muller writes of Patton via email. (Rieley died in 2015.) “I was hooked at that point.” The two eventually formed a duo known as Muller & Patton and released two records. Concurrently, Patton has released a slew of his own work — Our Follies is his ninth studio album. From 2007 through 2011, Patton and Muller were living in the Philippines and working for Bigfoot Entertainment. (Muller still lives there.) They primarily composed and recorded music for TV and film while also writing and HE’S GOT RHYTHM

» P.73


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF PATRICK MCCORMACK

Madaila

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music + nightlife scene B Y J OR D A N A D A MS

Soundfrights 2: Double Tap

Given how Halloween party plaWnners and music makers like to spread out the hellish holiday for as long as (in)humanly possible, last week’s petrifying preview of evildoings on the local music scene needed a sequel — especially because Halloween, October 31, falls within this week’s issue. So, as promised last week, we’re coming back with part two. Because, like Jason Voorhees, Freddy Kreuger and Michael Myers, some column gimmicks just won’t stay dead. Speaking of revenants, MADAILA rise from the grave on Thursday. The psychpop quintet, which played its supposed final show at the Higher Ground Ballroom almost exactly one year ago, returns to the South Burlington nightclub to rock your socks off. “There was talk of Halloween at Higher Ground pretty early on this year,” the band’s front person and creative mastermind, MARK DALY, told Seven Days by phone. “We just love the

holiday. It’s always been a fun night to play music. And we love dressing up.” To generate a bit of buzz before the show, the group recently unveiled a double-sided single featuring two unreleased songs, “Clandestine Magic” and “Staring Contest.” The tracks are the first new pieces of material the band has dropped since its 2018 single “Where Do We Go From Here?” — the title of which unintentionally hinted at Madaila’s dissolution. Avid fans are likely to recognize “Clandestine Magic,” since the groovy synth-pop song had long been a staple of the band’s set. But the club-ready “Staring Contest” is more or less a brand-new experience. Also, fun fact: Madaila recorded the songs back when guitarist WILLOUGHBY MORSE was still in the band. WALKER ALLEN has since replaced him. Elephant in the room: Does this mean that Madaila are getting back together for realsies? Short answer: no. Long answer: It’s complicated. (Though not as complicated as Seven Days’ recent cover profile of the band’s keyboardist, ERIC

MAIER. That’s a whole other can of spray paint … er, worms.) “We thought [Halloween] would be the perfect opportunity to dip our toes back in the water and see how it feels,” Daly continued. “There’s no pressure. Just because we’re playing a show doesn’t mean we have to be a band and jump back in the van and tour. It’s just a little test.” However, Daly did tease the possibility of a new Madaila LP to be released at some point in 2020, assuming the group is able to hunker down and record this winter. “What else is there to do?” Daly joked. One thing at a time, though. Right now, he’s only focused on Thursday’s performance, which, Daly said, may include some “fun Halloween surprises.” Oh, by the way, neo-soul outfit JUPTR open the show. That means DAN RYAN, drummer for both projects, pulls double duty that night. Buy the guy a beer if you see him, for crying out loud!

Checking Boxes

Attention, working bands and artists: Nonprofit Big Heavy World, Vermont’s multipurpose music incubator and archive, seeks your input for a crucial survey of our state’s music scene. Modeled after a similar project in Austin, Texas, the poll is a joint effort of BHW and Sound Diplomacy, an international company that “empower[s] cities and places to achieve their social, cultural and economic goals through music and the nighttime economy,” according to its website. You can access the questionnaire at bigheavyworld.com. Questions range from general demographics to specifics about how many shows the artist plays locally to how far they travel to perform, how much said shows contribute to SOUNDBITES

» P.69

104.7 The Point welcomes

THU 10.31

THU 10.31

The Commonheart

FRI 11.1

Crumb

FRI 11.1

First Friday: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

SAT 11.2

Mister Chris and Friends

SAT 11.2

Filmore

WED 11.6

Big Wild

WED 11.6

AliT

THU 11.7

Chris Lake

THU 11.7

Albert Cummings

Juicebox

Divino Niño, Shormey

Alana Springsteen

EVAN GIIA, Ark Patrol

Sabrina Comellas

Harder They Come

JUPTR

FRI 11.8

The Motet

Star Kitchen, Jennifer Hartswick & Nick Cassarino Duo

COURTESY OF MONIKA RIVARD

12.13 Stephanie Quayle 1.10 Kiss The Sky: The Jimi Hendrick Re-Experience Tribute 3.20 Lost Dog Street Band 5.12 Highly Suspect 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019 4V-HG103019.indd 1

67 10/29/19 4:28 PM


Yatzee! You found the Canna-Egg!

Bring this to the store to collect your prize, October 30-November 5, 2019.

music+nightlife

CLUB DATES

live music

COMEDY ›› P.72 | DJS ›› P.70 TRIVIA, KARAOKE, ETC. ›› P.72

WED.30

Alone I Walk, the Second After (punk) at Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10.

FRI.1 // MUSTARDMIND [ART-ROCK]

Birdcode (jazz) at Juniper, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free. Frankie and the Witch Fingers, Greaseface (rock) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 8 p.m. free/$5. 18+.

388 Pine Street, Burlington

Jim Charanko (Americana) at Moogs Place, Morrisville, 8 p.m. Free. Josh Dobbs presents: The Last Question (storytelling) at Radio Bean,

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10/28/19 10:25 AM Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Matthew Mercury (rock) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Mike Martin and Geoff Kim (jazz) at Leunig’s Bistro & Café, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Mosaic featuring special guests and members of Kat Wright (jam) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10 p.m. $5. Tufa and the Pride (album release), Josh West and Friends (jam) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. Wednesday Night Dead (Grateful Dead tribute) at Zenbarn, Waterbury, 7 p.m. Free.

THU.31

Berklee American Roots Night at Zenbarn, Waterbury, 7 p.m. Free. Blackwolf (blues, roots) at Edson Hill Dining Room & Tavern, Stowe, 6:30 p.m. Free. Bob Gagnon Quartet (jazz) at Foam Brewers, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Cash Bash: A Night of Johnny Cash at Nectar’s, Burlington, 9 p.m. $5/8. 18+. The Commonheart, Juicebox (rock, soul) at Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 8 p.m. $12/14. Duncan MacLeod Blues Band at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 7 p.m. Free. The Full Cleveland (yacht rock covers) at Monkey House, Winooski, 8 p.m. $5. Funkwagon (funk) at Monopole, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 p.m. Free. George Petit Trio (jazz) at Leunig’s Bistro & Café, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. HLH (electronica) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10 p.m. $5. Jamflow McRat Duo (jam) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free. Katie Toupin, Grayson Foster (rock) at Club Metronome, Burlington, 7 p.m. $10/12.

open mics & jams WED.30

Irish Sessions (traditional) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Say you saw it in...

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Open Mic with Andy Lugo at Manhattan Pizza & Pub, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic with Austtin at Monopole, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 p.m. Free.

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Graphic Design

Uncompromising and unpredictable, Brooklyn’s

MUSTARDMIND

make art-rock music — heavy on the art. The quartet’s twisted tunes meander through various shades of influence. Post-punk ferocity blends with ineffable indie-rock malaise. But simultaneously, danceforward architecture and a bit of singed electro-pop keep things spry and saturated. The band’s 2019 EP, Modern Evil, contains tightly executed tracks yet sounds as if the band could erupt into experimental chaos at any moment. Mustardmind perform on Friday, November 1, at Radio Bean in Burlington. Locals

FOSSA and the DEAD SHAKERS open.

Light Club Jazz Sessions and Showcase at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 10:30 p.m. Free.

Madaila, JUPTR (pop, rock) at Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $20/23.

Scary as Funk Super Group (funk) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. $5.

Liz Beatty and the Lab Rats (rock, blues) at Whammy Bar, Calais, 7 p.m. Free.

Maddy Walsh & the Blind Spots (rock) at Red Square, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free.

Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free.

Low Cut Connie, Aubrey Haddard, J’Beau (rock) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $25.

Miku Daza (carnival punk) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 11:30 p.m. $5.

THU.31

THU.31

Open Mic at Whammy Bar, Calais, 7 p.m. Free.

New Fame Cypher Series (hip-hop) at Charlie-O’s World Famous, Montpelier, 9 p.m. Free.

WED.6

Open Mic Night at Moogs Place, Morrisville, 8:30 p.m. Free.

MON.4

Irish Sessions See WED.30.

Open Mic with Alex Budney at Localfolk Smokehouse, Waitsfield, 8:30 p.m. Free.

SAT.2

Irish Session at Bagitos Bagel and Burrito Café, Montpelier, 2 p.m. donation.

Family Night (open jam) at SideBar, Burlington, 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at SideBar, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic with Chris Parker at Twiggs — An American Gastropub, St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free.

» P.70

Bluegrass Session at Jericho Café & Tavern, 7 p.m. Free. John Lackard Blues Jam at CharlieO’s World Famous, Montpelier, 6 p.m. Free. Open Mic with Andy Lugo See WED.30. Open Mic with Austtin See WED.30.


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM COURTESY OF RICK NORCROSS

N R BA BASH MAGAZINE

ENORMOUS RAFFLE:

The Mighty Pickle

S

UNDbites

CONT I NUE D F RO M PA GE 6 7

their annual income, and the ease of connectivity and collaboration of peers, among other things. Folks, I can’t stress enough how important this is, and I commend BHW for taking the initiative. I’ve had conversations with many people on topics relating to the heart of this survey, and pooling knowledge and experiences is the best way to make progress. BHW will collect data through November 30. The data will be published at some point relatively soon after, with a formal summation expected in early 2020.

Older and Wilder

Bust out the party hats, streamers and those obnoxious noisemakers, because on Saturday, November 2, Radio Bean celebrates its 19th birthday with an all-day music marathon. Performances start at 8 a.m. and conclude at 2 a.m. on Sunday, November 3. I’ll point out that daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, so we roll the clocks back an hour to 1 a.m., and the party keeps going for an additional 60 minutes. It’s a nutty scene. Trust me; I marathoned the entire day three years ago. You can read my account on our website. From hole-in-the-wall coffeehouse to dual-stage regional music hub and restaurant, the café and its sister spaces ¡Duino! (Duende) and the Light Club Lamp Shop are crucial to Burlington’s music scene. I don’t have the space here to list every act that will perform throughout the day, because there are literally 100 singer-songwriters, bands, solo instrumentalists, poets and rappers on the bill. If you’ve never checked it out, you absolutely should. It’s one of the most Burlington-y events in the Queen City. The only way to get through the

THE BIGGEST SKI & BOARD RAFFLE IN THE NORTHEAST

whole thing is to stay caffeinated. And, lucky for us all, java is on the house throughout. Also, free pancakes during the first two hours.

Pickle Rick

The day has finally come when I’m able to use a “Rick and Morty” reference as a subhead in this column! Famed Western swing star RICK NORCROSS, front person of RICK AND THE ALL-STAR RAMBLERS (and king of lengthy email updates), blasted out a fun bit of news to his followers earlier this week. The band’s former touring vehicle, a deep-green converted Flxible Starliner bus known as the Mighty Pickle, has been sold. It first went on the market in 2018. Norcross explains to his fans that a buyer in Florida nabbed the iconic transport and subsequently donated it to MARTY STUART’s Congress of Country Music, a forthcoming hub for all things country in Philadelphia, Miss. Stuart, a Grammy Award-winning rockabilly legend, announced the museum and performance center in 2018. As of now, no grand-opening date has been announced. 

TICKET INCLUDES:

RAFFLE TICKET, FOOD, BEVERAGE & FREE SMUGGS LIFT TICKET

NOV. 9 TH 7:00 PM

at the CAMBRIDGE COMMUNITY CENTER

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT CAMBRIDGE AREA ROTARY WINTER WELLNESS DAYS

7:00 WINTER WILDLANDS ALLIANCE’S

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8:30 LIVE MUSIC

BRETT HUGHES AND THE HONKY TONK ALLSTARS

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW AT BACKCOUNTRYMAGAZINE.COM/BARNBASH2019 Untitled-21 1 Backcountry_BarnBash2019_4.75x5.56.indd 1

10/28/19 AM 10/25/19 10:51 3:34 PM

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. MUNA, “Hands Off” SORRY GIRLS, “Easier” SHURA, “religion (u can lay your hands on me)” ELECTRIC GUEST, “I Got the Money” BAT FOR LASHES, “Kids in the Dark”

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music+nightlife live music

CLUB DATES

Gold Standard With 20 years of legendary performances on the books, Toronto’s the

THU.31 CONTINUED FROM P.68

NEW DEAL

are an enduring force in live electronica. The trio found new life with the recent addition of drummer Davide

Shane Murley Band (folk-rock) at Blue Paddle Bistro, South Hero, 6:30 p.m. Free.

Di Renzo. He joins founders Jamie Shields and Dan Kurtz, the latter of whom spent several years playing with electro-pop provocateurs Dragonette while his original band was on hiatus. Hard-hitting and decadent, the

Surf Sabbath (Black Sabbath tribute) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free.

Canadian outfit scours every corner of dance music to concoct progressive, almost symphonic compositions. Catch the New Deal on Saturday, November 2, at Club Metronome in Burlington.

Yestrogen (rock) at the Skinny Pancake, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free.

Annie in the Water, Sweet William and Sugar Cone Rose (jam) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

The New Deal (electronic) at Club Metronome, Burlington, 9 p.m. $20.

The Big Sip, Gemma Laurence (jam) at the Skinny Pancake, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Radio Bean Birthday Bash (eclectic music marathon) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 8 a.m. Free.

Bob Gagnon (jazz) at El Toro, Morrisville, 7 p.m. Free.

Radio Bean Birthday Bash (eclectic music marathon) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 8 a.m. Free.

Carrie Cook and D Jazz (jazz) at Highland Lodge Restaurant, Greensboro, 6:30 p.m. Free.

Rebecca Padula (Americana) at El Toro, Morrisville, 7 p.m. Free.

Chris Powers (rock covers) at Gusto’s, Barre, 5 p.m. Free.

Dave Mitchell’s Blues Revue (open jam) at Red Square, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Dirty Looks (rock covers) at Gusto’s, Barre, 9 p.m. $5. Doomfuck (metal) at Monopole, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 p.m. Free. Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk) at the Old Foundry at One Federal Restaurant & Lounge, St. Albans, 6:30 p.m. Free. Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free.

Tom Caswell Duet (blues) at the Old Foundry at One Federal Restaurant & Lounge, St. Albans, 6:30 p.m. Free.

SAT.2 // THE NEW DEAL [ELECTRONIC]

Inferno: A Social Experience featuring Night Protocol, Revolt, Torex, Stukz, Vetica (synthwave) at Monkey House, Winooski, 10 p.m. free/$5.

Phil Abair Band (rock) at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 9 p.m. Free.

Will Bradford, Sparxsea (singersongwriter) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Chris Lyon (Americana) at Twiggs — An American Gastropub, St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free.

Salvation Farms Aid (eclectic) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7 p.m. $20.

SAT.2

Jamie Lee Thurston (country) at 14th Star Brewing Co., St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free.

Sean and Dan Jarvis (rock, folk) at Twiggs — An American Gastropub, St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free.

Dark Star Project (Grateful Dead tribute) at Monkey House, Winooski, 9 p.m. $5/10. 18+.

Jim Yeager Trio (rock) at the Skinny Pancake, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free.

Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Julia Rose (singer-songwriter) at Stone Corral Brewery, Richmond, 8 p.m. Free.

Shane Hardiman (jazz) at Bleu Northeast Seafood, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free.

Lauren Lee (jazz) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free.

Sierra Polley (singer-songwriter) at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 5 p.m. Free.

Green Kettle Band (bluegrass) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

The Medicine Tribe Trio (rock, funk) at the Tap Room at Switchback Brewing Co., Burlington, 6 p.m. Free.

Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand at Sweet Melissa’s, Montpelier, 5:30 p.m. Free.

Mustardmind, Fossa, the Dead Shakers (art-rock) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10 p.m. $5.

Humble Hero (rock) at Sweet Melissa’s, Montpelier, 9 p.m. Free.

Nicomo (folk) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9 p.m. $5.

djs WED.30

Supernatural (covers) at the Old Post, South Burlington, 9 p.m. Free. Swimmer, Eggy (jam) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 9 p.m. $6. Twist of Fate (rock) at City Limits Night Club, Vergennes, 9 p.m. Free.

DJ Craig Mitchell (open format) at Ruben James, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. DJ Cre8 (open format) at Red Square Blue Room, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

DJ Cre8 (open format) at Red Square, Burlington, 11 p.m. Free.

DJ Disco Phantom (open format) at Finnigan’s Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

DJ Ianu (open format) at Half Lounge, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

DJ Godpaco (EDM) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 11 p.m. Free.

DJ KermiTT (open format) at Red Square, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

DJ Toussaint (open format) at Sweet Melissa’s, Montpelier, 9 p.m. Free.

THU.31

No Scrubs ’90s Night (’90s hits) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 10:30 p.m. Free.

D Jay Baron (hip-hop) at Red Square, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. DJ Bay 6 (hits) at Gusto’s, Barre, 8 p.m. Free. DJ Bay 6 (hits) at Gusto’s, Barre, 8 p.m. Free.

70

The MaUPsh with That’s All (singer-songwriter, spoken word) at Whammy Bar, Calais, 7:30 p.m. Free.

Mister Chris and Friends, Danica Cunningham (children’s music) at Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, noon. $12/15.

The Aerolites (rock, folk) at Moog’s Joint, Johnson, 9 p.m. $5.

Dave Keller Band (blues, soul) at Double E Performance Center’s T-Rex Theater, Essex Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15.

Jesse Agan and Troy Millette (folk-rock) at the Skinny Pancake, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Midnight Moonshine (country) at Olive Ridley’s, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 9:30 p.m. Free.

FRI.1

Crumb, Divino Niño, Shormey (indie) at Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $18/20.

Jeh Kulu 25th Annual West African Dance Party with Sabouyouma, A2VT, Gua Gua and DJ Ali Bedoe at Nectar’s, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10/15.

FRI.1

DJ Craig Mitchell (open format) at Positive Pie, Montpelier, 10 p.m. $10. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format) at Red Square, Burlington, 11 p.m. $5.

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Ali T (singer-songwriter) at Espresso Bueno, Barre, 7:30 p.m. Free. Band X (rock) at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 9 p.m. Free. Bear’s Tapestry, Zack DuPont, Danny & the Parts (folk) at SideBar, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Bethany Conner and Troy Millette (folk-rock) at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 5 p.m. Free. The Bubs, Father Figuer, the Pyros (punk) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $8. Cash Journey (Johnny Cash tribute) at Monopole, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 p.m. Free. Chris and Erica (rock, country) at Smitty’s Pub, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free.

DJ Disco Phantom (open format) at Manhattan Pizza & Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 11 p.m. $5. Dsantos Latin Dance Social at Waterworks Food + Drink, Winooski, 9 p.m. $5. First Friday: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle (drag, dance) at Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 9 p.m. $7/10. Now That’s What I Call: The Hits with David Chief and SoBe (hip-hop, R&B) at Club Metronome, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

Electrolads (electronica) at Zenbarn, Waterbury, 9:30 p.m. $8/10. Etna Old Time (Americana) at Stone Corral Brewery, Richmond, 8 p.m. Free. Filmore, Alana Springsteen (country) at Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 8 p.m. $12/15. George Petit (jazz) at Bleu Northeast Seafood, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free. J Bengoy, Princess Nostalgia (indie) at Foam Brewers, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free. Jacob Green (singer-songwriter) at Gusto’s, Barre, 6 p.m. Free.

Willverine (DJ set) (J Dilla cuts) at Foam Brewers, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free.

SAT.2

DJ ATAK (house) at Red Square Blue Room, Burlington, 11 p.m. $5. DJ Davis and DJ GaGu (EDM) at the Engine Room, White River Junction, 9 p.m. $5. DJ Earl (hits) at City Limits Night Club, Vergennes, 9 p.m. Free.

The Trichomes (jam) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free. Two Cents in the Till (Americana) at the Den at Harry’s Hardware, Cabot, 7 p.m. Free. Win Ball Band (rock, blues) at Village Café & Tavern, North Ferrisburgh, 8 p.m. Free.

SUN.3

Clark (singer-songwriter) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free. Cosmic Dust (blues-rock) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10:30 p.m. Free. Danny Coane & his Bluegrass Buddies at the Skinny Pancake, Burlington, noon. Free. The Furious Bongos (Frank Zappa tribute) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8 p.m. $15. Michael Franti & Spearhead, Devon Gilfillian (sold out) (folk, jam) at Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, 8 p.m. $50. SUN.3

SUN.3

Disco Brunch with DJ Craig Mitchell at Misery Loves Co., Winooski, 11 a.m. Free. Open Decks at Half Lounge, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

MON.4

Jack Bandit and Friends (EDM) at Half Lounge, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

TUE.5

DJ LaFountaine (EDM) at Gusto’s, Barre, 9:30 p.m. $3.

CRWD CTRL (house, techno) at Red Square, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

DJ Raul (Latin) at Red Square Blue Room, Burlington, 5 p.m. Free.

WED.6

DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 11 p.m. $5.

» P.72

Chromatic (hip-hop) at Half Lounge, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Nechromancer, Monochrome Dystopia (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL)

From the bowels of hell come Nechromancer, Vermont’s only goth-IBM band. IBM stands for industrial body music, a particularly dark strain of electronica that emerged in the 1980s. As I wrote in my review of the band’s 2017 debut, Intersect, “If Fangtasia, the fictitious vampire nightclub on HBO’s ‘True Blood’ had a house band, it would be Nechromancer.” The group returns from its shallow grave with a sophomore record, Monochrome Dystopia. Not much has changed in the two years since the

Ali T, Smoke & Mirrors (BIG MO RECORDS, CD, DIGITAL)

For the last several years, Royalton singer-songwriter Alison Turner, aka Ali T, has been plying her trade around Vermont and the greater New England circuit. She’s carved out a niche playing intimate solo shows and made a name for herself with promising songwriting and no small amount of drive. Turner is no weekend warrior; she’s about that life. Smoke & Mirrors, her sophomore LP, continues an upward trend. While there is no denying the talent Turner possesses, her earlier work risked blending in with

band’s debut: The synths are still icecold, the guitars fluid, and the beats as volatile and mechanized as ever. And the mood remains sufficiently Satanic. Unfortunately, the LP just doesn’t have the same nihilistic charm as its predecessor. To be fair, I’d rather live in a world with a moderately passable follow-up than a world with no Nechromancer at all. Again, no one else in the state is making anything quite like the black magic this four-piece conjures. But I question the presentation of this album. It contains four new originals alongside two remixes and five “reduxes” from Intersect. That means that nearly half of the first record’s 11 cuts reappear in some form on the follow-up. “Unhallows Grieve” and “Vampire Queen” appear

twice. Perhaps the reduxes should have been scrapped or saved for a rainy day, because the production changes seem minimal and lateral. Why not just release a six-track EP? Synthwave trio Night Protocol remixed “Unhallows Grieve,” which means that Matthew Binginot, a member of both projects, worked some production magic on the original. Clean and sleek, the remix shifts the tone away from terror to a neon-streaked, ’80s pop aesthetic to great effect. The other remix doesn’t fare as well. “Vampire Queen (Club Remix)” adds spazzy beats that would even nauseate the Roxbury Guys. It’s a step in the wrong direction for this tune. The sharp and nimble redux that appears later is much more pleasing — though, again, it doesn’t much improve on the Intersect original. The four originals also fall a bit flat. Opener “Twist of Fate” adequately sets the tone with sledgehammer

guitars and wonky synth arpeggios. But the instrumental cut is too long and repetitive. Of the new inclusions, “High Tech No Life” comes closest to pushing the envelope. Its four-on-the-floor kick drum and dense nest of electronic chirps, surges and waves come together nicely. “Punish Me” sounds too much like an Intersect track without building upon the groundwork. And while vocalist Vile Heathen (aka Joshua Perrin) broods like a champ on “Fear of Sanctuary,” the über-dance number lacks the voluptuousness of which the band has proven itself capable. In case you hadn’t put two and two together, Nechromancer make some of the most Halloween-appropriate music in all of the Green Mountains. Unfortunately, their latest is merely a spooky background. Monochrome Dystopia is available at nechromancer.bandcamp.com.

the scenery. The hooks on her debut album, Break, felt familiar, as did the musical real estate it tried to occupy. The album was good but didn’t necessarily possess the vibrancy of newness. In short, her music felt nice and safe. “Smoking Gun,” the first track on the new album, dispels feelings of security right off the bat. As sound bites of newscasters describing an assortment of mass shootings play in the background, Turner’s guitar and double-tracked voice wade into one of the most pressing, difficult subjects in current American society. “Young man was pissed that day / Wants the world to hear what he’s got to say / Acts like there’s hell to pay / Traumatic past explodes like a hand grenade,” she sings of the crisis

of young white men committing mass murder. The song is no half measure, no cliché statement, but an incredibly wellarticulated ballad that brings the listener right into Turner’s thoughts. That level of clarity permeates Smoke & Mirrors. Turner’s songs tell deep, immersive stories, often about how obfuscated lives can become in the social media era. “Bitter Bitch” and “Cliché” both touch on the push/ pull of trying to succeed in a field that simultaneously demands conformity and originality. The former is a slow burn of a tune, featuring a twitchy snap beat over a synth bass and Turner’s subtle guitar work as she laments a culture that turns woman against woman. Indeed, this is a record that aims to tell the story of women in the modern age. On “Playing House,” Turner sings of a housewife named May, “26 and beautiful,” who finds herself trapped in a domestic

life she once thought she wanted but is now succumbing to urges for more. “Spin” may be from another’s perspective, but in it Turner essentially gives sage advice — which might be considered odd, given that the singersongwriter is only 26 years old herself. Yet there is both wisdom and empathy in the song, as she namechecks the Beatles and the Smiths before reminding listeners, “You’re never alone.” Turner’s second offering makes a strong statement and exudes personality and sonic adventure. It’s good enough to ease worries of how she will evolve further and makes you wonder what that evolution will be. Smoke & Mirrors is available on all streaming platforms and can be purchased at sheisalit.com. Turner celebrates the album’s release with a full-band show on Wednesday, November 6, at the Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in South Burlington.

GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED:

J

JORDAN ADAMS

CHRIS FARNSWORTH

ARE YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

71


COMEDY

CLUB DATES

music+nightlife

5 NIGHTS

A WEEK

live music

FRI 1 | SAT 2

SAT.2 CONTINUED FROM P.70 Oshima Brothers, the End of America (indie folk) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $5. Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session at Radio Bean, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free.

EMMA

WILLMANN FRI 8 | SAT 9

BIG WILD,

makes sensational pop music as grand and festive as his moniker implies. As many electronic producers do, the Los Angeles-based artist often enlists international guest stars, such as Tove Styrke, Rationale and Yuna, to lead his

Trio Gusto (jazz) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 5 p.m. Free.

as a hip-hop producer also emerge in heavy bass grooves

FRI.1

and moody atmospherics. His glossy sound coalesces on his 2019 debut album, Superdream. Check out Big Wild on Wednesday, November 6, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. EVAN GIIA and ARK PATROL add support.

(802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

SUN.3

Untitled-12 1

Jesse Agan (singer-songwriter) at 14th Star Brewing Co., St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free. Lowell Thompson and Friends (rootsrock) at Hatch 31, Bristol, 7 p.m. Free.

Danny & the Parts, Zack DuPont (country) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

Strange Purple Jelly (jam) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

Egg Drop Soup, Savage Hen (punk) at Monkey House, Winooski, 8:30 p.m. $3/8. 18+.

Taiyamo Denku, Bourbon Legends, Learic (hip-hop) at Monkey House, Winooski, 9 p.m. Free.

Ensemble V (jazz) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Ali T, Sabrina Comellas (singer-songwriter) at Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10/12. Big Wild, EVAN GIIA, Ark Patrol (pop) at Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $22/25.

Karaoke with Rob Jones at Manhattan Pizza & Pub, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

WED.6 // BIG WILD [POP]

Discount Face Tattoos, the Silent Mile, Snow Day, Potentially Lobsters (punk) at Orlando’s Bar & Lounge, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free.

WED.6 vermont

MON.4

Sean Kehoe (singer-songwriter) at Manhattan Pizza & Pub, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

Ukulele Kids with Joe Beaird at the Skinny Pancake, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free.

burlington

Karaoke with Samantha Dickey at Ruben James, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 9 p.m. $5/8. 18+.

Honky-Tonk Tuesdays with Pony Hustle at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10/28/19 10:27 AM10 p.m. $5.

Karaoke with Dave Bourgea at Burlington St. John’s Club, 8:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke with Mike Lambert at Park Place Tavern, Essex Junction, 9:30 p.m. Free.

TUE.5

Gua Gua (psychotropical jazz) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at JP’s Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at JP’s Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

Ryan Fauber with Erich Pachner (singer-songwriter) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Seth Yacovone at Moogs Place, Morrisville, 7 p.m. Free.

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock at Monopole Downstairs, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 5 p.m. Free.

SAT.2

Set Theory (rock) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

THURS, OCT 31 | 7PM

Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco at Olive Ridley’s, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 8 p.m. Free. Trivia Mania at Nectar’s, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free.

Open Mic (singer-songwriter) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9 p.m. Free.

POSSESSED!

Karaoke at JP’s Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free.

the backbone of Stell’s work, though hints of his past life

Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk) at Monkey House, Winooski, 5 p.m. Free.

LOCALS PERFORM AS FAMOUS COMEDIANS

THU.31

various singles. Gushing synths and disco-lite beats form

Bloodroot Gap (Americana) at Lawson’s Finest Liquids, Waitsfield, 5 p.m. Free.

FUNCHES

‘Vampire Camp’ (film screening) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 9:30 p.m. Free.

Quintron and Miss Pussycat, Three Brained Robot (rock) at Monkey House, Winooski, 8:15 p.m. $12.

MON.4

RON

Party People Jackson Stell, aka

Trivia Night at City Sports Grille, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free.

Funk You (funk) at Nectar’s, Burlington, 8 p.m. free/$5. 18+. John Fealy (folk) at Radio Bean, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. Free. Mosaic featuring special guests and members of Kat Wright See WED.30. Wednesday Night Dead See WED.30. Zion I, Mister Burns, Eva Rawlings (hip-hop) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $15.

Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading) at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Monday Night Trivia at 14th Star Brewing Co., St. Albans, 7 p.m. Free.

trivia, karaoke, etc. WED.30

Cinema Casualties presents ‘Night of the Demons’ and ‘Butcher M.D.’ (film screening) at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free. Godfather Karaoke at SideBar, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke at JP’s Pub, Burlington, 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock at City Limits Night Club, Vergennes, 9 p.m. Free. String Band Karaoke at the Skinny Pancake, Hanover, N.H., 6 p.m. Free. Trivia Night at Parker Pie Co., West Glover, 7 p.m. Free.

Trivia Night at ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free.

TUE.5

Karaoke with DJ Molotov at Charlie-O’s World Famous, Montpelier, 9:30 p.m. Free. Trivia Night at the Skinny Pancake, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free. Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment at On Tap Bar & Grill, Essex Junction, 7 p.m. Free.

WED.6

Godfather Karaoke See WED.30. Karaoke See WED.30. Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock See WED.30. String Band Karaoke at the Skinny Pancake, Hanover, N.H., 6 p.m. Free. Trivia Night See WED.30. Trivia Night See WED.30. 

WINTER HOURS: Lunch and Dinner

comedy

WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY 11am-10pm

WED.30

SATURDAY 3pm-10pm

Indie Rumble (improv) at Vermont Comedy Club, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Vermont Comedy Club, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. Free.

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Possessed: Comedians Channel Other Comedians (standup) at Vermont Comedy Club, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5.

FRI.1

Emma Willmann (standup) at Vermont Comedy Club, Burlington, 7 & 9:30 p.m. $20/27.

SAT.2

SUN.3

Emma Willmann See FRI.1.

TUE.5

Boom City with Root 7 (improv) at Enosburg Opera House, Enosburg Falls, 7 p.m. $10. Femcom (standup) at Espresso Bueno, Barre, 8:30 p.m. Free. Unrehearsed with Matt Fleury (sketch comedy) at Revelry Theater, Burlington, 8 p.m. $7/8.

Fanny Pack (standup) at Vermont Comedy Club, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5. StorytellingVT at Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free.

WED.6

Indie Rumble See WED.30. Open Mic See WED.30.


obsessed? selling pop songs. During this time, they encountered Sudarsano, then a rising vocalist. “She’s my favorite singer,” Patton says of the Jakarta-based artist. Patton imagined Our Follies as a cast album for a show that never quite existed. A host of instrumentalists brings the lavish showstoppers to life, including a few noteworthy locals: pianist Tom Cleary, drummer Caleb Bronz and saxophonist Joe Moore, as well as Patton’s clarinetist sister, Anna, and his father on bass. Due to logistical complications, the album’s instrumentals were recorded piecemeal. Some tracks were even culled from the project’s original demos. But, rather than assemble a full ensemble of vocalists to play the album’s many “characters,” Patton decided he and Sudarsano would be the only singers. “I tried to create characters based on his songs,” Sudarsano says by phone. “It was fun for me to kind of try to pretend I was that kind of person.” Though it has no formal story line, the album winks at various tropes associated with musicals of the early jazz era. For example, “Our Overture” does what an overture should: introduce the musical themes of what follows. But the very inclusion of an overture here is a bit cheeky, since most neo-pop-jazz albums don’t begin that way. Two subsequent cuts overtly reference the album’s spiritual source material. “Take Her to Hear Some Jazz” is a brush-shuffle, bass-tickled duet about the genre itself. “If They’d Had Flappers (Back in Shakespeare’s Day)” prominently incorporates scat singing, which is practically compulsory in vocal jazz. The song is about one of the most famous wordsmiths of all time, yet most of the lyrics are gibberish. Is it meta commentary, or is Patton simply staying true to the blueprints laid out decades earlier by the Gershwins, et al.? Frankly, it’s both. “It was important to me to not be parodying that music,” says Patton. “[But] there are formulas. Once you get a feel for the rules, it’s easy to write in that style.” The “rules,” which Patton studies by examining the minutiae of old music, emerge on the album in different ways. For instance, the interplay between vocals and instrumentals, such as the playful, dawdling piano line that traipses behind the vocals like a call-and-response on “It Doesn’t Look So Good,” is common for old jazz standards. Our Follies “is neither homage nor mimicry,” according to Muller. “These songs have a nostalgic character but also a distinctive, modern feel,” he says. “They’re an extension of the music that Ben loves.”

LUKE AWTRY

He’s Got Rhythm « P.66

I’VE ALWAYS LOVED WRITERS OF THAT ERA. BE N PAT TO N

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P R E S E N T S

“Abra Cadabra Presto,” a saucy Sudarsano-led number, addresses listeners as if they were part of an audience. It recalls feisty, upbeat songs sung by young ingénues —think Miss Adelaide and the Hot Box Girls in Guys and Dolls. The vocalist shows her versatility on the following track, the tightly harmonized “Underneath the Lilac Tree.” Brash and boisterous on “Abra Cadabra Presto,” here the singer transitions into a milder, more subdued version of herself. Sudarsano says she imagines the song sung by a more innocent woman who “probably got married to her first love.” She adds that Patton allows her the creative freedom to explore the characters he creates. Patton is as shy as he is prolific. If Our Follies were to one day make it to the stage, the composer would not be the star. “I think I would be terrified,” he says.

“I’m not an actor. I have stage fright just as a singer-songwriter.” That’s perhaps why he’s remained under the radar since returning to Vermont and settling in Burlington in 2016. He’s made scant live appearances locally, despite having released three studio records and a live album in that time. But things could be changing. “Since coming to Burlington, I feel like I’m in a new phase,” Patton says, admitting that he’s experienced depression as well as a perpetual struggle to find his place in various music communities and scenes in the places he’s lived. Our Follies may never get the live staging it deserves. But Patton and Sudarsano, along with a talented orchestra, create such a vivid world that listeners should be able to dress the sets, hang the lights and sew the costumes in their imaginations.  Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

KINAN AZMEH CITYBAND SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16 5:00 PM, GRAND MAPLE BALLROOM, UVM DAVIS CENTER $ 3 5 A D U LT

$5 STUDENT

P R E S E N T E D I N P A R T N E R S H I P W I T H :

H E R E ’ S W H AT ’ S C O M I N G U P :

Sam Reider and The Human Hands. . 11/1 Modigliani String Quartet . . . . . . . . 11/15 Dar Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11/22 TICKETS

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ARTIST INFO

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BROCHURE:

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PUBLIC ART

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

art

Sean Hunter Williams with his granite sculpture “Culmination”

Rock of Places

A new public sculpture by Sean Hunter Williams honors diversity in Barre’s stone-cutting community B Y S U S A N L A R SO N

S

ean Hunter Williams’ granite sculpture “Culmination” is an eight-foot-tall cluster of forms that suggests the silhouette of a city rising from a quarry. It’s the newest addition to Barre’s Art Stroll, which offers to strollers an outdoor collection of granite works. Williams’ four-sided sculpture is composed of domes and spires reminiscent of cathedrals and mosques, as well as stairways that lead to doorways and through arches. Echoing architectural styles from around the world, it honors the stone carvers who immigrated to Barre beginning in the 1880s for the city’s highquality carving granite, Williams said. He created the statue in response to Studio Place Arts’ 2015 call for proposals 74

for the Stone Sculpture Legacy Program. The theme “From Many Lands, One Community” arose from Barre’s first Ethnic Heritage Festival, dating back to the 1970s, said Sue Higby, executive director of Studio Place Arts. When Charles Semprebon, a Barre businessman, bequeathed more than $2 million to the city in 2009, $103,000 of it funded the Stone Sculpture Legacy Program and the Functional Art Bike Rack Program. Both highlight the historical and ongoing artistic excellence of Barre’s stone-cutting community. “Programs like these create fresh momentum,” said Higby, who coordinates the sculpture program. “Only nine years ago, there were three sculptures in downtown Barre. Now there are 14.”

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Of those, six were Semprebon funded. Others, such as “Mr. Pickwick,” designed and carved by Giuliano Cecchinelli and funded by community supporters of the Aldrich Public Library, were inspired by the program, Higby said. Williams, a second-generation stone cutter, said his career was inspired by his dad, Jerry Williams, who owns Barre Sculpture Studios. The elder Williams received the 2018 Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, along with fellow carver Chris Miller, for creating the 14-foot statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture, for the Vermont Statehouse dome. “Because I had an early exposure to sculpture, I just always had an inclination to do it,” Sean said. “It didn’t feel like a conscious decision. It came naturally.”

“Culmination,” his first public art commission, is located on the Pearl Street pedestrian walkway, which isn’t yet officially open. Williams chose the granite for “Culmination” by browsing blocks already taken from the Rock of Ages Granite Quarry in Barre to find one that most closely matched the dimensions he had in mind. He then had the 8-by-3-by-4-foot block of gray granite trimmed. “What’s great about being in Barre is you can send the block to different sheds that have different capabilities and get the piece trimmed down to what you need,” he noted. To plan the sculpture, Williams first made a model half the intended size. He created a tightly grouped silhouette of


Upstairs At The Peacham Vermont Town Hall

Peacham Corner Guild

ART SHOWS

Annual Christmas Show buildings, inspired by structures such as did at the very end, because I had a lot of the Amiens Cathedral in France and the stone that was still showing at the sides.” Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, as well Williams’ favorite part was adding the as architectural features such as flying architectural details, including windows, buttresses and German timber framing. ridges and brickwork patterns. “You get The forms are based on actual structures certain effects using different pneumatic but aren’t exact reproductions, Williams chisels with a softer hit,” he said. said. “Culmination” was completed in The tallest structure is the most eight months, but the sculpture sat in contemporary: a rectangle with a big Williams’ studio for several years while window at the top, representing a construction of the pedestrian walkway skyscraper. “I wanted to suggest growth continued. Designed by Robert White and also provide an anachronism — that of ORW Landscape Architects, the this could be in any era,” the artist said. He area includes a serpentine, decorated packed the buildings together to empha- sidewalk; an entrance arch; and oversize the tightness of the stone-cutting head lighting. Williams’ sculpture was community, which brought diversity to installed there in September. Though Barre. “Culmination” was never weighed, he “The way in estimated it at which those forms three tons. emerge from the Williams has boulder but remain since received addiconnected to it evoke tional public art the idea of a town commissions. He which consists of created a marble many different parts sculpture called but remains unified,” “Jungle Book” for Williams said. “In the Downtown this way, ‘CulmiRutland Sculpture SEAN HUNT ER WILL IAMS Trail; it commemonation’ reflects the spirit of the quote by rates writer Rudyard Aristotle that the whole is greater than the Kipling’s years in Vermont. The sculptor sum of its parts.” is currently working on a six-foot-long Williams doubled the measurements granite brook trout that’s giving birth; of his half-scale model to create each the Vermont Arts Council’s Art in State element of the full-scale sculpture. The Buildings program commissioned it. The basic silhouette of the skyline is the same, trout will be installed at the Roxbury Fish but there are small differences between Culture Station. the two. “When you have a larger piece, A maquette for “Culmination” and there are more opportunities for detail photographs of the piece are currently because you have more material to play on view at “Rock Solid XIX,” the annual with,” he said. stone sculpture exhibit at Studio Place To create the rough rock surface that Arts. comprises most of the base, Williams Two more sculptures funded by used shell rocking, a process he’d never Semprebon’s bequest are expected in tried before. He said it’s an older way of 2020. They’ll nod to the donor’s enthusplitting the stone off the block to make siasm for cycling and will be associated it look natural again. with the bicycle trail, Higby said. In 2009, “It’s actually pretty hard, and it was Semprebon left $500,000 each to Barre a learning curve, but it’s a good thing to City and Barre Town to complete the bike know because not a lot of people do it,” path that links the two communities. Williams said. “The process takes time Higby hopes new donors will come because you’re trying to guide the cracks forward to commission works for the that you make in the stone, and to control Stone Sculpture Legacy Program. “How a crack you have to coax it to the place you could you ever see too many sculptures in want it to go.” the city of Barre?” she asked. m Splitting off a chunk might take 20 minutes. “You have to use your ears, wait- INFO ing and listening for that harmonic sound “Rock Solid XIX,” on view through November that means the stone is about to split,” he 2 at Studio Place Arts in Barre. Williams explained. “It was definitely the hardest talks about creating “Culmination” on Friday, part about the piece.” November 1, 4 p.m., at the gallery. A ribbon In that stylized base, Williams carved cutting for the opening of the Pearl Street shapes to represent quarry caves. “Those pedestrian walkway is Friday, November 8, 5 weren’t planned in any of the models,” he p.m. Learn more at studioplacearts.com and said; “they were just a freehand thing I seanhwilliams.wordpress.com.

Unique Handcrafted Gifts Small Antiques Specialty Foods Invited Artists Vanessa’s Café by Sharon Hunter

Friday Nov. 1, 10-7 Saturday Nov. 2, 10-3 www.PeachamCornerGuild.com Untitled-10 1

10/23/19 3:28 PM

Tibetian Association of Vermont presents

I WANTED TO SUGGEST GROWTH AND ALSO PROVIDE AN ANACHRONISM —

Cultural Performances •Hancrafts • Yake Dance • Children’s Corner Tibetian Circle Dance • Tibetian Food • Raffle Prizes to be won

THAT THIS COULD BE IN ANY ERA.

Saturday, November 16, 2019 • 10:30am-5pm Edmunds Middle School • Main Street, Burlington vermonttibet.org Vendor & sponsor opportunities contact Tenzin Chopel, president: 802-986-6299

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10/28/19 12:11 PM

supporting our working landscape an event to benefit: Echo, Leahy Center for Lake Champlain featuring

eden specialty ciders flag hill cider puckerbrush cider tin hat ciders windfall orchards casual bites and sips

Local Cheese pairings

harvest-pressed vintage ciders from 100% local orchards

november 8th 6:30-9:30pm Echo, Leahy Center for Lake Champlain

1 C o l l e g e St, B u r l i n g to n , V e r m o n T

For tickets and info find us on Facebook @CiderTerra

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art NEW THIS WEEK

ART HOP JURIED SHOW: A group exhibition of works selected by a guest juror, with first, second and third prize winners. Open during Flynn performances or by appointment. Through November 30. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington.

burlington

f ‘THE ART SHOW’: Artists bring one piece each to this non-juried monthly exhibition of work in a variety of mediums. Winner of people’s choice award takes home collected entry fees. Reception: Friday, November 1, 6-9 p.m.; people’s choice voting closes at 8 p.m. November 1-30. Info, 540-3081. The Gallery at RL Photo in Burlington.

‘BE STRONG AND DO NOT BETRAY YOUR SOUL’: Photographs by 47 artists from the collection of Light Work, a nonprofit based in Syracuse, N.Y., that explore topics of politics, social justice, identity and visibility. ‘RESIST! INSIST! PERSIST!’: Curated by UVM students in a fall 2018 art history class, the exhibit draws works primarily from the museum’s collection to explore how historical and contemporary artists have countered adversity and hardship with empowerment and expression. Through December 13. Info, 656-0750. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont in Burlington.

f ‘CONTRAST’: A new exhibition by the Art Tribe — Melanie Brotz, Annie Caswell, LaVerne Ferguson, Kara Greenblott, Billie Miles, Lynne Reed, Kelley Taft and Beth Young — who are dedicated to supporting and encouraging each other in making art. Reception: Thursday, November 7, 5-8 p.m. November 4-December 27. Info, 598-7420. Flynndog Gallery in Burlington.

‘DARK MATTER’: The 11th annual “dark arts” group exhibition in multiple mediums, curated by gallery director Christy Mitchell. Through November 2. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

barre/montpelier

f ELLIOT BURG AND ATHENA PETRA TASIOPOULOS: Photographs from the streets of Havana, Cuba, and mixed-media collages, respectively. Reception: Thursday, November 7, 5-7 p.m. November 5-January 3. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

DAVID HOLUB: Digital illustrations that combine words, images, whimsy, heartbreak and humor. Through November 30. Info, 862-9647. The Daily Planet in Burlington.

upper valley

f MYRA MUSGROVE: “Say Nice Things to Me,” acrylic paintings by the Brooklyn artist that “dissect an affair.” Reception during Art Walk: Friday, November 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m., with wine tasting November 1-December 5. Info, 295-0808. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction.

northeast kingdom

f ROBERT MALLORY KLEIN: “The Character of the

Kingdom,” paintings of the villages and hamlets of the Northeast Kingdom by the retired diplomat turned artist. Reception: Friday, November 1, 5 p.m. November 1-December 22. Info, 533-9075. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro.

outside vermont

f AQUARELLE ARTISTS: Watercolor batiks by members of the local artist group. f MARILYN KRETSER: Watercolors by the featured local artist in the Community Gallery. Reception: Friday, November 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m. November 1-30. Info, 518-563-1604. Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh, N.Y.

ART EVENTS ANNUAL SILENT AUCTION: A fundraising event featuring items from local artists and businesses. Preview at 4 p.m. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio, White River Junction, Friday, November 1, 5-7 p.m. Info, 295-5901. ARTIST TALK: GLEN COBURN HUTCHESON: The member artist presents his class “How to Draw Everything,” and Hasso Ewing follows with a discussion of her work. The Front, Montpelier, Wednesday, November 6, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 552-0877. ARTIST TALK: SEAN HUNTER WILLIAMS: The sculptor discusses “Culmination,” the new granite sculpture he created via the Stone Sculpture Legacy Program, and the intensive program in Carrara, Italy, he attended. Studio Place Arts, Barre, Friday, November 1, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 479-7069. FIRST FRIDAY ART: Dozens of galleries and other venues around the city open their doors to pedestrian art viewers in this monthly event. Various Burlington locations, Friday, November 1, 5-8 p.m. Info, 264-4839. FREE FIRST FRIDAYS: Once a month, visitors are welcome to view the exhibitions without a guide and at their own pace. Wood-fired pizza available from La Pizza Lupo. Guests bringing or consuming alcohol on the grounds must be of legal age. Hall Art Foundation, Reading, Friday, November 1, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 952-1056.

Travis Shilling “Tyrannosaurus Clan” opened with a reception last Friday

at the BCA Center. Shilling, a Canadian Ojibwe painter, filmmaker and playwright — the

second artist son of Aboriginal painter Arthur Shilling — was born in Rama, Ontario, and maintains a studio in Toronto. His works in the Burlington gallery may be a revelation to local art viewers. Shilling’s visions frequently depict animals — painted in the Ojibwe style — at odds with humans who seem blithely bent on destruction. For example, an outsize bird perches on a backhoe that’s digging a channel for a pipeline; a fish hovers alongside an oil rig in the sea. Shilling’s juxtaposition of graphical, vibrant native symbology and darkly impressionistic scenes is jarring — in a good way. Trained in native and contemporary arts, he wields both to address some of the sad consequences of imbalance in the modern world. Through February 8. Pictured: “Owl.” stamps and stencils, that facilitate a sense of freedom. No artistic experience required. Register on the WholeHeart, Inc. Facebook page. Richmond Free Library, Saturday, November 2, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 917-5677. LAUREN PAKRADOONI: The multimedia artist’s interactive installation incorporating sound, printmaking and kinetic sculpture is on view during Gallery Walk. Epsilon Spires, Brattleboro, Friday, November 1, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 518-225-6879. ‘NONPROFIT EXHIBITION MODEL: CURATOR, ARTIST & GRANTOR’: A presentation in the Jump/ Start Business of Art series. Generator, Burlington, Wednesday, November 6, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0761. OPEN STUDIO FIGURE DRAWING: Sessions featuring a variety of approaches to working from the figure are suited to all levels of drawing, painting and sculpture backgrounds and expertise. Easels and tables available. (Canceled January 1.) River Arts, Morrisville, first Tuesday of every month, 3-5:30 p.m. $10. Info, 888-1261. SPOOKY NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: an evening of pre-Halloween entertainment in conjunction with current exhibit “Conjuring the Dead: Spirit Art in the Age of Radical Reform.” Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, Middlebury, Wednesday, October 30, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 388-2117.

‘FREE TO BE’ WITH MARY HILL: Part of a monthly series, this workshop explores words, colors and applied images, using a variety of fabric, rubber

76

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

TALK: ‘FROM REMBRANDT TO VAN GOGH AND BEYOND’: Art historian Carol Berry discusses Vincent Van Gogh’s life, the development of his art, and the artists who influenced him. Part of the First Wednesdays series, a Vermont Humanities Council program. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Wednesday, November 6, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. TALK: PHOTOGRAPHY AS SOCIAL JUSTICE: Photographer Dona Ann McAdams discusses her work and shows her empathetic black-and-white portraits of performing artists, AIDS activists, political protests, people living with schizophrenia, Appalachian farmers, cloistered nuns and others. Part of the First Wednesdays series, a Vermont Humanities Council program. Rutland Free Library, Wednesday, November 6, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. VIVA LAS ARTES!: Annual fall internationally themed dinner/auction fundraiser for the art center. Prizes for best dressed and accessorized. Reservations required. River Arts, Morrisville, Friday, November 1, 6 p.m. $75. Info, 888-1261.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

AARON STEIN: “Off the Map,” work created using old license plates and found objects by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY PAMELA POLSTON. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

‘DIMENSIONS OF CONNECTION’: An ongoing collaboration of performance and multimedia artist Anna Huff and creative media faculty member Al Larsen that explores how the human psyche coexists with emerging technology practices. Interactive media, performance and sculptural props invite playful exploration. Through October 31. Free. Info, 865-8980. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington. GARRETT MORIN: “Crowd Sorcery,” new works in pastel by the New York-based artist inspired by Neolithic monuments to the dead. Through November 16. Info, 233-2943. Safe and Sound Gallery in Burlington. MARTIN SEEHUUS: “Far Away and Moving Very Fast,” paintings that focus on playful honesty. Through November 30. Info, 391-4083. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. MERCHE BAUTISTA: “Of Joy and Other Acts of Resistance,” mixed-media installations that represent female identity by the Spanish-Mexican artist. Through October 30. Flynndog Gallery in Burlington. SCOTT ANDRÉ CAMPBELL: “Distribution,” mixedmedia geometric abstractions that create order from chaos. Through October 31. Info, 324-0014. Soapbox Arts in Burlington. STEPHEN MEASE: Special events and scenes of Vermont by the Burlington photographer. Through October 31. Info, 391-4083. Union Station in Burlington. ‘TRANSCENDENT: SPIRITUALITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART’: A group exhibition of nationally recognized artists who explore or evoke themes of spirituality through their work, reflecting on questions of human nature, cultural identity and sanctity in everyday life. Artists include Anila Quayyam Agha, Leonardo Benzant, Maïmouna Guerresi, Shahzia Sikander, Zarina, and Vermontbased artists Sandy Sokoloff and Shelley Warren. ‘TRAVIS SHILLING: TYRANNOSAURUS CLAN’: The Canadian Ojibwe painter debuts a new series of work that explores the environmental impact of industry and the threat of extinction to the animal realm and indigenous culture. Through February 8, 2020. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘EARTH PRESS PROJECT: DISPATCH FROM GAIA’: The culmination of the collaborative installation of artist Nancy Milliken Studio and Vermont poet laureate Chard diNiord, which has been in the Saint Michael’s Natural Area since late August. Through November 1. Info, 654-2851. McCarthy Art Gallery, Saint Michael’s College in Colchester.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


ART SHOWS

‘IN THEIR ELEMENT’: An installation of sculptures on the museum grounds by contemporary artists Rodrigo Nava, Jonathan D. Ebinger and Dan Snow. Curated by Carolyn Bauer. Through October 31. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum. ‘JOEL BARBER & THE MODERN DECOY’: The first major exhibition to explore the life, collections and artwork of Barber (1876-1952), with objects including decoys, drawings, photographs and watercolor paintings from the museum’s collection. Through January 12, 2020. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum. JUDITH LERNER: Vividly colored landscape paintings by the Vermont artist. Through December 20. Info, 660-8808. Dorset Street Dermatology in South Burlington. MAXINE DAVIS: Fused-glass panels by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 985-5124. Pierson Library in Shelburne. MAXINE DAVIS: Fused-glass art by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 985-5124. Shelburne Town Hall. ‘POLLINATE THIS!’: How can art explore, examine, and express pollination — metaphorical and otherwise? Experience how Vermont artists and photographers view pollination. Through October 31. Free with museum admission. Info, 434-2167. Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington. SAM MACY: “Natural Color,” Vermont scenes assembled in hand-cut native and exotic wood forms using natural, untouched and unstained wood. Through November 24. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne. TOM WATERS: “Forest, Field & Stream,” landscape paintings in oil. Through November 24. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

barre/montpelier

‘200 YEARS—200 OBJECTS’: In the final celebratory year of the university’s bicentennial, the museum exhibits a curated selection of artifacts, documents and images from the school’s collections. Through December 21. Info, 485-2886. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University in Northfield. ADELAIDE MURPHY TYROL: “Anatomy of a Pond,” acrylic paintings and drawings, including larger fine-art paintings and small natural history armature illustrations. Through December 31. Info, 229-6206. North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier. CHRIS JEFFREY: Kinetic wall pieces that encourage the viewer to become involved in bringing the art to life, plus light boxes that seem to project colorful UV-lit structures into infinity. Through November 30. Info, 585-0867. Center for Arts and Learning in Montpelier. ‘CONDUITS’: Painters Liz Hawkes deNiord and Richard Heller and collodion print photographer Rachel Portesi explore underlying realities in their artworks. Through October 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. ‘ROCK SOLID XIX’: An annual, since 2000, showcase of stone sculptures and assemblages by area artists, and other work that depicts the beautiful qualities of stone. DAMARISCOTTA ROUELLE: “Humanity – No Fear of the Other and the Good Life,” recent paintings. Third floor gallery. TUYEN MY NGUYEN: “Perspective,” installations made from tautly strung thread and string that explore scale differences in small and large configurations. Second floor gallery. Through November 2. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre. ELIZABETH NELSON: “Northward,” paintings by the Vermont artist. Curated by Studio Place Arts. Through December 14. Info, info@studioplacearts. com. Morse Block Deli & Taps in Barre. GALEN CHENEY & TESSA O’BRIEN: Mixed-media paintings. Through November 1. Info, 262-6035. NORTHERN VERMONT ARTIST ASSOCIATION: A group show featuring works by members of the longtime artists’ organization. Through November 1. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. ‘IN THE DETAILS’: Watercolors by Samantha Aronson and photography collage by Michelle

Saffran. Music for the evening provided by Jay Saffran. Through October 31. Info, 279-5048. ART, etc. in Northfield. JANIE COHEN: “Rogue Cloth Work,” hand-stitched pieces of old cloth combined and transformed into new textile assemblages with new contexts. Through December 27. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. ‘MONKEYS, MISSILES AND MUSHROOMS’: Paintings and drawings by Marina Epstein that reflect the artist’s life in Vermont and exotic tropical influences from living in the Yucatan. Through October 30. Info, 229-6297. Capitol Region Visitors Center in Montpelier. ‘NORMAN ROCKWELL’S ARLINGTON: AMERICA’S HOME TOWN’: An exhibit chronicling Rockwell and other artists who lived in Arlington, as well as many local residents who posed for the scenes of everyday life they portrayed. A collaborative effort of the Canfield Gallery and the Russell Collection of Vermontiana. Through January 31, 2020. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

Refresh your reading ritual. Flip through your favorite local newspaper on your favorite mobile device. (And yes, it’s still free.)

PATRICIA LEAHEY MERIAM: Oil paintings of landscapes, animals, still lifes and more by the local artist. Proceeds of sales benefit the BOH capital campaign. Through November 5. Info, 793-5964. Barre Opera House. SHOW 35: Recent works by members of Montpelier’s sole collective art gallery. Through November 30. Info, info@thefrontvt.com. The Front in Montpelier. SUSAN WAHLRAB AND CHRIS MILLER: ‘UNCHARTED’: After a lifetime of artistic investigations, the central Vermont artists leap into uncharted waters with challenging materials, subject matter and presentation. Through November 22. Info, 738-3667. The Garage Cultural Center in Montpelier.

stowe/smuggs

2019 SMALL WORKS SHOW: An annual exhibition that celebrates the little things, in 2D and 3D pieces 24 inches or less. Through November 9. Info, 2538943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. BRIAN FEKETE: “Quixotica,” an exhibition of five large-scale oil paintings on canvas that explore abstraction, gesture and color. Through December 20. Info, 881-0418. 571 Projects in Stowe.

f ELIJAY HAMILTON-WRAY: Oil paintings by the MFA student in studio arts. Reception: Thursday, October 31, 3-5 p.m. Through November 8. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Northern Vermont University in Johnson. HEARTBEET LIFESHARING FIBER ARTS: Collaborative works of fiber artists and the therapeutic woodworking studio at the lifesharing communities in Hardwick and Craftsbury that include adults with developmental disabilities. f JENNIFER HUBBARD: “The View From Here,” landscape paintings featuring scenes from Lamoille and Orleans counties. Reception: Thursday, November 14, 5-7 p.m. Through December 27. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. ‘MOUNTAIN AIR’: A group exhibition of the mountain landscape featuring painting, photography and sculpture, curated by Kelly Holt. Through November 22. Info, 760-4634. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. ‘PEAK TO PEAK: 10TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION THEN AND NOW’: An exhibition of photographs and artifacts to highlight the evolution of the division’s equipment and training since its beginning in 1943. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. ‘UNBROKEN CURRENT’: Photography, painting, sculpture and mixed-media works by Mildred Beltré, Sanford Biggers, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons, Rashid Johnson, Harlan Mack and Carrie Mae Weems investigate cultural and personal identity, social justice and history. VASILIS ZOGRAFOS: “Studio of Archeo-Virtual Spiritings,” contemporary paintings by the Greek artist that borrow from archaeological traditions and aesthetics. Through November 9. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. MAD RIVER VALLEY/WATERBURY SHOWS

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goats. Through January 4, 2020. Info, 579-9501. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland.

mad river valley/waterbury

‘GOING UP THE COUNTRY’: Juried works by member artists including woodcuts by Mary Azarian, oil paintings by Kathleen Kolb, paintings and sculptures by Susan and Patrick Farrow, Yvonne Daly’s painted, embroidered and silk-screened clothing and much more. Through November 1. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

2019 ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHY SHOOT-OUT: A group photo exhibition on the theme of trees of Vermont. Through November 27. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury. ‘BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL’: Juried paintings by members of the Vermont Watercolor Society illustrate diverse styles and techniques. Through December 21. Free. Info, 496-6682. Vermont Festival of the Arts Gallery in Waitsfield.

JOHN BROWDOWSKY: “Why 40 Still Lifes,” paintings resulting from the artist’s project of painting one still life a week over 12 months. Through November 11. Info, info.77art@gmail.com. B&G Gallery in Rutland.

middlebury area

WHITNEY RAMAGE: “(Dis)Embodiment,” multimedia works that utilize sculptures, performance videos, photographs and drawings to explore how the human body relates and interacts with the world. Through November 11. Info, info.77art@gmail.com. The 77 Gallery in Rutland.

‘CEMETERIES OF ADDISON COUNTY’: Photography by Kathryn Wyatt that portrays the quiet beauty of local cemeteries through an artistic lens. Through November 30. Info, 349-0991. Lincoln Library. ‘CONJURING THE DEAD: SPIRIT ART IN THE AGE OF RADICAL REFORM’: Photographs and original drawings acquired by Solomon Wright Jewett (1808-94), a Vermont farmer, legislator and spiritualist who claimed supernatural powers, including bringing back the deceased. DANA SIMSON: “The animals are innocent,” mixed-media/ceramic sculptures and paintings featuring animals that address loss of habitat and food sources, among other perils. Through January 11, 2020. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury. CORRINE YONCE: “Somewhere Between Place and Home,” a multimedia exploration of three projects by the community organizer, artist and documentarian that explore what it means when one’s primary residence is something other than fully home. Through February 29, 2020. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. ELLEN GRANTER: “Creatures Great and Small,” paintings inspired by the Massachusetts artist’s observations and love of wildlife that inhabits the New England coastline. Through October 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls. HANNAH MORRIS: “Waiting to Happen,” a solo exhibition of new collages, composed of magazine photos and paper detritus, by the Barre artist. Through October 31. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes. KATHRYN WYATT: “The Cemeteries of Addison County,” photography that portrays the quiet beauty of local cemeteries through an artistic lens. Through October 31. Info, 458-2603. Ilsley Public Library in Middlebury. MUSEUMLAB: A diverse array of pieces from the museum’s collection selected by professors from a variety of disciplines; visitors are invited to observe the reactions sparked when this “teaching laboratory” displays art supporting various college courses. Through December 8. Info, 443-5258. Middlebury College Museum of Art.

upper valley

COLEEN O’CONNELL: “Feathers, Ferns and Fish,” prints using a variety of techniques by the ecologically minded local artist. JENNA RICE: “Guitar Tattoos,” pyrographic artwork on musical instruments by the Weathersfield artist and musician. Through December 31. Info, 295-4567. Long River Gallery & Gifts in White River Junction.

Vasilis Zografos In his first solo exhibition in North America, Greek artist Vasilis Zografos presents an engaging selection of paintings at Stowe’s Helen Day Art

Center. The title is “Studio of Archeo-Virtual Spiritings,” but the works have nothing to do with this spooky time of year. Curated by Stephanie Bertrand, the paintings draw, literally, from the classic art traditions of Zografos’ homeland, but they “deliberately abandon the aura of the finished masterpiece in favour of ghostly studies of restored Antique statuettes and plaster replicas.” While the replication of images from museum catalogs speaks to today’s digitized visual space, the re-creation of those images by hand simultaneously validates the persistent medium of painting. Zografos’ works “spirit” the past into the present. Through November 9. Pictured: paintings by Zografos. PETER K.K. WILLIAMS: Oil paintings including landscapes inspired by Vermont, Lake Champlain and the rainforest of Costa Rica, as well as recreations based upon Paleolithic cave paintings from France. Through November 10. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury. T.J. CUNNINGHAM & HELEN SHULMAN: “Ingress,” realist and abstracted landscape paintings, respectively. Through October 31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury. ‘VOTES … FOR WOMEN?’: An exhibition of vintage photographs, banners and memorabilia that coincides with the 100th anniversary of the campaign to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

rutland/killington

northeast kingdom

KAREN HENDERSON: “Contemplate,” landscapeinspired textiles and mixed-media artworks. Through November 22. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury.

DONA ANN MCADAMS: Acclaimed Vermont photographer and activist Dona Ann McAdams’ expansive oeuvre features historic black-and-white portraits of avant-garde performers, pioneers of queer liberation, portraits of people living with schizophrenia, Appalachian farmers, cloistered nuns, race track workers and luminous images of horses, oxen and

‘THE PIVOT AND THE BLADE: AN INTIMATE GLANCE AT SCISSORS’: A collection of objects that convey the long human relationship to scissors, their design and explore myriad professional, creative, superstitious, violent and domestic uses. Through December 31. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover.

HALLOWEEN AND DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATION Thursday, October 31st 5-Year Anniversary Party in Essex

10/27-11/03 • $5.55 house margaritas all week!

DRINK SPECIALS, GIVEAWAYS & MORE!

OPEN DAILY FOR LUNCH AND DINNER

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WENDY KLEMPERER, MIRANDA THOMAS & JACKIE PADICH: Paintings and sculpture that incorporate natural imagery. Through January 5, 2020. Info, 359-5000. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center in Quechee.

‘ART OF FIRE’: An all-media exhibit by members. Through November 5. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

Share the news! Celebrate the happy couple with a wedding or engagement announcement in Seven Days Lifelines.

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SUE LAWRENCE & ANDREW WILLIAMS: Oil paintings with a fall foliage theme by the Claremont, N.H., artists. Through October 31. Info, 295-0808. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction.

‘’90S REIGN’: Work by students in the animation and illustration program. Through November 14. Info, 626-6487. Quimby Gallery, Northern Vermont University-Lyndon in Lyndonville.

in 1920. Through December 8. Info, 443-6433. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College.

Guess who’s tying the knot...

lifelines

‘ELEMENTS OF GLASS: FROM THE WORKSHOP OF SIMON PEARCE’: A collaborative exhibition with the renowned Vermont glassmaker explores the transformation from sand to glass, from design to finished product. Through March 31, 2020. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

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ART SHOWS

‘WINDOWS FROM THE OLD BARN’: Framed paintings of farm and wild animals on barn windows. Through December 3. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘ALCHEMY: METAL, MYSTERY AND MAGIC’: A group show featuring sculptures and painting by Jeanne Carbonetti, Sabrina Fadial, Alexandra Heller, Peter Heller, Pat Musick, Dan O’Donnell, Gerald Stoner and Johny Swing. Through February 29, 2020. Info, 258-3992. The Great Hall in Springfield. DOUG TRUMP: “By Rail,” 12 oil and mixed-media works on repurposed wood. Through February 9, 2020. FAFNIR ADAMITES: “Interfere (with),” a sculptural installation created with felted wool and burlap that focuses on intergenerational trauma and generational emotional turmoil. Through March 7, 2020. GORDON MEINHARD: “The Lives of Tables,” modernist still life paintings of tables that appear to become more animated as the series progresses, by the cofounder of the museum. Through March 7, 2020. MARÍA ELENA GONZÀLEZ: “Tree Talk,” an installation that uses rubbings and tracings of birch bark as templates for laser-cutting paper piano rolls. Through February 9, 2020. THELMA APPEL: “Observed/Abstract,” a survey of the career of a cofounder of the Bennington College Summer Painting Workshop, whose work now

centers on the tarot. Through February 9, 2020. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed work by Vermont artists, including paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Arista Alanis, Steve Budington, Clark Derbes, Jason Galligan-Baldwin and Sarah Letteney. MALCOLM MORLEY: Approximately 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper created between 1964 and 2016 by the British-born American artist and founder of super-realism. RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER: Some 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper that reference everyday objects, symbols, people and places, often made from unconventional and industrial materials. The American painter, sculptor and draftsman died in 2011. Through December 1. $10. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading. NATALJA KENT: ‘Movement Artifact,” large-scale, camera-less “photographs” created with direct application of light to paper in the darkroom. Through November 1. Info, 251-5130. Epsilon Spires in Brattleboro.

manchester/bennington

22ND ANNUAL NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: Outdoor sculptures and gallery exhibits featuring 41 artists throughout the historic village. Through November 3. Info, 430-9715. Various locations around North Bennington.

‘AUTUMN ANGLES’: The juried exhibition features works by SVAC artist members. ANDO HIROSHIGE: Woodblock prints by the Japanese master (1797-1858), curated by Steven Schlussel. Through November 17. Donations. Info, 362-1405. Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester.

DEBORAH SACKS: “Cats, Landscapes & Figures,” mixed-media prints by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library.

‘VISIBLE IN VERMONT: OUR STORIES, OUR VOICES’: A multigenerational photo and story exhibition highlighting the experiences of people of color living in or attending school in Vermont. ASA CHEFFETZ: VERMONT WOOD ENGRAVINGS: Works by the late printmaker (1896-1965). Through December 30. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

f JORDAN LAURA MCLACHLAN & MORTON BARTLETT: “Family Matters,” a special exhibition of outsider art, in association with Marion Harris Gallery in New York City. Reception: Saturday, November 9, 3-5 p.m. Through February 29, 2020. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

JANET VAN FLEET: “Hanging Around,” mixed-media constructions of found materials. Through November 9. Info, 685-4699. North Common Arts in Chelsea.

randolph/royalton

‘AN ARCHIVE OF FEELING’: A group exhibition of photography, sculpture, painting, textiles and installation that ask what we hold and what materials are able to hold us. Artists include Lydia Kern, Caitlin LaDolce, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Wylie Garcia, Janie Cohen, Josh Urban Davis, Morris Fox and Marina Leybishkis. Curated by J. Turk. Through November 3. Info, seth@chandler-arts.org. Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph. ‘COLORS IN LIFE’: More than 30 paintings by the Connecticut River Chapter of the Vermont Watercolor Society. Through November 10. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

KATE EMLEN: “Breathe the Wind,” paintings large and small, inspired from immersion in nature. Through December 20. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery in South Royalton.

outside vermont

EVELYN R. SWETT: “Compost Compositions,” paintings that muse on waste and transformation. MARTHA STEIN: “A 40 Year Retrospective,” works in fiber sculpture. SHARI WOLF BORAZ + MARY GERAKARIS: “Borders of Consciousness, Dreaming in Color,” artworks in embroidery, and paintings on aluminum, respectively. Through November 16. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. m

CALL TO ARTISTS 12TH ANNUAL LEGO CONTEST & EXHIBIT: Creators of all ages are invited to design and build original LEGO sculptures and display them at the museum November 7-11. Prizes based on creativity and craftsmanship in six age groups: preschool; grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12; adult; and adult-child collaborations. Entry forms and more info at brattleboromuseum.org or 257-0124, ext. 101. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. Through November 5. $5 per entry. Info, 257-0124. 2019 MEMBERS’ ART SHOW CALL TO ARTISTS: For one month, the gallery hosts a non-juried community exhibition featuring works by members, opening November 26. Submissions accepted between October 19 and November 2 only. More info at website or mail@ helenday.com. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe. Free. Info, 253-8358. 3RD ANNUAL LYNDONVILLE ART WALK: Artists and makers in all mediums are invited to create work in the theme of opposites, such as black/white, spring/fall, hot/cold, or whatever comes to mind. More info at Melmelts@yahoo.com. Green Mountain Books and Prints, Lyndonville, Through November 8. Free. Info, 229-8317. ‘ABSTRACTION’: Abstract images combine shapes, color, pattern, texture and imagination to create an image largely independent of visual reality. For an exhibition in January, we seek abstract images made in whatever way you choose. Curator: Kirsten Hoving. More info on website. Deadline: November 11. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $39 for up to five images, $6 each additional image. Info, photos@photoplacegallery.com. ‘THE ART SHOW’: All sizes and mediums of artwork accepted, one piece per artist, to this monthly non-juried exhibition. $10 cash entry fee. Drop-off time for artwork is every First Friday of the month from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Opening reception is 6-9 p.m., with people’s choice awarded a mini-grant. Info: publicartschool@gmail.com. The Gallery at RL Photo, Burlington, Through January 2, 2020. Info, 540-3081.

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CALL FOR MURAL ARTISTS: Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop requests proposals from experienced muralists for a high-impact public art opportunity that will be developed in two phases: sketch and execution. Design must incorporate a phoenix. Mural location: alley at 5 Stowe Street in Waterbury. Prize for winning preliminary sketch: $750. Email proposal to info@axelsgallery.com. Subject line: 2019 Mural Submission (your first and last name). Deadline: December 15. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop, Waterbury. Info, 244-7801. CALL TO ARTISTS: MURAL OPPORTUNITIES: Local nonprofit Arts So Wonderful has a graffiti-abatement program giving artists a chance to make public art and beautify Burlington. There are several current opportunities for artists to collaborate on murals around town before the winter weather comes, as well as plan for spring projects. Various Burlington & Winooski locations, Through October 31. Info, artssowonderful2@gmail.com. CALL TO ARTISTS: BOTANICAL BLITZ: During the coldest months of winter, the gallery will turn into a botanical refuge with paintings and drawings, sculptural works and installations that depict the plant, insect and animal worlds. We are looking for new work, in traditional and nontraditional media, for an exhibition January 21 to March 7, 2020. Deadline: November 15. For details, visit studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10; free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069. ‘CELEBRATING THE SMALL’: For the last exhibition of the year, we’re seeking artworks 10-by-10 inches or smaller, including frame, and priced at no more than $100. Must be ready to hang. Artists can submit up to five pieces. Artwork must be dropped off by November 23 at 4 p.m. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop, Waterbury. Info, 244-7801. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES THROUGH AN ARTIST’S EYE: The Orleans County Natural Resources Conservation District and the

Memphremagog Arts Collective are looking for artists of all types to submit work around the theme of ecosystem services and agriculture. The juried exhibition will open on April 3, 2020, at the MAC Center for the Arts in downtown Newport. More info at vacd.org/ conservation-districts/orleans-county or emily.irwin@vt.nacdnet.net. Memphremagog Arts Collaborative, Newport, Through December 31. Free. Info, 624-7022. ISLAND ARTS GALLERY CALL TO ARTISTS: Artists interested in showing at the gallery must submit an artist statement or biography, medium, and two to five high-quality digital images of their work to Mary Jo McCarthy at maryjomccarthy@gmail.com. Deadline November 15. If accepted, each artist or artist group will be assigned a month for exhibition in 2020. Island Arts Gallery, North Hero. Free. Info, 372-6047. MEMBERS’ ART SHOW: All members are welcome to submit one or two pieces of work to this nonjuried show, which will open November 26. Send high-resolution images of work to gallery@helenday.com, or call 253-8358 with any questions. Deadline: November 2. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe. Info, 253-8358. PHOTO CONTEST: Photographers are invited to enter up to three submissions of photos taken in Vermont between January 1 and November 22, the deadline date. Must attend at least one meeting of River Arts Photo Co-op to qualify. Winning images will be in an exhibit; prizes given. Visit RiverArtsVT.org for full submission guidelines, and submit images to info@RiverArtsVT.org. River Arts, Morrisville. Free. VILLAGE HEALTH GRAND OPENING ART CONTEST: Professionals, amateurs, adults and children, including groups, are invited to submit work in all mediums for display. Send digital submission by November 30 to info@villagehealthvt.com. Cash prizes. Rules and entry forms at villagehealthvt.com. Village Health, Middlebury. Free. Info, 382-9491.

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10/28/19 10:16 AM


movies Dolemite Is My Name ★★★★

T

he first time I ever heard the name Dolemite, it was uttered by Bill Murray in a riff from Jim Jarmusch’s 2005 Broken Flowers. But Jerry Seinfeld is responsible for me finally finding out who Dolemite was. And for bringing a reanimated Eddie Murphy back from wherever he’s been nursing his wounded ego for the past decade. Netflix’s unofficial laugh ambassador first brought the comedy legend to the streaming giant in a revelatory episode of “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” that debuted in July. That led to a multi-project deal worth $70 million to Murphy. And that in turn led to his critically lauded Netflix debut, which premiered last Friday. Who was Dolemite? There’s no short answer. There is, however, a tremendously entertaining one, and Dolemite Is My Name unspools it beautifully. Murphy stars in the true story of Rudy Ray Moore, a 1970s comic who built a cult following with a succession of jaw-droppingly DIY comedy records and blaxploitation films. What makes Moore’s story so engaging is not only the work that brought him success but the innumerable

REVIEWS

failures preceding it. Moore simply would not take no for an answer in his quest for show-biz glory. He attempted a career as a preacher. Then as a magician. Later, as a nightclub dancer. He recorded a series of R&B singles in the ’60s. The movie opens a bit later, in Los Angeles, with Moore trying unsuccessfully to persuade a DJ played by Snoop Dogg (who has called Moore his “uncle”) to put those singles in rotation. That evening, he gets up onstage at the club where he does odd jobs and tries standup. Neither the audience nor his boss is amused. But then a funny thing happens. A loquacious homeless man walks into Moore’s place of work and regales everyone with tall tales of a mythical pimp named Dolemite. Such declamations, often incorporating braggadocio and rhyme, are part of an African American folk tradition with which Moore was familiar. Out of the blue, he finds himself seized by the inspiration to refine and repurpose the material into a comedy act in which he’ll play the unfiltered character. One of the picture’s many appealing qualities is its good-heartedness. Scripted by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (Ed Wood) and directed by Craig Brewer (Hustle & Flow), it tells a story filled with offbeat friendships and unlikely alliances.

BACK IN BLAX Murphy makes a return to form in the true story of a comic who pimped himself.

After a Dolemite comedy album flies up the Billboard charts, Moore sets his improbable sights on movie stardom. Again and again, he hits up the white owners of his label for advances to finance a Dolemite film, and it’s undeniably touching when they help him out. The making of the movie is depicted in both hilarious and fastidious detail. Numerous scenes were shot in the original picture’s locations, and many replicate it frame for frame. Wesley Snipes is deliciously bitchy as its slumming director, while Craig Robinson, Chris Rock, Tituss Burgess

The Current War: Director’s Cut ★★★

F

ailed Oscar bait is a genre unto itself — just ask the hosts of the podcast ELECTRIC DREAMS Cumberbatch gives a stilted This Had Oscar Buzz. The Current performance as Thomas Edison in this long-shelved biopic. War could be the quintessential example of a movie engineered for glories it probably won’t obtain. Helmed by a Sundance Film Festival darling (Alfonso Gomez-Rejon of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl), this triple biopic stars four actors who’ve appeared prominently in both prestige fare and superhero films. It was slated for 2017 award-season release by the Weinstein Company until the revelations surrounding Harvey Weinstein led to its ignominious shelving. Now, at last, this chronicle of the battle to control the initial electrification of America reaches theaters — in Gomez-Rejon’s preferred cut. While it may not light up audiences, The Current War is more fun than most films of its class, largely because of the chasm between its reach and its grasp. With every scene, the director seems to shoot for the relatability, artistic daring and historical gravitas that Steven Spielberg combined in uttered by a human. Of Edison, we’re told, Michael Shannon fares better. Perhaps because he’s not a genius, Westinghouse gets moments of Lincoln, yet the result is more like Bohemian “He engineers his own reality.” Cold and arrogant, the champion of direct vulnerability and believable connection to othRhapsody without the music. With his restless cross-cutting and con- current spends the whole movie grandstand- ers. To the film’s credit, it gives both men laudstantly moving camera, Gomez-Rejon appears ing; the aggressively stylized script and di- able qualities, and it manages to convey wortheager to give us a demystifying, boots-on- rection give Cumberbatch no space to build while information — in particular, about how the the-ground view of famous figures such as a character. Tantalizing hints of doubt and prospect of execution by electrocution became a pawn in their rivalry. Thomas Edison (Benedict Cumberbatch). Yet moral ambiguity flit by, barely explored. Yet the whole production is so hyped up Playing Edison’s alternating-current-promotalmost every line of Michael Mitnick’s screenplay is a sound bite unlikely ever to have been ing nemesis, industrialist George Westinghouse, with Dutch angles, fish-eye lenses and mu80 SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

and Da’Vine Joy Randolph cohere into one of the year’s great supporting casts. For his part, Murphy makes a winning, grinning return to R-rated form. He’s wanted to tell this story for nearly 20 years, even pitching Moore several times before his death in 2008. Better late than never. Dolemite Is My Name succeeds as a tribute to a guy who wouldn’t give up from a cat who clearly has any number of lives left in him. Stay tuned next for Murphy’s long-awaited return to the comedy stage. RI C K KI S O N AK

sical crescendos that one keeps expecting the principals to burst into song. That’s especially true of the film’s third main subject, Nikola Tesla (Nicholas Hoult). The revered futurist doesn’t do much in the story, but the movie nudges us to be awed by him even as Hoult’s fake accent gives off Borat vibes. (“I will leave your slanted room,” he snarls at a hotel owner.) The Current War reaches its wink-at-the-audience nadir when a disgruntled investor tells Tesla his name will never appear on anything again. I prefer biopics that teach us something new rather than making us feel smug about what we already know. (Yes, “Bohemian Rhapsody” was a hit. Yes, Tesla is a car.) The Current War makes a fitful, valiant effort to get beyond middle school history and broach the murk of controversy. But its style, while undeniably entertaining, gets in the way of its substance, and it shies away from aspects of the story that might offend modern sensibilities. (Edison and his allies’ penchant for zapping animals to demonstrate the dangers of AC gets very short shrift here.) The Current War fails to overcome the core logistical challenge of dramatizing a “war” between two parties who hardly ever meet face-to-face. Yet it earns a special place in the annals of failed Oscar bait by dint of sheer chutzpah. And who knows? Worse films than this one have lit up an awards race. MARGO T HARRI S O N


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ARCTIC DOGS: An arctic fox (voiced by Jeremy Renner) who dreams of becoming a sled dog uncovers a nefarious plot in this family animation directed by Aaron Woodley (Spark: A Space Tail). With John Cleese, Anjelica Huston and Alec Baldwin. (93 min, PG. Bijou, Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace) HARRIET: Cynthia Erivo portrays Harriet Tubman, who escaped from slavery to become an activist and organizer of the Underground Railroad, in this biopic directed by Kasi Lemmons (Eve’s Bayou). With Leslie Odom Jr. and Joe Alwyn. (125 min, PG-13. Roxy, Savoy) THE LIGHTHOUSE: Robert Eggers (The Witch) directed this critically acclaimed, reputedly trippy tale in which Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson play the keepers of a remote lighthouse in the 1890s. (109 min, R. Roxy, Savoy) MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN: In the 1950s, a detective with Tourette’s syndrome investigates the murder of his mentor and discovers a larger plot in this adaptation of Jonathan Lethem’s novel, directed by and starring Edward Norton. With Bruce Willis, Dallas Roberts and Willem Dafoe. (144 min, R. Roxy) PARASITE: An unemployed family finds plenty to do — and money to be made — in an affluent home in this satirical drama from Bong Joon Ho (Snowpiercer), which won the Palme d’or at the Cannes Film Festival. With Kang-ho Song and Yeo-jeong Jo. (132 min, R. Roxy) TERMINATOR: DARK FATE: Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton) is back to protect yet another kid endangered by a time-traveling cyborg in this sequel set 20 years after Terminator 2: Judgment Day. With Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mackenzie Davis and Natalia Reyes. Tim Miller (Deadpool) directed. (128 min, R. Bijou, Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Palace, Paramount, Welden)

NOW PLAYING ABOMINABLEHHH1/2 Lost in Shanghai, a young yeti needs help to return to his Everest home in this DreamWorks animated adventure. Jill Culton (Open Season) directed. With the voices of Chloe Bennet, Albert Tsai and Eddie Izzard. (97 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 10/2) AD ASTRAHHHHH Brad Pitt plays an astronaut sent across the solar system on a mission to find his father (Tommy Lee Jones), who disappeared on a mysterious expedition, in this sci-fi film from director James Gray (The Immigrant). With Liv Tyler and Ruth Negga. (122 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 9/25) THE ADDAMS FAMILYHH1/2 Charles Addams’ creepy cartoon family becomes a family animation directed by Greg Tiernan and Conrad Vernon (Sausage Party), with the voices of Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron and Chloë Grace Moretz. (105 min, PG) ANTHROPOCENE: THE HUMAN EPOCHHHHH Directors Jennifer Baichwal, Edward Burtynsky and Nicholas de Pencier traveled around the globe to chronicle humanity’s impact on the planet in this documentary. (87 min, NR) COUNTDOWNH1/2 An app that helpfully tells you when you’ll die? That’s the premise of this horror flick from first-time director Justin Dec. With Elizabeth Lail, Anne Winters and Charlie McDermott. (90 min, PG-13) THE CURRENT WAR: DIRECTOR'S CUTHH1/2 Benedict Cumberbatch plays Thomas Edison in this drama about the inventor's rivalry with George Westinghouse (Michael Shannon) for dominance of the electrical grid. With Nicholas Hoult and Tom Holland. Alfonso Gomez-Rejon directed. (107 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 10/30)

ratings

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

Countdown

It’s time to start loving yourself.

DOWNTON ABBEYHHH The story of the to-themanor-born Crawley family and their servants continues in this offshoot of the TV series, which includes a royal visit. With Michelle Dockery, Matthew Goode and Maggie Smith. Michael Engler directed. (122 min, PG) GEMINI MANHH Will Smith plays an aging hitman who finds himself facing off against his own equally lethal clone (also Smith) as director Ang Lee (Life of Pi) makes a return to action cinema. With Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Clive Owen. (117 min, PG-13; reviewed by L.B. 10/16) THE GREAT ALASKAN RACEH1/2 In this drama based on events in 1925, a team of dog sledders races to bring aid to sick kids in Nome. With Brian Presley, who also directed, Treat Williams and Henry Thomas. (87 min, PG) HUSTLERSHHHH Strip club workers figure out a not-so-legal way to make more money off their wealthy clients in this comic crime drama from director Lorene Scafaria (The Meddler). With Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez and Julia Stiles. (109 min, R) IT: CHAPTER TWOHHH Pennywise the demonic clown (Bill Skårsgard) returns to his old tricks as the adaptation of Stephen King’s door-stop horror novel wraps up with this sequel set 27 years later. Starring Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader and Isaiah Mustafa. Andy Muschietti returns as director. (169 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 9/11) JOKERHHH In this stand-alone backstory for Batman’s nemesis, he’s played as a struggling funnyman by Joaquin Phoenix. Robert De Niro, Zazie Beetz and Frances Conroy also star. Todd Phillips (The Hangover) directed. (121 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 10/9) JUDYHH Renée Zellweger portrays Judy Garland in this biopic that focuses on the star’s attempt at a London concert comeback in 1968, with flashbacks to her unhappy youth. With Jessie Buckley, Finn Wittrock and Rufus Sewell. Rupert Goold (True Story) directed. (118 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 10/16) THE LAUNDROMATHH1/2 Dubbed “an earnest lesson in political economy dressed up as a farce” by the New York Times, director Steven Soderbergh’s film about the Panama Papers features a star-studded cast, including Meryl Streep, Gary Oldman and Antonio Banderas. (95 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 10/23) MALEFICENT: MISTRESS OF EVILHH Angelina Jolie’s sharp cheekbones return, along with more drama between humans and fairies, in this dark fantasy from director Joachim Rønning. Elle Fanning is the newly engaged Princess Aurora; Michelle Pfeiffer, the scheming mother-in-law-to-be. (118 min, PG) WHERE’S MY ROY COHN?HHH1/2 This documentary from Matt Tyrnauer (Studio 54) explores how the notorious lawyer and fixer influenced American politics all the way from Joseph McCarthy to Donald Trump. (97 min, PG-13) ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAPHH A decade after the events of Zombieland, the undead have evolved into superzombies. Changing “family” dynamics mean that Jesse Eisenberg, Emma Stone, Woody Harrelson and Abigail Breslin’s characters must evolve, too — or, perhaps, perish. Ruben Fleischer again directed. (99 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 10/23)

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movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. (**) = SPECIAL EVENTS. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

BETHEL DRIVE-IN 36 Bethel Drive, Bethel, betheldrivein.com

Closed for the season.

BIG PICTURE THEATER 48 Carroll Rd. (off Route 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 The Addams Family Gemini Man friday 1 — thursday 7 Gemini Man (Fri-Sun only) Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Closed on Mondays.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Route 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 The Addams Family Gemini Man (Wed only) Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil *Terminator: Dark Fate (Thu only) friday 1 — tuesday 5 *Arctic Dogs Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil *Terminator: Dark Fate

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 The Addams Family Downton Abbey Joker The Laundromat Maleficent: Mistress of Evil friday 1 — thursday 7

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER 21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 Abominable The Addams Family Countdown Gemini Man The Great Alaskan Race Joker Judy Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (2D & 3D) **Studio Ghibli Fest 2019: Spirited Away (dubbed: Wed only) *Terminator: Dark Fate (Thu only) Zombieland: Double Tap

friday 1 — wednesday 6 Abominable Ad Astra The Addams Family *Arctic Dogs Downton Abbey Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil *Terminator: Dark Fate Zombieland: Double Tap

wednesday 30 — thursday 31

Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil **Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (Wed only)

Abominable The Addams Family *Arctic Dogs **Christmas Jars (Mon only) Countdown The Great Alaskan Race Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil *Terminator: Dark Fate Zombieland: Double Tap

friday 1 — thursday 7

friday 1 — wednesday 6

MAJESTIC 10

wednesday 30 — thursday 31

friday 1 — wednesday 6

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 Abominable Ad Astra The Addams Family Downton Abbey Gemini Man Hustlers Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Zombieland: Double Tap

MARQUIS THEATRE

65 Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31

Judy **The Pollinators (Wed only) *Terminator: Dark Fate

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS 222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

The Current War: Director’s Cut Downton Abbey Joker Judy The Laundromat Zombieland: Double Tap

The Addams Family *Arctic Dogs Countdown **Desolation Center (Tue only) Downton Abbey Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil **Slayer: The Repentless Killogy (Wed only) *Terminator: Dark Fate **The Tony Alva Story (Wed only) Zombieland: Double Tap

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 N. Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

friday 1 — tuesday 5

wednesday 30 — thursday 31

The Current War: Director’s Cut *Harriet Joker *The Lighthouse *Motherless Brooklyn *Parasite

The Addams Family Joker

Zombieland: Double Tap

THE PLAYHOUSE CO-OP THEATRE

11 S. Main St., Randolph, 728-4012, playhouseflicks.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 The Addams Family friday 1 — sunday 3; wednesday 6 — thursday 7

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX 454 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 Gemini Man Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil friday 1 — thursday 7

Judy

Schedule not available at press time.

THE SAVOY THEATER

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

Closed for the season.

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 Anthropocene: The Human Epoch Judy Where’s My Roy Cohn? friday 1 — thursday 7

friday 1 — thursday 7

*Harriet (except Wed) *The Lighthouse

The Addams Family *Terminator: Dark Fate

Open-caption screenings on main screen on Mondays.

WELDEN THEATRE

104 N. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 31 The Addams Family Joker (Thu only) Maleficent: Mistress of Evil friday 1 — thursday 7 The Addams Family (except Wed) Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (Fri-Sun only) *Terminator: Dark Fate Zombieland: Double Tap

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The Addams Family Countdown Downton Abbey **The House That Dripped Blood (Thu only) Hustlers It: Chapter Two Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil **Met Opera: Manon (encore: Wed only) **Studio Ghibli Fest 2019: Spirited Away (dubbed: Wed only) Zombieland: Double Tap

*Arctic Dogs Downton Abbey Joker Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Zombieland: Double Tap

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY REAL OCTOBER 31-NOVEMBER 6 tional influence. Halloween costume suggestion: angel, fairy godmother, genie, benefactor.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21):

In his novel Zone One, Scorpio author Colson Whitehead writes, “A monster is a person who has stopped pretending.” He means it in the worst sense possible: the emergence of the ugly beast who had been hiding behind social niceties. But I’m going to twist his meme for my own purposes. I propose that when you stop pretending and shed fake politeness, you may indeed resemble an ugly monster — but only temporarily. After the suppressed stuff gets free rein to yammer, it will relax and recede — and you will feel so cleansed and relieved that you’ll naturally be able to express more of your monumental beauty. Halloween costume suggestion: your beautiful, fully exorcised monster.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you have any skill in fulfilling the wishes and answering the prayers of your allies? Have you developed a capacity to tune in to what people want even when they themselves aren’t sure of what they want? Do you sometimes have a knack for offering just the right gesture at the right time to help people do what they haven’t been able to do under their own power? If you possess any of those aptitudes, now is an excellent time to put them in play. More than usual, you are needed as a catalyst, a transformer, an inspira-

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Author Amy Tan describes the magic moment when her muse appears and takes command: “I sense a subtle shift, a nudge to move over, and everything cracks open, the writing is freed, the language is full, resources are plentiful, ideas pour forth, and, to be frank, some of these ideas surprise me. It seems as though the universe is my friend and is helping me write, its hand over mine.” Even if you’re not a creative artist, Taurus, I suspect you’ll be offered intense visitations from a muse in the coming days. If you make yourself alert for and receptive to these potential blessings, you’ll feel like you’re being guided and fueled by a higher power. Halloween costume suggestion: your muse. GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): More than a century ago, author Anton Chekhov wrote, “If many remedies are prescribed for an illness, you may be certain that the illness has no cure.” Decades later, I wrote, “If you’re frantically trying to heal yourself with a random flurry of half-assed remedies, you’ll never cure what ails you. But if you sit still in a safe place and ask your inner genius to identify the one or two things you need to do to heal, you will find the cure.” Halloween costume suggestion: physician, nurse, shaman, healer.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian artist Marc Chagall (1887–1985) was a playful visionary and a pioneer of modernism. He appealed to sophisticates despite being described as a dreamy, eccentric outsider who invented his own visual language. In the 1950s, Picasso observed that Chagall was one of the only painters who “understood what color really is.” In 2017, one of Chagall’s paintings sold for $28.5 million. What was the secret to his success? “If I create from the heart, nearly everything works,” he testified. “If from the head, almost nothing.” Your current assignment, Cancerian, is to authorize your heart to rule everything you do. Halloween costume suggestion: a heart. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The Dead Sea, on the border of Jordan and Israel, is far saltier than the ocean. No fish or frogs live in it. But here

and there on the lake’s bottom are springs that exude fresh water. They support large, diverse communities of microbes. It’s hard for divers to get down there and study the life forms, though. The water’s so saline, they tend to float. So they carry 90 pounds of ballast that enables them to sink to the sea floor. I urge you to get inspired by all this, Leo. What would be the metaphorical equivalent for you of descending into the lower depths so as to research unexplored sources of vitality and excitement? Halloween costume suggestions: diver, spelunker, archaeologist.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We have stripped all things of their mystery and luminosity,” lamented psychologist Carl Jung. “Nothing is holy any longer.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Virgo, your assignment is to rebel against that mournful state of affairs. I hope you will devote some of your fine intelligence to restoring mystery and luminosity to the world in which you dwell. I hope you will find and create holiness that’s worthy of your reverence and awe. Halloween costume suggestion: mage, priestess, poet, enchantrix, witch, alchemist, sacramentalist. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “One language is never enough,” says a Pashto proverb. How could it be, right? Each language has a specific structure and a finite vocabulary that limit its power to describe and understand the world. I think the same is true for religion: One is never enough. Why confine yourself to a single set of theories about spiritual matters when more will enable you to enlarge and deepen your perspective? With this in mind, Libra, I invite you to regard November as “One Is Never Enough Month” for you. Assume you need more of everything. Halloween costume suggestion: a bilingual Jewish Santa Claus; a pagan Sufi Buddha who intones prayers in three different languages. SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I am glad that I paid so little attention to good advice,” testified poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. “Had I abided by it, I might have been saved from some of my most valuable mistakes.” This is excellent advice for you. I suspect you’re in the midst of either committing

or learning from a valuable mistake. It’s best if you don’t interrupt yourself! Halloween costume suggestion: the personification or embodiment of your valuable mistake.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Cleopatra was an ancient Egyptian queen who ruled for 21 years. She was probably a Capricorn. All you need to know about her modern reputation is that Kim Kardashian portrayed her as a sultry seductress in a photo spread in a fashion magazine. But the facts are that Cleopatra was a well-educated, multilingual political leader with strategic cunning. Among her many skills were poetry, philosophy and mathematics. I propose we make the real Cleopatra your role model. Now is an excellent time to correct people’s misunderstandings about you — and show people who you truly are. Halloween costume suggestion: your actual authentic self. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Around the

11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, the 11th sign of the zodiac, Aquarius, will be capable of strenuous feats, will have the power to achieve a success that surpasses past successes, will be authorized to attempt a brave act of transcendence that renders a long-standing limitation irrelevant. As for the 11 days and 11 hours before that magic hour, the 11th sign of the zodiac will be smart to engage in fierce meditation and thorough preparation for the magic hour. And as for the 11 days and 11 hours afterward, the 11th sign should expend all possible effort to capitalize on the semi-miraculous breakthrough. Halloween costume suggestion: 11.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-March 20): Author Robert Musil made a surprising declaration: “A number of flawed individuals can often add up to a brilliant social unit.” I propose we make that one of your mottoes for the coming months. I think you have the potential to be a flawed but inspiring individual who’ll serve as a dynamic force in assembling and nurturing a brilliant social unit. So let me ask you: What would be your dream-come-true of a brilliant social unit that is a fertile influence on you and everyone else in the unit? Halloween costume suggestion: ringleader, mastermind, orchestrator, general.

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LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE I’m looking for someone who loves to play games in and out of the bedroom. gIyari75, 35, seeking: W

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LAUGHING, OUTDOORS, CHILLING, WORKING OUT, WATCHING TV Like to laugh and make people laugh, too. Down-to-earth. Not a lazy person, but I do like to relax and enjoy TV or something like video games. I do enjoy a little 420. Scarp35, 36, seeking: W, l

WOMEN seeking...

CANADIAN LOOKING FOR FUN Only here a few days. I want to have some fun with some nice Vermont girls. ;) Papat444, 38, seeking: W, l

THE ONE FOR ME I absolutely love to laugh and usually can have a good time anywhere as long as there is humor. I’m up-front and very honest (probably too honest). I’m not really into sugarcoating things, I believe in right and wrong, and I am very independent. I’m not into liars, laziness or underachievers. hjviss, 35, seeking: M, l BEAUTIFUL INSIDE AND OUT I’m a beautiful woman looking for a beautiful man. I believe in the law of attraction — what you seek is seeking you, and your thoughts are powerful. Looking for a man who sees with his heart and is also strong. I am super healthy and frisky. I am compassionate and caring. His heart is also strong. Sunflower33, 65, seeking: M HAPPY. LOVE LIFE! I’m 60 y/o and look great! Fun, funny, love to laugh and have a very positive attitude. I can take care of myself. It would be fun to do some things with a nice, honest, trusting man. No offense, but I don’t like fat guys. I take good care of myself. No small children, please. LakeChamplain, 60, seeking: M, l GARDEN, READ, COOK, FISH, GOLF Looking for a partner, casual date, LTR. Golf, intelligent conversation, fishing, movies, exchange ideas, volunteering. MissDairyGoodnessVT, 65, seeking: M

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NEW IN TOWN Fresh from Queens, New York City, I am the antithesis of the native Vermonter. And yet, here I am — ready to balance out all those overworked, stressed-out vibes to eat organic food and enjoy the slant of the sun on the changing autumn leaves. Currently I am surveying the landscape before heading out and listing my personal 10 essentials. webmamma5000, 53, seeking: M, l OUTDOORSY, HONEST, HEALTHY MUSIC LOVER I’m an independent, strong woman looking for a self-assured gentleman comfortable in his own skin. Not interested in drunks or smokers but someone who lives a healthy lifestyle and enjoys the simple things in life: healthy food, nature, live music, biking, hiking, friends, family. Looking for someone who can flow with the trials and tribulations of life without drama. Gratefulgypsy, 61, seeking: M, l FUN, RELAXED AND OPEN Hi there! This is my first personal ad! I’m looking for fun and a real person with an honest, open mind who is single and lives in northwest Vermont. I love to laugh, hold hands and really get to know someone. I’m not afraid of new adventures, and a motorcycle is a plus! I love the outdoors. Ginger6, 46, seeking: M, l GREAT LIFE, LOOKING FOR COMPANY Strong, smart, independent woman on the threshold of new adventures seeks a funny, interesting, openhearted man to keep company with. A spark of mutual attraction between us is important to me — we’ll feel it if it’s there. Then the fun is figuring out the rest. Firefly57, 62, seeking: M, l GROUNDED, THOUGHTFUL, OPTIMISTIC, ATHLETIC I’m a newly single professional, petite and athletic, seeking companionship. Of great value to me and what I seek in others is kindness, thoughtfulness, interesting conversation and spontaneity. My interests run the gamut of quiet Sunday morning with the newspaper to travel to daylong hikes, bike rides and Nordic skiing. Movies, music and unscripted adventures also top the list. 400river, 56, seeking: M, l ECLECTIC, EXTROVERTED, HAPPY I’m a successful budding entrepreneur. Looking to meet someone who has the same shared interests. I’m getting to know the area. Nixprenom, 33, seeking: M, l FLYING WITH MY OWN WINGS I like to fly with my own wings but welcome that special someone to fly with me. I’m interested in the arts, gardening, walking in the woods, sitting at the waterfront. People tell me the thing that stands out in me is my ability to laugh at myself. I’m looking for a flying, unique man whom I cannot live without. hollyhock, 68, seeking: M, l

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

LIVE THE DREAM! Compassionate, kindhearted but brutally honest, tall, slender, inquisitive, very sassy, no punches. goldenmoments327, 62, seeking: M, l PRRRRRR... Lookin’ for fun, honest, real person for friendship, FWB, dating, LTR option. KittyKat, 53, seeking: M GREAT PERSONALITY, ATTRACTIVE, POSITIVE AND FUN Looking for that special someone who is open, sincere and not afraid to open their heart again. I have a positive personality and believe in people. SweetCaroline, 69, seeking: M MYSTICAL, MAGICAL, HARD-CORE OFF-GRIDDER I’m empathic, loving and deeply caring, so I’m looking for a partner who honors my heart and treats it with care and respect. I am truly a forest dweller and a homesteader. I would love a partner with the skills and desire for self-sufficient homesteading and wild living. I want something lasting and committed. I want a life partner/s. MountainWoman, 49, seeking: M, W, NBP, l THOUGHTFUL, HONEST, CREATIVE Just looking for friends to share life with and have fun. A131, 65, seeking: M, W ARTISTIC, EASYGOING, AMBITIOUS Intrigued by the world. Compassionate. I like stormy days and sunny days. I can be somewhat fearless, mostly mellow. Strong-willed; caring. Chilldog89, 30, seeking: M, l SEEKING ADVENTURE AND FUN Every day I enjoy music, reading and writing, hiking, playing, painting, gardening, meeting up with friends, and dancing. (Note: Cooking is not listed — LOL.) My home is always full of music, fruit, cheese, apples, fun-loving people, good and jovial vibes, a little magic. I am interested in casual dating — going out and discovering new places and new activities. LadyL0664, 53, seeking: M, l

MEN seeking... WANT A COUPLE/GROUP NEEDING EXTRA COCK 41-y/o male, 225 pounds, 6’, muscular with slight padding looking for a couple or group that wants a discreet extra cock to play with. Totally hetero (sorry, guys, I am just wired that way) but interested in a casual MMF or group thing where the lass gets all the attention. If that floats anyone’s, boat give me a shout. JohanBrauer, 41, seeking: W, Cp, Gp I THINK I’M SUPER FUN Hi friends. OK, like all the other big animals, I’m getting ready for winter: buying my pass to ski at Mad River Glen, stacking the firewood and looking at flights to sunny places like Mexico. If you think I’m half as funny as I think I am, we should have a great time meeting up. sailorman, 48, seeking: W, Cp, l

ACTIVE, HEALTHY, POSITIVE, OPEN, SENSUAL Just a chill guy looking for companionship, a like-minded individual. Love all activities that include nature. Nature is a must for sanity. Enjoy skiing, hiking, running, gardening, dirt bike, motorcycle, snow machine. I live off-grid in a home I built. Honest, open-minded. Try to keep it real and not sweat over the small stuff. Trust and honesty are very important in any relationship. 420 friendly. Natureseverything, 53, seeking: W, TW, NC, NBP, l SUBMISSIVE SEEKING... Looking to expand my experiences. I am open to many different scenes and roles. luke1966, 53, seeking: W, TW, Q, NC, NBP, Cp, Gp LOOKING FOR COMPANIONSHIP I am a fun, caring person, and I love the outdoors. I get along with lots of people. I love to sing, listen to music. I am looking for someone who loves to do things. She has to get along with family and friends. No jealousy. My hobby is woodcrafting. Johnpaul5267, 52, seeking: W GOOD GUY I am a college-educated, retired business owner who is financially secure. I have a great sense of humor. I am an avid golfer who enjoys hiking, skiing, softball and trout fishing. Also, I enjoy good food and wine and an occasional cigar. I am seeking a woman with a good attitude who enjoys traveling to date and travel with. appleman, 69, seeking: W, l COUPLE LOOKING TO HAVE FUN! Hello, my girlfriend and I are in an open relationship. I’m 26; she’s 25. We are looking to either explore and meet a female or another couple to have drinks and maybe more. We also go solo! So either way, we are looking for good people looking for a good time and fun. Tattoos19, 26, seeking: W, Cp, Gp, l SINGLE MALE EXPLORING Single, white athletic male. 32 y/o living in South Burlington. Senator802, 32, seeking: Cp, Gp MAYBE I’LL VOTE! HAHA? Hi, sweetie pie! SWM, long blond hair. Love rock, AC/DC, Zoso (Zeppelin tribute), Pink Floyd to heaviest metal. I love nature, animals. Empathic, compassionate, caring people — I’m one, also! I’ve been celibate more than 18 months. Considering, I’ve a very high libido, stamina. Unique and very knowledgeable prowess. I love satiating my lover (very often)! Not bragging, being honest. Compatibility is the key! Let’s come together and meet, vice versa! Your move, sweetness. Teafortwo, 57, seeking: W FAT HIKER, DOWN-TO-EARTH Looking for a good friend to play around with. I am in a crazy, controlling relationship. Just looking for a kind, understanding heart to feel free with once in a while. Nighthiker84, 35, seeking: W

UNUSUAL OLD MAN I’m a 57-y/o conservative, Christian Navy veteran with unusual tastes and interests in the bedroom. I’m seeking a woman between 20 and 40 who matches my unusual interests for a friends with benefits relationship. I’m honest and loyal, and I expect the same in return. VermontPappa, 57, seeking: W NY GUY IN VT Nice guy. Offbeat sense of humor. Looking for that certain someone who can help me feel at home. I like dinner and a movie or Church Street, then a Lake Monsters game. I love theater or live music or hangin’ out at home smokin’ a doobie and chillin’ to some vinyl. Tidy but not a clean freak. urwatuis, 59, seeking: W, l FARMER, HUNTER, FISHERMAN, MOTORCYCLE, SNOWMOBILE Hunter. Fishing. Motorcycle. Snowmobile. Harley1200, 55, seeking: W, l LET’S PLAY BALL Just looking to relax with a female who’s drama-free, loves adventure, loves the outdoors, loves fun. Handtman, 58, seeking: W, l

TRANS WOMEN seeking... GENEROUS, OPEN, EASYGOING Warm, giving trans female with an abundance of yum to share (and already sharing it with lovers) seeks ecstatic connection for playtimes, connections, copulations, exploration and generally wonderful occasional times together. Clear communication, a willingness to venture into the whole self of you is wanted. Possibilities are wide-ranging: three, four, explorations, dreaming up an adventure are on the list! DoubleUp, 62, seeking: Cp, l

COUPLES seeking... FUN COUPLE SEEKING COUPLE Married 37-y/o female and 36-y/o male, looking to explore with another couple. We want a friendship with equal playtime. We like to eat, drink and enjoy cannabis. We are clean, disease-free and non-tobacco-smoking and expect the same from you. She is 5’4, 250 pounds, dirty blond hair. He is 5’11, 240 pounds, dark brown hair. Let’s play. Bruinsfans61, 36, seeking: W, Cp, l ATTRACTIVE MARRIED COUPLE Attractive, caring and honest married couple looking to meet a female for fun times both in and out of the bedroom. She is bi-curious; he is straight. We are very easygoing and fun to be around. Will share a photo once we communicate. Let’s see what happens. VTcouple4fun, 48, seeking: W WE GET OFF ON... ...engaging conversations with other people. We are looking to meet new, awesome, open-minded people who are in search of friends, and sometimes we think we may want a little more. We are 40 and sane but far from basic. We are busy professionals, so we want our fun time to count. Maybe you want to join us? MondaysFundays, 40, seeking: Cp FULL TRANSPARENCY Adventurous, educated, open couple married 12 years interested in meeting another open couple for some wine, conversation, potential exploration and fun. She is 40 y/o, 5’11, dirty blond hair. He is 41 y/o, 5’10, brown hair. ViridisMontis, 42, seeking: Cp


i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

I’M CORNY FOR YOU! You: tall, cute and wearing a black “dad hat” with a red heart emblem. Me: short and adorable, but wearing brown heels not suited for the maze. Our friends left to go to the bathroom, and our eyes met in mutual amusement at their inability to preemptively pee. There was an undeniable spark! When: Sunday, October 13, 2019. Where: Danville Corn Maze. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914897

GOT A LOOK THAT KILLS You were helping a dude in a scooter wash windows. I yelled, “You missed a spot” out the car window, and you shot a look that could stop a heart, and you kind of did mine. I’d like to know more about you. How’d you hurt your ankle? Let’s get a coffee. When: Monday, October 14, 2019. Where: outside Penny Cluse. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914891

KAYLEE FROM BARRIO Kaylee, this is Brian. We were friends, and then you disappeared. Knew you when you worked at Barrio and Butch + Babe’s. How are you? Would like to catch up. Wishing you well. When: Monday, June 1, 2015. Where: summer. You: Trans woman. Me: Man. #914895

MILTON SAND BAR SUNDAY You: on an orange Harley, long blond hair. Enjoying the sun and your music for about an hour. Me: across the road, sitting on my tailgate. Wanted to walk over and say hi, but didn’t want to disturb you. We waved to each other as your drove off. Should have crossed that road. Single? Maybe a coffee sometime? When: Sunday, October 13, 2019. Where: Route 2, Sand Bar. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914890

MANATAT Manatat, this is Brian, the man who made your past stained-glass window. I hope this finds you and family well. Let’s meet up and catch up over lunch or dinner. It’s been too long. Always my best, Brian. When: Monday, October 1, 2018. Where: co-op. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914894 SUNDAY MORNING, GOODWILL IN SOUTH BURLINGTON You told me I “looked smart” as we tried to figure out some mystery item. I told you that I wasn’t sure and said, “Maybe I’m not so smart!” You had a great smile. Wish we could have talked more. Are you free? Coffee? When: Sunday, October 13, 2019. Where: Goodwill, Shelburne Rd. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914893 WILLISTON STARBUCKS You came in with a fellow bald-headed buddy. They called “Patrick” when your coffee was ready. Wish I had made eye contact with you before you were on your way. Single? Next one on me? When: Wednesday, October 16, 2019. Where: Starbucks, Williston. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914892

NOTRE DAME JACKET, WAITSFIELD FARMERS MARKET I asked, “College or high school?” and then became so flustered by the smiling, handsome man answering me that I stuttered! When you came back, I was too busy working to ask if you were local (and single?). When: Saturday, October 5, 2019. Where: Waitsfield Farmers Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914889 BEAUTIFUL SERVER AT PENNY CLUSE You were wearing a red leopard-print shirt. I’m pretty sure I noticed you checking me out while I sat at the counter eating my tofu scram. I was wearing a brown-and-pink flannel. Hit me back if you want to do more than look. When: Saturday, October 12, 2019. Where: Penny Cluse Café. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914888

FITNESS FANATIC I see you often. Most of the time you are furiously working the exercise bike; I’ve always admired how fit you are. Finally, last week, I was working out next to you. As you finished I looked over at you, and you gave me a warm smile. Meet at the exercise bikes soon? When: Tuesday, October 8, 2019. Where: Planet Fitness, Plattsburgh. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914887 BESPECTACLED FELLA IN MEHURON’S I grabbed an unruly bunch of kale and may have shaken water on your shoes. You said goodbye as you left and waved as I drove away. Do I know you? I’m still curious a few weeks later, so I figured ... maybe this guy also likes to do the crossword and occasionally browse the I-Spys for fun? When: Monday, September 30, 2019. Where: Mehuron’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914886 DINNER AT SHELBURNE FARMS, 9/29 You sat behind me at a table in a cream-colored outfit, at the end of the table. I sat at the end of my table. We made eye contact several times and exchanged smiles. No rings on your hand ... Single? When you left, I said goodnight and wished you safe travels. Would enjoy seeing that smile again. Coffee? When: Sunday, September 29, 2019. Where: Shelburne Farms. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914885 LOST DISC GOLF DISC, WILLISTON I spied a wandering disc golf disc that may belong to you, spotted at the course behind the Williston Central School. No name/number, but it’s from an event, so it may have some sentimental value! Check the Lost & Found section on Craigslist for more ways to contact me if it’s yours. When: Sunday, September 29, 2019. Where: Williston. You: Nonbinary person. Me: Man. #914884 I BELONG TO YOU I turned and saw you for the first time; dark and handsome, strong and sleek, quick half-smile, expressive eyebrows. Our eyes met; my heart slowed down to beat your name. When we walked together, it seemed, by silent pact, that we belonged to each other already. When I asked what you thought of me, you just pointed at your smile. When: Saturday, August 17, 2019. Where: Middlebury Co-op. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914882

Ask REVEREND Dear Gentle Man, 

Irreverent counsel on life’s conundrums

Dear Reverend,

I met this girl at a bar, and a few days later we went on a date. After dinner, we went to my house for a few drinks. We fooled around for a while, and not long after we started to have sex, she yelled: “Punch me!” I got really uncomfortable and froze up. She called me a pussy, and she left. I feel bad about it, but I’m not used to rough sex. Isn’t punching taking it too far?

Gentle Man

(MALE, 29)

It’s obvious you didn’t take it far enough for her taste, but that’s understandable. She committed a big boudoir blunder by dropping the “Punch me!” bomb right out of the gate. Someone who’s into that sort of thing should know better, but maybe the drinks went to her head. I bet the evening would’ve turned out differently if she had playfully suggested a light spanking or a simple blindfold. Her loss, I suppose. The rough stuff might be fantastic for some, but — as with any sexual activity — it’s OK only if everybody involved is on board. Partners need to discuss

REDHEAD, OLD NORTH END We’ve crossed paths a number of times. Winooski laundromat next to Pho Hong, the intersection of North Street and North Winooski, and a number of times at Trader Joe’s. I’m nervous and shy, but I want you to know I can’t get you off my mind! I’m 5’1, blue eyes, brown hair in top knot, short facial hair. When: Friday, September 27, 2019. Where: Trader Joe’s. You: Woman. Me: Trans man. #914881

BARISTA BABE AT ONYX I heard you talking about wanting to have a baby. I’ll father it for you. You’re tall and beautiful and really kind. Let’s make babies and dress them in cashmere sweaters with names like Jacque and Arabica. Meet me at Onyx. I’ll be wearing tortoiseshell non-prescription glasses and a J.Crew cashmere sweater. When: Saturday, September 28, 2019. Where: Onyx coffee. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914876

AUBURN HAIR, GRAY DRESS, SUNGLASSES Lake Placid corner store, 11:30 a.m. You: amazingly attractive with your slender legs, big smile and beautiful auburn hair. You walked by me next to the juice cooler. I said, “It’s a beautiful day,” and you smiled and said it’s an “amazing day.” Any day would be amazing with you. Find me, babe, and let’s seize the day. When: Wednesday, September 18, 2019. Where: Lake Placid. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914880

BERLIN WALMART MEASURING WINDOW BLINDS I helped you measure the extension cord to determine the size for your kitchen window. I was taken by your eyes and smile. Should have asked if you needed help with the installation, but when I looked for you, you were gone. If you see this and still need assistance with any house-related tasks, please respond. When: Saturday, September 28, 2019. Where: Berlin, Vt. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914875

BRIGHT EYES, NO BS ATTITUDE You: blue eyes, tall, no-bullshit kind of attitude, always in uniform. Me: curious about you. I see you often, and randomly, in Montpelier, always working hard. Always on the move. You’re tough to find, but I seize up when you’re right in front of me. I want to become acquainted with you. Do you drink? I’ll buy. When: Wednesday, October 2, 2019. Where: Montpelier. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914879

PET PATH CROSSING You: handsome, jeans, blazer with possible cat carrier accessory. I was wrangling an anxious hound dog and smitten smile after seeing you in the lobby at drop-off/pickup. You may not have seen me, but if you’re interested in a free drink, it’ll keep me from forming a fake friendship with a vet to try and secure your digits illicitly. When: Tuesday, September 24, 2019. Where: Orchard Veterinary. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914874

HAM & CHEESE LOVER I spy my hot cheese, the occasional peanut butter to my jelly. I’m astounded every day by what we found — I’m excited for all the adventures to come! Love, Ham lite. When: Saturday, April 13, 2019. Where: in a field. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914878 WALKING BY MY HOUSE You’re either walking alone or with your man almost every day. We always exchange smiles, waves or small flirts, and I’ve seen you smiling ear to ear when you hit the end of my house. Yes, you have my motor running. So anytime you want to just stop and tell me what’s on your mind, please do it! I dare you! When: Monday, September 30, 2019. Where: off North Ave. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914877

TRADER JOE’S JUST NOW, 9/27 You were in a cardigan and striped skirt. I was helping my mother shop. No easy way to say it, but I just stopped. Sorry that I kept looking. I’m not creepy, I promise. If you see me and have two minutes for a call, I could introduce myself. I should have today. When: Friday, September 27, 2019. Where: Trader Joe’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914872 MICHELLE, WATERFRONT BIKE PATH Always nice to see you! OK, so you didn’t go to UVM! Can we meet to continue the conversation? Perhaps grab an app at Shanty on the Shore? You are in my thoughts, and I think we would click very well. Guy on bike! A. When: Sunday, September 22, 2019. Where: BTV waterfront. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914868

boundaries and safety before diving into any sort of BDSM. Punching is pretty out there, even for an experienced practitioner. Anything involving the head, face or neck is often considered edgeplay. That’s a term for anything that could be viewed as not safe, sane or fully consensual. The definition is very subjective, but the people involved need to trust each other implicitly. You shouldn’t feel bad about freezing up. Actually, you should be commended for knowing and respecting your own limits. Good luck and God bless,

The Reverend What’s your problem?

Send it to asktherev@sevendaysvt.com. SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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Internet-Free Dating!

Friends first! Very handsome, fit, healthy, fun, active, happy and sexy Latino SWM, acting 45 with natural body features, looking for SWF housemate in the 40s. Hiking, flat-water kayaking, walking, camping, soccer, cooking, dining out, swimming, travel, making love frequently. DD-free. #L1363 I’m a GWM, mid-50s, seeking bi or gay males for playtime. I have varied interests and am reasonably intelligent. MidVermont, Rutland area. I do not text. Hello to good-looking Bear Grigor in the personals. Contact me. I love bears. #L1362

M seeks F. “If one takes pleasure in inflicting pain and the other takes pleasure in receiving it, a nearly unbreakable bond is created between the two.” “They benefit equally who metes out discipline and who is subject to it.” #L1365 I’m a SWM 60-y/o bi seeking guy to have fun with. I am 6’1, 180 pounds. Clean, DD-free. Mostly a bottom, but like everything. #L1364 I’m a SWM 27-y/o seeking a SF, 18 to 40. I’m a single-woman man looking to settle down. I have a steady job, car and dog. I’m active and looking for someone who is, as well. #L1360

Fairly fit 57 SWM looking for bright, adventuresome SWF, 45-60, who enjoys outdoors, hiking, skiing, cooking and great food, and new places! Recently returned to central VT after a 14-year absence; semi-retired 30-year Hist/Econ teacher and coach. Seeking companion; some good laughs, travel, and ability to communicate. #L1353 Mountain man, 56-y/o, looking for mountain woman. Enjoys downhill skiing, healthy outdoor activities. Looking for woman with same interests who enjoys laughter, good times, good food. Cat lover. In Lamoille County. #L1352

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

I’m a GWM, 60ish, seeking a male or males 18+ who are into spanking and wearing and using adult diapers. #L1357 I’m a SWM, 45-y/o, seeking a bi/ gay male. Looking for a friend to do things with. Interests: cooking, movies, travel. I am 5’10, 180 pounds. Winter is coming; let’s connect. #L1359 Single, active male looking for female ages 47-61 with good sense of humor, nonsmoker, love to dance, work out, and sports. Within 50 miles of Rutland. #L1355 I’m a white male, 50-y/o, seeking gay men. Joy jelly seeks gay men for fun and play. Come inside and fill me with your warmth. Addison County. #L1351

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW. Very laidback, sincere, good shape, GL, open-minded, 60s single guy. Very clean and DD free. Interested in meeting a compatible couple or woman. Definitely have oral tendencies and interest in being a willing sub or boy toy. Thanks. #L1354 Separated guy, 57, tall, mostly in shape. Seeking outdoorsy, active lady for adventure and travel and hopefully a longterm relationship. I have many interests. Nonsmoker, 420 OK. Must like dogs, be funny and fun. #L1350 Easy on the eyes. Discreet 52-y/ o SWM, 5’9, 160 pounds. Brown and blue. Seeking any guys in shape, DD-free, who enjoy receiving oral and are a good top and last a long time. Well hung guys a plus. Chittenden County and around. #L1349 I’m a SBM, 70 y/o, seeking a SWF or SWM bi, cp, tw, tm. 36 to 70 y/o. Looking for HJ or BJ. Love to perform oral and receive the same. Be discreet and DD-free. Love to kiss, role-play and have sweet sex. #L1346

I’m a single male, 62 y/o, seeking a male or female for friendship. Friendly and caring person, 5’9, 150 pounds. Looking for friends who love running, walking, biking, hiking or other activities, even dancing. I’m a nonsmoker, kind, intelligent and respectful. Still working part time but love being out early a.m. I love folk, jazz and classical music. The summer is still here, but soon the colors will be here. Hope to hear from you. #L1348 I’m a SWM, 66, seeking a SWF 55 to 68. I enjoy being outdoors, a nice dinner out and a home-cooked meal at home. Homebody, handyman. Weekend getaways. NEK. #L1343 Beautiful, pretty, handsome, healthy, fun, active, happy and sexy Latino SWM acting 45 w/ natural body features for SWF in the 40s. Hiking, flat-water kayaking, walking, camping, soccer, cooking, dining out, swimming, holding hands, travel, making love frequently. DD-free. #L1344

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10/29/19

4:54 PM

Put on your patty pants and bite into Seven Days Burger Week! november 8-17

Participating restaurants are serving up burger specials that you’ll really flip for. Think breakfast burgers, triple-deckers, veggie burgers and, of course, good old-fashioned beef patties.

The biggest burger fanatics will win epic prizes throughout the week. Archie's Grill 3 Squares Café The Bearded Frog The Bench Blue Paddle Bistro Bluebird Barbecue Burlington Beer Company Butch + Babe's The Chubby Muffin Drifter's ¡Duino! (Duende) Fire & Ice Restaurant The Friendly Toast Grazers Grazers at 14th Star Brewing Co. Hatchet Hinesburgh Public House Idletyme Brewing Company Jericho Country Store J. Morgan's Steakhouse La Villa Bistro & Pizzeria Leunig's Bistro & Café McGillicuddy's Five Corners McGillicuddy's Irish Ale House McGillicuddy's Irish Pub McGillicuddy's on the Green McKee's Pub & Grill Mill River Brewing

it’s not too late to ketchup. c’mon, get on the list! burgerweek@sevendaysvt.com

BBQ & Smokehouse Mule Bar Mulligan's Irish Pub Myer's Bagels The Old Foundry at One Federal Restaurant & Lounge Our House Bistro Park Squeeze Pauline's Café Railroad & Main Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room Rí Rá Irish Pub & Whiskey Room Sarducci's Restaurant and Bar Shelburne Tap House The Skinny Pancake Burlington The Skinny Pancake - Quechee Stone Corral Brewery Sweetwaters The Tavern at The Essex Culinary Resort & Spa The Windjammer Restaurant Three Penny Taproom Von Trapp Brewing Bierhall Restaurant Vermont Pub and Brewery Zenbarn Zero Gravity Craft Brewery

burgerweekvt.com

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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10/28/19 7:21 PM


COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

Humane

Society of Chittenden County

housing »

Bumble Bee AGE/SEX: 2-year-old spayed female ARRIVAL DATE: August 29, 2019 REASON HERE: Bumble Bee's previous owners could not care for her medical needs. SUMMARY: Buzz, buzz! Meet Bumble Bee, a friendly and social girl whom you just can’t help but love. If you’re looking for a cat who will play, cuddle and greet you at the door (and always be super cute, too!), she could be just the one for you! Bumble Bee currently lives in a foster home — ask a staff member how you can meet her!

DID YOU KNOW? Trick-or-treaters at the door can often be scary and stressful for pets! Consider keeping them in a separate room away from the front door, especially during peak hours. Care should also be taken when opening the door, as it could give your pet an opportunity to dart outside. While you’re at it, keep the candy bowl away from curious cats and canines so everyone in the family can have a safe Halloween!

DOGS/CATS: She has lived with another cat and a dog and did well with them both.

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE Sponsored by:

Visit the Humane Society of Chittenden County at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 or visit hsccvt.org for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


on the road

CARS/TRUCKS 2019 VOLVO XC 40 MOMENTUM Volvo XC40 Momentum T5. 3,900 miles, AWD, 2-toned blue/white, all extras & warranties. $35,500. Driven only in Scandinavia. Voted European Car of the Year 2019. Contact Peder: pmarcuss@together.net or 802-343-4559.

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

Route 15, Hardwick

802-472-5100

3842 Dorset Ln., Williston

802-793-9133

ANY OLD CARS: WANTED TO BUY Any condition, running or not. Mercedes Benz, Porsche, Jaguar & most foreign old cars. Call Adam: 203-507-7900. CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled: It doesn’t matter. Get free towing & same-day cash. Newer models, too. Call 1-866-5359689. (AAN CAN)

housing

FOR RENT 1-BR APT. FURNISHED, GARAGE 2 enclosed porches, large fenced-in yard, W/D. Furnished: brand-new BR set & LR set. Basement, gas heat, off-street parking, very clean. NS. Lease starts immediately. Call or text

sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM

CLASSIFIEDS KEY appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our

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802-355-4099, or email skyhorse205@yahoo. com. 2-BR STOWE TOWNHOUSE Lovely, bright 2-BR, 2-BA. View of Mt. Mansfield, pool, walk to grocery & Mayo Farm. $1,600/mo. long-term furnished/unfurnished. (Short-term possible.) 802-253-8747. AFFORDABLE 2-BR APT. AVAIL. At Keen’s Crossing. 2-BR: $1,266/mo., heat & HW incl. Open floor plan, fully applianced kitchen, fi tness center, pet friendly, garage parking. Income restrictions apply. 802-655-1810, keenscrossing.com. BURLINGTON Single room, Hill Section, on bus line. No cooking. Linens furnished. 862-2389. No pets. BURLINGTON Church St. Marketplace studio. W/D. No parking. NS/pets. Avail. now. $872/mo. + utils. 922-8518. KEEN’S CROSSING IS NOW LEASING! 1-BR, $1,054/mo.; 2-BR, $1,266/mo.; 3-BR, $1,397/mo. Spacious interiors, fully applianced kitchen, fi tness center, heat & HW incl. Income restrictions apply. 802-655-1810, keenscrossing.com. PINECREST AT ESSEX 7 Joshua Way, Essex Jct. Independent senior living for those 55+ years old. 1-BR avail. 11/15, $1,215/mo. incl. utils. & parking garage. NS/pets. 802-872-9197 or rae@fullcirclevt.com. SMALL HOUSE ON LAKE Winter rental: a cottage on the lake. 2-BR, fully furnished, enclosed porch & deck on lakeside. Seasonal rental Nov. 1-Apr. 3. 6 miles from Burlington. Newly renovated w/ a lot of sunlight. Incl. cable TV & internet. Heat, electric

readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

CHILDCARE

& rubbish separate. Request application from thomasbusiness agency@comcast.net.

HOUSEMATES ROOMS FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, heat, W/D, garden space incl. 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $250/mo. for basement; other rooms $400-500/ mo. Dep., refs. req. 453-3457. SMALL ROOM DOWNTOWN AVAIL. NOW Small room in large house. Respectful living w/others. Wi-Fi/ cable, W/D on-site, back porch, garden. Tobacco outside only. Inside: 420-friendly. $600/ mo. +$200 sec. dep., incl. utils. Off-street parking: +$100. Don, 802-233-1334. S. BURLINGTON HOUSEMATE WANTED 2-BR, 2-BA at Queen City Park. Off-street parking, near the lake. $600/ mo. + utils. Call Lisa, 862-6081.

LAND 15 ACRES IN JAY, VT. Undeveloped in Jay, Vt., off Route 105. Creek on the property. heartsbrook.wordpress. com, heartsbrook@ gmail.com.

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x10

services

BIZ OPPS BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print & distribute your work internationally. We do the work; you reap the rewards! Call for a free Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN) GET RID OF YOUR TIMESHARE TODAY! Safely, ethically & legal. Don’t delay. Call today. 1-844-757-4717. (AAN CAN

m

PART-TIME NANNY NEEDED ASAP Nanny needed for 2 young children in our home, 2 days a week following the school calendar. NS, clean driving record a must. Contact shminkler@ gmail.com for details.

COMPUTER COMPUTER ISSUES? Free diagnosis by geeks on-site! Virus removal, data recovery! 24-7 emergency $20 off any service w/ coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 866-996-1581. (AAN CAN)

SNOWPLOWING

CLASSIFIEDS

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

ENTERTAINMENT 20192020

SEASON NOW ACCEPTING CONTRACTS & OPENINGS Residential and Commercial

MJS Contracting

DISH TV $59.99 for 190 channels + $14.95 high-speed internet. Free installation, Smart HD DVR incl., free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL/LEGAL AUTO INSURANCE Starting at $49/ mo.! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save. Call 855-569-1909. (AAN CAN)

Call Mike @ 802-343-0089

GUINEA JIM All related descendants of Dr. James Gibson, aka “Guinea Jim,” of Savannah Sound, Eleuthera, Bahamas, lgclassydisplay-MJScontracting100219.indd 9/30/19 4:29 PM 1 please contact Richard EMMY WINNER W/ CAMERA Love at drjamesgibson Emmy-winning producer A PLACE FOR MOM bahamas@gmail.com has helped over a million or 305-528-6645. (AAN offers photography for families find senior all areas. We specialize CAN) living. Our trusted, in portraits, weddings, local advisers help find executives, social & the arts. Incl. private gallery, solutions to your unique needs at no cost to USB. Details at jldamon. you. 1-855-993-2495. com. (AANCAN)

CREATIVE

ELDERCARE

1185 Shelburne Road, South Burlington

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

SUBLETS/ TEMPORARY FURNISHED 2-BR APT. DOWNTOWN Avail. now! 3-min. walk to Church St., pier, UVM. Avail. Nov.-Feb. Wi-Fi, cable TV. $1,700/mo. + $1,000 dep. + $100/mo. parking & partial utils. Don: 802-233-1334.

NEW South Burlington property! 1185 Shelburne Road is located 5-10 minutes from downtown Burlington. Amenities include: • Banking • Retail • Dining on first floor of building • Laundry & Parking included

Resident spaces in the building for entertaining and relaxing, a beautiful terrace on our top floor includes a grill and amazing lake views. One bedrooms available for immediate occupancy, $1375. Open houses daily!

Call Larkin Realty today and schedule your showing, 802.864.7444 4t-larkinrealty100919.indd 1

10/3/19 12:45 PM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x22.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses DESIGNED FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE!

HIGH PERFORMANCE MODULAR HOMES

UPDATED LAKEFRONT GETAWAY

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 30 LAURENTIDE LANE

WESTFORD | 120 SPLIT ROCK PLACE #3 | #4781911

SOUTH HERO | 51 US ROUTE 2 | #4763347

OPEN Sunday

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Privacy abounds! Tucked in this wooded lot is an opportunity to build your own 3 bedroom home with your style in mind. Use the floor plan provided or choose from the many options this builder has to offer. Endless features to choose from will make this the home of your dreams. $404,275

Lipkin Audette Team 846.8800 LipkinAudette.com

Explore the Model Home and Design Center at Hillside at O'Brien Farm. Located on a picturesque hillside, this 30+ acre neighborhood offers 118 energyefficient homes in the heart of South Burlington. Choose from 20 unique home designs, floor plans, and finishes. Prices Starting at $361,000

MEADOW MIST TOWNHOMES

hw-GreenTree092519.indd NEED HELP W/ 1

FAMILY LAW? Can’t afford a $5,000 retainer? Low-cost legal services: pay as you go, as low as $750-1,500. Get legal help now! Call 1-844-821-8249, Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m.-4 p.m. PCT. familycourtdirect. com/?network=1 (AAN CAN) STRUGGLING W/ YOUR PRIVATE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline: 888-6705631. Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST. (AAN CAN)

Evan Potvin

Lipkin Audette Team

evan@cbislandsrealty.com Lakechamplainrealestate.com 802-999-6277

662.0162 LipkinAudette.com

homeworks

HW-EvanPotvin-103019.indd 1

HINESBURG | 58 REDBUD LANE | 4777283

This 2-story townhouse features a kitchen with granite counters and stainless appliances. 2 bedrooms with large closets, a full bath, and laundry on the second floor. Hardwood floors, oversize windows and highly efficient mechanical systems and building materials-earning this townhome a NHBA Green designation. Full basement and a one car garage. $ 278,360

Only 20 minutes from Burlington sits this completely renovated, year-round, 3 bedroom ranch with direct Lake Champlain frontage. Great income opportunity with excellent rental history. $399,000

10/28/19 10:56 AM

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon. Bill Martin Margo Plank Casco

Call or email Kristen today to get started: 865-1020 x22, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

Call Margo Casco or Bill Martin at 482-5232 vermontgreentree.com

HEALTH/ WELLNESS GENTLE MASSAGE THERAPY Emotionally soothing, physically healing, coconut-oil Swedish massage conveniently at your location. Pete Bellini, C.M.T., 802-4978953. Check online ad for more info. GENTLE TOUCH MASSAGE Specializing in deep tissue, reflexology, sports massage, Swedish & relaxation massage for men. Practicing massage therapy for over 12 years. Gregg, gentletouchvt. com, jngman@charter. net, 802-234-8000 (call or text).

Untitled-25 1 9/23/19 4:03 PM ONE-STOP SHOP

For all your catheter needs. We accept Medicaid, Medicare & insurance. Try before you buy. Quick & easy. Give us a call 866-2822506 (AAN CAN) PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

HOME/GARDEN CLASSIC SHADES PAINTING Quality craftsmanship & courteous customer care. Interior/exterior painting. Residential/ commercial. Lead certified. Call now for your free estimate, 802345-2038, or email us at classicshadespainting@ gmail.com. HOME IMPROVEMENT Free estimates. Rot replacement, painting interior/exterior, flooring, roofing, trim, siding (any type), decks, porches. 25 years of experience. Tom, 802343-2708, tfortin1007@ gmail.com.

LOOKING FOR SELFSTORAGE UNITS? We have them! Self Storage offers clean & affordable storage to fi t any need. Reserve today! 1-855-617-0876. (AAN CAN)

PET AFRICAN GRAY PARROT Friendly African gray parrot. Talks & loves attention. Unfortunately, have to re-home due to move. Can come w/ cage. Call/ text 802-249-1044.

MISCELLANEOUS PETS 4 NOKIA STUDDED WINTER TIRES Used 1 winter. 195 65 15. $250 for all 4. Call 802-399-9827.

buy this stuff

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS MOVING SALE: ALL MUST GO! Microwave, slow cooker, table settings, silverware/cookware, pans, knife set in block, TV, DVD player, Tupperware, several coolers, drink jug, vases. Call 802-860-1670; no texts. rcserve@hotmail. com.

ORLANDO + DAYTONA BEACH Florida vacation! Enjoy 7 days & 6 nights w/ Hertz, Enterprise or Alamo Car rental incl. Only $298. 12 mos. to use. 855-898-8912. (AAN CAN) VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150. Free shipping. Money back guaranteed! Call today: 1-844-8795238. (AAN CAN)

6/6/16 4:30 PM

HORSE TACK AUCTION Nov. 24, 1 p.m.; noon preview. Canadian Club, 414 E. Montpelier Rd. Horse equipment & riding apparel, English & Western blankets, saddles, etc. Karen, 802-839-0147.

WANT TO BUY MODEL TRAIN COLLECTIONS Looking to purchase model train collections. Please email or call/text Andrew at amstewar1@gmail.com. 802-318-8788.

BUY THIS STUFF » SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Kristen, 865-1020, ext. 22, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

SOUTH BURLINGTON HOME Sought after Dorset Farms neighborhood! This four bedroom 2-1/2 bath home is in an exceptional community and schools, “bike-able” neighborhood, and close to downtown, UVM, and the airport. Contact: 802-2333081 or grosselk@ gmail.com $473,000

on Pine St. All levels & 10:44 AM styles10/28/19 are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music. burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlington musicdojo.com.

FSBO-Grosselfinger103019.indd 1

buy this stuff [CONTINUED] WANTED: FREON R12. WE PAY CA$H. R12, R500, R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. www. refrigerantfinders.com/ ad, 312-291-9169.

music

GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

INSTRUCTION BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn piano, voice, guitar, bass, violin, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best instructors in spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo

HARMONICA LESSONS W/ ARI Lessons in Montpelier & on Skype. 1st lesson just $20! All ages & skill levels welcome.

Calcoku

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

15x

2-

2-

1-

CONTACT KRISTEN, 865-1020, EXT. 22, FSBO@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Avail. for workshops, too. Pocketmusic. musicteachershelper. com, 201-565-4793, ari.erlbaum@gmail.com.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

art

REHEARSAL SPACE Lovely, air-conditioned & furnished creativespace rooms avail. by the hour in the heart of the south end district. Monthly arrangements avail., as well. Tailored for music but can be multipurpose. info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 802-540-0321.

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FOR SALE CRAFT FAIR Northgate Apartments is having a craft fair on Nov. 9, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Crafts & art include original art, some of which was included in art shows in Europe, handcrafted wooden bowls, handcrafted knit & crocheted items, metal craft, & more. Please come &

7

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9 4 5

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6 4 8 2

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

1 5 2 9 1 6

No. 608

SUDOKU

5 4 8 1 7 Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

5:45 PM ZBA-19135-CU Smith – Zoning Board of Adjustment site visit to 2588 Thompson’s Point Rd., Charlotte, 05445. 6:00 PM ZBA-19-186AP Minkler – Zoning Board of Adjustment site visit to 1158 Roscoe Rd., Charlotte, 05445. 6:30 PM ZBA-19-162CU Clewly – Jeff Small applies for Conditional Use, on behalf of J. Dean Clewly, regarding an addition of a 10’X16” deck, renovation of a lake side porch, and adding a 2nd floor over entry way in the Shoreland District. 7:00 PM ZBA-19-135CU Smith – Continuation of Oakley Smith’s September 11th ZBA hearing.

7

16x

CALCOKU

The Charlotte Zoning Board of Adjustment

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3 2 12x

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CHARLOTTE PLANNING & ZONING OFFICE P.O. Box 119 Charlotte, Vermont 05445 www.charlottevt.org

Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

3

(ZBA) will hold a public hearing at the Town Offices at 159 Ferry Road in the Town of Charlotte for the following application on Thursday, Nov. 14th, 2019: 5:30 PM ZBA-19-162CU Clewly – Zoning Board of Adjustment site visit to 95 Jolly Club Rd., Charlotte, 05445.

Sudoku

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visit the craft show at 275 Northgate Rd. Questions? Call 802-658-2722, ext. 19.

6

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List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45!

8 3 7 1 5 9 6 2 4

ANSWERS ON P. C-6 2 4★★5= CHALLENGING 6 7 8 ★★ 1★ =3HOO,9BOY! ★ = MODERATE

9 1 6 3 2 4 5 7 8 7 5 1 4 8 3 2 9 6 4 9 3 2 6 7 8 5 1

7:30 PM ZBA-19-186AP Minkler – Lee and Deborah Minkler appeal the denial of application 19-153-ZP. For more information contact the Planning and Zoning Office at 425.3533. NOTICE: TO APPEAL ANY DECISION OF THE ZONING BOARD, INTERESTED PARTIES MUST PARTICIPATE IN THE REGULATORY PROCEEDING (24 V.S.A. SECTION 4471) CITY OF BURLINGTON REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS The City of Burlington, through the Burlington Housing Trust Fund (BHTF), provides grants and loans for the promotion, retention, and creation of long-term affordable housing for very

low, low, and moderateincome households. Non-profit corporations, municipal corporations, limited equity housing cooperatives, for-profit corporations, partnerships, and individuals are eligible to apply for project funding. Capacity grants are also made for the staffing, training, planning, fundraising, and ongoing operations of non-profit organizations creating or preserving housing for very low, low, and moderateincome households. The BHTF requests proposals for FY2020 awards. The total funding available for projects and capacity grants for FY2020 is approximately $363,901.00. Application packets may be requested from the Community & Economic Development Office at trawlings@burlingtonvt. gov. The deadline for submitting a final application is November 27, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. For further information, please contact Todd Rawlings at (802) 652-4209. DOUGLAS BETTS, MD PSYCHIATRIC PRACTICE CLOSED Dr. Betts has retired and his psychiatric practice has been closed. Any patients seeking their medical records can contact Dr. Betts directly. REQUEST FOR BIDS: DERWAY COVE DEMOLITION Winooski Valley Park District is requesting bids for demolition of existing structures and utilities, re-grading and reseeding at Derway Cove Park (3090 North Ave. Burlington). Project fully permitted/funded, with demolition completion by February 28, 2020. Bidders provide references from similar projects to demonstrate qualifications. Women and Minority owned businesses, small locally owned businesses, and Section 3 businesses


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS strongly encouraged to submit bids. For information, bid forms, and questions contact Donal Dugan@ Donal.dugan@ gmail.com by 4 PM Friday November 15, 2019. STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 40-2-17 FRCV METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY v. ERNEST H. BAPP OCCUPANTS OF: 2895

Tyler Branch Road, Enosburgh Falls VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 26, 2019, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Ernest H. Bapp to CitiFinancial, Inc., dated August 17, 2006 and recorded in Book 108 Page 156 of the land

records of the Town of Enosburgh, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from CFNA Receivables (MD), Inc. f/k/a CitiFinancial, Inc. to CitiFinancial Servicing, LLC dated February 4, 2016 and recorded in Book 130 Page 49; (2) Assignment of Mortgage from CitiFinancial Servicing, LLC to Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC dated February 4, 2016 and recorded in Book 130

Show and tell.

»

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

Page 50, and (3) Assignment of Mortgage from Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC to Metropolitan Life Insurance Company dated November 28, 2016 and recorded in Book 131 Page 400, all of the land records of the Town of Enosburgh for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 2895 Tyler Branch Road, Enosburgh Falls, Vermont on November 22, 2019 at 11:00 AM all and singular

GRAND OPENING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 —10AM Try our snacks & drinks!

OPEN EVERYDAY 10am-8pm 1128 Williston Road South Burlington 802-800-1818 8h-alwaysfullasianmarket103019.indd 1

crossword

FREE

SAMPLES

the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL/UNIT OF LAND IN TOWN OF ENOSBURG /TOWN OF GEORGIA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF VT, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 77 PAGE 243 1D# TB2895, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS ALL AND THE SAME LAND AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO ERNEST H. AND MARY E. BAPP BY WARRANTY DEED OF DARWIN R. LACROSS DATED DECEMBER 15, 1972 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 55 AND PAGE 263 OF THE ENOSBURG TOWN LAND RECORDS. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ERNEST H. BAPP AND MARY E. BAPP, HUSBAND AND WIFE FROM DARWIN LACROSS BY DEED RECORDED ON 12/18/1972 IN BOOK 55 AND PAGE 263. BY FEE SIMPLE DEED THE SAID MARY E. BAPP HAVING CONVEYED HER INTEREST TO ERNEST H. BAPP , BY QUIT CLAIM DEED, DATED 06/06/1995 RECORDED ON 06/14/1995 IN BOOK 77, PAGE 243 IN FRANKLIN COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF VT.

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience.

DATED : October 15, 2019

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

By: /s/ Rachel K. Ljunggren Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CALEDONIA UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 143-6-18 CACV HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN ASSETBACKED NOTES, SERIES 2005-2 v. RODNEY HALE AND CATAMOUNT ELECTRIC SERVICE OCCUPANTS OF: 139 Calendar Brook Road, Lyndonville VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered April 1, 2019 ,in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Rodney Hale and the late Mattie

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Mitchell to Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc., as nominee for Delta Funding Corporation, dated June 8, 2005 and recorded in Book 169 Page 379 of the land records of the Town of Lyndon, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from to Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc., as nominee for Delta Funding Corporation to HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as Indenture Trustee for the registered Noteholders of Renaissance Home Equity Loan AssetBacked Notes, Series 2005-2 dated October 2, 2006 and recorded in Book 187 Page 34 of the land records of the Town of Lyndon for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 139 Calendar Brook Road, Lyndonville, Vermont on November 20, 2019 at 12:00 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND IN LYNDON, IN THE COUNTY OF CALEDONIA AND STATE

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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Name and Address of Court: Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit Probate Division PO Box 511, 175 Main Street Burlington, VT 05401 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 400-3-19 CNPR In re estate of Betty M. Boller

Executor/Administrator: Corey F. Wood 34 Pearl Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-6304 cwood@bpflegal.com Name of publication Seven Days Publication Date: October 30, 2019 Name and Address of Court:

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

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Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit, Probate Division PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 054020511 TOWN OF JERICHO – SELECTBOARD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Jericho Selectboard hereby provides notice of a public hearing being held pursuant to Title 24, Sections 4384 for the purpose of hearing public comment regarding: Proposed Jericho Comprehensive Town Plan 2019 Update. The Selectboard is required to hold two public hearing on the Town Plan updates. The first public hearing is scheduled for December 5, 2019 at 7:00p.m. in the Jericho Town Hall, located at 67 Vermont Route 15. The purpose of the proposed Town Plan update is an interim action to bring certain section of the plan up to-date prior to the regular Town Plan renewal scheduled to take place in 2024 as required by the Vermont Municipal and Regional Planning and Development Act. The proposed Plan will affect all areas of the Town of Jericho. The 2019 proposed updates includes information associated with Enhanced Energy Planning, the Commercial District, as related, the 2019 Commercial District Master Plan, the Natural Resources Chapter as related to the adoption of the Natural Resources Overlay in 2018, and adds a new Healthy Community chapter to reflect the Town’s desire to include health in all policies. Table of Contents: Introduction, Vision and Goals, The Jericho Community, Land Use, Natural Resources, Cultural and Historic Resources, Economic Development, Housing, Education and Child Care, Transportation, Utilities Facilities and Services, Energy, Healthy Community, Implementation, Maps. Copies of the proposed Town Plan are available at the Jericho Town Hall, located at 67 Vermont Route 15. A digital copy may be viewed on the

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support groups VISIT SEVENDAYSVT. COM TO VIEW A FULL LIST OF SUPPORT GROUPS ADDICT IN THE FAMILY: SUPPORT GROUP FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILIES OF ADDICTS AND ALCOHOLICS Wednesdays, 6:30-8 p.m., Holy Family/St. Lawrence Parish, 4 Prospect St., Essex Junction. For further information, please visit thefamilyrestored. org or contact Lindsay Duford at 781-960-3965 or 12lindsaymarie@ gmail.com. ADULT SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE LOSS SUPPORT GROUP Support group forming. Meetings are every third Thursday of the month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. starting September 19, 2019, in Williston, VT. The support group is for anyone who has been touched by suicide loss recently or long ago who wants to work through their grief in a safe, respectful environment. Contact Joanna at joanna. colevt@gmail.com or 802-777-5244. Maria at mariagrindle@msn.com or 802-879-9576. Please leave a message so we can get back to you for a mutually acceptable time to talk. AL-ANON For families & friends of alcoholics. For meeting info, go to vermont alanonalateen.org or call 866-972-5266. ALATEEN GROUP Alateen group in Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the UU building at the top of Church St. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to

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overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION SUPPORT GROUP This caregivers support group meets on the 2nd Tue. of every mo. from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, 300 Cornerstone Dr., Suite 130, Williston. Support groups meet to provide assistance and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They emphasize shared experiences, emotional support, and coping techniques in care for a person living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Meetings are free and open to the public. Families, caregivers, and friends may attend. Please call in advance to confirm date and time. For questions or additional support group listings, call 800-272-3900. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP 1st Monday monthly, 3-4:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required (to receive dial-in codes for toll-free call). Please dial the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline 800-272-3900 for more information. ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at Debtor’s Anonymous plus Business Debtor’s Anonymous. Wed., 6:307:30 p.m., Methodist Church in the Rainbow Room at Buell & S. Winooski, Burlington. Contact Jennifer, 917-568-6390. BABY BUMPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR MOTHERS AND PREGNANT WOMEN Pregnancy can be a wonderful time of your life. But, it can also be a time of stress that is often compounded by hormonal swings. If you are a pregnant woman, or have r ecently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood,

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SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Town of Jericho Website at www.jerichovt. org/2019-Town-PlanAmendments.

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/s/ Corey F. Wood Signature of Fiduciary

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Date: 10/23/2019

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

Publication Dates: October 30, 2019

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I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must

Name of publication Seven Days

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To the creditors of Mary Evelyn Parker late of South Burlington, Vermont.

Executor/Administrator: Reed L Parker 374 Zephyr Rd Williston, VT 05495 802-310-0351

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The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

/s/ Reed L Parker Signature of Fiduciary

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TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1214-9-19 CNPR In re estate of Mary Evelyn Parker

Date: 10/23/2019

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Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

DATED : October 9, 2019 By: /S/ Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

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Other terms to be announced at the sale.

To the creditors of Betty M. Boller late of Shelburne, Vermont.

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

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OF VERMONT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: BEING PREMISES CONSISTING OF TWO ACRES, MORE OR LESS, WITH A DWELLING HOUSE AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON LOCATED ON CALENDAR BROOK ROAD, AND BEING ALL OF THOSE PREMISES REMAINING TO VERA E. RENAUD WHICH WERE CONVEYED TO HER AND HER HUSBAND EDWARD RENAUD, WHO PREDECEAED VERA RENAUD, BY WARRANTY DEED OF SAMUEL W. HATHAWAY AND JAYNE A. HATHAWAY DATED OCTOBER 17, 1989, AND RECORDED IN BOOK 100 AT PAGE 217 OF THE LYNDON LAND RECORDS. REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE TO THE AFOREMENTIONED DEED AND ITS RECORD AND TO THE DEEDS REFERRED TO THEREIN AND THEIR RECORD IN FURTHER AID OF THIS DESCRIPTION.

sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

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AND BEING THE REAL ESTATE WHEREOF THE SAID VERA E. RENAUD DIED SEIZED AND POSSESSED IN STATE OF VERMONT.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BETTER BREATHERS CLUB American Lung Association support group for people with breathing issues, their loved ones or caregivers. Meets first Monday of the month, 11 a.m.-noon at the Godnick Center, 1 Deer St., Rutland. For more information call 802-776-5508. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury. It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522. BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. monthly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon. monthly from 4:15-6:15 p.m. White River Jct. meets the 2nd Fri. monthly at Bugbee Sr. Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Call our helpline at 877-856-1772. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP The Champlain Valley Prostate Cancer Support Group will be held every 2nd Tue. of the mo., 6-7:45 p.m. at the Hope Lodge, 237 East Ave., Burlington. Newly diagnosed? Prostate cancer

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Homeshares ALBURGH Share home w/ lovely lake views w/ Hosts who enjoy writing, nature & photography. Seeking housemate to help 6-7 hrs/wk. $300/mo. (all inc). Private BA. No pets/deposit!

MIDDLEBURY Share a home w/ senior veteran who enjoys sharing stories. $200/mo. rent in exchange for help w/ cleaning, cooking 2x/week & companionship. Private BA.

SO. BURLINGTON Share a condo w/ quiet professional in her 50s who enjoys travel & live music. Unfurnished bedroom. $600/mo. plus sec. deposit. 3 miles to UVM & medical center. No pets.

Finding you just the right housemate for over 35 years! Call 863-5625 or visit HomeShareVermont.org for an application. Interview, refs, bg check req. EHO Homeshare-temp2.indd 1

reoccurrence? General discussion and sharing among survivors and those beginning or rejoining the battle. Info, Mary L. Guyette RN, MS, ACNS-BC, 274-4990, vmary@aol.com.

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Overcome any hurt, habit or hangup in your life with this confidential 12-Step, Christ-centered recovery program. We offer multiple support groups for both men and women, such as chemical dependency, codependency, sexual addiction and pornography, food issues, and overcoming abuse. All 18+ are welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; we begin at 7 p.m. Essex Alliance Church, 37 Old Stage Rd., Essex Junction. Info: recovery@essexalliance. org, 878-8213. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Celebrate Recovery meetings are for anyone with struggles with hurt, habits and hang ups, which includes everyone in some way. We welcome everyone at Cornerstone Church in Milton which meets every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to have you join us and discover how your life can start to change. Info: 893-0530, julie@mccartycreations. com. CENTRAL VERMONT CELIAC SUPPORT GROUP Last Thu. of every month, 7:30 p.m. in Montpelier. Please contact Lisa Mase

for location: lisa@ harmonizecookery.com. CEREBRAL PALSY GUIDANCE Cerebral Palsy Guidance is a very comprehensive informational website broadly covering the topic of cerebral palsy and associated medical conditions. It’s mission it to provide the best possible information to parents of children living with the complex condition of cerebral palsy. cerebralpalsy guidance.com/ cerebral-palsy. CODEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS CoDA is a 12-step fellowship for people whose common purpose is to develop healthy & fulfilling relationships. By actively working the program of Codependents Anonymous, we can realize a new joy, acceptance & serenity in our lives. Meets Sunday at noon at the Turning Point Center, 179 So. Winooski Ave., Suite 301, Burlington. Tom, 238-3587, coda.org. DECLUTTERERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Are you ready to make improvements but find it overwhelming? Maybe two or three of us can get together to help each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612. DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program

that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org. DIVORCE CARE SUPPORT GROUP Divorce is a tough road. Feelings of separation, betrayal, confusion, anger and self-doubt are common. But there is life after divorce. Led by people who have already walked down that road, we’d like to share with you a safe place and a process that can help make the journey easier. This free 13-week group for men and women will be offered on Sunday evenings, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Sep. 8 through Dec. 1, at the North Avenue Alliance Church, 901 North Ave., Burlington, VT. Register for class at essexalliance. churchcenter.com. For more information, call Sandy 802-425-7053. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or have been affected by domestic violence. The support group offers a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and

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to recover. In support group, participants talk through their experiences and hear stories from others who have experienced abuse in their relationships. Support group is also a resource for those who are unsure of their next step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996. EMPLOYMENTSEEKERS SUPPORT GROUP Frustrated with the job search or with your job? You are not alone. Come check out this supportive circle. Wednesdays at 3 p.m., Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Abby Levinsohn, 777-8602. FAMILIES, PARTNERS, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are people with adult loved ones who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. We meet to support each other and to learn more about issues and concerns. Our sessions are supportive, informal, and confidential. Meetings are held at 5:30 PM, the second Thursday of each month at Pride Center of VT, 255 South Champlain St., Suite 12, in Burlington. Not sure if you’re ready for a meeting? We also offer one-on-one support. For more information, email rex@ pridecentervt.org or call 802-238-3801.

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FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE EXPERIENCING MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS This support group is a dedicated meeting for family, friends and community members who are supporting a loved one through a mental health crisis. Mental health crisis might include extreme states, psychosis, depression, anxiety and other types of distress. The group is a confidential space where family and friends can discuss shared experiences and receive support in an environment free of judgment and stigma with a trained facilitator. Weekly on Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington. Info: Jess Horner, LICSW, 866-218-8586. FCA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Families coping with addiction (FCA) is an open community peer support group for adults 18 & over struggling with the drug or alcohol addiction of a loved one. FCA is not 12-step based but provides a forum for those living this experience to develop personal coping skills & draw strength from one another. Weekly on Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Turning Point Center, 179 So. Winooski Ave., Suite 301, Burlington. thdaub1@gmail.com. FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS (FA) Are you having trouble controlling the way you eat? FA is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating or bulimia. Local meetings are held twice a week: Mondays, 4-5:30 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Church, Norwich, Vt.; and Wednesdays, 6:30-8 p.m., at Hanover Friends Meeting House, Hanover, N.H. For more information and a list of additional meetings throughout the U.S. and the world, call 603-630-1495 or visit foodaddicts.org. G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP mkeasler3@gmail. com or call 310-3301 (message says Optimum Health, but this is a private number).

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS Meet twice a month: every second Monday from 6-7:30 p.m., and every third Wednesday from 10-11:30 a.m., at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to the public and free of charge. More info: Diana Moore, 224-2241. HEARING VOICES SUPPORT GROUP This Hearing Voices Group seeks to find understanding of voice hearing experiences as real lived experiences which may happen to anyone at anytime. We choose to share experiences, support, and empathy.  We validate anyone’s experience and stories about their experience as their own, as being an honest and accurate representation of their experience, and as being acceptable exactly as they are. Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 p.m. Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-777-8602, abby@ pathwaysvermont.org. HELLENBACH CANCER SUPPORT Call to verify meeting place. Info, 388-6107. People living with cancer & their caretakers convene for support. INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/PAINFUL BLADDER SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) and painful bladder syndrome can result in recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder/pelvic region & urinary frequency/ urgency. These are often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. For Vermont-based support group, email bladder painvt@gmail.com or call 899-4151 for more information. KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive listening, Kindred Connections provides

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practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact info@vcsn.net. LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peer-led support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining. LGBTQ VETERANS GROUP This veterans group is a safe place for veterans to gather and discuss ways to help the community, have dinners, send packages and help the families of LGBTQ service people. Ideas on being helpful encouraged. Every 2nd and 4th Wednesday, 6-8:30 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church (The Little Red Door), 64 State Street, Montpelier. RSVP, 802-825-2045. LIVING THROUGH LOSS: WEEKLY SUPPORT GROUP The Volunteer Chaplaincy Program at Gifford Medical Center invites community members to attend “Living Through Loss,” a grief support group from noon to 1:30 p.m. every Friday in the Gifford Medical Center Chapel. The group is open to anyone who has experienced loss. Each of the Friday sessions is facilitated by Gifford Volunteer Chaplain Anna Mary Zigmann, RN, an ordained minister and spiritual care provider specializing in trauma and loss, or by the Rev. Timothy Eberhardt, spiritual care coordinator for the Chaplaincy Program. There is no religious component to the group apart from the Serenity Prayer to close each meeting. For more information, email teberhardt@ giffordmed.org or  azigmann@gmail.com, or call 802-728-2107.

SUPPORT GROUPS »

SEVEN DAYS OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 6, 2019

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support groups [CONTINUED] MALE SURVIVOR OF VIOLENCE GROUP A monthly, closed group for male identified survivors of violence including relationship, sexual assault, and discrimination. Open to all sexual orientations. Contact 863-0003 for more information or safespace@pride centervt.org. MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with marijuana? MA is a free 12-step program where addicts help other addicts to get & stay clean. Ongoing Wed. at 7 p.m. at Turning Point Center, 179 So. Winooski, Suite 301, Burlington. 861-3150.

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MYELOMA SUPPORT GROUP Area Myeloma Survivors, Families and Caregivers have come together to form a Multiple Myeloma Support Group. We provide emotional support, resources about treatment options, coping strategies and a support network by participating in the group experience with people that have been though similar situations. Third Tuesday of the month, 5-6 p.m. at the New Hope Lodge on East Avenue in Burlington. Info: Kay Cromie, 655-9136, kgcromey@aol.com. NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS Bennington, every Tue., 1-2:30 p.m., CRT Center, United Counseling Service, 316 Dewey St.; Burlington, every Thu., 3-4:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Cathedral, 2 Cherry St. (enter from parking lot); Berlin, second Thu. of the month, 4-5:30 p.m., CVMC Board Room, 130 Fisher Rd.; Rutland, every 1st and 3rd Sun., 4:30-6 p.m., Rutland Mental Health Wellness Center, 78 S. Main St.; No. Concord, every Thu., 6-7:30 p.m., Loch Lomond, 700 Willson Rd. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, program@namivt. org or 800-639-6480.

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Connection groups are peer recovery support group programs for adults living with mental health challenges. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Bellows Falls, 3rd Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., Compass School, 7892 US-5, Westminster; Brattleboro, 1st Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., 1st Congregational Church, 880 Western Ave., West Brattleboro; Burlington, 2nd & 4th Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., HowardCenter, corner of Pine & Flynn Ave.; Berlin, 4th Mon. of every mo., 7 p.m. Central Vermont Medical Center, Room 3; Georgia, 1st Tue. of every mo., 6 p.m., Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway (Exit 18, I-89); Manchester, 4th Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., Equinox Village, 2nd floor; Rutland, 1st Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., Rutland Regional Medical Center, Leahy Conference Ctr., room D; St. Johnsbury, 4th Wed. of every mo., 5:30 p.m., Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital Library, 1315 Hospital Dr.; Williston, 1st & 3rd Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., NAMI Vermont Office, 600 Blair Park Rd. #301. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, info@namivt. org or 800-639-6480. Family Support Group meetings are for family & friends of individuals living mental illness. NARCONON SUNCOAST DRUG AND ALCOHOL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Narconon reminds families that overdoses due to an elephant tranquilizer known as Carfentanil, has been on the rise in nearly every community nationwide. Carfentanil is a synthetic opiate painkiller 100 times more powerful than fentanyl and 1000 times stronger than heroin. A tiny grain of it is enough to be fatal. Click here to learn more about carfentanil abuse and how to help your loved one. You can also visitnarconon-suncoast.org/drug-abuse/ parents-get-help.html for more information. ADDICTION SCREENINGS: Narconon can help you take steps to overcome addiction in your family. Call today for a no cost screening or referral: 1- 877-841-5509

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS is a group of recovering addicts who live w/ out the use of drugs. It costs nothing to join. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using. Info, 862-4516 or cvana.org. Held in Burlington, Barre and St. Johnsbury. NAR-ANON BURLINGTON GROUP Group meets every Monday at 7 p.m. at the Turning Point Center, 179 So. Winooski Ave., Suite 301, Burlington. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of addiction in a relative or friend. Info: Amanda H. 338-8106. NEW (AND EXPECTING) MAMAS AND PAPAS! EVERY PRIMARY CAREGIVER TO A BABY! The Children’s Room invites you to join our weekly drop-in support group. Come unwind and discuss your experiences and questions around infant care and development, self-care and postpartum healing, and community resources for families with babies. Tea and snacks provided. Weekly on Thursdays, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bring your babies! (Newborn through crawling stage). Located within Thatcher Brook Primary School, 47 Stowe Street, childrens roomonline.org. Contact childrens room@wwsu.org or 244-5605. NORTHWEST VERMONT CANCER PRAYER & SUPPORT NETWORK A meeting of cancer patients, survivors & family members intended to comfort & support those who are currently suffering from the disease. 2nd Thu. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m., St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 11 Church St., St. Albans. Info: stpaulum@myfair point.net. 2nd Wed. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Winooski United Methodist Church, 24 W. Allen St., Winooski. Info: hovermann4@ comcast.net. OPEN EARS, OPEN MINDS A mutual support circle that focuses on connection and selfexploration. Fridays at 1 p.m., Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Abby Levinsohn, 777-8602.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS (OA) A 12-step program for people who identify as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. No matter what your problem with food, we have a solution! All are welcome, meetings are open, and there are no dues or fees. See oavermont.org/ meeting-list/ for the current meeting list, meeting format and more; or call 802-8632655 any time! POTATO INTOLERANCE SUPPORT GROUP Anyone coping with potato intolerance and interested in joining a support group, contact Jerry Fox, 48 Saybrook Rd., Essex Junction, VT 05452. QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFE The Queen City Memory Café offers a social time & place for people with memory impairment & their fiends & family to laugh, learn & share concerns & celebrate feeling understood & connected. Enjoy coffee, tea & baked goods with entertainment & conversation. QCMC meets the 3rd Sat. of each mo., 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thayer Building, 1197 North Ave., Burlington. 316-3839. QUEER CARE GROUP This support group is for adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth. It is held on the 2nd Monday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. at Outright Vermont, 241 North Winooski Ave. This group is for adults only. For more information, email info@outrightvt. org. QUIT TOBACCO GROUPS Are you ready to be tobacco free?  Join our FREE fi ve-week group classes facilitated by our Tobacco Treatment Specialists.  We meet in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere.  You may qualify for a FREE 8-week supply of nicotine replacement therapy. Contact us at (802)-847-7333 or quittobaccoclass@ uvmhealth.org. SCLERODERMA FOUNDATION NEW ENGLAND Support group meeting held 4th Tue. of the mo., 6:30-8:30 p.m. Williston Police Station. Info, Blythe Leonard, 878-0732.

SEX & LOVE ADDICTS ANONYMOUS 12-step recovery group. Do you have a problem w/ sex or relationships? We can help. Shawn, 660-2645. Visit slaafws.org or saa-recovery.org for meetings near you. SEXUAL VIOLENCE SUPPORT HOPE Works offers free support groups to women, men & teens who are survivors of sexual violence. Groups are available for survivors at any stage of the healing process. Intake for all support groups is ongoing. If you are interested in learning more or would like to schedule an intake to become a group member, please call our office at 864-0555, ext. 19, or email our victim advocate at advocate@ sover.net. STUTTERING SUPPORT GROUPS If you’re a person who stutters, you are not alone! Adults, teens & school-age kids who stutter & their families are welcome to join one of our three free National Stuttering Association (NSA) stuttering support groups at UVM. Adults: 5:30-6:30, 1st & 3rd Tue. monthly; teens (ages 13-17): 5:30-6:30, 1st Thu. monthly; school-age children (ages 8-12) & parents (meeting separately): 4:15-5:15, 2nd Thu. monthly. Pomeroy Hall (489 Main St., UVM campus. Info: burlingtonstutters.org, burlingtonstutters@ gmail.com, 656-0250. Go Team Stuttering! SUICIDE SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP For those who have lost a friend or loved one through suicide. Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 N. Main St., Wallingford, 446-3577. 6:30-8 p.m. the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo. SUICIDE HOTLINES IN VT Brattleboro, 2577989; Montpelier (Washington County Mental Health Emergency Services), 229-0591; Randolph (Clara Martin Center Emergency Service), 800-639-6360. SUPPORT GROUP FOR WOMEN who have experienced intimate partner abuse, facilitated by Circle (Washington Co. only). Please call 877-5439498 for more info.

SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE If you have lost someone to suicide and wish to have a safe place to talk, share and spend a little time with others who have had a similar experience, join us the 3rd Thu. at the Faith Lighthouse Church, Rte. 105, Newport (105 Alderbrook), 7-9 p.m. Please call before attending. Info: Mary Butler, 744-6284. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE, S. BURLINGTON Who: Persons experiencing the impact of a loved one’s suicide. When: first Wednesday of each month, 6-7:30 p.m. Location: S. Burlington. This group is currently full and unable to accept new participants. Please call Linda Livendale at 802-272-6564 to learn about other groups within driving distance. We are sorry for the inconvenience. Thank you! THE COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS SUPPORT GROUP The Compassionate Friends international support group for parents, siblings and families grieving the loss of a child meets every third Tuesday of the month, 7-9 p.m., at Kismet Place, 363 Blair Park Rd., Williston. Call/ email Jay at 802-3731263, compassionate friendsvt@gmail.com. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) chapter meeting. Hedding United Methodist Church, Washington St., Barre. Wed., 5:15-6:15 p.m. For info, call David at 371-8929. VEGGIE SUPPORT GROUP Want to feel supported on your vegetarian/ vegan journey? Want more info on healthy veggie diets? Want to share & socialize at veggie potlucks, & more, in the greater Burlington area? This is your opportunity to join with other like-minded folks. veggy4life@ gmail.com, 658-4991. WOMEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP FAHC. Led by Deb Clark, RN. Every 1st & 3rd Tue., 5-6:30 p.m. Call Kathy McBeth, 847-5715.


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ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POST-A-JOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM BOLTON VALLEY RESORT HIRING ALL SEASONAL POSITIONS! FRONT HOUSE RESTAURANT MANAGER

To find out more information regarding openings at Bolton Valley Resort, visit our website to apply online. Email resume to: HR@boltonvalley.com. boltonvalley.com/about-us/employment-andmountain-host-program

Food Editorial Assistant

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Nutrition Lecturer

For position details and application process, visit jobs.plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings.” SUNY College at Plattsburgh is a fully compliant employer committed to excellence through diversity.

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• Have an obsessive attention to detail. We’re serious! • Have excellent copywriting skills, particularly when it comes to writing short listings. • Be an expert and efficient researcher, comfortable making phone calls and navigating restaurant websites and social media, as well as learning our own website platforms. • Be familiar with Vermont’s dining scene, as well as 7 Nights and Vermont Restaurant Week. • Work well independently and on a strict deadline. This position is based at our office in downtown Burlington, though there may be some flexibility to work remotely. To apply, please email Carolyn Fox at carolyn@sevendaysvt.com by Friday, November 1, with a résumé, three references, and a cover letter outlining your availability and how you fit the above requirements. We thank you for your application, but only qualified applicants will be contacted for the next step: a writing challenge. No phone calls, please. Seven Days is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Housing Vermont has created a new position for an Associate Developer to join our amazing development team. This position reports to the VP of Development and the successful candidate will be an excellent communicator with experience in real estate development and financial analysis. We believe in equal access to affordable housing and economic opportunities; the power of partnerships based on integrity, respect and professionalism; a collaborative workplace with professional, skilled and dedicated staff.

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10/25/19 11:46 AM

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Please send a cover letter and resume with salary requirements to Kathy Beyer, jobs@hvt.org.

Monaghan Safar Ducham PLLC, a downtown Burlington law firm, has an HOUSING VERMONT IS AN E.O.E. immediate opening for a full time administrative assistant position, in a fast-paced, 4t-HousingVT102319.indd 1 10/21/19 6:40 PM exciting environment. Responsibilities include MANUFACTURING TECHNICIAN POSITIONS drafting and proofing legal Location: Essex Junction, VT Night Shift: 7pm to 7am documents for the firm’s real Sr Technician Level 3 - Manufacturing Engineering Req. # 18002106 estate and estate planning Position Requirements: practices, and general office • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree. assistance. Competitive Principal Technician Level 4 - Manufacturing Engineering Req. # 18002732 Position Requirements: salary and benefits. • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree. • 10 years of relevant experience.

Pay Rates: Starting at $26.00 per hour (not including shift differential). Schedules: Work approximately 14 Days per Month!! • Includes long 4 day weekends every other week! Eligible for Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental, & Vision Coverage. • Paid Vacation Time: Approx. 3 weeks per year (accrued). • Paid Sick Time: 80 hours per year. • 401k Investing Options.

The ideal candidate has excellent computer, organizational and interpersonal skills. Interested persons, please email a cover letter and resume to mcain@msdvt.com.

Education Assistance: > Up to $5,250 per year in a degree related field. sevendaysvt.com

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FWSU

AFFORDABLE HOUSING, ASSOCIATE DEVELOPER

Are you a writer who likes food? Do you enjoy poring over menus, reading restaurant reviews and looking at photos of signature dishes? Can you also compose concise, compelling, colorful copy — fast? If so, consider applying to become Seven Days’ first-ever Food Editorial Assistant. This part-time, temporary position (January through April) will contribute to our annual statewide 7 Nights dining guide, as well as to the behind-thescenes work of Vermont Restaurant Week. • Have a flexible schedule January through April.

10/25/19 11:51 AM

Bus Driver 0.52 - 0.54 FTE

(part-time, temporary; January-April)

To qualify, you must:

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER needed for am & pm route. 17.5 hours per week. Pay based on experience. Contact Patsy at 802-8492068 for more info.

Apply online at globalfoundries.com/about-us/careers or for more information email jobs@globalfoundries.com.

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10/28/19 1:02 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

WAIT STAFF

Full and Part Time Available

Full Time Installer We are seeking to immediately hire a full time installer to add to our growing family business. This job is full time, 40 hours per week, 8-4:30 PM Monday through Friday.

Wake Robin, Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier continuing care retirement community, is adding members to our team of Dining Room Wait Staff. This is a perfect opportunity for individuals with the time and drive to begin their working experience, or for professionals who wish to supplement their current career endeavors. Experience as a server is preferred but not required. We will train applicants who demonstrate strong customer service skills and a desire to work with an active population of seniors.

LEASING SPECIALIST We are in search of an enthusiastic individual who loves to help people, has excellent presentation skills, likes a fast-paced work environment and wants to be part of a fun, successful team. This is a wonderful opportunity in a growing company with a great culture and future opportunities.

Wake Robin offers an excellent compensation and benefits package and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting.

General experience in at least two of the following duties Interested candidates please send resume and cover letter to are key: Sheetrock , Mudding, HR@wakerobin.com or visit wakerobin.com to complete an application. Taping, Tile work, carpentry, gas work, electrical, driving a box Wake Robin is an Equal Opportunity Employer. truck, comfortable on ladders, roofing, dealing with customers. Also must be willing and able to 4t-WakeRobinWAITstaff103019.indd 1 10/28/19 promote our company and its products. Ensures seamless, culturally appropriate Please email your resume to: and effective service delivery to those Sarah@ accessing services through all Steps to greenmountainfireplaces.com End Domestic Violence programs. The person in this position or call 802-279-1902. is responsible for the supervision of direct service staff and for Salary is commensurate with overseeing the overall direction of direct service programs. experience.

FedEx Delivery Driver Full time, $750/week. Part-time option available. Work seasonally or year round. Send contact info to: Vermontfedexdriver@ gmail.com.

Leasing experience not required; however, 3:43 PMsales, customer 1t-FedEx101619.indd service, hospitality experience and reliable transportation are a must.

Director of Program Services

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10/14/19 5:16 PM

Send resumes to: sbroderick@ farrellpropertiesvt.com

Development and Communications Manager 3v-GreenMountainFireplaces103019.indd 1 10/29/19 1:01 PM

OFFICE COORDINATOR

Responsible for development activities with the end goal of increasing both revenue and recognition for the nonprofit, through fundraising appeals, public relations, communications, social media, marketing and more. Send resume and cover letter with job title, to employment@ stepsvt.org. EOE.

Busy, well-established Chiropractic office seeks Members of marginalized communities and those who have sharp, energetic, and experienced domestic violence are encouraged to apply. organized person. The ideal candidate will be computer proficient, have 10/28/19 great communication and 4t-StepstoEndDomesticViolence103019.indd 1 customer service skills and be able to juggle the dayto-day activities of a busy health care practice. The candidate should be very PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT fast and organized, always on time, responsive, have a Full-time position available for a Highway good sense of humor and Equipment Operator/Maintenance Worker. be a problem solver.

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No calls please. Email resume and cover letter to drspmahoney@gmail.com.

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Responsibilities include snow plowing, road repairs, and maintaining road and related facilities. Experience in highway maintenance is desirable and applicant must have good working knowledge of heavy equipment. Class B CDL is required. Excellent benefits. Position is open until filled and can be picked up at the Public Works office at 7878 Williston Road. EOE.

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2/8/19 12:03 PM

12:30 PM

Patient Access Job Fair

TOWN OF WILLISTON

The position starts at 15 hours a week while you train and while our current Office Coordinator phases out. You will gradually move to 32 hours by start of January.

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Monday, November 11 | 11am - 2pm Fanny Allen Campus: 790 College Parkway, Colchester Fanny Allen Boardroom

Our call center is expanding and we are seeking looking for numerous Patient Access Specialists Full time positions in Colchester with health insurance, paid time off, on-site parking and more.

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Hiring Range: $15-18/hour dependent upon experience

Learn More: uvmmed.hn/PAS

10/28/19 4:39 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Associate Retirement Plan Administrator

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

FINANCIAL ANALYST

We are a locally owned Retirement Plan Consulting and Administration Firm seeking a creative, energetic and detail oriented individual to join our professional team to provide support and assist Senior Pension Consultants within a team environment. The successful candidate will develop a thorough knowledge of the regulatory environment surrounding qualified retirement plans and gain experience with plan design and operation. Professional growth potential through training is offered; prior experience is not required. We offer a full benefit package. This is not a telecommute position. Qualifications include: proficiency with Microsoft Office suite (Excel and Word), mathematics/accounting skills, excellent written/verbal communication with sound problem solving and decision making skills. Full job description on Seven Days job page: bit.ly/2BHSK5k. Email your resume to erin@futureplanningassoc.com or mail to:

Sheridan Journal Services, an established provider of publishing services for scientific, technical, medical & scholarly journals, is seeking a Financial Analyst. We are looking for someone who can work independently to develop, maintain, interpret and distribute periodic financial reports for management to monitor business performance and evaluate business trends. In addition, this position will oversee estimating, customer billing and author billing functions and supervise a group of 3 to 5 employees.

Client Care Coordinator • Meet with potential clients and family members to discuss their needs and provide solutions in the form of a service plan

We provide a comprehensive benefits package, including health, dental and vision coverage, 401(k), paid time off and flexible working schedules, to name a few! We have a stunning office with a positive, friendly work culture. This could be a great opportunity for you! Please submit your resume to careers.djs@sheridan.com.

• Conduct Service Inquiries, Care Consultations, and client/ CAREGiver introductions

Requirements include: • Strong computer skills, including data entry • Healthcare experience desired • Must have good driving record

Hiring Now!

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Immediate openings Full-time and flexible part-time schedules Days, early evenings, & weekend shifts

• Bachelor’s Degree preferred

10/28/19 1:18 PM

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT MULTIPLE JOB OPENINGS!

CUSTODIAL / MAINTENANCE WORKERS C.V.S.D. is looking for motivated people to join our team to help maintain our schools. Great place to work, warm inviting environment, competitive pay and benefits. No experience? That’s okay, we will teach you what you need to know.

Manufacturing Call Center Warehouse

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Current positions: • Night custodian at our Williston campus (2:30 p.m.-11:00 p.m.) Job # 3191315 • Night custodian at Charlotte Central school (3:00 p.m.-11:30 p.m.) Job #3189480 • Night custodian / Supervisor Charlotte Central school (2:30 p.m.-11:00 p.m.) Job # 3191311

Apply in person 210 East Main Street, Richmond, VT

JANITRONICS JOB FAIR

9/13/19 1:25 PM Immediate

opening for a Regular Route Driver. Great starting salary and benefits. Contact Ken Martin at kmartin@cvsdvt.org or call 482-7120 for more details. You can also apply online to schoolspring.com, Job #3191271.

10/30 - Wednesday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm 11/7 - Thursday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Janitronics has been providing job opportunities for individuals and families throughout New York and Vermont for almost 50 years. We have part-time and full-time positions for first job experience, students, supplemental income, a second job, or a career change. Positions are available at all levels, including frontline facility service, janitors, administrative, warehouse, floor technicians, and management. Wages: $12.00/hour - $20.00/=hour, depending on position. Apply online at janitronicsinc.com or call 518-456-7350 Ext. 2 to Schedule an Appointment! Bring your resume and dress for the job you want! Janitronics Office: 65 Commerce Street (Not Avenue!) Williston, VT 05495

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FISCAL SERVICES SPECIALIST (PART-TIME) • Position Goal: Provides administrative support to the Fiscal Services department. • Reports to: Chief Operations Officer and Budget/Finance Director • Cooperates with: Champlain Valley SD Staff and Administration, School Administrators, Town Treasurers/ School Bookkeepers, State Agencies, and Vendors • Position located at C.V.S.D. Central office. Job #3161624 • Please apply online to schoolspring.com with above referenced job #’s.

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10/21/19 5:35 PM

RESPITE SUPPORT WORKER

BUS DRIVER Untitled-40 1

Negotiable Salary, Medical Benefits, Paid Vacation, Great Team environment. Must submit to background checks and a preemployment drug screening. Please forward resume and cover letter to: Sabrina Milano via email at Sabrina.milano@ homeinstead.com.

Open your accessible home to a delightful gentleman in need of evening and weekend overnight respite. A clean, safe, caring and wheelchair accessible environment as well as an extra bedroom is required. Weekends and days are flexible with generous pay available for both hourly and 24 hour shifts. A portable ramp is available for individuals who have a limited number of stairs at their home as well as a wheelchair accessible van. The ideal candidate will be kind, compassionate, and comfortable with assisting with daily living skills.

For more information contact Pam at 802-324-7012, pamelacook24@aol.com.

ccs-vt.org

E.O.E.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

Bakery & Retail CARING PEOPLE WANTED Home Instead Senior $200.0 Care, a provider Sign o 0 of personal Bonus n !!! care services to seniors in their homes, is seeking friendly and dependable people. CAREGivers assist seniors with daily living activities. P/T & F/T positions available. 12 hours/week minimum, flexible scheduling, currently available. $12-$16.50/hour depending on experience. No heavy lifting. Apply online at: www.homeinstead.com/483 or call us at 802.860.4663.

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MAC TECHNICIAN & SALES ASSOCIATE Small Dog Electronics, located at 316 Flynn Ave in Burlington, is seeking a full time Mac Technician and a Full Time Sales Associate. Applicants should have a knowledge of computer repairs and sales, but specific Mac knowledge is not required. Please send resumes to sales@smalldog.com.

KITCHEN TEAM!

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Ability to prioritize tasks and attention to detail are a must. We are happy to train if the appetite is there. Please submit an application in person or email your resume to: info@steeplemarket.com. No phone calls please.

9/23/19 4:54 PM

TOWN OF WILLISTON PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT WATER & SEWER DIVISION POSITION The Public Works Department is accepting applications for a Water & Sewer Division position. This is a full-time position with an excellent benefit package. The ideal candidate should be experienced in the operation and maintenance of public water and sewer systems have a VT Class D Public Water System Operators Certificate and reside within 25 miles of Williston.

Applications are available at the Williston Public Works Office located at 7878 Williston Road, Williston, VT, 05495. Applications will be received until the position is filled. EOE

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Steeple Market is looking for several people with a culinary passion to join our Kitchen Team! The ideal candidates will have stellar customer service skills, a flexible schedule, short-order cook experience, and deli knowledge.

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Job includes research and customer service. Must be enthusiastic, efficient, enjoy meeting and working with the public and have a good driving record. Some photography work. Friendly working environment. Company vehicle provided. Please send resume to info@nancyjenkins.com.

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FULL-TIME

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COURIER

Bakers and Retail staff in our busy Shelburne store. Experience preferred, but we can train the right candidates. Apply in person: 5597 Route 7 Shelburne, VT

5/31/19 12:37 PM

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SUPERVISOR The Accounts Payable Supervisor is primarily responsible for the supervision of daily workflow of an assigned payables team function. This position will be assigned to direct the flow of documents to ensure invoices are processed and paid in a timely manner while following all departmental and corporate policies and procedures.

New, local, scamfree jobs posted every day! sevendaysvt.com/classifieds

LEARN MORE & APPLY: uvmmed.hn/sevendays

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8/1/16 4:10 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

Floral Merchandiser Burlington & Middlebury

PT, 4 mornings per week, approximately 15-20 hours. Fun and flexible job perfect for a creative person who likes to work independently. Please email resume to simplyreadyflowers@gmail.com.

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PRINT BINDERY/ MAILING DEPT. ASSISTANT Minuteman Press, a local print/marketing services company, is seeking a hard working individual with an impeccable eye for quality control yet who still understands the need for efficiency and timeliness.

10/21/19 1:31 PM

HOUSEKEEPER

Experience in the printing industry would be helpful but not necessary. We are a growing, fast paced shop with a friendly professional staff. Good communication skills are essential.

FULL-TIME

Vermont’s premier continuing Care Retirement Community seeks a member to join our housekeeping team. Housekeepers work collaboratively to support residents who live independently as well as those who live in residential care. Housekeepers are critical to the well-being of residents and the quality of the Wake Robin environment. Candidates must have housekeeping and/or industrial cleaning or industrial laundry experience.

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Interested candidates can apply online at wakerobin.com or email a resume with cover letter to: hr@wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer.

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10/28/19 2:41 PM

RECEPTIONIST/ ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

10/18/19 12:37 PM Providing Innovative Mental Health and Educational Services to Vermont’s Children & Families.

“Make a difference in the life of a child!”- NFI Vermont, a leader in specialized trauma and adolescent development, is looking to expand our team of innovators. Full time and part time positions available. Competitive wages, training opportunities, flexible work schedules and family oriented culture. Excellent benefits with tuition reimbursement offered for 30 or more hour employees. Visit our career page at nfivermont.org to learn more!

RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS Allenbrook Program

Please put Bindery/Mailing in the header when you submit your resume and cover letter. This position can be full or part time. We are willing to train the right person. jon@minutemanvermont.com

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NFI Vermont's Allenbrook program in South Burlington is currently hiring full time residential counselors for both day and overnight positions. Includes a $500 sign on bonus. Please apply online at nfivermont.org/careers or call 802-497-8868 for more information.

10/28/19 12:49 PM

PAYROLL & BENEFITS MANAGER

Looking for a dynamic individual to join our team. This full-time position We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and celebrate the diversity of our clients and staff. Vermont-NEA is seeking a highly qualified manages our payroll and Receptionist/Administrative Assistant to provide benefits administration. support to our professional staff. 4t-NFI103019.indd 1 10/28/19 12:02 PMStrong technical skills and CLERICAL ASSISTANT In addition to the qualifications below, this aptitude for continuous position requires exceptional interpersonal skills, OPENINGS improvement in these careful attention to detail, excellent oral/written areas is required. The Vermont Judiciary is recruiting for several communication skills, strategic thinking, managing We desire a candidate full-time, permanent Docket Clerk positions to multiple projects, and a commitment to confidentiality, who can contribute to a perform specialized clerical duties including data entry all within the context of a highly professional and professional, friendly, and and extensive customer service over the phone. advocacy-oriented membership organization. positive work environment, with an emphasis on Specific qualifications: At least 3 years’ experience Locations in Burlington, Newport, White River Junction, excellent customer service, in an administrative position; appreciation for the and Chelsea. High School graduate and two years of clerical teamwork, and efficient role of labor unions and for the work of public or data entry experience required. operations. Knowledge of school educators; advanced proficiency in Microsoft ADP Workforce Now and Excel is required. Bachelor’s degree preferred, but Starting at $16.88 per hour with excellent benefits, paid holidays Excel required. Excellent not required. and leave time. Open until filled. EOE. benefits package. Position To apply, send a cover letter, resume and at least Candidates shall submit a complete and up-to-date Judicial open until filled. 3 references to: Jeff Fannon, Executive Director, Branch Application and resume. An electronic version of Vermont-NEA, 10 Wheelock Street, Montpelier, VT Full job description and the Application may be found at vermontjudiciary.org/ 05602, or by email to kferguson@vtnea.org. to apply: sbvt.gov/ employment-opportunities/staff-openings. departments/human_ This position will remain open until filled. resources

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10/21/19 6:33 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

FULL TIME ACCOUNTANT Seeking a Philanthropic Advisor for Northwest Vermont

TEMPORARY POSITIONS

Do you have a creative and entrepreneurial spirit? Are you enthusiastic about how philanthropy can make a difference in Vermont?

The following Temporary Positions are available:

We are seeking a Philanthropic Advisor to join our statewide Philanthropy team and to engage with individuals, families, nonprofits, professional advisors, businesses, and community leaders to expand effective philanthropy throughout Vermont.

November 1 – March 31 in our Warming Shelter:

The Philanthropic Advisor is responsible for increasing charitable giving to and through the Foundation, providing exceptional customer service, and deepening the relationships with current and prospective fundholders.

Part Time, Saturday - Sunday 5 p.m. and 1 a.m.

The Advisor will have shared responsibility for the greater Chittenden County area, in addition to lead responsibility for Grand Isle and Franklin Counties and other areas as needed and will maintain a highly-visible presence in this region.

For more info, go to: https://bit. ly/2lvAUh5 3v-Spectrum103019.indd 1

If this sounds like a good fit for you, visit vermontcf.org/jobs for a complete job description and instructions for applying by Monday, November 18th.

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We have an immediate opening for an experienced Web Designer/ Developer to join our inhouse creative team. This role will be responsible for creating and websites and landing pages, interactive online experiences, and eyecatching email commuications. You should have a bachelor’s degree in Web Development, Digital Media Design, or related discipline, three years (or more) of related work experience, and an inspiring online portfolio. For the complete description and to apply online visit:

NationalLife.com/careers

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HARWOOD UNIFIED UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT is seeking a full time accountant to join our fiscal service team immediately. This accountant performs a variety of accounting functions in accordance with school district procedures and government guidelines and regulations. The major duties and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, processing accounts payable, processing payroll, filing required reports with state and federal governmental agencies, managing receipts, preparing various financial reports and completing special projects for administration and other stakeholders. REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS: • A bachelor’s degree in accounting, or a related field, plus at least two years of experience in an accounting role • Comprehensive knowledge of accepting accounting principles, policies and procedures • Highly proficient in accounting software and systems as well as spreadsheet applications • Ability to analyze financial data • Strong written and oral communication skills If interested, please send a letter of interest, resume, copy of transcripts, and 3 current letters of reference to Michelle Baker, Director of Finance & Operations, Harwood Unified Union School District at mbaker@huusd.org. EOE.

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Web Designer Are you a fearless team player who loves a challenge and wants to work with passionate people at a CAUSE driven company? Then National Life is looking for you!

CENTRAL OFFICE

GENERAL MANAGER

Looking for a Better Job with a Successful Career Path? Want your Weekends Free? MSI has YOUR Solution! GREAT BENEFITS! COMPETITIVE WAGES!

MSI is HIRING!

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS:

• Assemblers, 1st & 2nd Shifts • Material Handler • Accounting/Administrative Assistant • Class A CDL Driver • Facilities Cleaner Located in Beautiful Morrisville, VT Manufacturing Solutions Inc. 153 Stafford Avenue, Morrisville, VT 05661

The Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District – a nineteen-member union municipality located in Montpelier, Vermont -- is hiring a General Manager. The General Manager oversees nine full-time and five part-time employees, manages an annual budget of $1 million and is responsible for the performance of the District. The primary role includes staff assistance to the Board of Supervisors in formulating and implementing policies, managing personnel and financial resources, and representing the District with municipalities, members of the public and solid waste partners. The General Manager’s duties include coordination of solid waste planning and implementing projects; budget and capital plan preparation and monitoring; human resources administration; oversight of ongoing programming and operations; personnel management; grant administration; compliance with federal and state laws; technical assistance to the Board of Supervisors, local officials, and persons requesting to communicate with the District. This is an exempt full-time position. Starting range of $62,000 to $75,000 (negotiated rate), plus generous benefits package. For full details please visit cvswmd.org.

Apply Online at: msivt.com/careers or Email Resume and Cover Letter to: HR@MSIvt.com.

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10/28/19 12:08 PM

To apply send resume, cover letter, writing sample and three references to administration@cvswmd.org, or General Manager Search, CVSWMD, 137 Barre Street, Montpelier, VT 05602.

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10/21/19 5:21 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Join our ily! e fam employe e

r th a Cash fo Earn Extr ! Holidays ime or ible part-t x e fl ry e V s! schedule full-time nd Shifts & Weeke Evening nt s Discou Generou ers & T Custom The BES ers Co-work

We have SEASONAL positions thru DECEMBER

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Join our team of passionate professionals in a positive, progressive working environment dedicated to building the future of freshwater protection! The FUND for Lake George, Inc. (The FUND), the leading nonprofit organization dedicated to the lasting protection of Lake George and its watershed, is seeking an inspired professional to join our team as Development Manager. This individual will be The FUND’s point person accountable for all aspects of planning, coordinating, and executing fundraising activities designed to accelerate and propel The FUND’s work, by building both its current financial capacity and its endowment to ensure enduring success in protecting Lake George as a working model for freshwater ecosystems everywhere. Candidates should possess a minimum of 2 years of related professional fundraising experience. A demonstrated working knowledge of major gift prospect management, development department operations, and fundraising database management is essential. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. For a complete job description and application instructions, please visit: fundforlakegeorge.org/jobs.

Seasonal Call Center

Holiday Job Fair Wednesday, 3:00–5:30 PM October 30 CALL CENTER: Customer Sales & Service 128 Intervale Road, Burlington, VT 05401 For more info, call 660-4610

gardeners.com

Download our job application TODAY and bring the completed form to our job fair! 7D_Hol19_5H_103019.indd 1 Untitled-14 1

10/7/19 10:31 3:46 PM 10/28/19 AM

MULTIPLE POSITIONS!

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Join NPI, Vermont’s premier Technology Management firm. Have fun and delight clients. NPI appreciates its staff, and offers a pet-friendly office, generous time off, matching 401k, family health coverage, Flexible Spending Accounts, open-book management, and profit-sharing.

Systems Engineer You will be a member of our crack Engineering team and install and support core client systems. If you are expert in any one of these areas, you’ll fit in well, and have the opportunity to grow into others: Microsoft servers, cloud services, and/or collaboration tools; switching and wireless; security and firewalls. Requires three-plus years of full-time IT infrastructure experience. Learn more: http://tinyurl.com/NPI-Engineer-SD

Canopy IT Support Technician As a member of our top-flight Canopy team, you will be a go-to for products and applications clients rely on every day. Sound The team handles support requests, monitors network components, interesting? configures workstations and users, Apply online automates service delivery, reports on today! system health, and resolves issues. You will work in our office most days, with occasional visits to client sites. One year fulltime IT experience required. Learn more: http://tinyurl.com/NPI-Canopy3-SD

End-User Support Specialist You will work at client sites to keep end-users happy, their workstations running fast, and their applications working smoothly. You will be exposed to a variety of technical issues and will manage workstations, applications, printers, and enduser IT access, all with the support of the other members of the excellent Canopy team. A strong knowledge of Windows 10 and PC applications is required. Learn more: http://tinyurl.com/NPI-EUSS-SD

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10/25/19 12:37 PM

We are growing and are hiring! All of the following positions offer competitive pay and excellent benefits including health coverage, retirement options, and paid time off.

Engaging minds that change the world

Holiday Help UVM Bookstore

Are you a sandwich aficionado? Red Hen Baking Company is looking for a few fine folks to join our sandwich line in our brand new kitchen. The ideal candidate takes pride in making excellent food, works cleanly and efficiently, and works well independently and in a team. Please send a resume and cover letter to Rob at rob@redhenbaking.com.

CAFÉ STAFF* If you enjoy great food and coffee and enjoy customer service, you would love working in our bustling cafe! Job requirements include: • Previous food service/cash handling experience necessary. • Customer Service • Making espresso drinks • Making sandwiches to order *This position requires more than seasonal employment —we are interested in long term commitment. Contact Hannah at buyer@redhenbaking.com or 802-223-5200 x16

BREAD BAKER

If you derive satisfaction from working with your hands and being able to appreciate the fruits of your labor every day, you might want to bake bread with us! Professional food experience is required. Contact Douglas at douglas@redhenbaking.com.

DISHWASHING AND BUSSING We have a full-time position available for a person who enjoys physical work, working with a team, and serving the public. In addition to competitive pay and benefits, this position offers one of the best times you can have while at work. Contact Randy at Red Hen Baking Company: (802) 223-5200 or randy@redhenbaking. com or come fill out an application at our Middlesex café.

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This is a temporary position employed 22.5 to 37.5 hours per week to provide retail support to the UVM Bookstore and the General Merchandise and Textbook departments during our busy months of November, December, and January. This position will assist with the high volume daily processing and shipping of web orders, stocking, straightening, and merchandising the sales floor, and running a cash register at one of our two locations. The ideal candidate will be have availability Friday-Monday, be comfortable working both independently and as part of a team, have strong organizational and customer service skills, and be very detail oriented. The ability to lift, carry, bend, stoop, and move heavy objects over 25 pounds and perform repetitive movements such as climbing ladders and pricing and security tagging merchandise on a routine basis is required. For further information on this position or to apply, please contact Brendan Andrews by email (Brendan.Andrews@uvm. edu). Applicants must apply by submitting a cover letter, resume, and three references. Application review will begin immediately. Hourly pay rate is $14.00/hour. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity of the institution and can deliver high quality service to the UVM Bookstore operation. This is a temporary position and not eligible for UVM benefits. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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10/23/19 3:12 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Building a community where everyone participates, and everyone belongs.

Nursing Opportunity

Are you a cleaning expert? Do you have some solid cleaning experience and are ready to take it to the next level? We want to talk with you!

Part time, flexible position supporting individuals through our developmental services and Homeward programs. This is an exciting and unique opportunity for a registered nurse who wants to make an impact on a variety of individuals. Responsibilities include training of staff, quality assurance, general nursing oversight and advocacy for consumers.

Elderwood at Burlington, a Skilled Nursing Facility, is seeking a Director of Environmental Services to join our team! This Full Time career opportunity is a fantastic chance to join a growing organization that truly represents a team atmosphere!

CCS offers a team-oriented environment, comprehensive training, benefits and a competitive salary. Send your letter of interest and application to Elizabeth Sightler, esightler@ ccs-vt.org

Shared Living Provider Open your accessible home to someone with an intellectual disability or autism and make a positive impact on their life, and yours! A generous stipend, paid time off (respite), comprehensive training & supports are provided. CCS is currently offering a variety of opportunities that could be the perfect match for your household and lifestyle.

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E.O.E.

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O P E R AT I O N S SUPPORT True North Wilderness Program is a wilderness therapy program for adolescents and young adults. We are seeking a full-time, year-round Operations Support person. The ideal candidate is an adaptable team player with a positive attitude who is willing to work indoors and outdoors performing a variety of tasks associated with the logistics of running our program. Tasks including food packing and rationing, gear outfitting, transportation and facilities maintenance. Candidates must be willing to work weekends and occasional evenings. A clean and valid driver’s license is required. Competitive salary and comprehensive benefits offered including health, dental, vision and accident insurance and a retirement savings plan. Send resumes to: jobs@truenorthwilderness.com

10/18/19

SIGN ON BONUS OF $2,500

The Arbors at Shelburne, a Benchmark Senior Living Community, offers our employees an extensive benefits package, award benefits as well as employee appreciation days each month.

The Arbors at Shelburne is currently recruiting for licensed nursing assistants or experience caregivers. We have full and part time openings on our day and evening shifts, in our community dedicated to seniors living with memory challenges. We offer competitive shift and weekend differentials. Salary up to $21.00/hour based on experience.

The Arbors at Shelburne Attn: Human Resources 687 Harbor Road Shelburne, VT. 05482 (802) 985-8600 phurteau@benchmarkquality.com

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10/18/19 4:16 PM

UNISERV DIRECTOR/ORGANIZER Vermont-NEA is seeking to fill a UniServ Director/Organizer position to serve our statewide network of local Associations. We are accepting applications until the position is filled, and we will interview finalist candidates as soon as possible. The 4:04 PMstarting date is as soon as practicable, and the position is based in Montpelier, Vermont but requires significant travel throughout the state. The pay and benefits are generously part of and pursuant to a collectively bargained agreement. Duties include assisting local educator unions building capacity with organizing, training for collective bargaining, and grievance processing around working conditions and professional issues, and engaging with local union members. The UniServ Director/ Organizer position will work with Vermont-NEA’s professional staff and work in concert with our legal, communications, program benefits, and professional development personnel.

LNAs/EXPERIENCED CAREGIVERS

Please call to schedule an interview or stop in to complete an application.

Our facility also offers updated equipment and technology for our nursing team, recent renovations, and convenient parking among additional perks! Apply today: elderwoodcareers.com or directly: bit.ly/2Mr7FqG

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Contact Jennifer Wolcott, jwolcott@ccs-vt.org or 655-0511 ext. 118 for more information. ccs-vt.org

The Director assists with ensuring the health and well-being of our residents by being responsible for the staffing and operation of the Housekeeping and Laundry Department.

The successful candidate will have unusually strong and broad skills, including: unlimited dedication to the interests of both public education and public school educators in Vermont; thoughtful and deep affinity for the labor movement; strong understanding of class analysis and tools to implement economic social justice; excellent interpersonal skills both with groups and with individuals, including the ability to provide education/training to adults; extensive ability to work collaboratively as well as individually; thorough working knowledge of employee rights as well as education and labor laws and processes; appreciation for the role of labor unions; excellent oral and written communication skills; understanding of public policy issues/trends affecting public education and educators; interest and involvement in political action activities as they relate to public education and educators; good computer abilities; a willingness to work many evenings and some weekends on Vermont-NEA business; requires reliable transportation. Please send application letter, resume, two or three writing samples, and names/contact information of three references to Jeff Fannon, Executive Director, Vermont-NEA, 10 Wheelock Street, Montpelier, Vermont 05602-3737. Direct phone and email inquiries to (800) 649-6375 or kferguson@vtnea.org.

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10/22/19 9:41 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Are you passionate about economic justice? If so, you might be the perfect fit for our team! CVOEO’s Financial Futures Program supports people with low and moderate incomes to learn, earn, save and own. The Coach assists clients to create financial stability through one-onone coaching, financial classes, and appropriate referrals; the position also includes community outreach/marketing and other administrative activities as needed. For complete job description and requirements: cvoeo.org/careers. We offer an excellent benefit package including health insurance, paid holidays, vacation, sick leave and a retirement plan. To apply, please submit a cover letter and resume by e-mail to: FFMBDCoach2019@cvoeo.org. The review of applications begins immediately and will continue until suitable candidates are found. CVOEO is an Equal Opportunity Employer

R&D Mechanical Engineer

Eastview at Middlebury is seeking an energetic, dependable, self-motivated RN or LPN with great communication skills to join our nursing team! The ideal candidate possesses experience in the long-term care setting and a familiarity with required assessments, care planning and regulations. The ability to multi-task and make sound clinical decisions independently, while providing ongoing evaluation and case management, are imperative. A good working knowledge of routine and emergency medical care standards, as well as hands-on clinical nursing procedures, is a must. Additional duties include providing guidance to and supervision of direct care staff and Medication Technicians, (including assisting the Health Services Director in providing ongoing education), and communicating with families, medical providers and various outside agencies to ensure the best possible outcomes for our residents. Flexible hours, every other weekend, rotating holidays and after hours on-call support required. Send resumes to: acoyle@eastviewmiddlebury.com.

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Are you interested in improving and developing new industrial

10/21/19

Mortgage Banker

products and technologies? Do you enjoy working in a Central Vermont Product Development Mechanical Designer, R&D for Hot Runner dynamic, fun and engaging environment? Are you eager to join There is no better time to join NSB’s team! a team of innovative engineers working for the leading global JOB DESCRIPTION: supplier of injection molding equipment? If you answered yes, Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking Responsible for developing injection molding machinery sub-systems in a dynamic, fun and engaging environment. institution headquartered in Vermont. We are looking for a professional Within a team environment, and with a high sense of ownership you will invent, concept, design and implement new this role is for you. to join our team as Mortgage Banker for Central Vermont. This position solutions and products that improve hot runner value, performance, cost, lead-time and/or application range.

Our global Development Team is looking to hire experienced offers a strong opportunity to work for an established and growing Mechanical Engineers. With a greatRESPONSIBILITIES: sense of ownership, the premier Vermont mutual savings bank. Concept, Design and Engineer innovative hot runner products using a systematic approach and solid engineering successful candidate will participate in lead the technical • and Job Responsibilities principles development of new hot runner components and products. Evaluate design thru simulations (FEA and CFD) and prototyping • • The Mortgage Banker will be responsible for originating a variety You’ll be closely involved in product validation and subsequent • Design of test models, test cells, for the verification and validation of design concepts of new residential loans. Responsibilities for this position include launch into our manufacturing operations. • Analyze large datasets and make data driven decisions or recommendations interviewing applicants, collecting financial data and making

• Contribute to the formulation of business cases and product definitions recommendations regarding Northfield Savings Bank loan • Support business commercialization phases products. We are looking for someone who has an understanding • Concept, Design and Engineer innovative hot runner solutions • May participate in or lead continuous improvement or isolated service issue activities of the borrower’s needs and who will provide assistance to our Create and manage development project plans & budget • engineering using a systematic approach and solid principles customers with the purchase process from application to closing. Product Development Mechanical Designer, R&D for Hot Runner • Formally communicate project status and health during the development stage • Evaluate design thru simulations (FEA and CFD), Requirements JOB DESCRIPTION: Responsible for developing injection molding machinery sub-systems in a dynamic, fun and engaging environment. prototyping and Lab testing TECHNICAL/PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE: Within a team environment, and with a high sense of ownership you will invent, concept, design and implement new solutions and products that improve hot runner value, performance, cost, lead-time and/or application range. • The Mortgage Banker must possess excellent communication and Advanced CAD user in modeling and detailing techniques (GD&T) • Manage development project and•communicate updates to RESPONSIBILITIES: customer service skills. A Bachelor’s Degree and two to four years Strong background and knowledge in mechanical design, stress analysis, fluid dynamics and heat transfer • • Concept, Design and Engineer innovative hot runner products using a systematic approach and solid engineering principles Management of experience in a financial institution or related area is required • Proficient in use of Finite Element Analysis (Thermal & structural) and CFD tools • Evaluate design thru simulations (FEA and CFD) and prototyping • Design of test models, test cells, for the verification and validation of design concepts along with registering with the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing Solid understanding of manufacturing, joining and assembly processes of precision machinery • EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS: • Analyze large datasets and make data driven decisions or recommendations • Contribute to the formulation of business cases and product definitions System. Mortgage origination experience and a good understanding • Ability to analyze, compile and report on large dataset analysis using statistical tools • Support business commercialization phases • May participate in or lead continuous improvement or isolated service issue activities • University degree in Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc./M.Sc.) of banking products, services, policies and procedures are preferred. • Proven ability to analyze and solve complex technical problems with innovative solutions • Create and manage development project plans & budget • Formally communicate project status and health during the development stage • Strong sense of project ownership and in meeting established commitments • 5 or more years’ experience in a related industry preferred TECHNICAL/PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE: Find out what NSB can offer you • Advanced CAD user in modeling and detailing techniques (GD&T) • Strong background and knowledge in mechanical design, stress analysis, fluid dynamics and heat transfer Positions are available in both Bolton, Canada and Milton, • NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package • Proficient in use of Finite Element Analysis (Thermal & structural) and CFD tools EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS: • Solid understanding of manufacturing, joining and assembly processes of precision machinery Vermont. We offer a great work environment, competitive including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) • Ability to analyze, compile and report on large dataset analysis using statistical tools • University degree in Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc. and/or M.Sc.) • Proven ability to analyze and solve complex technical problems with innovative solutions Strong sense of project ownership and in meeting established commitments • compensation retirement program, professional development opportunities, 5 or more years design experience in a related industry preferred. • and attractive benefits package. EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS: and a positive work environment supported by a team culture.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

Apply online today at husky.com or email resume to miltontalent@husky.ca.

• •

University degree in Mechanical Engineering (B.A.Sc. and/or M.Sc.) 5 or more years design experience in a related industry preferred.

Husky’s benefits include Medical, Dental, Vision, 401K, Paid Time Off, On-site Fitness Center and Café! E.O.E.

Northfield Savings Bank hours of operation are Monday through Friday generally 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Please submit your application and resume in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred) Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank - Human Resources P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

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STAFF NURSE

FINANCIAL/ MICRO BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COACH

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGER

(Burlington, VT) Pizza 44, a one-year young South End restaurant, is searching for an experienced restaurant front end manager. Great opportunity for a focused, customer experience driven professional. We make some of the best food in Vermont and desire to deliver service that is equal to our food. If you want to be part of a growing family-oriented business that takes great 6:18 PM pride in both food and staff, we would welcome the opportunity to discuss this unique employment opportunity. Contact: info@pizza44vt.com. Excellent opportunity for proven professional. This is a full-time position.

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10/21/19 6:08 PM

Operations Coordinator We’re seeking an Operations Coordinator to take us to the next level in the areas of financial management, human resources, facilities, IT, and green initiatives. The Coordinator will work closely with the Executive Director on strategic planning and organizational culture, and supervise a part-time assistant. At least three years’ experience in operations, financial, and/ or HR management, plus experience working in diverse & inclusive organizations. Send resumé and cover letter to jobs@vermonthumanities.org by November 15. Vermont Humanities is the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. E.O.E.

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10/28/19 11:10 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-18

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

BOOKEEPER Seeking Full Charge Bookkeeper with at least five years’ experience in QuickBooks and Excel. Seeking a motivated individual with the ability to multi-task. The job is approximately 30 hours per week. Diana@sheltratax.com

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Executive Director

$3,000 SIGN ON BONUS

Camp Ta-Kum-Ta is excited to announce the search for our 3rd Executive Director in 35 years. Camp provides challenging, extraordinary experiences in a safe and loving environment for children who have or have had cancer and their families.

EVENING NURSE

The Arbors at Shelburne, a Benchmark Senior Living community, has an opening for a full-time evening nurse with a Sign On Bonus of $3,000. We offer our employees an extensive benefits package, award benefits as well as employee appreciation days each month. Please submit a cover letter and resume via e-mail to:

The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors and will serve as the chief administrator, providing leadership and implementing policies and programs. 12:21 PM We are looking for a proven leader and confident spokesperson that can build community and connections through telling a story. Our story is one of love, laughter and the opportunity to truly make a difference. This position is rewarding, humbling and impactful.

10/28/19

Data Center Operator/ Technical Analyst

bconroy@benchmarkquality.com Brendan Conroy, RN, DNS Or stop in to complete an application. The Arbors at Shelburne 687 Harbor Road, Shelburne, VT. 05482 (802) 985-8600

(3rd Shift) Please refer to our Position Profile and Job Description Tech Vault is seeking a 3rd for qualifications and application information at: Shift Data Center Operator/ takumta.org/about-us/career-and-internshipA Benchmark Assisted Living Community, EOE. Technical Analyst to add to its EOE opportunities team of professionals. Ideally this candidate has strong mechanical and computer 10/18/194t-ArborsEveningNURSE102319.indd 3:06 PM 1 10/21/19 skills. Candidates must be 4t-CampTaKumTa102319.indd 1 self-motivated, organized, fast learners, detail oriented, and HARWOOD UNION MIDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL flexible to working various shifts. Data Center operations experience is a plus, but Harwood Unified Union School District is seeking a Director of not required. This position is a Maintenance for Harwood Union Middle/High School beginning contract (1099) to hire position. in December 2019. This is a full year, full time position. If interested, email resumes: Copley Hospital is a vital and integral part of our Duties include, but are not limited to: managing, overseeing, jwest@techvault.net.

DIRECTOR OF MAINTENANCE

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10/25/19

and supervising the daily operation of the buildings and grounds at Harwood Union HS; planning, preparing, and monitoring the 12:00 PMdepartment budget; hiring, training, developing, supervising and scheduling all buildings and grounds staff at Harwood. Director would also supervise and manage six custodial, maintenance, and grounds employees.

PREP LEADER American Flatbread, Middlebury Hearth is interviewing for a Prep Leader. We are looking for someone with the ability to see a job through to completion, great communication skills, and an enthusiasm for cooking with local, seasonal, and organic foods. Baking, knife skills and prep experience are helpful, but we are happy to train the right candidate and value a positive attitude above all. Full time, Tues-Sat, 8:30-4:30 pm. Please stop in or download an application at: americanflatbread.com and forward it to Chef Samantha: samantha@ americanflatbread.com.

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Required Qualifications: • High school education plus 8 years of relevant technical training/ experience, or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired • 6 years of custodial experience in an educational, medical, or comparable setting • 3 years of supervision experience • Must hold a valid Vermont driver’s license • Must hold a VT Class 2 Water Operators License or be able to acquire this within 2 years • Communication skills, written and oral, and interpersonal skills • Basic computer skills • Cell phone required and must be able to respond at any time • Ability to work evenings, weekends, and holidays • Good technical skills For more information or questions, please contact Ray Daigle at 802-583-8174 or rdaigle@huusd.org. If interested, send letter of interest, resume, copy of licenses, and 3 current letters of reference to Ray Daigle, Harwood Unified Union School District, 340 Mad River Park, Suite 7, Waitsfield, VT 05673. Job Starts: 12/1/2019. E.O.E.

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DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

local community, our employees are skilled in their areas of responsibility and our size allows us to offer a personal touch to our patients. Supporting one another is central to our culture. We are looking for a Director of Information Technology who will lead and support the Information Technology Team, plan and direct all aspects of design, implementation and maintenance of information systems to effectively apply technology solutions, and is responsible for translating the mission, strategic goals and program priorities of the organization into department operations. The Director will evaluate IT resources and structure and provide leadership focused on service, accountability and delivery with a concentration on clinical decisionmaking and process integration. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science (Master’s preferred) and five years of successful IT leadership in a Healthcare setting.

VISIT WWW.COPLEYVT.ORG/CAREERS OR APPLY IN PERSON TO: COPLEY HOSPITAL HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICE HEALTH CENTER BUILDING, 2ND FLOOR 528 WASHINGTON HIGHWAY MORRISVILLE, VERMONT 05661 OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY | ORTHOPAEDICS | CARDIOLOGY EMERGENCY SERVICES | ONCOLOGY | REHABILITATION SERVICES GENERAL SURGERY | DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

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WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

HR Generalist to work as part of a team in performance management, supervisory coaching, labor relations, onboarding, and position/records management. Excellent interpersonal, organizational, verbal and written communication skills required. Ability to work independently, deliver accurate and timely work, and aptitude and interest to learn. Please Note: This position is being recruited at multiple levels. If you would like to be considered for more than one level, you MUST apply to the specific Job Requisition. HR Adm II, Req #3040, HR Adm III, Req #3041, HR Admin IV, Req #3038. For More information, contact Margaret Loftus at Margaret.loftus@vermont.gov. Department: Human Resources. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: November 3, 2019.

To find out more information regarding openings at Bolton Valley, visit our website to apply online: boltonvalley.com/about-us/employment-andmountain-host-program/assistant-to-thepresident-133

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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BOLTON VALLEY RESORT HIRING ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT

HR ADMINIS TRATOR – MONTPELIER

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov

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Engaging minds that change the world

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions.

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR

E-Commerce Logistics Coordinator - UVM Bookstore - #S2303PO The UVM Bookstore is seeking an experienced E-Commerce Logistics Coordinator to join our team. The ideal candidate will have excellent customer service skills, a strong work ethic and eye for detail, and demonstrated experience with and knowledge of online retail practices and social media marketing.

If you have a strong desire to help people become homeowners, then we want to hear from you. We are seeking a dynamicRESIDENTIAL individual to join our residential mortgage lending MORTGAGE team working out of our St. Albans office.

This position will manage the daily processing, packaging, and distribution of all UVM Bookstore e-commerce orders and serve as the Store Lead for high volume order fulfillment during the start and end of each semester; develop and maintain merchandise catalogs on the UVM Bookstore website; create and execute a social media strategy for customer and community engagement that involves routinely posting content to the Bookstore’s various social media platforms; and serve as the primary contact for questions about existing online orders.

LOAN ASSISTANT

• Responsibilities include working with customers to find the right loan program to We are seeking a full time Residential Mortgage Loan meet their needs and guiding the customer through the entire mortgage loan process Assistant for our growing South Burlington Loan Office. from application toThis loan closing.will be responsible for performing a vaindividual administrative dutiesinclude to provide loan origina• Key attributes forriety the of successful candidate the ability to establish rapport tion and documentation support for our Mortgage and develop relationships with customers and referral sources andLoan the ability to explain Officers. Other concepts responsibilities include overseeing to customers our loan programs, and terms they may not the be familiar with.

High School diploma and two years of relevant e-commerce and social/digital marketing required and familiarity with collegiate retail platforms is highly desirable. *

completion and accuracy of loan documents, process-

*Online job posting contains further position and minimum qualification details.

• Required traits include being a self-starter, collaborative, a problem solver, ing loans and ensuring proper loan documentation inproficient and comfortable withoftechnology, and cluding input information willingness and preparing allability relatedto develop and call on centers of influence and referral andcations abilityand to credit educate, explain and loan documents, follow sources, up on verifi inform prospectivereports, clients preparation of loans for underwriting, as well

The Bookstore seeks candidates who demonstrate an ongoing commitment to diversity, sustainability and exceptional customer service to our customers. To learn more about the Bookstore, visit https://uvmbookstore.uvm.edu/ Library Support Senior - Dana Medical Library - #S2298PO The Dana Medical Library seeks a Library Support Senior to join their team. Provide team oversight and performs operational functions of Dana Medical Library’s Document Delivery & Interlibrary Loan (DD/ILL) Unit. Borrow research materials on behalf of university staff, students and faculty, and University of Vermont Medical Center (UVM MC) employees. Lend research materials to reciprocating libraries and institutions. Provide scanned copies of research materials to university staff, students and faculty, and UVM MC employees and authorized community organizations. Participate in the development and implementation of library policy and procedure for interlibrary loan and document delivery. Manage records, data and files associated with the lending and borrowing aspects of DD/ILL.

as commitment notes, and other loan documen• A Bachelor’s degree is desirableletters, but not required. tation and set up, assisting customers with advances

• The successful candidate should have a demonstrated background in residential on home construction lines and providing all other loan mortgage lending support or customer sales and the aptitude business development and needed. Requirements includefor excellent writcustomer service. ten and oral communication, and a minimum of 2 years of prior residential loan experience with a familiarity of • Being detail oriented, efficient, organized, and delivering prompt follow-up are critical secondary market mortgage loan products is preferable attributes for success along with excellent verbal and written communication skills. but not required. Attention to detail, strong organiza-

Union Bank is the tional leading Vermont bank skills, and thebased abilitycommunity to multi-task are mortgage essential. loan originator in the state and has been named the Vermont USDA Rural Development Lender of the Year for the past six years and a VHFA Top Performer. We offer a comprehensive array of loan products including construction, conventional, VHFA, FHA, VA, RD, PMI and portfolio loans. As a locally based community bank, we are able to make decisions quickly. We offer challenging and rewarding career opportunities, and are committed Union Bank offers competitive wages, a comprehensive to excellence and benefi providing you the tools and support to be successful. ts package, training for professional develop-

Environmental Hazards Specialist - Physical Plant Department #S2101PO - The Physical Plant Department at the University of Vermont is seeking an individual for a full-time benefits eligible position as an Environmental Hazards Specialist. This position performs cleanup of environmental hazards, hazardous material inspections, and monitors projects across campus in accordance with state and federal regulations and UVM procedures and practices. A High School diploma and four years of experience in the asbestos industry or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Knowledge of applicable Federal, State and current issues in both asbestos and lead disciplines. Specialized certifications or ability to obtain within one year in the State of Vermont required. Valid driver’s license is required. *

Union Bank offers ment, a comprehensive compensation and benefits To be strong advancement potential, stable hoursprogram. and supportiveplease work environment. Qualifi ed applications considered for thisa position, submit a cover letter, resume, references and salary requirementsmay to:apply with a cover letter, resume, professional references and salaryResources requirements to: Human - Union Bank P.O. Box 667 PO Box 667 Morrisville, 05661 – 0667 Human Vermont Morrisville, VT 05661-0667 careers@unionbankvt.com Resources careers@unionbankvt.com EOE ~ Member FDIC Member FDIC 10v-UnionBank102319.indd 1

Equal Housing Lender

*Online job posting contains further position and minimum qualification details. For further information on these positions and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit www.uvmjobs.com. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Open positions are updated daily. Please call 802-656-3150 or email employment@uvm. edu for technical support with the online application. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Equal Opportunity Employer

Residential Mortgage Loan Assistant - LPO Seven Days, 3.83 x 7

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.30.19-11.06.19

Commercial Roofers & Laborers

Help Vermonters pursue their education goals! We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment. We offer many top-notch benefits.

OUTREACH COUNSELOR/GUIDE COUNSELOR (VSGU) This position is responsible for supporting Vermont middle, high school and first-year postsecondary students in their pursuit of education and training as part of the Vermont state GEAR UP (VSGU) Grant. VSGU is a grant provided to VSAC through the Federal Department of Education (ED) which is designed to increase the high school graduation and postsecondary/technical training enrollment rates for low-income, first-generation students.

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This position works with students and families in middle and secondary school(s) in Franklin County to provide education, career, and financial aid information and counseling in support of postsecondary education or technical training goals. The position supports students through the transition from high school into, and through, first year of postsecondary education or technical training. The position will provide support to GUIDE (Giving Undergraduates Important Direction in their Education) students; liaise with postsecondary and technical training institutions in support of GUIDE students; and develop, implement, and monitor social networking opportunities for GUIDE students and their parents. Our ideal candidate will have a Master’s in counseling or education, 3+ years of experience in counseling or education, an understanding of the socioeconomic and academic needs of the clients served, ability to work independently, ability to work with groups, plus develop and deliver presentations. Driving a motor vehicle is required as a regular part of this position. Candidate must also successfully complete a criminal background check. This is a grant funded position that is contingent upon continued grant funds.

OUTREACH COUNSELOR, TALENT SEARCH PROGRAM Do you want to change some lives? Are you energized by the enthusiasm of teenagers? Then apply for one of two full-time positions with VSAC as an Outreach Counselor in our Educational Talent Search program—one in Franklin County and one in Washington and Orange Counties. Outreach Counselors provide career and college readiness services to students at middle and high schools. The target start date is mid-December. Our ideal candidate will have a Master’s Degree in counseling, education or related field, experience working with youth in educational settings, an understanding of the socioeconomic and academic needs of first-generation, modest-incoming students and families, excellent communication, organizational and group presentation skills, proven success working independently and a comfort creating and maintaining relationships with people in a variety of settings.

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TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST I Job Goal: This position is responsible for ensuring the smooth operations of all technology for the district. Essential Duties include the following:

• Manages the Technology Helpdesk • Supports PCs, PC operating systems, and manages network accounts • Monitors help desk ticket systems and assigns and/or resolves tickets accordingly • Provides on-site and remote support to multiple schools • Performs hardware and software evaluations • Installs, updates, and supports a wide variety of software • Maintains district inventory database • Assists with the deployment of devices • Exhibits commitment to the district’s vision plan • Performs other tasks and duties as assigned by the Technology Director This is a full-time, full-year position with a generous benefits package. Interested candidates must apply online at SchoolSpring.com. Job #3184005.

TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST III Colchester School District is seeking a Technology Specialist III who will be responsible for providing backup to the network engineer and perform other system administration jobs. We are looking for someone who is highly organized, pays close attentions to details, works well in a team, and has strong communication skills.

The successful candidate will create a curriculum plan to cover the full spectrum of career and college planning services, meet with students regularly in groups and one-on-one, offer workshops and presentations to students, parents and professionals and develop rapport with middle and high school students, area school staff and faculty, and agency and college personnel.

• Responsible for the design, implementation, and maintenance of system solutions • Provides data management support for a variety of applications • Schedules and performs preventative and regular software and hardware maintenance and upgrades • Designs new computer applications and modifies existing systems • Automates processes to streamline operations • Monitors all network applications and resolves issues • Research and evaluates new technologies and remains current with technology trends • Exhibits commitment to the district’s vision plan • Performs other tasks and duties as assigned by the Technology Director

Applicants must have a valid driver’s license, a willingness to travel up to 1,200 miles a month, a properly inspected, registered, and insured motor vehicle for business use and must provide their own workspace when working away from VSAC offices. Candidate must also successfully complete a criminal background check. This is a grant funded position that is contingent upon continued grant funds. VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Positions are open until filled. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org.

Vermont Student Assistance Corporation PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org 12t-VSAC103019.indd 1

Year round, full time positions. Good wages & benefits. $16.50 per hour minimum; Pay negotiable with experience. EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 802-862-6473

Interested candidates must apply online at SchoolSpring.com. Job #3179469. 10/28/19 11:03 AM 8t-ColchesterSchoolDistrict102319.indd 1

10/21/19 5:29 PM

Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, October 30, 2019  

Steve Conant Evolves His Business and Burlington's South End; The State of Vermont Is Selling Its Surplus of Seized and Abandoned Firearms;...

Seven Days, October 30, 2019  

Steve Conant Evolves His Business and Burlington's South End; The State of Vermont Is Selling Its Surplus of Seized and Abandoned Firearms;...

Profile for 7days