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SAVE THE DATES

Calendar listings return!

VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E JUNE 16-23, 2021 VOL.26 NO.37 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PAGE 52

After a year in hotels, homeless Vermonters prepare to live in tents and cars

KICKED to the Curb BY CHEL SEA E DGAR, PAGE 2 8

NEW ISSUE!

Home, design & real estate

OUT OF HIS SHELL

PAGE 17

Steve “the Turtle Man” Parren retires

HE’S GOT THE BEAT

PAGE 46

Urian Hackney is on the rise


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Do you know an organization that is

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WEEK IN REVIEW JUNE 9-16, 2021 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN & MATTHEW ROY

POP A CORK, VERMONT

GOING UP

A nine-story apartment complex is planned for downtown Burlington, not far from the “pit,” where another project has been stalled for years. Which one will be finished first?

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

An Ethiopian refugee resettlement group is eyeing Brattleboro as a possible destination for the people it serves, VPR reported. Good news. Gov. Phil Scott

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802nice

SARA FLEMING

Marchers in the parade

That’s how much Vermont’s maple production was down in 2021 compared to the previous year.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW FRONTIERS

More than 80 percent of all eligible Vermonters have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, and Gov. Phil Scott celebrated the milestone on Monday by making good on his promise to lift all remaining COVID-19 restrictions. The announcement came 464 days after the state identified its first case of COVID-19 and marked a major step toward normalcy, signaling what many hope will be an end to the pandemic in Vermont. “There are no longer any state COVID-19 restrictions,” Scott said. “None. So unless there is a federal requirement in place — like [for] public transportation or long-term care facilities — employers, municipalities and individuals can operate under the same conditions as before the pandemic.” Vermont’s “universal guidance” still encourages but does not require social distancing and masking for unvaccinated people. Municipalities and businesses can also set their own stricter guidelines, Scott said, equating it to a “no shirt, no shoes, no service” policy. State officials had initially anticipated lifting all restrictions by July 4, but Scott accelerated the timeline once it became clear that Vermont’s nation-leading vaccination

21 percent

effort was on pace to surpass even the most optimistic projections. Vermont is the first state in the nation to have vaccinated four out of every five eligible people. Those 12 and older are now able to get vaccinated, and younger children may become eligible later this year. Scott also announced on Monday that he would allow his state of emergency declaration to expire at midnight on Tuesday. The order, first issued in March 2020, has allowed Scott to enact broad measures aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus, such as closing down certain business sectors and limiting gathering sizes. It has also helped the state to respond swiftly to the needs of its most vulnerable residents, allowing for the expansion of vital meal delivery systems and enacting a temporary ban on most evictions. Vermont avoided some of the death and despair seen in other states, the governor said, thanks to the sacrifices of its citizens. “Our state has shown the world what’s possible when you have a group of people with the right attitude, following the data and trusting medical science,” Scott said. He’s left one “emergency” measure in place: the right for restaurants and bars to sell alcoholic beverages to-go. The better to celebrate…

NATURE AND NURTURE

Health officials held walk-in vaccination clinics over the weekend at several Vermont state parks, which offered free admission. Two birds, one stone.

1. “Champlain Valley Fair Announces 2021 Entertainment Lineup” by Jordan Adams. The post-pandemic bill includes several tribute acts. 2. “Surprise Koffee Kup Buyer Emerges, Won’t Reopen Bakeries” by Anne Wallace Allen. The company that makes Wonder bread bought the local bakery’s assets. 3. “Celebrating the ‘Pandemic All-Stars’ Who Helped Vermont Through a LessThan-Stellar Time” by Seven Days staff. By rising to the challenge with heart, courage and indomitable spirit, these Vermonters sustained us all. 4. “Will Raap Plans to Turn Nordic Farms Into a Grain-Based Ag Hub” by Sally Pollak. The entrepreneur plans to turn the Charlotte farm into an ag center that showcases grains, botanicals and beverages. 5. “Rice High Students Say School Mishandled Complaints of Sexual Violence” by Derek Brouwer. Several current and former students protested the school’s response to sexual misconduct.

LESSON PLAN

The Vermont State Colleges System is using $16 million in federal funds to offer free tuition and scholarship programs for state residents. Can’t beat those deals.

tweet of the week @caseylyly

I am torn ~ entirely ~ the fuck up by mosquito bites. hello, Vermont summer! /// #VT #BTV FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S KIND IN VERMONT

HINESBURG PROUD A crowd of cheerful people marched on Saturday in Hinesburg’s first-ever pride parade, carrying rainbow flags and signs supporting the LGBTQ community. Students and staff from the Champlain Valley School District organized the event. It included a march from Champlain Valley Union High School to a celebration at Hinesburg Community School, complete with speeches, pride-themed art and ice cream. Marchers carried signs that announced, “We embrace and celebrate you. You are amazing!” and “Hinesburg LGBTQ+ Pride.” “We wanted to show our support for

people in our community that don’t always feel it,” Samantha Raymond said. She’s a rising junior at CVU who helped emcee the event. “When I look out here today, I feel accepted and supported,” said a rising ninth grader at the rally. “And that is how everyone should feel all the time.” Two recent anti-LGBTQ incidents in Hinesburg prompted the event. In April, Hinesburg fire chief Al Barber shared a homophobic meme on his Facebook page for which he later apologized, then announced he’d retire in July. In May, LGBTQ-affirming chalk drawings were vandalized. The parade crowd included dozens of kids of all ages, parents, school staff and community members.

Rep. Bill Lippert (D-Hinesburg), who has represented the town in the Vermont House for 27 years as an out gay man, was one of several elected officials on hand. “The recent defacement of art is very disappointing, but I don’t think it represents the community,” he told Seven Days. “I think the turnout today is a big statement of support,” he said. Having been involved in gay rights activism for most of his adult life, he was excited to finally be part of a pride parade in his own town, Lippert said. “This is the world we were working to create, where young people are free to be who they are,” he said. SARA FLEMING SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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TURTLE POWER. founders/Coeditors Pamela Polston, Paula Routly

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publisher Paula Routly

deputy publisher Cathy Resmer AssoCiAte publishers

Don Eggert, Pamela Polston, Colby Roberts NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy

Consulting editor Candace Page

stAff writers Derek Brouwer, Chelsea Edgar,

Colin Flanders, Courtney Lamdin, Kevin McCallum, Alison Novak, Anne Wallace Allen politiCAl Columnist Mark Johnson ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston

AssoCiAte editor Margot Harrison musiC editor Chris Farnsworth

CAlendAr writer Kristen Ravin

speCiAlty publiCAtions mAnAger Carolyn Fox stAff writers Jordan Adams, Jordan Barry,

Melissa Pasanen, Ken Picard, Sally Pollak

Your story about Val Hussey, the “lunch lady,” brought tears to my eyes [“Pandemic All-Stars,” June 9]! They may never know of her on national news, but that kind of dedication to preventing children from going hungry — helping parents feed their families during financial struggles — is what really makes a difference. She is totally a hero. Ginger Vieira

ESSEX JUNCTION

AssistAnt proofreAders Katherine Isaacs,

Martie Majoros, Frank Smecker D I G I TA L & V I D E O

digitAl produCtion speCiAlist Bryan Parmelee senior multimediA produCer Eva Sollberger multimediA journAlist James Buck DESIGN Art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan

produCtion mAnAger John James

designers Jeff Baron, Kirsten Thompson SALES & MARKETING

LOWEST PRICE DEADLINE JUNE 24TH, 2021.

LOVIN’ SPOONFUL

proofreAders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler

CreAtive direCtor Don Eggert

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READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

deputy editor Sasha Goldstein

AssistAnt editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler

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FEEDback

direCtor of sAles Colby Roberts

senior ACCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw ACCount exeCutives Robyn Birgisson,

REMEMBERING DAD

[Re “Alive to Tell the Tale,” May 26]: Reading your excellent piece about Vermont World War II vets reminded me of my father. He was born in Tuscany and emigrated as a little kid with his family, settling in Montpelier in 1909. In 1942, after Pearl Harbor, at the age of 37, weighing perhaps 120 pounds soaking wet and wearing eyeglasses with lenses as thick as

Michelle Brown, Logan Pintka

mArketing & events direCtor Corey Grenier

QUIET REFLECTION

sAles & mArketing CoordinAtor Katie Hodges

BTV vigil honors George Floyd on anniversary PAGE 5

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

PASSING THE BATON

business mAnAger Marcy Carton

Dave Gram’s last Fair Game PAGE 15

direCtor of CirCulAtion Matt Weiner

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Luke Awtry, Harry Bliss, James Buck, Rob Donnelly, Luke Eastman, Caleb Kenna, Sean Metcalf, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 5 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh, N.Y.

Seven Days is printed at Quebecor Media Printing in Laval, Québec.

DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Colin Clary, Elana Coppola-Dyer, Jeremy Day, Donna Delmoora, Cabe Feller, Matt Hagen, Nat Michael, Dan Nesbitt, Dan Thayer With additional circulation support from PP&D. SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-month 1st ClAss: $175. 1-yeAr 1st ClAss: $275. 6-month 3rd ClAss: $85. 1-yeAr 3rd ClAss: $135. Please call 802-864-5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below. Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any

VE RM O N T ’S I N DE P E N D E N T VO IC E MAY 26-JUNE 2, 2021 VOL.26 NO.34 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CirCulAtion deputy Jeff Baron

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Benjamin Aleshire, Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Margaret Grayson, Amy Lilly, Bryan Parmelee, Jim Schley, Carolyn Shapiro, Molly Zapp

INSIDE

ALIVE TO TELL THE TALE

©2021 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

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STO RY BY STE VE GO L DSTE I N P HO TO S BY JAM E S BUCK , PAGE 3 2

the bottom of a Coke bottle, he enlisted in the Marine Corps. He went through boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina, with kids half his age and was honorably discharged in 1946 as a staff sergeant. I asked him once why he enlisted when he could have checked a half dozen deferment boxes. His answer was simple: “Oh, I had to.” Enough said. J. Paul Giuliani

MONTPELIER

advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

P.O. BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 802-864-5684 SEVENDAYSVT.COM @SEVENDAYSVT

Vermont’s remaining World War II survivors bear witness

BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE

“Alive to Tell the Tale” [May 26] was beautiful. The recollections of these men


WEEK IN REVIEW

TIM NEWCOMB

AD LOGIC

I’ve been following the discussion around readers asking you to stop accepting ad dollars from cigarette companies [Feedback: “Ban Cigarette Ads,” June 2]. These ads don’t bother me. I am not a smoker. I don’t see how these advertisements are any different than ones for alcohol. On page 39 of your June 2 issue, there is a large ad for vodka and chocolate liqueur. Alcohol also kills. Then should these be banned, as well? Amanda Conley

SOUTH BURLINGTON

MORE ADVICE ON BARKING DOG

would be lost if not for your interviews. War is horrible, yet these men survived, and the rest of us owe them a debt of gratitude for preserving our country. Sue Wetmore

BRANDON

POOR PAY

I was struck by Mark Johnson’s comment in his June 2 Fair Game column: “Pay in the newspaper business is notoriously low. (I made $19,000 a year when I started at the Burlington Free Press in the 1980s. You work hard and pay your dues.)” I find this attitude of “work hard and pay your dues” coming from an older generation misleading and unfair. Adjusted for inflation, a starting salary of $19,000 in 1982 would be about $53,000 today; if Johnson had started at that salary in 1985 or even 1989, that salary would respectively be about $47,000 or $40,000 now — all well above the $34,000 starting salary discussed in the column. For the first time in recent history, young people are experiencing less economic prosperity and opportunity than their parents. Attitudes like Johnson’s, even throwaway comments like the one he made, only serve to further culturally perpetuate this problem. Joyce Cellars

BURLINGTON

‘MEAN AND HYPOCRITICAL’

[Re Off Message: “Scott Vetoes Noncitizen Voting Proposals, Signs Bupe Bill,” June 1]: Gov. Phil Scott’s vetoes of the

Montpelier and Winooski non-U.S. citizen voting charter changes are both mean and hypocritical. Not four months ago, Scott wrote the U.S. Department of State asking to triple the number of refugees sent to Vermont. “Refugees are an integral part of our efforts to grow Vermont’s economy,” Scott said at the time. By vetoing a charter change that expands voting rights and encourages public participation, Scott sends the message that refugees are welcome for their labor, but we have no intention of giving them a meaningful voice in their communities. The path to citizenship is long and burdensome, particularly after four years of restrictive Trump policies that have created a massive backlog. Many of our immigrants in Montpelier and Winooski have been legal, permanent residents for years. They pay taxes and their children attend our schools, yet they are denied a vote in local decision making.  As Vermonters, we can give the governor credit for his handling of the pandemic without offering a blanket free pass on issues like these. Scott’s first state Senate campaign centered on opposing civil unions, and while he’s “evolved” on that stance, he continues to veto core progressive policies that benefit working Vermonters, such as a minimum wage increase and paid family leave. While he may stray from the Republican platform by opposing local control in this case, make no mistake: The R certainly belongs next to his name.  Conor Casey

MONTPELIER

Casey is a Montpelier city councilor.

I frequently read and enjoy “Ask the Reverend,” but the [May 19] advice about a barking backyard dog was not very helpful. The suggestion that she tell the dog’s owner to use a “bark collar” to resolve the problem is especially disturbing. The dog is barking for a reason — no shelter from the elements, no water, no food, a medical issue, loneliness, etc. As a longtime volunteer for animal welfare groups in Massachusetts and Vermont, I would suggest the following. 1. Check with the local animal control officer or humane society/shelter to see if they accept complaints. If that is not an option, notify the police or sheriff directly (before trying to reason with or befriend the dog’s owner yourself ). Remain calm and consistent, because it can sometimes be a frustrating process. Ask other neighbors — who

CORRECTIONS

Mellisa Cain’s age was wrong in last week’s “Pandemic All-Stars” profile titled “Helper in the Hood.” She is 39. “A BTV Jubilee” incorrectly described the racial makeup of the City of Burlington’s department heads.

FEEDBACK

Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number. Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability. Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

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WITHOUT OUR

FRONTLINE

STAFF there would be no Ben & Jerry’s

Throughout the last year, our farmers, farm workers, manufacturing employees, and scoopers have been our unsung heroes and the backbone of our business.

Without the hard work and dedication of these individuals Ben & Jerry’s wouldn’t be, well, Ben & Jerry’s. The past 15 months have been challenging in so many ways, and we couldn’t have done it without the efforts and support of our folks on the frontline. In the midst of a global pandemic, with lockdowns, mask mandates, and business restrictions, these individuals at Ben & Jerry’s showed up everyday to keep things moving while keeping themselves and those around them safe. All of us at Ben & Jerry’s want to extend our most sincere thank you for the hard work and determination of our Vermont farmers, farm workers, manufacturing employees, and scoopers.

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contents JUNE 16-23, 2021 VOL.26 NO.37

COLUMNS

SECTIONS

11 14 26 35 44 48 50 85

24 34 40 44 46 50 52 58 59

Magnificent 7 Fair Game Bottom Line Side Dishes Art Review Album Reviews Movie Review Ask the Reverend

Life Lines Food + Drink Culture Art Music + Nightlife Movies Calendar Classes Classifieds + Puzzles 81 Fun Stuff 84 Personals

FOOD 34

Catch the Drip Winooski’s Offbeat Creemee ditches dairy for poolside plant-based treats

Real Restaurant

After a year in hotels, homeless Vermonters prepare to live in tents and cars

KICKED to the Curb

Chef Jean-Luc Matecat’s dream comes true at Pioneer Lakeshore Café

34

STUCK IN VERMONT

Online Now

B Y CHE L SE A E D GAR , PAG E 28

COVER IMAGE JAMES BUCK • COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

17

40

46

NEWS & POLITICS 13

FEATURES 26

CULTURE 40

From the Publisher

Saving Place

Sling, Arrows and Hijinks

Days of Thunder

Teenage Dream

Art review: “Together: Nature Unites Us,” Elizabeth Billings, Nature Conservancy natural areas

A Very Hungry Caterpillar After a 30-year lull, gypsy moths infest the Champlain Valley

Turtle Savior

Urian Hackney reflects on a remarkable year — and gets ready for an even bigger one

Steve Parren looks back on three decades of conservation work

Theater review: The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), Northern Stage Diana Whitney edits a poetry collection for young women and girls

Storyteller Ferene Paris Meyer is the subject SUPPORTED BY: of “Ferene Existing While Black,” a new mural by Tanya Talamante and Cynthia Cagle; it will be unveiled Saturday during Burlington’s Juneteenth Celebration. Cynthia and Ferene talked with Eva Sollberger about their friendship and artistic collaboration.

We have

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STOWE, VT 2021

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COURTESY OF JOSEPH GRESSER

LOOKING FORWARD

WEDNESDAY 16 & 23

Eat, Drink and Be Merry Feeling antsy for the return of festival season? Take the edge off at Trucks, Taps & Tunes, a weekly mini festival on the Essex Experience Green. Each Wednesday, folks feast on food-truck eats, sip cold suds from a beer trailer, and revel in live music by local and regional acts. Boston’s Lee Ross gets booties shaking with funk and reggae grooves on June 23.

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY KRISTEN RAVIN

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

SATURDAY 19

Silent Cinema New Hampshire-based silent film accompanist Jeff Rapsis believes the 1924 movie Girl Shy is “a candidate for Hollywood’s first-ever rom-com.” This frenetic black-and-white motion picture stars silent-comedy master Harold Lloyd as a bashful man who falls in love despite his difficulties with women. Rapsis improvises a live score for a screening at Brandon Town Hall. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

FRIDAY 18

ISLAND IN THE SUN Greensboro’s Highland Center for the Arts hosts a different touring street performer each Friday in June. On the 18th, it’s Sara Kunz, also known as the Flyin’ Hawaiian. Born and raised on the Big Island, Kunz transports audience members to a circus-like paradise with feats of clowning, contortion and acrobatic hula hooping. Arrive early for food and cocktails from the venue’s café and bar. COURTESY OF SIMON & SCHUSTER

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

WEDNESDAY 16 & 23

Good Day Not only does Woodstock’s weekly Market on the Green offer the fresh, local foods that might populate your shopping list, it’s also an opportunity for community members to come together. Locals share smiles and conversation as they browse veggies, cheeses, ice cream and crafts amid live music on the Woodstock Village Green. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

WEDNESDAY 23

Superstar Species For such small beings, pollinators are a pretty big deal. Birds, butterflies, bees, and other insects and animals support food growth, clean air and plant diversity by transporting pollen from place to place. Learn to bring these major players to your own yard during Gardening With Wildflowers: Making Space for Pollinators and Other Wildlife, a free webinar hosted by the Vermont Land Trust. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 56

THURSDAY 17

History Lesson In her 2006 novel Copper Sun, author Sharon M. Draper combines young adult and historical fiction to tell the story of a 15-year old girl kidnapped from her African village and sold into slavery in 1738 South Carolina. Parents, educators and readers alike hear from the Coretta Scott King Book Award winner during a virtual talk and Q&A hosted by Fletcher Free Library in anticipation of Burlington’s Juneteenth Celebration. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 53

Submit your upcoming events at sevendaysvt.com/postevent.

ONGOING

Piece by Piece What do 67 seemingly disparate artworks in a current Stone Valley Arts group exhibition have in common? Created by 30 individual artists, the pieces in “Neuroanatomy: An exhibition of collage” reflect the expanding world of art made by assembling various materials to a backing such as paper or fabric. The show is on view at the Poultney gallery through June 27. LEARN MORE AT STONEVALLEYARTS.ORG

THIS IS A SAMPLING OF VERMONT’S IN-PERSON AND VIRTUAL EVENTS. BROWSE THE FULL CALENDAR, ART SHOWS, AND MUSIC+NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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PERFORMERS PERFORMERS INCLUDE INCLUDE

DWIGHT BROWN •• JUDI JUDI EMANUEL EMANUEL DWIGHT && NICOLE NICOLE •• CHRISTAL CHRISTAL BROWN LUIS JADE •• KERuBO KERUBO ••A2VT A2VT LUIS CALDERIN CALDERIN •• OMEGA OMEGA JADE SABOUYOUMA SABOUYOUMA• JENNI • JENNIJOHNSON JOHNSON••RAJNII RAJNII EDDINS EDINS FERENE PARIS MEYER MEYER••LAKE LAKECHAMPLAIN CHAMPLAINMASS MASSCHOIR CHOI FERENE PARIS MYRA FLYNN SINN • JEH KULU AND MORE TO BE• ANNOUNCED SOON

MUSIC • FOOD • MUSEUM EXHIBITIONS • EDUCATION

MULTIPLE SITES ACROSS BURLINGTON FLYNN ROOSEVELT PARK PARK FLYNN ELEMENTARY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCHOOL •• ROOSEVELT CITY HALL PARK • CHAMPLAIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FLETCHER FREE LIBRARY

SATURDAY, JUNE 19 • 2021 SATURDAY, JUNE 19RAIN • 2021OR SHINE ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND

ALL EVENTS ARE FREECOVID AND RAIN OR SHINE. COVID GUIDELINES WILL BE ENFORCED GUIDELINES WILL BE ENFORCED

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Homing Instinct

If health care is a human right, so is a roof.

© DMITRIY OS IVANOV | DREAMSTIME

We finally got some rain in Vermont, and I was reminded of the lovely sound it makes on my house. No matter how hard it comes down, I know I’ll be dry — a luxury that I came to appreciate in my outdoorsy youth. It’s awful waking up wet and cold, with all of your stuff sodden, realizing “normal” people will likely view you with suspicion and be less than eager to help you dry off, warm up or regroup. What’s worse is experiencing it every day — and not as a result of a long-distance hike or a threemonth bike tour. I try to remember that misery, and picture it being permanent, when I’m safe and warm inside and it’s inhospitable out. If health care is a human right, so is a roof. Most Vermonters seem to agree on that — at least in theory. Awash in federal dollars, the legislature just voted to spend $190 million on statewide affordable housing over the next three years. Paradoxically, checkout time is imminent for hundreds of homeless Vermonters who have been lodged in motels, on the state’s dime, for the duration of the pandemic. The costly program is ending before a single new unit has been built to accommodate them. Where will they go? Chelsea Edgar asked around and shares her findings in this week’s cover story, “Kicked to the Curb.” Not surprisingly, most of these vulnerable individuals will probably end up living outside, in cars, or in other unsanitary and dangerous situations. A large number of them live with mental illness, addiction, posttraumatic stress and other complex disorders. It’s an unintended coincidence that the summer issue of Nest, Seven Days’ quarterly home, design and real estate supplement, is inserted in this paper. In keeping with the season, it has a “backyard” theme, featuring creative chicken coops, tiny houses and accessory dwelling units that are delightful to behold. Some of those structures serve as comfortable living spaces, and cities like Burlington could make it easier to build more of them. The term “affordable housing” generally applies to low-income renters and house hunters, but there’s a dearth of it for working Vermonters of all stripes looking to upgrade in this red-hot real estate market. Anecdotes abound. The last one I heard was If you like what we do and can afford to help a property in Lincoln listed at $475,000. Buyer pay for it, become a Seven Days Super Reader! A offered $575,000 — $100,000 over the asking Look for the “Give Now” buttons at the top of price. Buyer B swept in and got it for $650,000. sevendaysvt.com. Or send a check with your People are waiving inspections, contingencies address and contact info to: and other buyer protections to gain any SEVEN DAYS, C/O SUPER READERS P.O. BOX 1164 advantage in these bidding wars. BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 In some cases, the buyers are out-of-state For more information on making a financial pandemic refugees moving in with money that contribution to Seven Days, please contact our communities desperately need. But that’s Corey Grenier: small comfort to those who can’t afford a home. VOICEMAIL: 802-865-1020, EXT. 136 If you’ve got one, be grateful. EMAIL: SUPERREADERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Paula Routly

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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FAIR GAME

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY MARK JOHNSON

‘Just Trying to Exhale’

Lt. Gov. Molly Gray says she’s too focused on her current role to think about running for Congress

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doesn’t really want to talk about going to Washington, even though the crowd around Vermont’s political water cooler assumes she’ll try someday. The political phenom would rather recap her first session as lieutenant governor or recount her trip to Macedonia with the Vermont National Guard. Or lay out why Vermont needs paid family leave and how, without more affordable housing and childcare, the state’s demographic gap will widen. Or how the pandemic revealed the depth of the broadband-access problem. All the talk about Washington, D.C. — an idea her supporters were floating even before she beat three Democrats in the 2020 primary and then crushed her Republican opponent by 9 points — is, Gray says, premature and distracting. In an interview last week in her Statehouse office, she pushed back on the central question: whether she has the right experience to be a credible candidate for Congress should Sen. PATRICK LEAHY (D-Vt.) step aside next year — against all expectations and prayers — and Rep. PETER WELCH (D-Vt.) seek Leahy’s job, leaving his House seat open. Gray maintained that her résumé is different but sufficient. Her victory last fall from outside the “Montpelier infrastructure” shows there are nontraditional paths to political office, she said, and suggested it was sexist to ask her whether a candidate for Congress should have legislative experience. “Would you say the same of Sen. Sanders?” she asked. Sen. BERNIE SANDERS (I-Vt.) won the state’s lone House seat in 1991 after serving eight years as mayor of Burlington, an executive post. (His did regularly contend with a legislative body, the Board of Aldermen, during meetings so contentious they were rightly dubbed the Monday Night Fights.) As a candidate last year, Gray said women face questions about youth and experience that male candidates don’t. She pointed out that Leahy was just 34 when he ran for the U.S. Senate. (He had been elected Chittenden County state’s attorney twice and had served eight years.) Gray, 37, grew up on a dairy farm in Newbury. A graduate of the University of Vermont and Vermont Law School, she worked for Welch and later the International Committee of the Red Cross. She then did human rights work in Europe and most recently spent three years as a Vermont assistant attorney general. She is also the niece of the late BILL GRAY, a former OLLY GRAY

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

AND I’M TRYING TO FOCUS ON THAT WORK. LT. GO V. MO L LY GR AY

TIM NEWCOMB

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I’M SO GRATEFUL TO BE ELECTED, TO BE SERVING,

U.S. attorney for Vermont. He was a wellrespected public figure who ran Leahy’s 1986 campaign, lost his own U.S. Senate bid in 1988 to then-Republican JIM JEFFORDS and was awaiting confirmation to a federal judgeship when he died of leukemia in 1994 at age 52. With those credentials, Gray, who had never run for political office and hadn’t voted in elections for 10 years until 2018, raised nearly half a million dollars in 2020 and drew support in her primary race from high-profile Democrats including former governors MADELEINE KUNIN and PETER SHUMLIN. She beat a solid Democratic field and defeated Republican SCOTT MILNE. Gray rejects the premise that a deep political background is needed to go to D.C. and had a ready answer to counter the argument. “I think we have a lot of incredibly qualified people here in the state that could do a lot of good work for Vermont in Washington, and I would like to say this: I hadn’t run for office before. I have a bit of a different path. We have a lot of Vermonters with different paths, and a lot of Vermonters

with incredible experience. And I think we need to see more people from more backgrounds, diverse backgrounds, running for office, engaging. That’s what’s going to make us stronger, more resilient in the future.” Welch was elected to Congress in 2006 after a lengthy career in the Vermont Senate. Prior to Welch and Sanders, PETER SMITH had served in the Vermont Senate and two terms as lieutenant governor before going to Washington. He also helped set up the Community College of Vermont and was its first president. JEFFORDS was elected to the House after serving as Vermont attorney general and one term in the state Senate. Gray agrees with others, including a group of prominent civic leaders, that Vermont, which has never sent a woman to Congress, should do so the next time there is an open seat. Gray said it is premature to discuss future candidacies for Congress, particularly since it is not clear when there will be an open seat. But unlike House Speaker JILL KROWINSKI (D-Burlington), another

next-generation Democratic leader who has said she would not be a federal candidate in 2022, Gray declined to take the idea off the table. “I’m just trying to exhale,” Gray said, citing the just-ended socially distanced legislative session and “a campaign that wasn’t easy, not only because it was a pandemic, but it was a tough campaign. I’m so grateful to be elected, to be serving, and I’m trying to focus on that work.”  If an opening occurs, “there’s a different conversation,” Gray said. “I don’t think it’s healthy for me personally to entertain hypotheticals because of what I want to do, what I want to do right here, right now,” she said. Voters lose, she said, when politicians are constantly looking ahead to the next election instead of focusing on the job at hand. According to the state Constitution, Gray’s $78,000-a-year job is limited to presiding over the Vermont Senate, breaking tie votes and serving on a panel that makes Senate committee assignments, as well as acting as Vermont’s chief executive when the governor is out of state and taking over


GOT A TIP FOR MARK? MJOHNSON@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Sunday, June 20th

The Windjammer Celebrates Dad! if the governorship becomes vacant. Like previous LGs — many of whom had political ambitions — Gray has used the largely ceremonial office to help raise her political profile. For example, during the session, Gray held seven Seat at the Table events on issues including climate change, broadband, and paid family and medical leave that a total of 500 people attended virtually. Gray said she provided the House and Senate leaders a report on recommendations made so that the events were more than listening sessions. This summer she’ll conduct a Recover Stronger Tour to ask people how Vermont should spend federal coronavirus relief funds. Are these forums thinly disguised campaign events, ways to build name recognition? “I don’t see it that way,” Gray said. Getting input on how to best spend coronavirus funds “is not going to happen through phone calls here to the Statehouse.”  Unlike some previous lieutenant governors, who’ve returned to the farm, a doctor’s office, airplane cockpit or car dealership when the legislative session ends, Gray has no second job or current plans to practice law, though she’s considering teaching classes at Vermont Law School in the fall. “Right now, we’ve been pretty 24-7,” she said, “I couldn’t imagine right now taking on another job.”  Only days earlier, Gray had returned from a weeklong visit to North Macedonia; Gov. PHIL SCOTT had declined to join Vermont National Guard officials because of his pandemic-related duties and recommended Gray. The focus was to expand on the decades-old military-tomilitary partnership to include economic opportunities between North Macedonia and Vermont. The state’s secretary of commerce and community development, LINDSAY KURRLE, also went. “They were just outstanding ambassadors for Vermont. There was no white space in the schedule,” Adj. Gen. GREG KNIGHT said. What Gray brought to the table, Knight said, was a legal background that could help facilitate ties with the Vermont Law School. Knight said Gray’s farming knowledge was helpful when discussions turned to food security. Gray’s “depth of experience was very helpful. These are things I don’t specialize in,” Knight said.

Since being sworn in, Gray has been peripatetic, including recent back-toback days when she highlighted the Click It or Ticket program alongside law enforcement and later attended a remembrance for GEORGE FLOYD, who was killed by a Minneapolis police officer. She has consistently promoted and visited vaccine sites; she got a shout-out along with other Vermont leaders from Leahy on the U.S. Senate floor Monday after the state reached the 80 percent threshold of residents vaccinated. Gray’s Twitter posts can be rah-rah and feel-good on issues such as expanded voter eligibility, but she’s also used social media to condemn threats to Roe v. Wade. During the session, she regularly pushed out press statements applauding the passage of a bill or the work of her Senate colleagues. One state senator grumbled that Gray sometimes appeared to try to take some credit for legislation she didn’t work or vote on. For example, Gray proclaimed she was “particularly proud to serve as Senate president” when senators endorsed constitutional amendments protecting reproductive rights and denouncing slavery. Gray noted she always had to be prepared in case of a tie vote. After we talked, Gray and I walked over to the ornate Senate chamber, where she needed to sign several bills before they went to the governor. She motioned me up to the podium, to show me the impersonality and challenge of moderating a session while looking at a big computer screen. (During Senate sessions, Gray presided in the chamber, but the senators Zoomed in from home.) Then she pulled up a small mat on the spot where the lieutenant governor stands, exposing a metal grate, and asked me what challenge it presented for a female lieutenant governor. My first thought was that the grate led to a legendary system of tunnels and ducts where politicians could secretly hear their opponents. Then Gray took off her shoe and showed me how the heel could get stuck in the metal grate — a problem she fixed with a small piece of plywood from Lowe’s.

POLITICS

Fully Charged

Here’s another potential nontraditional candidate who could be considered for Congress: MARY POWELL. The former CEO of Green Mountain Power thinks Leahy will run for reelection but said

she’d “absolutely” consider running if an opening occurred. “If I thought there was a big void and … if I ever felt like I was the one that had unique skills that we needed at a certain time and place, absolutely I would consider it. But I don’t see that happening in the next couple of years, frankly,” Powell told Fair Game. A lack of political experience, she said, wouldn’t be an impediment. “Our nation is rife with stories of Serving Dinner passionate people running” who never 11:00am – 8:00pm ran before, Powell said. Powell’s 12 years helming GMP won her praise nationally as well as at home for her leadership skills, out-of-the-box thinking and “customer-obsessed” focus. Her fans include environmentalist BILL MCKIBBEN, who told Vermont Business Magazine when she retired in 2019 that 862.6585 “you could count the forward-thinking 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington utility executives of America on the fingers WindjammerRestaurant.com of one finger. That would be Mary Powell.” During her time there, GMP divested its pension portfolios of fossil fuel stocks. It now sources all of its electricity from 8v-windjammer061621 1 6/11/21 renewable sources. Powell, 60, has been working on several clean energy projects and boards of directors since leaving GMP and may return to work full time.  “I’ve had a lot of chances over the last year and a half to get involved in things I find intellectually interesting and emotionally valuable. I’m just trusting the universe that I’m going to land where from 6/9 ad file:Headline “ my kind of fire-hose personality is of best wishes all the use,” sheEmeraldrose said. 

dads out there a happy fathers

Mediaday” Notes

VTDigger.org health care reporter KATIE copy can read “ we are fully JICKLING is moving on after a year and stocked come on in 10% off a half. She’ll pursue a master’s degree in theology Belgium then until in fathers day and when youa Fulbright-funded project in India next mention this ad” then the spring researching gender equity in bottomchurch. can be Jickling, the samewho hours the Protestant website previously workedect... at Seven Days, helped lead Digger’s coronavirus coverage. A recent investigative piece that detailed the abuse of students in Randolph by a vice principal was a prizeworthy tour de force. Meanwhile, SCOTT FLEISHMAN has left WCAX-TV after 11 years, primarily covering sports. He’ll be taking a public relations post at Gifford Health Care, a network of community health centers throughout central Vermont and the Upper Valley. m

4:22 PM

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news

MORE INSIDE

EMOTIONAL SCENE OUTSIDE RICE HIGH SCHOOL PAGE 19

LEGAL

WINOOSKI TEACHER DECRIES DISTRICT RACISM PAGE 21

OLIVER PARINI

State Officials, Advocates Prep for the End of the Eviction Moratorium B Y A NNE WA LL A C E A LLE N anne@sevendaysvt.com

The end is near for the eviction moratorium that has been in place since the start of the pandemic. On July 15, Vermont courts will allow pending eviction actions to go forward, meaning tenants can be ordered out for nonpayment of rent or other reasons. In cases in which a court had already ruled in favor of the landlord, tenants could be told to leave 14 days after Vermont’s state of emergency ends, said Grace Pazdan, an attorney with Vermont Legal Aid. FILE: KIM SCAFURO

ENVIRONMENT

Gypsy moth caterpillar

A Very Hungry Caterpillar After a 30-year lull, gypsy moths infest the Champlain Valley B Y A L ISON NOVAK • alison@sevendaysvt.com

I

n late May, Rachel Kring noticed a few fuzzy little caterpillars crawling around a table in her Hinesburg backyard. A few days later she went outside to find a dark swath of the insects clustered on the side of her house. Soon, hundreds of caterpillars were dropping from the branches of backyard trees, swinging from silken threads and feasting on leaves. In Essex, a similar scenario was playing out at ShawnnaLea Zemanek’s townhome: Just a few caterpillars on her trash and recycling bins at first, then a burst of hundreds on the exterior siding. She grabbed a hose to spray them off, but in minutes they were crawling back up. “Drowning them wasn’t even working,” she said. Kring and Zemanek aren’t the only ones under siege. In recent weeks, hordes of gypsy moth caterpillars have appeared on trees and backyards in the Champlain Valley. It’s been 30 years since the state has seen the species in such high volume, according to state entomologist Judy Rosovsky, who works in the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. 16

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“We’re in the middle of an outbreak,” said Rosovsky. “There’s no question about that.” She characterized the caterpillar infestation as “startling.” Last fall, there were reports of large numbers of gypsy moth egg masses, but “it wasn’t clear to us that

WE’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF AN OUTBREAK. THERE’S NO QUESTION ABOUT THAT. J UD Y R O S O VS K Y

it was going to be this bad, this soon,” she said. Similar outbreaks have been reported recently in upstate New York, central Pennsylvania and Ontario. Rosovsky attributes Vermont’s insect explosion to the absence of a caterpillarkilling fungus called Entomophaga maimaiga. The fungus, native to Japan, was accidentally introduced to the

Northeast in the late 1980s and quickly began devastating the moth. Fungal spores penetrate the moth larvae and, as the fungus grows, it devours the larvae from the inside out. But because of a prolonged period of dry weather, the water-loving fungus is “in a hunkered-down stage” and not proliferating, Rosovsky explained. She sees a link between the gypsy moth outbreak and climate change: Since she moved to Vermont in 1985, she said, there’s been a clear warming trend and an increase in hot, dry summers. Gypsy moth caterpillars — with their hairy bodies, yellow heads, and rows of red and blue spots — are “gross,” said Zemanek. They’re also voracious eaters that can strip trees bare. Their preferred meal is oak leaves, but they’ll feast on maples, pines and other species, too, according to Josh Halman, a forest health expert in the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. Defoliated trees lose the ability to A VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR

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Vermont’s state of emergency expired on Tuesday at midnight. A national eviction moratorium, established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is due to end June 30. It’s not clear how many people will be affected by the end of the eviction moratorium, which occurs as the state is scaling back a program that provides motel housing for the homeless. Renters have been told throughout the pandemic that, despite the moratorium, they were still accountable for paying rent, Josh Hanford, the state’s housing commissioner, said during Gov. Phil Scott’s regular COVID-19 briefing on Tuesday. “I don’t think this is a surprise; this has been in the works for months,” he said. He noted that Vermont has received millions of dollars in federal coronavirus relief money to help people pay their rent during the crisis. More than 20 local agencies are helping renters with translation services, landlord-tenant mediation and the technology needed to apply for aid, Hanford said. Vermont Legal Aid has received extra money this year to help prevent evictions, he added. “We feel we have the resources in place to help folks,” Hanford said. Housing advocates and lawyers have complained that the rental assistance process has been slow, hindering efforts to prevent eviction actions from being filed. m


Turtle Savior

Steve Parren looks back on three decades of conservation work

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BY A NN E WALL ACE ALLEN • anne@sevendaysvt.com

Single offices for remote work, with flexible terms and a great location. Approximately Tour the property on 1,600 sf with with a shared YouTube kitchenette and waiting room. Quick access to I-89, Burlington, Essex and Colchester. Property is on the bus line.

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undreds of turtles that ply Vermont’s woods and waterways have something in common: They were hand-raised in Steve Parren’s Monkton living room at some point during the 30 years when he ran Vermont’s Nongame and Natural Heritage Program. Parren, who retired May 8, is a biologist with an affinity for all species, including birds, reptiles and plants. And that extends to humans. He’s credited with helping his program win buy-in from policy makers who in the 1980s were largely unfamiliar with the idea of conserving nongame species in the interest of biodiversity. And his colleagues commend him for recruiting volunteers who still spend hundreds of hours monitoring the recovery of peregrine falcons and loons. Parren himself has been monitoring the Pond Brook wood turtle population near his home since 1984, hatching hundreds of turtles — and rehabilitating others — at home. The work has brought him a measure of fame in Vermont. “Steve has been instrumental in bringing about a transformation in the department and a public focus to the conservation needs of all species,” said Bob Popp, the state botanist at the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department and Parren’s colleague since the early 1990s. It’s not long ago that the state paid bounties for killing Vermont wildlife, including rattlesnakes, bobcats and birds of prey. The concept of nurturing an intact ecosystem that would enable all animals to survive started to get attention in the 1920s, said Fish & Wildlife biologist Jon Kart. “But there wasn’t a mechanism or entity whose real focus was: What is out there, how is it doing, and what can we do to help it?” Kart said. The Nongame and Natural Heritage Program was the answer. Public interest in the environment had been growing since the 1960s, and in the ’70s the Fish & Game Department was renamed Fish & Wildlife to reflect concern for the 99 percent of species not being fished or hunted. Vermont’s ecosystem includes more than 200 species of native mammals, birds, reptiles and fish. Fishing and hunting

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ENVIRONMENT

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ALL OF THE SPECIES DESERVE A LITTLE PIECE OF THE PIE.

THAT HAS BECOME MY PITCH. STE VE PAR R E N

license fees paid the department’s way back then. The Nongame and Natural Heritage Program documents the status of species and natural communities, information that guides Fish & Wildlife’s conservation efforts. It focuses on animals that are not hunted or fished and is charged with protecting the plants and animals on the state’s endangered species list, which includes eight amphibians and reptiles, 10 birds, eight mammals, and 150 plants. Parren spent hours of his own time, day and night, on the shores of Lake Champlain protecting the small populations of endangered nesting turtles, such as the eastern spiny softshell turtle. He put screens over their nests to keep predators out, fenced off areas where the nests were buried, and shot raccoons that were raiding the shoreline for turtle eggs. Although Parren’s living-room turtles get the most attention, said Kart, “there are thousands of hatchlings that survived because of what he did to keep those nesting areas safe.” TURTLE SAVIOR

STOP the cruel and indiscriminate use

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6/7/21 2:35 PM

of hounds to hunt bobcats, bears, and other

wildlife on Vermont’s National Wildlife REFUGE.

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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6/2/21 4:28 PM


news OLIVER PARINI

Jane Schlossberg

COURTESY OF JANE SCHLOSSBERG

A Very Hungry Caterpillar « P.16

photosynthesize their food, Halman explained. But that doesn’t mean they’re doomed to die. Since trees generate and store carbohydrates throughout the year, they have reserves they can draw from. It typically takes several years of defoliation to kill a tree. Since the caterpillars are chomping on leaves early in the growing season, there’s still time for the denuded trees to grow a second flush of leaves by midsummer, Halman said. The caterpillars’ leaf binge will only last another few weeks, he said. Then they’ll become pupae and transform into moths in August. The male moths “will fly around and drive everyone crazy,” while the females will lay anywhere from 600 to 1,000 eggs in tree bark in late August or early September, Rosovsky said. The egg clusters — oval-shaped beige masses with a hairy protective covering — will encase the eggs until the end of April, when they start hatching again. If homeowners spot the egg masses on their trees in the early fall, they can scrape them into a bucket of soapy water to kill them, Rosovsky said. Jane Schlossberg, who lives on 84 acres that straddle the St. George/Hinesburg town line, says the caterpillars have wreaked havoc on her property. They’ve stripped the leaves off the oaks and draped 18

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Gypsy moth caterpillars

themselves over the roof of her house. They also poop constantly. The caterpillar frass — little brownish-black pellets of chewed up leaves — sounds like rain as it falls from the trees. Caterpillars molt five or six times in their lifespan, shaking off bristles that float in the air like feathers and land on Schlossberg’s skin, causing a rash she likens to poison ivy. In search of ammunition against the pests, Schlossberg called University

of Vermont Extension entomologist Margaret Skinner. The bug expert recommended wrapping the base of the affected trees with burlap. The caterpillars now congregate there in writhing piles several inches thick, “like the ‘Twilight Zone,’” Schlossberg said. She pummels them to death with a rock, which she said gives her a macabre sense of satisfaction. Elsewhere in Hinesburg, Kring has been battling her infestation using another

tactic Skinner suggested. She wrapped her tree trunks with duct tape coated in petroleum jelly. The caterpillars gather near the tape and Kring brushes them into a bucket of soapy water. She’s also used a Shop-Vac to suck them up, which she said has provided entertainment for the neighbors. “We’re homeowners that are going to try to battle them, even if it’s futile,” Kring said. “I can’t just give up.” She said it seems like her dual strategies are reducing the number of caterpillars. In Essex, Zemanek has found some relief by spraying a mixture of soapy water and vinegar around the foundation and siding of her house. She recently saw a neighbor using an electric fly zapper to kill the caterpillars. State forestry workers are preparing to assess the damage. In July, Halman will conduct aerial surveillance from a small plane to see where defoliation has occurred. Combining that information with citizen reports will provide a clearer picture of the most affected areas. Next spring, foresters will wrap burlap around trees and later count the gypsy moth egg masses that accumulate under the cloth — one clue to the probability of widespread defoliation in 2023. Halman said it’s too early to predict what’s in store for next year, but the caterpillar clusters will likely return if conditions remain dry and the fungi stay dormant. If that’s the case, Rosovsky said, the state might help coordinate a spraying program for those communities hardest hit by the caterpillars; landowners would pay for it. A bacteria-based organic pesticide known as BTK (Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki) could be sprayed from a crop-dusting airplane on badly affected areas of the state soon after the gypsy moth caterpillars hatch next spring. In order to work, the bacteria must be sprayed when the caterpillars are less than half an inch long, meaning it would not be effective now, Halman said. The spraying approach was used several years ago when there was an outbreak of forest tent caterpillars in northern and central Vermont, he said. Those broader mitigation efforts are no solace for homeowners trying to manage the insects right now. Schlossberg worries that if drought conditions continue, gypsy moth outbreaks will become a regular occurrence. “This land is like my family. I nurture it. I love it. Seeing it go through this was a sad acceptance of what’s happening,” she said. “There’s not much I can do except crush as many of these buggers as I can.” m


Get lost in the moment and find your best self. EDUCATION

Rice High Students Say School Mishandled Complaints of Sexual Violence BY D E RE K B R O UW E R • derek@sevendaysvt.com

FILE: OLIVER PARINI

Several current and former students stood outside Rice Memorial High School on June 9 to protest the school’s response to sexual misconduct. Leading the rare public display at the private Catholic school were young women, including a rising senior, a recent graduate and a 2020 graduate, who each said they’d been sexually assaulted or harassed by fellow students on and off campus in recent years. They said administrators mishandled and downplayed their reports and, in at least one case, assigned a student to the same classroom as the young man she had reported as assaulting her.

Maddie Goddard (left) and Hannah Sheppard speaking with Rice Memorial High School principal Lisa Lorenz

“Jesus would not turn his back on a victim in the way the administration has,” they wrote in a letter to school officials. Administrators dispute the students’ claims. The students, joined by some peers and a couple of parents, bore messages on cardboard signs and T-shirts in hopes of pressuring Rice to confront what they say is an ongoing problem. Samantha Morgan, a 2020 graduate, connected the issue to the Catholic Church’s decades-long practice of burying child abuse claims against clergy: “Just because Popes cover up violence doesn’t mean Rice should,” her sign read. Hannah Sheppard, who had graduated just days before, wore a T-shirt with the message “I’m taking back what they stole from me ... MYSELF” on the back. Sheppard and Morgan both said they alerted school officials to different instances of misconduct by the same classmate, only to be let down by administrators. Morgan said they interviewed her regarding her report during her sophomore year that the classmate had groped her in a school stairwell, but took no action. She later heard that school leaders seemed to have accepted his explanation that it was an accident. Sheppard told her guidance counselor that the same boy had assaulted her off

campus in 2017, when she was a first-year, she said. The following school year, she walked into a class and discovered that he was also enrolled. She immediately walked out, went to the office and asked why he was there. School leaders told Sheppard it was a mistake — and that to fix it, she would have to drop the class. “I didn’t feel safe at school,” Sheppard said. “I feel I want to stand up for other girls that don’t feel safe at school, and something needs to change for them.” A rising Rice senior, Maddie Goddard, said a classmate touched her inappropriately on campus. She didn’t report it to school officials because she knew how they’d handled Sheppard’s report. “I don’t feel anything is going to be done,” she said. Minutes after the protest began, Rice principal Lisa Lorenz walked over and spoke with Goddard and Sheppard. Sheppard could be heard crying as she explained why they were there. She also handed Lorenz the group’s two-page letter. “It’s not just you,” she told the principal, “It’s everyone in the school.” The pair hugged. Lorenz declined an interview request but emailed a statement defending the school’s response to sexual misconduct allegations. Rice thoroughly investigated each complaint in compliance with “strict protocols,” the statement read, while noting that the process “can often leave one party dissatisfied with outcomes.” “However, dissatisfaction with the outcome should not be equated with ignoring the complaint,” the statement read. “I can assure everyone that any allegation of misconduct is addressed with the utmost seriousness.” In their joint letter, the students described school administrators as sweeping sexual misconduct under the rug in order to preserve the school’s public image. Some of the students they accused of misconduct have since been chosen for public accolades, several of the students said. The topic gets little to no attention in the school curriculum, they said, even after a former teacher was charged for taking “upskirt” photos of a student and colleagues in 2018. m Sasha Goldstein contributed reporting.

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news Meanwhile, his skill with the human species helped him navigate a shifting public policy ecosystem to ensure his program’s survival. Parren was a key advocate for the Vermont conservation license plate, established in 1995, and the donation checkoff on income tax forms, established in 1986. Both raise money for the program. “Steve fought and pushed and collaborated in many ways to make sure his program was doing cutting-edge science, was getting that information out to the public and to elected officials and other decision makers,” said Kart, “and stood behind his division even when attacked by folks that didn’t like the implications of his findings.” Those were the days when species protection halted the construction of hydroelectric dams out West, noted Sally Laughlin, who cofounded the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and who worked closely with Parren for decades as a citizen member of the state’s endangered species committee, which advises the secretary of natural resources on whether to list or delist endangered species. Such construction holdups prompted a wave of anti-conservation sentiment everywhere, including Vermont. Parren steered the program through a half dozen administrations in Vermont. Their enthusiasm for endangered-species work varied. “Good intentions and enthusiasm and even biological skills are not the only thing you need to have a successful nongame program and endangered species program,” said Laughlin. “It had to run through public hearings and the various state requirements, and Steve set it up so it ran smoothly. And we didn’t just list a species; we developed a recovery program.” He said he learned how to explain the value of saving a little-known species to people who hadn’t thought through the overall benefits. “It’s like the rivets in the plane,” Parren said. “You lose a couple of rivets, the plane is probably still going to fly. You lose too many, and you’re going to have a bad landing.” Some opponents worried that by focusing on nongame species, the state would stop protecting the population of game species such as deer, moose and bear, Parren said. But he doesn’t think that happened. It’s all about perspective, he noted. “People care about wildlife. But if you’re making a living off the land, you 20

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Turtle Savior « P.17

Steve Parren checking his game camera near the stream behind his home in Monkton

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have to make different decisions,” he said. “A farmer is going to mow his fields; that’s how they make a living. You have to respect that.” Parren, who grew up in Suffield, Conn., earned a bachelor’s degree in natural resources conservation. He headed west to work with seals in Alaska, and then to Washington State for a job with the Forest Service. He returned to the Northeast for a master’s degree program at the University of Vermont in 1979, joined Fish & Wildlife in 1987, and became head of the Nongame and Natural Heritage Program in 1991. It’s now part of the state’s Wildlife Diversity Program. Now that he’s retired, he’s not sure what his next move is going to be. He’s enjoying

the break from work, though he still checks in on the Pond Brook turtles. Both of Parren’s daughters grew up helping with turtle protection, and one of them, Molly Parren, is now a biologist who works for the American Turtle Observatory, a network of turtle scientists based in New Salem, Mass. She and her father coauthored a scientific paper about turtle hatchlings in Vermont that was recently published in the journal Herpetological Conservation & Biology. Molly said she was just a child in 2003 when Vermont Fish & Wildlife seized 20 turtles that had been illegally trafficked. Officials asked the Parren family to care for most of them until they could be released back into the wild. “It was so fun for me,” she said from Massachusetts, where she was doing fieldwork on a turtle project. “I made a spreadsheet of turtles with their names,

which was great training for becoming a biologist later on. Who knew there were so many spreadsheets involved?” Laughlin said that despite early struggles, the program’s goals have been accepted widely in Vermont for at least a decade. And the public is noticing results. Osprey and peregrine falcon numbers were so perilously low in the 1980s that it was unclear whether they could recover, Kart said. By 2005 they had been taken off Vermont’s endangered species list. And this year, the bald eagle is expected to be delisted as well. But the work is far from over. Vermont keeps the location of the state’s two remaining rattlesnake population centers, in Rutland County, under wraps so that the snakes, which are on the state’s endangered list, aren’t harmed. The department passes out refrigerator magnets to people who live near rattlesnakes with the phone numbers of trusted members of the public who can return snakes to the wild. “We have a wonderful life and landscape here in Vermont,” said Parren. “All of the species deserve a little piece of the pie. That has become my pitch.” m


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EDUCATION

One of Winooski’s Only Black Teachers Resigns, Calls Out Culture of Racism B Y A L I SON NOVAK • alison@sevendaysvt.com FILE: JAMES BUCK

Citing the Winooski School District’s “white supremacist culture” and a lack of support, Thierry Mugabo Uwilingiyimana — the only Black middle and high school teacher in the most diverse school district in Vermont — announced his resignation last week. In an email to superintendent Sean McMannon, middle school principal Kate Grodin and high school principal Jean Berthiaume, Uwilingiyimana wrote that after three years of teaching in Winooski, district leaders “have made it impossible for me to stay.” The science and engineering teacher called out the culture in the school district, which he said was not “overt racial prejudice” but “racism that is hidden in plain sight.” “It looks like a district that is majority People of Color but entirely led by a white leadership team that resisted for decades to reflect that diversity. A leadership that would rather talk about diversity than be diversified,” he wrote. “It looks like a district in which most of the underpaid and overworked staff are [Black, Indigenous, people of color], with the most highly paid at the top.” In an interview, Uwilingiyimana elaborated on his discontent. During the early days of the pandemic, teachers were allowed to work from home while lower-paid support staff were made to do in-person work such as delivering supplies and meals to families. He said that when he spoke out about this, he was formally reprimanded by the school district, and a letter was placed in his personnel file. Uwilingiyimana started at the Winooski School District with no teaching experience. While he said he was assigned a mentor during his first year on the job, there was no designated time for that person to observe him teaching and to give him feedback. “I was not supported in becoming a lifelong teacher,” he wrote in his letter. “As a Black male teacher, the only one in the district, I should have been a top priority for retention.” He cited the statistic that only 2 percent of all teachers in the U.S. are Black men. In contrast, more than half of Winooski’s student body is BIPOC. Uwilingiyimana said he was rebuffed this year after suggesting that Winooski hire a new director of equity and antiracism to sit on the district’s leadership team — a position Uwilingiyimana said “is desperately needed to tackle the very issues that have historically harmed all of our students.” He noted that less diverse districts in the state have recently hired equity directors. “Ultimately, the only way to bring about the changes we need is for BIPOC people to have more power which

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Thierry Mugabo Uwilingiyimana at an event last summer

means you need to cede your power,” Uwilingiyimana wrote. McMannon said he could not comment on Uwilingiyimana’s resignation because it was a personnel issue. Several board members also declined to comment. Uwilingiyimana broke the news of his resignation in a letter to his middle and high school students last week. “I have done my part to make good trouble at Winooski,” he wrote. “I have spoken the truth, even when it was hard. That didn’t always make me friends. I have been punished for the way I fought for justice instead of joining hands with me to further the cause of justice. I have had to stand alone many times, but I also knew that I was on the right side of history and that gave me courage.” Uwilingiyimana is the rare teacher in Vermont who has a personal story that overlaps with many students of color in the district. Civil war and genocide forced his family to leave their home country of Rwanda when he was 6, and he spent six years as a refugee in Congo and Zambia before settling in Buffalo, N.Y. He was one of just a few Black students to attend a Jesuit college preparatory high school there and, with the help of scholarships, attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. Before becoming a teacher in Winooski, Uwilingiyimana worked as a software engineer and for several educational startups. Uwilingiyimana told students that he would look for a job as a software engineer and spend time in the evenings and on weekends helping to support them. “I plan to continue to work with and for you and your families to get organized, help your parents understand the school system, and make plans to get you what you need to succeed,” he wrote. m

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WEEK IN REVIEW

FEED back « P.7

Charlie Messing

BURLINGTON

So, I would urge Edgar and Seven Days to caution readers that 60-year-old memories from the age of 3 are, at the least, questionable, and it would be interesting to ask Labelle how and when she came to recall the alleged abuse. Mark Pendergrast

COLCHESTER

MEMORY CHECK

“‘My Life Was Totally Destroyed,’” by Chelsea Edgar [May 26], covers the passage of S.99, a bill that lifts the statute of limitations on lawsuits arising from childhood physical abuse. I will not argue for or against the statute here, but I want to urge skepticism about the memories of Maura Labelle, whose quote about her destroyed life was in the headline.

SENSITIVE SUBJECT

[Re “Opposite Sides of the Street,” June 2]: My school’s social studies curriculum focused largely on race and racism this year. We had many important conversations with the kids and as a staff. Racism is a critical factor in U.S. history, and if you don’t think it still has a serious impact on people, like those at the grange hall meet-

Katherine A. Collins

BARRE

NEW PARKWAY PLAN

[Re “‘Right Way’ or the Highway,” May 26]: An activist is “a person who campaigns to bring about political or social change.” Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, Public Works Director Chapin Spencer and many who work for Burlington are also activists, trying to convert this city into one that works their way — encouraging new businesses with plenty of construction and, usually, avoiding too much community feedback. The Champlain Parkway may look great on paper, but it’s not what people want. The Pine Street Coalition, which opposes the project, is composed of experts, and they’re having trouble getting city hall to listen to reason. This highway was designed for increased car traffic through town, and things have changed in the decades since. “This administration has a pragmatic, problem-solving approach,” Spencer said, adding, “The city has a strong record of trying to do what the Pine Street Coalition is now asking for.” This implies that the two groups have relatively identical goals. But the materials provided by the “Champlain RIGHTway” project prove that it’s cheaper, safer and solves more problems. This is also a pragmatic, problem-solving approach. Mark Hughes of the Vermont Racial Justice Alliance says the new design is far more acceptable; it would not continue the tradition of making things difficult for 22

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views on race, rather than focus on their actions, does students a disservice. Reading the student body president’s (admittedly lighthearted) comment that “Most white adults don’t know how to talk about racism at all” was disheartening. Many white adults are trying really hard to get better at having these conversations. Between conservatives who bemoan/ threaten to legislate any conversation about race and “woke” students poised to pounce on a problematic comment, it’s a tough job! Andrew Diemar

WINOOSKI

Diemar is a middle school teacher.

CRITICAL RACE THEORY IS ‘TOXIC’

FILE: JAMES BUCK

are also concerned or affected — to file a complaint. Complainants should request anonymity. 2. Most states, including Vermont, have laws regarding length of tether, outdoor shelter requirements, water, etc. 3. Familiarize yourself with these laws and local dog licensing requirements so you are fully informed before speaking with authorities. Rabies vaccination is also a state law and is required for licensing. (Municipal dog licensing ordinances can be found via the town clerk, selectboard, mayor’s office, town website, etc.) 4. If authorities do visit the owner, they will at least be told that a complaint has been received and Vermont has laws to protect dogs. Based on my experience, proceeding in this manner is the best way to hopefully help the dog and resolve the issue.

poor people. Highways were often situated in the middle of BIPOC neighborhoods. That became a major problem, and this new highway should not continue that.

Ellie Martin speaking at the Essex Center Grange Hall

In 1961, she lived at St. Joseph’s Orphanage for a brief six months when she was 3 years old, a time in life when few people can recall anything, during the period of “infantile amnesia.” Consequently, it is doubtful that the 3-year-old Labelle was really rowed into Lake Champlain in the middle of the night by a nun who threw a “small bundle” (body) overboard and warned, “This could happen to you.” Labelle may well believe these “memories” with all her heart, but she most likely came to envision them under the influence of therapy, or she was inspired to envision them by other stories of real orphanage abuse. In my 2017 book, Memory Warp, I wrote about such possibly illusory abuse memories and how they are created.

ing, you’re probably underinformed (and white). But issues arise when teachers and students, often with the best intentions, mischaracterize the role of race here. The grange hall speakers are right, even if they don’t seem to understand critical race theory: Students shouldn’t feel ashamed for being white. It wasn’t all white people’s fault that George Floyd got killed. (I’m sure many white people know, for the first time, how it feels to get personally blamed for the actions of some members of their race.) Students shouldn’t see U.S. history as merely a lesson in shameful racism. Abraham Lincoln, George Washington and even Martin Luther King Jr. were all flawed men who did admirable things, but for educators to reduce them to their

[Re “Unplanned Lesson,” June 9]: Critical race theory is a toxic concept that teaches Black youth that they are and always will be victims and shouldn’t even try to reach for the better life that has been available to every American who really wants it. According to CRT, things like logic, math, science, work ethic and success are all white supremacist ideas and thus to be rejected. It’s the soft racism of low expectations. Your article states that “Black, lowincome, special education and Englishlearning students are not doing as well academically as their peers ... Advanced Placement and honors classes at the high school were disproportionately made up of white students.” And you believe telling POC students that they have no chance to get into those AP classes and receive those honor student certificates will improve things? How about ramping up the quality of our education system instead? How about teaching our students about the many Black Americans who accomplished amazing things, such as Alexander Twilight, the first African American to be elected to the Vermont House in 1836? There are thousands more like him, then and now. Our educators could use those stories to instill in Black students a sense of pride and hope for their own future. Instead, the left is perpetuating an atmosphere of helplessness and disempowerment. The goal: to get more and more Americans on the dole and make them believe they’re powerless without Uncle Sam. This is how our liberties die, not with a bang but with a whimper. Shannara Johnson

MORRISVILLE


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lifelines

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

OBITUARIES Martha Kimball

and were affectionately referred to as the “Seaver twins.” During college, Marty dated an old classmate of Anne’s from Melrose, Army corporal Richard “Dick” Kimball. The combination of Dick’s charm, his uniform and his ability to procure inexpensive cigarettes from the PX was the magic elixir that led to a wonderful life together of more than 60 years. The two raised their children at their home in Lexington, Mass., and at camp at Spalding’s

Bay in Colchester, Vt. As empty nesters, they went on vacations to Florida and the Caribbean when they wanted to get warm and to Europe when they wanted to get cultured. Marty doted on her children, packing their school lunches before getting herself off to work, preparing supper (including dessert), washing their sheets on Thursdays (the days the kids didn’t have to make their beds), etc., etc. Fortunately, her children were visual, not tactile, learners and after years of observation were able to fend for themselves upon reaching adulthood. On weekends, she took her kids to pick berries behind the school, to catch pollywogs at the swamp, and to the ocean, where she allowed them to take home seashells and seaweed. And she took them to just about every historical site in Massachusetts and Vermont. As a grandmother, Marty played board games, card games, video games, Ping-Pong, badminton and virtually anything else her grandkids asked her

to play. She attended every sporting event and school event possible while splitting her time between Vermont and Massachusetts. The adoration and admiration between the two generations was mutual. With a friendly smile and kind words, Marty brightened the days of those she crossed paths with on Beach Road, Gleason Road and every road she ever traversed. She constantly lent a helping hand, providing meals, delivering flowers, and driving old friends and new acquaintances to appointments around town. Martha (how she was known in Lexington) was a member of Pilgrim Congregational Church for over 50 years, where she was actively involved with the Mission Committee, leader of the Care Committee, and the driving force behind the church becoming an Open and Affirming congregation. Marty is survived by her son Bob Kimball and his wife, Krissie; son Tom Kimball; and daughter Emily Collins

and her husband, Tom. She is survived by grandchildren Tom Kimball and his wife, Perry; Amanda Clere and her husband, James; Rick Lania and his wife, Abby; Tony Lania and his fiancé, Arley Donovan; and Bobby Lania; as well as great-grandchildren Will and Katie Clere, and Martha Kimball; and ”my friend Norm” Pellerin, who was kind and devoted to Marty after her return to Vermont. She also leaves many nieces and nephews and their spouses; grandnieces and grand-nephews and their spouses; and greatgrand-nieces and greatgrand-nephews, all of whom she loved with all her heart. She was predeceased by her husband, Dick, and her son Kenny. A celebration of Marty’s life will be held at a later time. Contributions may be made in Marty’s memory to Esperanza-Hope for the Children, Inc., 19 W. View Lane, Stow, MA 01775, or to Pathways Vermont, 50 Main St., #127, Winooski, VT 05404.

loving aunts, uncles, cousins and close friends in the music community.

Rob was a true Renaissance man — he loved nature, music, art and sports, and he delivered outstanding service as a master meat cutter in area grocery store meat departments throughout his work life. He was a terrific actor and singer who was a regular player for Burlington’s Lyric Theatre Company in the 1980s and ‘90s. He was an accomplished sailor and never happier than when out on Lake Champlain in his sailboat. He was an avid birdwatcher whose “life list” included hundreds of birds that he hiked out to see at his favorite places. He was

a talented woodcarver and delighted his family and friends with gifts of carved and painted birds, sea creatures and other animals. He painted landscapes and animals in his living room, surrounded by his collection of antique decoys and guitars. Rob played for over 30 years in bands around the east coast of Lake Champlain, most notably with the Mighty Loons, Yankee Pot Roast and, until his passing, with the Decoys, with whom he played guitar, bass, banjo and accordion. Rob has left the Decoys with some of their best songs, which he wrote and

sang: “Milton,” “Bat Actors,” “Rose My Winter Rose” and “North Sound” are just a few in that legacy. In addition to his loving family, Rob leaves his bandmate and best friend of 33 years, Bones Blankinship, who will make sure that Rob’s songs are remembered and played. A memorial service will be held at a later date in Weston, Vt. Donations can be made in Robert’s memory to a memorial fund with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention at afsp. donordrive.com/campaign/ robert-root-memorial-fund.

JANUARY 12, 1932JUNE 7, 2021 COLCHESTER, VT. Martha “Marty” (Seaver) Kimball, 89, daughter of William and Inez (Waite) Seaver and a beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, exhibiting fortitude to the end, passed away at camp on June 7, 2021. Marty was raised in Melrose, Mass., and followed in her oldest sister Priscilla’s footsteps to Mount Holyoke College, graduating in 1953. The sisters had emulated their trailblazing mother, who left the family farm in Woodstock, Vt., and later graduated from Mount Holyoke in 1916. Marty lost Priscilla much too soon, in 1969, but was fortunate to have had her cherished older sister Anne in her life for over 80 years. As adults, their five-year age difference seemed more like five minutes, as they spent countless hours together

Robert Root

OCTOBER 25, 1961JUNE 2, 2021 COLCHESTER, VT. Robert (Rob) Moffette Root of Colchester, Vt., passed away on June 2, 2021, at the age of 59. The loving son of the late Robert and Polly Root, Robert was the beloved brother of Caroline (George) Tirabassi and Deborah (Andrew) Jorgensen; the beloved uncle of Kristin (Jason), George (Caitlan), Polly (Chris) and Laura (Nicholas); and the greatuncle of Oliver, Jackson, Brindley, Lillian and Anders; he is also survived by many

READ, POST, SHARE + COMMENT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LIFELINES 24

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

IN MEMORIAM

Connie Marshall

1948-2019 To my dearest Connie, I miss you every day and can’t believe you won’t be here for the rest of my life. I never dreamed you would die at just the age of 71. My prayer will always be that I will be with you someday in some way. So much love, Mary and your entire family, who will continue to cherish all of our many memories of you

Billie Tudhope

1932-2021 The Memorial Service will be held on Wednesday, July 7, 2021, at 11 a.m. in Hyde Cemetery, West Shore Rd., North Hero, VT. In case of rain, North Hero Methodist Church.


OBITUARIES Terrence Dinnan

Terry was active artistically as a photographer and sculptor after college, especially in Winooski. He participated in several international art symposiums, including projects in Belgium and Japan. Terry and Marty met working at Free Mountain Toys. They were married at their house on Valentine’s Day 1986, and their daughter, Tai, was born later that year. Upon entering fatherhood, Terry’s work shifted to stone masonry. He and his partner, Al Ulmer, purchased a quarry in Essex, N.Y., and used its limestone for their projects, which included exterior walls, patios and fireplaces. In 2020, Terry sold the quarry to Champlain

Area Trails, donating his portion. The property is within walking distance of the ferry and is open to the public. Terry thrived during retirement. He had time to do what he loved: taking as much time as he wanted to creatively solve problems and build useful things in a beautiful way. He managed the house and property and pursued personal interests, including making cheese, wine, bread and wooden bowls. Terry’s last three years were brightened by the regular presence of his grandson, whom he cared for three days a week. Terry was predeceased by his brother, Jim. Terry is survived by his daughter, Tai Illick Dinnan (Evan Webster), and adored grandson, Lior. He is also survived by siblings Mary (Jan), Chris (Carie), Deb, and Jed (Karen), and by many cousins, nieces and nephews. A celebration of the lives of Terry and Marty will be held on August 14 at Shelburne Farms. To learn more and RSVP, please visit illickdinnan.wixsite.com/ my-site/rsvp.

of Shelburne Spinners, Free Mountain Toys and Earth’s Best Baby Food. Marty and Terry met working at Free Mountain Toys. They were married at their house on Valentine’s Day 1986, and their daughter, Tai, was born later that year. For the past two decades, Marty worked as executive director of the Lewis Creek Association, preserving and protecting precious waters and land. Marty’s work serves as a model for watershed associations across the state. She also served on

the Charlotte Selectboard, the Charlotte Planning Commission, the Charlotte Land Trust, the Vermont Natural Resources Board, and many other boards and commissions. Marty loved tending her homestead and the river that ran through it. She loved growing, preparing and sharing the bounty of her gardens. Her last three years were brightened and invigorated by the regular presence of her grandson, whom she cared for three days a week. She leaves an active legacy of conservation and passion for living close to the land. Marty is survived by her daughter, Tai Illick Dinnan (Evan Webster), and adored grandson, Lior. She is also survived by siblings Ginny Jaskot (Ken), Scilla Siano (Jim) and John Illick Jr. (Beth), and by many cousins, nieces and nephews. A celebration of the lives of Marty and Terry will be held on August 14, 2021, at Shelburne Farms. To learn more and RSVP, please visit illickdinnan.wixsite.com/ my-site/rsvp.

FEBRUARY 22, 1950APRIL 19, 2021 CHARLOTTE, VT. Terry Dinnan and his wife, Marty, died April 19, 2021, in a boating accident by their house on Lewis Creek in Charlotte, Vt. Terry, son of Eleanor and John Dinnan, was born on February 22, 1950, in Meriden, Conn. Terry grew up roaming the rural Connecticut woods with his siblings and friends, laying the foundation for his love of Vermont and his home on the river. Terry was an excellent student, good athlete and steadfast friend. He graduated from Cheshire High School in 1968. Terry began college at the University of Vermont, transferred to Boston University for one year, and then decided Vermont was the right place. He graduated from UVM in 1973 with degrees in psychology and fine arts. During his junior year at UVM, he started a long artistic relationship with mentor and friend Paul Aschenbach.

Martha Illick

AUGUST 31, 1950APRIL 19, 2021 CHARLOTTE, VT. Marty Illick and her husband, Terry, died April 19, 2021, in a boating accident by their house on Lewis Creek in Charlotte, Vt. Marty, daughter of Rowland and Edith Illick, was born on August 31, 1950, in Middlebury, Vt. Rowland’s work as a geography professor led to frequent travel for the family, including two years living in Beirut, Lebanon. Marty graduated from Middlebury Union High School in 1968 and from Hartwick College in Oneonta, N.Y., in 1972 with a degree in cultural anthropology. She spent her winter term of senior year in Togo, West Africa, studying the village market system for her thesis. Marty’s personality was punctuated by smiles, unique exclamations and a hearty, infectious laugh. She was curious, compassionate and drawn to treading lightly upon this Earth. She thrived working in the Vermont creative startup atmospheres

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BOTTOM LINE BY KEN PICARD

Elevated Anxieties A tough year of business for US Sherpa is bookended by a COVID-19 wave in Nepal

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ngyel Sherpa knows a lot of people in high places. The 41-year-old businessman is founder and CEO of US Sherpa, a Williston-based Himalayan trekking company and supplier of Nepali-made apparel and accessories. US Sherpa employs four people in Vermont and supports more than 300 artisans in Nepal, including several members of Sherpa’s extended family. A common surname in Nepal, the word Sherpa also refers to an ethnic group from the Himalayan region known for its mountaineering ability. Ongyel Sherpa was born in Nepal’s capital of Kathmandu and raised in Khumjung, a small village in northeastern Nepal at an altitude of 12,300 feet. Living and working at such elevations can bring many hazards, including sudden storms, rock slides and the perils of guiding climbers up some of the world’s tallest peaks. In April 2014, Sherpa’s cousin, Chhiring Ongchu Sherpa, was among 15 Nepali guides killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest. But Ongyel Sherpa, his family and the business that’s become their lifeline now face another daunting threat — a second wave of the coronavirus that is sweeping through Nepal. The nation of 30 million people has recorded more than 600,000 COVID-19 cases and more than 8,300 deaths, but experts believe the actual toll is much higher, according to a May story in the New York Times. As hundreds of thousands of Nepali workers return home from neighboring India, which itself is being ravaged by the disease, they are straining Nepal’s already beleaguered health care system. “Right now, my big concern is Nepal,” Sherpa said in a recent phone interview. “It’s very, very scary.” A series of fortuitous events in 1998 helped land Sherpa in Vermont. At the time, he was 18 and still living in Khumjung. Hoping to help support his family, he went to another village to interview for a job that would take him to Japan. But by the time he arrived, all the positions had been filled. Crestfallen, Sherpa returned home, only to answer a phone call later that day from Dr. Geoff Tabin, an ophthalmologist then based in Burlington. Tabin is cofounder and chair of the Himalayan Cataract Project, which works in some of the world’s poorest countries to prevent and reverse treatable blindness. One of Sherpa’s uncles had guided Tabin, an accomplished mountain climber, up Everest in 1988. A decade later, the 26

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

A mountain trek guided by US Sherpa

I’M GIVING MY ENTIRE ENERGY TO

SOMETHING I TRULY LOVE. ON GYEL S H E R PA

physician returned to Nepal and was working in a nearby eye clinic when he called Sherpa’s family to say that he had brought them a gift. Sherpa’s father invited his son to come with him to pick it up. Sherpa was shy at the time and could speak little English. But, he recalled, “the moment we met, [Tabin] was very energetic [and] very positive.” The young man told the physician that he hoped to visit America one day. “Going to the U.S. was beyond my imagination,” he added. On the spot, Tabin invited Sherpa to come to Vermont and help take care of his kids, then wrote him a sponsorship letter so he could obtain a visa. Sherpa arrived in Burlington in April 1998, overwhelmed by his unexpected good fortune. As he put it, “I felt like I was one out of a million people.” Tabin’s family welcomed the Nepali teen like one of their own, Sherpa recalled. Though he had expected his visit would be temporary, Sherpa soon began attending Burlington High School and eventually graduated from Rice Memorial High School. In 2005, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Champlain College, becoming the first member of his family to obtain a college education.

Ongyel Sherpa

That same year, Sherpa launched US Sherpa to help support his family and share Nepali culture with Americans. The business has two components: guided mountain treks in Nepal, and the sale of items such as hats, gloves, slippers, scarves, tote bags and blankets, all handmade in Nepal using traditional methods and materials. In 2012, Sherpa devoted himself to the business full time and now sells his products in hundreds of stores nationwide, including the Vermont Country Store, Outdoor Gear Exchange, Phoenix Books, and the Peace & Justice Store in Burlington. Amy Crosswhite, the Peace & Justice Center’s fair trade store and program manager, explained that many customers are tourists who chance upon the shop and are unaware of its social justice mission.

US Sherpa, she said, perfectly aligns with the store’s educational aim to help patrons shop with global impacts in mind. “We tend to have quite a lot of vendors, but we have a strong relationship with Ongyel and US Sherpa,” Crosswhite added. “And their stuff sells well.” “I’m giving my entire energy to something I truly love,” Sherpa said. His company’s products “really show where we come from and who we are.” But the pandemic has been a treacherous journey for the business. US Sherpa’s artisans have had trouble accessing raw materials, and widespread store closures in the U.S. last year forced the company to scale back production by about 20 percent, Sherpa said. With fewer planes flying internationally, shipping costs nearly doubled, while delays at U.S. Customs in New York City hampered the arrival of goods to American retailers. The financial hardships were further compounded by widespread postponements and cancellations of guided mountain treks. Normally, Sherpa returns to Nepal twice a year. In 2020, he made the trip just once, in February and early March — at the start of the pandemic. When he returned again this March, Sherpa noticed that tourism was still down dramatically. Last year, US Sherpa received a small Paycheck Protection Program loan, as well as some state assistance; Sherpa declined to say how much he received. But his company used the downtime to rebrand and launch a new logo, which is composed of two mountain shapes: Mount Everest on the top and Mount Mansfield on the bottom. The blue center symbolizes US Sherpa — “The place,” Sherpa explained, “where the Himalayas and Green Mountains overlap.” In recent weeks, Nepal has eased some of its pandemic restrictions, allowing international visitors to return to the country in time for mountaineering season. While this is good news for US Sherpa and its Nepali craftspeople, Sherpa knows that the pandemic is far from over. He’s hoping that some of Vermont’s recent good fortune in overcoming COVID-19 will soon extend to his home country and its people. m

INFO Learn more at ussherpa.com. Bottom Line is a series on how Vermont businesses are faring during the pandemic. Got a tip? Email bottomline@sevendaysvt.com.


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6/15/21 11:04 AM


KICKED to the Curb

After a year in hotels, homeless Vermonters prepare to live in tents and cars

S TO RY BY C H E L S E A E D G A R chelsea@sevendaysvt.com P H O TO S BY JAME S B U C K

That car is all I’ve got. My ticket to work, my house, everything. NO R MA C US H ING

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lmost every morning, from around 2:30 a.m. until the sun comes up, Norma Cushing stands in the parking lot of the Holiday Inn on Dorset Street in South Burlington, keeping watch over her gray Hyundai Sonata. Cushing is 54, with silver-flecked brown hair and a smattering of freckles across her nose; at the start of the pandemic, she was laid off from her job at Vermont Tent Company. The Holiday Inn has been Cushing’s home for the past eight months. Before that, she told me, she was living out of the Sonata, sleeping in parking garages and at highway rest stops. At the end of this month, when the Holiday Inn stops accepting state vouchers, Cushing will go back to living in her sedan. Recently, she said, there’s been a rash of car break-ins at the hotel, and she wants to make sure hers is safe. 28

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

“People are getting desperate,” she said. To reduce crowding in shelters at the onset of the pandemic, Vermont officials contracted with nearly 75 lodging establishments across the state, including the Holiday Inn, to house almost anyone below a certain income threshold. The undertaking was a massive expansion of a long-standing program that provides motel rooms to people experiencing homelessness. Before the pandemic, the state might have paid for rooms for up to 2,500 households a year; over the past 15 months, the state has used federal relief funds to shelter a total of nearly 6,000 households in motels, with no restriction on the duration of their stay. Vermont’s response has been lauded nationally as an epidemiological and humanitarian feat. In the early months of the pandemic, the infection rate among the state’s unhoused population was less than 1 percent, compared to a 25 percent average infection rate among the homeless

nationwide, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since March 2020, the state Department of Health has documented fewer than 25 cases of COVID-19 in Vermont’s shelters, with no reported deaths. But at the beginning of this month, the Vermont Department for Children and Families, which directs the motel voucher program, enacted more restrictive guidelines to limit the number of people who are eligible for rooms; on July 1, anyone housed in the motels who doesn’t meet the new criteria will be forced to leave. Certain groups — adults 60 and older, households with children, and people who are pregnant or disabled — will be able to remain in the motels until mid-September, after which federal support may or may not continue, depending on the state of the pandemic. Everyone else, an estimated third of the roughly 2,300 people now living in the motels, will be kicked out. Cushing doesn’t

meet any of the new criteria; hence, her vigil. “That car is all I’ve got,” she said. “My ticket to work, my house, everything.” Public health experts and housing advocates have sharply criticized the end of the universal voucher program. “We have to ask ourselves whether the only policy option in front of us is returning a large part of our unhoused population to literal homelessness,” said Anne Sosin, director of the Center for Global Health Equity at Dartmouth College, who has studied the impact of the pandemic on vulnerable groups in Vermont and New Hampshire. “I think we can expect tremendous dislocation and disruption that will impact not only the people who have benefited from these housing interventions, but our broader communities.” Mairead O’Reilly, an attorney with Vermont Legal Aid who has lobbied for the continuation of the program, believes that the state will soon find itself confronting a new emergency. “The [Gov. Phil] Scott administration has talked about wanting to avoid a humanitarian crisis,” said O’Reilly. “These new rules are not going to help us avoid a humanitarian crisis.” This mass displacement will occur, ironically, as the state prepares to spend $102 million of its $2.7 billion windfall from the American Rescue Plan Act to increase shelter capacity and build 600 affordable housing units over the next year. In the meantime, the state’s housing shortage remains as dire as ever. Since last fall, the Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity has distributed more than 450 housing vouchers, funded by the federal CARES Act, which subsidize up to a year’s worth of rent for people coming out of homelessness. According to CVOEO executive director Paul Dragon, nearly half of the voucher recipients haven’t been able to find apartments. At the end of the month, he said, anyone who won’t be eligible to remain in the hotels after July 1 will receive checks for $2,500. “The money is there, but the housing just isn’t,” Dragon said. Over the past month, he said, more than half of the Holiday Inn’s residents have found permanent housing, made arrangements to live with friends or relatives, or relocated to a different motel. But Dragon anticipates that by the end of June, somewhere between 50 and 75 people will be stuck in limbo — and that’s only a fraction of the total number of people who will soon find themselves unhoused. “It’s a catastrophe,” he said.


After 15 months of guaranteed shelter, those who will be forced to leave the motels on June 30 feel betrayed and forgotten. Many of them have already spent years attempting to navigate the social service bureaucracy, and the prospect of being turned out on the street, no closer to finding stability, has pushed them into a dark place. A man named Marcus, who declined to give his last name out of concern for his safety, told me that he’s thought about barricading himself in his room. “This is bullshit,” he said. “We were all promised, at the beginning of this, that everyone would come out housed.” Since last September, Marcus, who is 50, has lived at Harbor Place in Shelburne, a motel that Champlain Housing Trust, a nonprofit that develops and manages affordable properties, has operated since 2013. He hasn’t been able to find an apartment, he said, but his housing coordinator at CVOEO did recently offer to reimburse him for a plane ticket to go live with an outof-state family member. Marcus declined. “I thought it was a joke at first,” he said. “Guess they figured I could be somebody else’s problem.” (Dragon told me this was a “recognized practice,” called diversion, that attempts to unite people with their support networks.) And yet, for all of their utility during the pandemic, the motels have not exactly been a panacea. Residents have overdosed and died by suicide; reports of mistreatment by hotel staff are as common as unwashed sheets. These scenarios represent only a slice of what people on the voucher program have experienced over the last year. Across the state, motel denizens have created a sort of whisper network; in the greater Burlington area, for instance, everyone knows which staff members will harass you for no reason and which places freshen the linens each week. Some of those who might be able to extend their vouchers through September say they’ve been so disillusioned by the substandard conditions that they don’t know whether they want to stay at all. “I’ve got insects everywhere in my room, these gross little silver things coming up through the floor,” said 60-year-old Jean Miller. She moved into Harbor Place at the beginning of May, after stints in several other motels around Burlington. “I’ve just been ping-ponged around, one place after another,” she said. “Would you want your parents to be treated this way?”

‘A HUMANITARIAN CRISIS’

Since the start of the pandemic, the motel program has cost roughly $50 million, covered entirely by federal relief dollars; at an average of $80 a night per room, Marcus, at Harbor Place, estimated that the state has spent at least $30,000 just to house him. An expenditure of that magnitude,

said Geoffrey Pippenger, senior adviser to the DCF commissioner, is not sustainable over the long term, nor does it address the root causes of homelessness. “Last summer, some people were saying that we had ended homelessness in Vermont, and I would argue that that’s not the case,” he told me. “We may have broken the cycle momentarily. But in order to end homelessness, you need to find people safe, stable housing, which has always been our goal.”

months before the pandemic program’s expiration date. According to the state’s 2020 Housing Opportunity Grant Program report, it takes an average of 125 days for people to find stable housing; even if there were a sufficient amount of affordable housing, said Jessica Radbord, an attorney with Vermont Legal Aid, the chances of everyone in the motels finding a place to live within that time frame would still be vanishingly slim. “Now, there’s just nowhere for them to go,” she said.

“The pandemic, in many ways, pulled back a wider lens on the scope of housing insecurity in Vermont.” Those insights, it seems, haven’t trumped other economic considerations. This spring, as vaccination rates ticked upward and Gov. Scott phased out travel restrictions, the promise of a flush summer and fall tourism season prompted some hotel owners to cut ties with the emergency voucher program, beginning July 1. That left state officials

For the past few decades, the primary metric for homelessness in Vermont has been the Point-in-Time Count, an annual census of people in motel rooms, in shelters or on the streets on a single winter night. But the survey, Pippenger noted, tends to miss the precariously housed — live-in caregivers, people who are couch surfing, or families who are “doubled up,” in the parlance of housing advocates, with another household. During a public health crisis that disproportionately affected people living in close quarters, he said, some of those arrangements became untenable, which shunted people into the motel system who otherwise might not have been on the state’s radar. The January 2020 Point-in-Time survey counted 1,110 people experiencing homelessness; by March 2021, the state was providing motel rooms for nearly 2,700 Vermonters. “I think those numbers were illuminating to a lot of people,” Pippenger said.

to figure out how to allocate a diminishing number of rooms — by DCF’s estimate, anywhere from 150 to 250 fewer than the state had at its disposal during the height of the pandemic. In April, a committee of legislators and housing policy advocates hashed out a plan to decrease the reliance on motels. Radbord, who helped write the proposal, pushed for a continuation of the open-door motel policy until the state had constructed more affordable housing and expanded its shelter capacity. But that idea, she said, was quashed from the start. “We were specifically told that we wouldn’t be getting right-to-shelter for everyone, but we also weren’t going back to the old rules, either,” Radbord explained, referring to the more restrictive pre-pandemic criteria for emergency

Darryl Phillips at Harbor Place

With funding from the first round of federal stimulus, Champlain Housing Trust spent $18.9 million to acquire and convert three motels into low- and middleincome apartments. According to CEO Michael Monte, 92 new units will become available in Chittenden County within the next six months, and roughly 100 more are slated for completion by the end of next year. But in the interim, Monte said, there simply isn’t enough affordable housing in the state to absorb the people leaving the motels. “The level of support for folks experiencing homelessness has never been higher. But the need has never been higher, as well,” he said. Within the past few months, Monte added, Champlain Housing Trust received more than 900 applications for 50 apartments, a stark indicator of demand versus supply. Residents learned about the new voucher criteria at the end of April, two

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KICKED TO THE CURB « P.29 motel vouchers. “So we had to do something that protected the most vulnerable.” Under the federal Administrative Procedures Act, a legislative committee and the secretary of state must review new rules proposed by a state agency before they take effect. In March, the legislature passed a bill that, according to Pippenger, allows the Agency of Human Services to modify and implement policies without first going through the formal vetting process — an emergency provision, said Pippenger, intended to allow DCF to respond quickly to “an evolving public health and housing crisis.” But even in emergency rulemaking, said Radbord, agencies still have to submit new rules to the legislative committee and the secretary of state when they become effective — and since the state began applying the new criteria to anyone who entered the motel system after June 1, those policies are already in play. So far, said Radbord, the agency still hasn’t submitted the revised rules, as it is legally required to do. “Upwards of 700 people are going to lose the only shelter they have on July 1,” said Radbord. “There’s so much at stake here, and abiding by the appropriate procedures is essential. I think they’re fundamentally misinterpreting their authority.” For Radbord, a key issue in the development of the new criteria was how the state defined one particular concern: disability. According to the pre-pandemic motel voucher guidelines, only people who received disability benefits were considered “disabled” and therefore eligible for emergency housing. The committee’s proposed guidelines, she said, reflected the broadest possible definition of disability, with no caveats that would exclude those who hadn’t yet been approved for benefits, a process that can often take years. But when DCF finalized the rules at the end of April, Radbord was dismayed that the guidelines extended vouchers only to disabled people who already receive benefits or to those who can provide documentation from a health care professional, which she fears might exclude a large swath of the unhoused population. That ambiguity in the disability criteria could have an immediate effect on Ramon Sanchez, who moved into the Holiday Inn in South Burlington after he was released from Northwest State Correctional Facility last year. Sanchez, who was diagnosed with diabetes last summer, said he hasn’t yet been approved for disability benefits; to support himself in the meantime, he found a temporary job at Gardener’s Supply in Milton for three weeks in May. At the end of last month, Sanchez said, 30

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

Al (left) and Adam at the Holiday Inn

his caseworker told him he had earned too much money to remain on the state voucher program in June, even though Sanchez was no longer working. “I need a fridge for my insulin,” he said. “I can’t sleep out on the street.” Finally, he said, the Probation and Parole Offices agreed to foot the bill for one week at a different hotel in South Burlington; after that, he had to pay for the room out of pocket with his earnings from Gardener’s Supply, which he was hoping to use for permanent housing. Every weekday, he said, he calls Economic Services, the division of DCF that coordinates the motel voucher program, at 7:55 a.m., five minutes before the line opens, hoping for any scrap of information that might offer him some clarity.

‘IT WAS BAD, REAL BAD’

In the universe of possible solutions to homelessness, providing rooms not designed for long-term habitation is far from ideal. “Motels are not what we really would strive for in terms of housing, for a lot of reasons,” said Sosin, the Dartmouth public health researcher. Some of the more quotidian reasons I heard from residents: a dearth of cooking appliances, insects of various description, rancid food in closets and nightstand drawers. Marcus, the Harbor Place resident who was offered a plane ticket out of Vermont, showed me a picture on his phone (according to Harbor Place policy, nonresident

visitors aren’t allowed to enter rooms) of an air-conditioning unit in his window, which was caked so thickly with dust that it looked as if it had grown fur. When he attempted to turn the unit on, he said, it spewed debris into his face. (A slightly cleaner window unit in his room, he said, works just fine.)

sometimes exceeded CVOEO’s capacity to respond. On a recent evening at the Holiday Inn, I met a young woman smoking in an alcove by the entrance, who introduced herself as Colleen. She told me she’d been moved from the Holiday Inn earlier this month,

This is bullshit. We were all promised, at the beginning of this, that everyone would come out housed. MARCUS

In this highly concentrated atmosphere, people who struggle with substance-use disorder and other mental illnesses have spiraled and relapsed. At the South Burlington Holiday Inn, 12 residents have overdosed in the past year, three of them fatally, according to South Burlington Police Chief Shawn Burke. Many people housed in motels have already experienced a disproportionate amount of trauma, said CVOEO associate emergency housing program director Chloe Collins, who helped oversee on-site support services for Holiday Inn residents. Even with the presence of mental health providers, she told me, the residents’ needs

with two days’ notice, and placed in a room at the Quality Inn on Shelburne Road. “They put me with all these people that I’ve been trying to stay away from,” she said. “It was bad, real bad.” She asked whether she could move back to the Holiday Inn, but she said that Economic Services wouldn’t allow it. “I left an abusive relationship, which is how I ended up homeless to begin with,” she said. “And basically, Economic Services told me that I’d chosen to be homeless. Like, are you for real? Are you fucking kidding me?” She crushed her cigarette beneath the toe of her Converse. “People shouldn’t have to choose between


a shitty relationship and having a place to live.” Colleen told me that she felt so unsafe at the Quality Inn that she decided to camp instead. She’s now living out of a tent — she wouldn’t tell me where, because she’s worried about people stealing her stuff — and taking the bus every morning to her job at Dunkin’ in Essex. She doesn’t sleep much; when she’s at work, she worries constantly about whether her belongings will still be there when she gets back. “I’ll never take nothing for granted again,” she said. “A shower, a place to sleep.”

the motels told me, staff had no financial incentive to treat them well. “They’ve just been banking off us,” said Colleen, the woman I met at the Holiday Inn. In some instances, the social service agencies themselves haven’t been the most reliable allies. One motel outreach worker at the Committee on Temporary Shelter, an agency in Burlington that provides support for people experiencing homelessness, told me that her supervisors had reprimanded her “for advocating too strongly” for her clients in the motels. The outreach worker, who requested anonym-

Rita Markley, the executive director of COTS, told me that random inspections are standard in shelters. The Travelodge owner, she said, wasn’t infringing upon the rights of residents. “Not all of the motels were excited about housing the people we serve,” Markley explained. The job of the motel outreach worker, she continued, was to “preserve the rooms and the relationships with motel staff,” not to “antagonize” them. “If we did something that jeopardized the very limited emergency housing for people who have no other place to turn, that would be

J.M. at the Holiday Inn

A young woman in a pale blue dress, who said she was 20 years old, nodded in agreement. “I don’t know where I’m going at the end of the month,” she said. “There’s a lot of creepy people in Burlington. That’s what scares me most, if I’m out on the streets.”

‘TAKE IT WITH A GRAIN OF SALT’

The pandemic voucher program created a strange symbiosis between social service agencies and motel owners. Social workers suddenly had somewhere to house people who might otherwise have been at high risk of contracting COVID-19; hotels that could no longer accept most tourists, due to pandemic restrictions, could pocket an average of $80 a night per room, thus averting financial disaster. As a result, several people living in

ity for fear of jeopardizing her future employment prospects, has experienced homelessness herself — for six months in 2018, she lived at Harbor Place, in the same room now occupied by one of her clients. In January, the outreach worker learned that the manager of Travelodge on Shelburne Road had forced voucher recipients to sign a contract allowing staff members to conduct room searches without notice. She confronted him, she said, and asked whether she would be subjected to random room checks if she were a regular paying guest. The manager told her that she would not. “That’s discrimination, plain and simple,” the outreach worker told me. The Travelodge manager then told her supervisor at COTS that she was barred from the property; according to the outreach worker, her supervisor didn’t come to her defense. (The management of the Travelodge did not respond to requests for comment.)

the antithesis of our mission,” said Markley. While this politic approach may have been necessary to ensure the cooperation of motel owners, the outreach worker said, it effectively punished her clients. “Everything about this program was set up for the convenience of the motels,” she said. Once, when she relayed to her supervisor a resident’s complaint about staff at a motel, she said, the supervisor warned her that the resident might not be telling the truth. “Her exact words were, ‘Take it with a grain of salt,’” the outreach worker told me. “If you dismiss your own clients as not credible, how could you possibly help them?” When I ran this anecdote by Markley, she seemed nonplussed. “I tell my kids to take things with a grain of salt,” she said. Within an hour of my conversation with Markley, the outreach worker was informed that her contract with COTS would be terminated at the end of this month.

Motel residents, too, have complained that they feel belittled by those who claim to support them. One afternoon, I was sitting on a cinder-block stoop outside one of the units at Harbor Place with a woman named Mindy, a survivor of domestic violence, who asked that her last name be withheld. She was telling me about the frustrations of searching for an apartment with her CARES Act voucher when a Champlain Housing Trust employee, Josh Headrick, approached us. “Is someone smoking weed out here?” he asked loudly. A few months ago, Harbor Place had adopted a no-substance rule to support people in recovery, which came as an unwelcome surprise to some residents. Mindy and I were the only people outside, and all I could smell was her cigarette. We shook our heads. Headrick, visibly agitated, persisted. “If you don’t smell marijuana, then there’s something seriously wrong with your head,” he said. Mindy told him, again, that she wasn’t smoking weed. Headrick asked us to walk over to where he was standing, and sniff. We obliged. I said I detected only a faint note of pot; Headrick stormed off toward the motel office. “I’m not smoking any marijuana!” Mindy called after him. Headrick yelled back, “Just fucking drop it!” Mindy told me that her sense of smell has been impaired since her ex-husband bashed her face several years ago. That incident, she said, happened at Harbor Place. “Josh knows exactly what’s wrong with me,” she told me. She was so upset by the interaction, she later said, that she didn’t come out of her room for two days. A few days after that encounter, I spoke on the phone with Headrick, who helps coordinate housing and support services for residents of Harbor Place, and his supervisor, Mike Ohler. Headrick denied that he had cursed, or that he was specifically questioning Mindy about the pot smell; he also disputed my recollection that he’d said there must be “something seriously wrong” with us if we couldn’t smell the pot. Headrick said he hadn’t been aware that his actions had been so upsetting to Mindy. Ohler chimed in: “If the perception of the client is that she was targeted, that’s something we can address.” “You know,” said Headrick, “what this makes me want to do is go back out to Harbor Place today. This just feels important enough for me to talk to Mindy and listen to her.” Later that day, Mindy told me that Headrick had come to Harbor Place and apologized to her profusely. Specifically, he said he was sorry for cursing at her.

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‘EVERYBODY’S SO UPTIGHT RIGHT NOW’

Nearly every Wednesday afternoon since January, an informal support group has gathered at the Hilltop Inn in Berlin, a squat brick building that overlooks a busy intersection near Interstate 89. The organizers are two residents of Barre’s Pierre Motel: Tammy Menard and a woman who asked to be identified only by her first name, Tina, out of concern for her safety and her job prospects, which she fears will be compromised if prospective employers find out she’s homeless. Menard and Tina split the $10 taxi fare each way from the Pierre to meet with residents of the Hilltop, offering them a space to commiserate and express their anxieties as the end of the month looms closer. “Everybody’s so uptight right now,” said Menard. “Nobody can get a job because they don’t know where they’ll be living in a month, or if they’ll be able to take showers to get clean for work, or how they’ll even be able to get to work.” On a late May afternoon at the Hilltop, half a dozen residents had gathered around a table in the motel’s breakfast lounge, a green-paisley carpeted room overlooking the parking lot, to share a moment of communal malaise. That morning, while she was sitting on her stoop at the Pierre, Menard told the group, a caseworker from Good Samaritan Haven pulled up and asked whether she knew of anyone who needed camping supplies for the end of the month. A woman with blond hair and worried eyebrows named Iris Peppin said she’d already seen encampments “down by the wires.” Menard, whose husband is on disability, will be able to extend her voucher through mid-September, but the thought

Nobody can get a job, because they don’t know where they’ll be living in a month. TAMMY ME NAR D

of that caseworker preparing a list of people who need tents struck her as profoundly horrible. “What happened to that money they were supposed to use to house us?” Menard said. “Did they spend it all in meetings, doing — that word I hate — ‘collaborating’?” Tina nodded. “Collaboration is a way of avoiding transparency,” she said solemnly. About half an hour into the meeting, two police cruisers pulled up to the entrance, and Peppin got up and left the room. A few minutes later, she reappeared with a brown dachshund, whom she introduced as Cannoli. “He gets upset when the officers knock on the doors,” she explained. After several minutes of prancing around our feet, Cannoli vaulted his cylindrical mass

A tent at the Intervale

onto Peppin’s lap, then summited the table. He stood there, whining furiously. “Cannoli! Stop it!” Peppin hissed. “Stop complaining! Nobody wants to hear your stories!” The general sentiment among the residents in the breakfast lounge was that nobody wanted to hear their stories, either — not the motel staff, who didn’t fix Peppin’s window for three weeks, in the dead of winter, after someone smashed the glass with a rock; not the social service agencies, who only seemed to respond to their paperwork with more paperwork. Tina had just learned that she’d been placed on a waiting list for a housing voucher, but her caseworker told her she had no idea when her name might come

up. Within the last year and a half, Tina had already lost three jobs, including a part-time remote gig at a private eldercare company in Stowe that would have paid $20 an hour, because of her chronically provisional living situation — first in transitional housing, then in the motel system. Tina’s caseworker, meanwhile, didn’t like the idea of her working part time. “She wanted me to get a full-time job at a Dollar General,” said Tina. “I’ve owned my own business. I’ve worked in the nonprofit world for years. And now, nobody takes me seriously.” Tina is 57, just three years shy of the age cutoff for extending her voucher. After June 30, she has no idea where she’ll go. She sighed. “I feel like we’ve become invisible.” m

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JAMES BUCK

food+drink

Catch the Drip

Lemon meringue pie sundae with plantbased vanilla creemee in a cone

Winooski’s Offbeat Creemee ditches dairy for poolside plant-based treats BY J O R D AN BAR RY • jbarry@sevendaysvt.com

A

isha Bassett isn’t originally from Vermont. But that hasn’t stopped her from embracing something that befuddles many out-of-staters: our bizarre name for softserve ice cream. “I remember the first time I saw the word ‘creemee’ on a sign,” Bassett recalled. “I was thoroughly entertained. It’s such a fun, quirky Vermont thing.” With Offbeat Creemee, Bassett takes things a step further into the unconventional. Next month, when she opens the concession stand at the newly renovated Myers Memorial Pool in Winooski, she’ll serve scoops and swirls of flavors that go way beyond the typical maple or chocolate-vanilla twist. Think coconut-charcoal, matcha-mint, beet-chocolate chip, and lemon meringue with vegan lemon curd and Biscoff cookie crumbs. Vanilla will be a mainstay on the menu, too. But, like the rest of Offbeat Creemee’s offerings, it will be entirely plant-based. “I dove in deep and ditched all the dairy,” Bassett said with a laugh.

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Bassett, 28, launched the first iteration of her ice cream business, Little City Creemee, with plenty of butterfat, dairy, eggs and sugar in 2020. She envisioned a mobile cart with flavors inspired by the world of high-end European pastry. “Anything that’s a cream can be an ice cream, like cannoli cream or pastry cream,” she explained. The Bethel, N.Y., native honed her pastry skills while earning her two-year culinary arts degree and four-year restaurant management degree at State University of New York Cobleskill. She worked in Italian bakeries and as a cake decorator in the Albany, N.Y., area before moving to Winooski with her husband, who grew up in Vermont. The couple wanted a slower pace, Bassett said, and to be close to her husband’s family. She did a baking job at a local grocery store, then worked as a Baker’s Hotline representative for King Arthur Baking. It was while walking the dog that she noticed Winooski’s lack of creemee stands

— and got the idea of filling the void with her own business. “I hated going out of my way to Burlington or a totally different town just to get an ice cream,” Bassett said. She researched soft-serve equipment and eventually decided to buy a machine with a lump sum she’d inherited from her dad. She and her husband borrowed a trailer and drove to Massachusetts to pick up her purchase in February 2020. “And then COVID hit,” Bassett said. Given the uncertainty of the pandemic and the rising workload at her full-time job, she decided to pause Little City until the fall. At that point, she started taking orders via Instagram and delivering creemee puffs, creemee pies, creemee-stuffed cannoli and hand-packed pints to customers around town. Meanwhile, restaurants and cafés looking to diversify their revenue streams were starting to catch on to the creemee craze. Joining a nationwide trend that first hit the greater Burlington area last year, several Onion City businesses are offering cold treats this summer: Waterworks Food

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+ Drink recently added a walk-up creemee window, and Rosie’s Confections scoops cones of Strafford Organic Creamery ice cream. Based on the area’s changed food landscape, Bassett made a decision. “Since I’m just doing ice cream, I realized I had to set myself way apart and do something that Vermont doesn’t really have,” she said. She spent the winter researching: reading food science articles to understand how fat and emulsions work, and then testing her recipes on a small home ice cream machine. Some were flops, but the failures offered good lessons: “Treat your ingredients how they want to be treated,” Bassett said. “You can’t force anything.” The nondairy base she landed on is a mix of coconut and oat milk, which she chose both for texture and for environmental reasons. With a fat content close to that of heavy cream, coconut gives the final product a luxurious, creamy mouthfeel. Oat milk has a smaller water footprint CATCH THE DRIP

» P.38

NEED INSPIRATION FOR HOMEMADE MEALS? GET RECIPE IDEAS FROM THE SEVEN DAYS FOOD TEAM. DIG INTO THE INGREDIENTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/RECIPES


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through a roster of 50 Vermont businesses. Craft and wellness vendors, food trucks, community programs and live music will round out the experience. “We really want this to be a discovery zone,” Nakhleh said. “Every week you’ll find something different.” The vendor lineup for the market’s opening night includes the CONSCIOUS EATZ plant-based food truck, MAGIC MANN, SISTERS OF ANARCHY ICE CREAM, WILD HART DISTILLERY and INSTANT KARMA GRANOLA. Products from other vendors — including BEE HAPPY VERMONT, KESTREL COFFEE ROASTERS, NOMADIC KITCHEN, MAPLE WIND FARM, CURLY GIRL POPS, STONY POND FARM and more — will be available on-site at Local Maverick’s table. Preordering is available on Local Maverick’s online platform; a drive-through pickup

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Tech and marketing startup LOCAL MAVERICK has been operating an online version of a SALT & BUBBLES WINE BAR farmers market since AND MARKET, which opens August 2020, when it for business on Friday, began as a collaboration June 18. with the BURLINGTON Over the next six months, Local Maverick FARMERS MARKET. Now, with MAVERICK MARKET at will work with Essex the ESSEX EXPERIENCE, the Experience owner PETER company will host its EDELMANN and ANGELA own weekly in-person GERACE of the TIPSY PICKLE to launch a shared comshopping event. mercial kitchen space for Beginning Thursday, emerging food busiJune 17, from 3:30 to 7:30 nesses. The trio hopes p.m., the market will host to offer workshops and 10 to 15 local vendors for classes, Nakhleh said, as on-site shopping at 19 well as sell local products Essex Way, in front of the on-site. ArtHound Gallery. “The Essex Experience “We’re really excited to combine online and is becoming such a strong, off-line to create an imcommunity-oriented mersive market experigathering place for food and craft and wellness,” ence in Essex, since right Nakhleh said. “The story now that doesn’t exist,” Local Maverick founder of an old strip mall adaptand CEO RYAN NAKHLEH ing is really cool.” m told Seven Days. Like Local Maverick’s CONNECT online sales platform, Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Sally Pollak: the market will focus on @vtpollak. On Instagram: Seven Days: @7deatsvt; Jordan Barry: @jordankbarry; Melissa Pasanen: @mpasanen. food and drink, rotating

Maverick Market

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Real Restaurant Chef Jean-Luc Matecat’s dream comes true at Pioneer Lakeshore Café B Y S A LLY POL L AK • sally@sevendaysvt.com

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kitchen: If you didn’t snap to, you were done.” Among the things he learned from his father was family history: His Matecat ancestors were servants to French royalty. “That’s great,” Matecat said. “I love cooking for people.” He’s cooked at an inn, a barroom, a chateau, a country club, a music club/ restaurant, a resort and a food truck. He even catered his and Lindsay’s wedding two years ago in Fairfax. “That was one of the stupidest choices I made in my life,” Matecat said. When Matecat and Lindsay opened their own place, they picked a spot about a mile from their home, a no-frills space with big windows, a lunch counter, a handful of tables and a neighborhood feel. Lindsay runs the front of the house. The breakfast and lunch menu is as

Breakfast sandwich with ham, arugula and pickled red onions

Lindsay Taylor Matecat and Jean-Luc Matecat

PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

L

ast week, for my first indoor restaurant meal since March 11, 2020, I started at the beginning: with breakfast. The place I chose, Pioneer Lakeshore Café, is a beginning, too — for Jean-Luc Matecat, its chef and co-owner. Matecat and his wife, Lindsay, opened the café in Colchester’s Malletts Bay on May 29. The 39-year-old chef, who grew up in central Vermont and the Mad River Valley, has been working in restaurant kitchens for more than 25 years. Now, for the first time, he owns his restaurant. Matecat calls it surreal. I call it real. At the welcoming café, I sat on a stool at the counter and drank a mug of coffee. I watched the cooks do their thing in the kitchen — one of my favorite things about being in a restaurant. I ordered a breakfast sandwich: fried egg, cheddar cheese, roasted mushrooms and arugula on a toasted brioche bun. The sandwich was real good. So was the price — $6. (The mushrooms add $1.50 to the $4.50 breakfast sandwich.) At the sweet little meal that got me back in the restaurant groove, I talked to a real person sitting a couple of stools away while he waited for his to-go order. His clothes, a blue suit and a pair of worn Nikes, caught my eye. He wore his face mask indoors. His name is Chris Reed. He’s a 24-year-old bank officer who commutes to work in Colchester from his home in Morrisville. Reed told me he had eaten lunch at the café the previous day and the chicken sandwich was the best he’s had in his life. “Now I’m here to try out breakfast,” he said. Reed ordered breakfast tacos — two for $6. The banker thinks that’s a pretty good deal. “It’s really affordable,” he said. Affordability is one of the things the Matecats are aiming for in their new restaurant, along with “making food that would reach the whole community.” Matecat started washing dishes at age 12 for his French-chef father, Patrick Matecat, at the acclaimed Common Man Restaurant in Warren. “Working in that dish pit was more difficult than most line-cooking jobs over the years,” he said. “It was the old French


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I GOT A LOT OF SATISFACTION [FROM] MAKING

A GOOD BURGER AND A FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH.

6/15/20 6:11 PM

Where craft burgers still weigh half a pound.

J E AN -LU C MATE CAT

American as French fries — which are hand cut and cost $4. The chef who served me short ribs, purple potatoes, broccolini, pan-fried rainbow trout and ratatouille the first time I ate his food has now designed a menu for the let-them-eat-cake crowd. Working with George Lambertson at ArtsRiot, Matecat said he realized that he was “really happy cooking pretty much anything.” “Spending all these years cooking terrines and complicated food,” he continued, “I got a lot of satisfaction [from] making a good burger and a fried chicken sandwich.” For breakfast, Pioneer Lakeshore Café serves eggs and home fries, breakfast sandwiches, waffles, and hash browns. The lunch menu kicks in at 11 a.m. and includes a couple of salads with optional grilled salmon or fried chicken, a crispy chicken sandwich, a burger, a fried fish sandwich, a vegetable pita, a lobster roll, and chili. Probably the most exotic thing on the menu is the alpaca burger, called the Big Pac ($11). This option gave me pause before I ate it on my first visit to the café — a takeout lunch — and challenged me with this thought: Why would I not think twice about eating cow, turkey, lamb or lobster, alive one minute and dead the next, yet I balked at the prospect of eating alpaca? Matecat is an enthusiastic feeder of people, as well as an expert one. He sold me on the alpaca when he told me about the farmers who raise the animals at CasCad-Nac Farm in Perkinsville. Matecat even wrote an alpaca cookbook, The CasCad-Nac Farm Cookbook.

The alpaca burger I ate in a Colchester park was mild and, as touted by Matecat, a little sweet. But the Big Pac’s flavor was somewhat obscured by its Big Maclike presentation: American cheese, secret sauce, pickles, lettuce. These are the essential extras that make a burger a burger, never mind the patty’s origin. And this was a real burger. In the kitchen with Matecat are two cooks he worked with during his pandemic-era gig as executive chef at Vermont National Country Club. He calls Matt Toll and Kyle Alber the “two gentlemen in the kitchen.” “The line cook is going extinct,” Matecat said. “There’s not a shortage; they’re not coming back. They’re gone. So, I found those people; you got to take care of them.” He’s trying to take care of himself, too, pacing himself for those super-long days.  “I still like to a work a lot,” Matecat said. “I can still do the 15-hour day. But it’s like peanut butter spread too thin on toast.” The chef who spent a good portion of his career leaving the kitchen at midnight or later now gets to work at 4:30 or 5 a.m. to prep before the café’s 7 a.m. opening. It’s when he takes on “big projects” such as making sauces. In the early hours, Matecat is “banging out a lot of those.” “I like the mornings now,” he said. “I’m gradually shifting my life.” m

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and overall environmental impact than commonly used nut-based dairy alternatives such as almond milk. “And if I can’t find it on the market, I know I can make it quickly and easily,” Bassett added. In early June, she officially rebranded Little City Creemee as Offbeat Creemee with behind-the-scenes help from On the Fly, a grassroots collective of business, finance and marketing experts that popped up to support Vermont’s food, drink and hospitality industries during the pandemic. The new name — with the tagline “plant based drip” — matches the confidence with which Bassett is churning out her 100 percent dairy-, egg-, refined sugarand soy-free ice cream. “A lot of places are soft in how they’re saying they’re plant-based,” Bassett said. “This is what it is, and it’s good. It has drip.” The name is also a nod to Bassett’s late father, who was a jazz performer. “Offbeat has that funkiness, that music kind of vibe,” she explained. “Plus, I like to experiment, so you might see some funky things — the offbeat flavors.” The rebranding arrives just in time for Bassett officially to introduce her Blackand woman-owned business to the community at Winooski’s reopened pool. She’d initially planned to be a mobile operation, but in March, when she came across a community board posting from the city seeking a local business to run the Myers Memorial Pool Snack Bar, she couldn’t pass it up. She submitted her proposal and got approval to lease the space at a remote Winooski City Council meeting on April 19. The Myers Memorial Pool reopened on June 6 after closing in 2016 for a complete renovation, according to the city’s website. The redesigned facility features a zeroentry program pool, a lap pool and a 16-foot water slide. Bassett will have a view of it all from just outside the splash zone. One of the snack bar’s windows faces the pool, while the other side faces the sidewalk for walkup orders from street traffic. Besides cones, Offbeat Creemee will sell milkshakes with flavors ranging from matcha to cookies-and-cream, sorbets made with produce from local farms, and more of Bassett’s experiments. Among those is a new take on the classic float combining vanilla ice cream with Queen City Kombucha. She plans to draw on other nearby small businesses for her toppings and mix-ins, using cookies from Essex’s Sweet Alchemy Bakery and Café and popcorn from Burlington bakery Black Rose Briar, for example. 38

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PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

Catch the Drip « P.34

Blueberry kombucha-creemee float

I DOVE IN DEEP AND

DITCHED ALL THE DAIRY. AIS H A BAS S E T T

Scoops of coconut-charcoal with sprinkles (front) and beet-chocolate chip

“I can’t wait to see kids in their strollers falling asleep with a creemee in their hands after getting totally sun-soaked and waterlogged,” she said. Bassett isn’t vegan herself — she admitted she loves a good cheese and meat platter — but she is looking forward to providing something indulgent to customers whose diet is restricted by allergies or cultural or religious beliefs. “It’s not a healthy creemee,” she said of her base. “But it’s a good alternative for people who can’t usually have them.” With Offbeat Creemee’s communityfunded Cone It Forward program, Bassett is also thinking about the kids who may not be able to afford a creemee. To help them enjoy one for free, Bassett will seed the program by donating all tips from the business’ opening weekend and every Saturday throughout the summer. “We want to support families and kids and make sure they feel welcome here,” she said. “We’ve got your back, and if you want a creemee, let me know.” Going by the rave reviews that Offbeat Creemee’s flavors earned in a recent taste test with teens from the King Street Center, kids could be lining up for postswim treats. Bassett shared a questionnaire that one focus-group member filled out, describing the vanilla as “good,” “the best,” “awesome” and “amazing.” And she’s got a strategy for winning over potential customers who are leery of vegan food. “I’ll give you a free sample if you’re really going to doubt me that much,” Bassett said with a smile. “Trust the creemee.” m

INFO Offbeat Creemee tentatively plans to open on July 4 weekend at Myers Memorial Pool, 62 Pine St., Winooski. instagram.com/ offbeatcreemee


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COURTESY OF KATA SASVARI

culture THEATER

From left: Eric Love, Grayson DeJesus and Jenni Putney

Slings, Arrows and Hijinks Theater review: The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), Northern Stage B Y A L E X BROW N • alex@sevendaysvt.com

N

orthern Stage hasn’t just restarted live theater in Vermont. They’ve built a new outdoor theater and developed a production especially suited to welcoming back actors and audiences, updating the comedy The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) to capture what it feels like to emerge from the pandemic. The Complete Works, written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield for the Reduced Shakespeare Company, premiered in 1987. It’s a dare: Can three actors present all 37 of Shakespeare’s plays in an evening? They’re still working out 40

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the details, and there’s been no time to rehearse, so they’ll wing it. The play celebrates spontaneity as much as — or more than — Shakespeare, with missteps, frantic scene changes and lots of direct address to the audience. The script asks the actors to personalize the show, so Grayson DeJesus, Jenni Putney and Eric Love use their own names, throwing in biographical details, some true and some just good comedy. During her time in pandemic isolation, Putney claims she was studying Shakespeare, but binge-watching “Bridgerton” seems to have left a bigger impression.

DeJesus turns his first entrance into a fusillade of special effects to mark the importance of performing again. And Love is so desperate to get back under the lights he begs for a chance to don some of the worst female wigs ever seen onstage. Improvisation and contact with the audience erase the fourth wall. Thursday’s preview show kept a nearly full house laughing, bad jokes forgiven and good ones applauded. The actors seemed eager to feel lifted on the wings of a crowd and the audience happy to cheer them. The play tosses plenty of slings and arrows at Shakespeare’s plots and verbal

hijinks but does so with the affection of good parody. Compressing all the history plays into a football game — with the crown itself hiked, thrown, fumbled and snared — is not a bad way to follow the wild swings of royal succession. The humor runs the gamut, low to high, from a whack with a rubber chicken to a silly but oddly valid deconstruction of Ophelia. Now 34 years old, the play was in need of the smart refurbishing that director Carol Dunne gave it. Othello was once treated as an excuse for white hip-hop; in this version, Putney sings an update of Cole Porter’s “I Hate Men” to mock


both Iago and Othello. The stale gag of feigning horror at men playing women, not even that funny during the Reagan administration, becomes playful freedom for drag. The production does more than plug in current pop culture references; it marks the transition we’re all sharing right now. Those keeping score on the “complete” promise will have to accept a brief nod to the sonnets and passing mentions of some plays. Sure, a breezy reference to a duke leaving town may not constitute covering Measure for Measure, but why quibble? Mashing all 16 comedies into one hyperspeed sketch is a clever idea that highlights how tough it is to tell them apart. The actors take pride in their speed and formationflying precision, but this was the one spot where things could have slowed down just enough to let us relish some of the allusions whizzing by. Exhilaration is all you get, plus abundant flying feather boas. Hamlet receives expansive treatment, staged pretty much as an 8-year-old might remember its events, including the big sword fight. The show’s finale is a hilarious physical stunt that tests the company’s stamina and the audience’s attentiveness. Start to finish, the actors imply they’re making this up as they go along, but they have rehearsed every hairpin turn and formed a working bond that’s a joy to watch. DeJesus is up for anything as he vaults from role to role. To play Romeo, he drapes a bad Beatle wig over his eyes to portray a lunkheaded kind of cool. As his tragic roles stack up, DeJesus dies beautifully — and often — but he’s truly more fun alive than dead. Putney is relentlessly, courageously goofy, equipped with a comedian’s essential strength of holding a straight face. She gives Hamlet’s famous soliloquy a trace of peevishness just to shake up the familiar, and always finds unexpected comic edges for her characters. With wide-eyed delight, Love takes on Shakespeare’s great female roles. The script calls for women’s high emotion to end in falling to the ground and vomiting, and Love’s ability to make this childish gimmick work demonstrates his wall-towall zeal for performance.

The tech is first-rate. Michael Ganio’s set is all about the entrances and exits, its curtains embellished with antique prints of London. Kate Marvin’s sound design has jokes of its own, and Travis McHale’s lighting combines flashiness and fun. Paul West directed the fights, and the actors’ swordsmanship deserves the applause it gets. Costume designer Barbara A. Bell summoned up a bottomless trunk of clothing to fit every moment. Northern Stage has followed guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Actors’ Equity Association to keep audiences and actors safe. The stage is outside, the seating parks viewers in pods to enforce distance from strangers, and the audience remains masked for the 90-minute show. These precautions may seem extravagant now in Vermont, but assuring safety for the vaccinated and unvaccinated, including kids, is a smart way to open. When the Northern Stage staff turned a creative gaze at an unprepossessing back alley, bold imagination kicked in. The new theater was carved out of the space to the side of the Barrette Center for the Arts. What once was home to dumpsters is now a landscaped space with fairy lights dripping over one wall and soft, fragrant mulch underfoot. The lighting arrays allow for big effects even in the summer dusk. Actors are miked, and the outdoor seating is first-class comfortable. This production is about theater itself, from show-must-go-on energy to the connection between actors and audience. At one point, the actors take up pom-poms to give a cheer for Northern Stage. Cheers indeed, to a theater that faced the economic and artistic losses of the pandemic and now expresses its own resilience in laughter. m

THE ACTORS SEEMED EAGER TO FEEL LIFTED ON THE WINGS OF A CROWD AND THE AUDIENCE HAPPY TO CHEER THEM.

INFO The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield, directed by Carol Dunne, produced by Northern Stage. Wednesday, June 16, 8 p.m.; Thursday, June 17, 4 and 8 p.m.; Friday, June 18, 8 p.m.; Saturday, June 19, 4 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, June 20, 5 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, June 22 and 23, 8 p.m., at the Courtyard Theater adjacent to Barrette Center for the Arts in White River Junction. See website for additional dates. $45; $19 for students. northernstage.org 2V-mswalker051921 1

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Burlington Resource and Recovery Center (RRC) 802.755.7239

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833-488-3727 erap.vsha.org No internet access? CVOEO offers VERAP application assistance by appointment at 802-863-6248. For legal assistance enrolling in VERAP, contact Vermont Legal Aid at 800-889-2047 or vtlawhelp.org/vlh-intake.

Waxaan xalkaan u joognaa inaan caawinno COVID-19

19-‫ ﻧﺤﻦ ھﻨﺎ ﻟﻠﻤﺴﺎﻋﺪة ﻓﻲ ﻣﻮاﺟﮭﮫ ﻛﻮﻓﯿﺪ‬، ‫ﺑﺮﻟﯿﻨﺠﺘﻮن‬ Burlington, tuko hapa kusaidia dhidi ya Covid-19

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The RRC is here to help in response to COVID-19 recovery@burlingtonvt.gov 802.755.7239 burlingtonvt.gov/resources 42

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culture

Teenage Dream Diana Whitney edits a poetry collection for young women and girls B Y M ARG A RET G RAYSON • margaret@sevendaysvt.com

womanhood and the sheer kinetic energy of growing into a changing body and adult desires. It begins:

COURTESY OF JEFF WOODWARD

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or Brattleboro poet Diana Whitney, the poetry anthology You Don’t Have to Be Everything: Poems for Girls Becoming Themselves was decades in the making. “In some ways, I’ve been working on it since I was 13,” she said in a recent phone interview. As a young, closeted, queer teenager, Whitney found herself in a cycle of depression and self-loathing. When she got the opportunity in adulthood to edit a book of poetry aimed at girls and young women, it was a chance to explore poems she might have needed to read as a teen. “It was both to share that experience of sadness, loneliness and shame but [also] to rage against shame and really share the message of ‘You are enough,’” said Whitney, now 47. You Don’t Have to Be Everything, released in March, features 68 poems by as many poets. The authors are prominent scribes such as Maya Angelou and Mary Oliver, young stars such as Amanda Gorman, and those who rose to prominence on Instagram or YouTube, including Nikita Gill and Sarah Kay. Whitney wanted to showcase both the “grand matriarchs” of poetry and modern writers who are finding new ways to reach young audiences. “Within the literary world, there can be discouragement of Instagrammer, online poets, and I really wanted the project to push against that,” Whitney said. She read and gathered poems for two years for the anthology, drawing on her four years as a poetry critic for the San Francisco Chronicle. The most practical consideration was cost, including republishing fees, which were higher for poems by more popular poets. Intersectionality was another major focus. Whitney, who is white, estimated that about half the poets represented are Black, Indigenous or other people of color, and one-third are LGBTQ, including transgender poets. “If this book is about finding the courage to become ourselves, I felt like almost no one can show us that more than these trans poets,” Whitney said. “Whether or not that experience of gender is one that a reader is

Wasn’t I beautiful, wasn’t I desperate, didn’t I give a shit about world peace, inner peace, only wanting it, wanting it, secret graffiti spelled out in lip gloss on the locker-room wall?

BOOKS

Diana Whitney

THIS BOOK IS ABOUT FINDING

THE COURAGE TO BECOME OURSELVES. D IANA W H ITNE Y

going through, those lessons and emotions are there for all of us.” She admitted that she identified some of her own blind spots in the process. A

writer friend’s queries reminded her to seek out poets with disabilities. The book’s sections are organized by emotion: Seeking, Loneliness, Attitude, Rage, Longing, Shame, Sadness and Belonging. Its pages feature beautiful, colorful illustrations and patterns, making reading feel like flipping through a magazine. Whitney included one of her works in the collection. Titled “Wanting It,” the poem reflects on the performance of young

The collection also includes works by Vermont poets Rage Hezekiah, Alison Prine and Bianca Stone. Hezekiah, in a poem titled “On Anger,” wonders, “What if anger, / my armor, is embedded in the marrow / of who I am.” For Whitney, gathering the poems was an opportunity to delve into her own tumultuous and formative teenage years. “Reading the poems [while] thinking about how that teen self would’ve responded and trying to remember what I was reading — it’s been a process of healing, and I’m really grateful for that,” she said. Now Whitney has her own daughters, ages 13 and 15. She’s shared copies of the book with them but doesn’t know whether they’ve read it. Regardless, Whitney said, they influenced it as she sought out “the poems that I hope my daughters will read.” Being a teenage girl, she said, is harder than ever amid the pressures of social media. But she’s optimistic based on how readily today’s young people accept those with different gender and sexuality identities. She wanted some poems in the book to reflect joy, confidence and maybe a bit of snark to contrast with the darker themes. “Everything’s intense and urgent, but then it can also be, like, really beautiful in those extremes,” Whitney said of the teenage years. “And I see those moments for my kids — moments of elation or discovery.” m

INFO You Don’t Have to Be Everything: Poems for Girls Becoming Themselves, edited by Diana Whitney, Workman Publishing, 176 pages. $14.95. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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art

Saving Place

Review: “Together: Nature Unites Us,” Elizabeth Billings, Nature Conservancy natural areas B Y PA M EL A POL ST O N • pamela@sevendaysvt.com

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rtwork does not usually share space with 142 bird species, denning bobcats and endangered bats. But the Raven Ridge Natural Area, which straddles parts of Hinesburg, Charlotte and Monkton, is not a conventional gallery. Far from a whitewalled box, this spot can trace its origins to a melting continental ice sheet 15,000 years ago. Its “walls” are craggy rock faces, mottled with lichen and shaded by towering deciduous trees. This is where Tunbridge artist Elizabeth Billings chose to site an installation — one of three she created in different locations as the first-ever resident artist for the Nature Conservancy.

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Installation at Equinox Highlands Natural Area

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MICHAEL SACCA

Last year, the pandemic dashed the Vermont chapter’s plans for a 60th anniversary gala to celebrate its work and thank its supporters, director of philanthropy Catherine Newman explained. That’s when an anonymous donor stepped in and offered to underwrite an artist residency for a year. The goal of this “engagement,” according to the Conservancy’s website, was “to elevate the relationship between nature and art during an unprecedented year when many found solace in nature.” Many, indeed; communications director Eve Frankel told Seven Days that in 2020 an unprecedented number of visitors took refuge in the Conservancy’s natural areas around the state. The website even cautions visitors to Raven Ridge: “If the parking area is full when you arrive, please consider using other trails.” The area is, after all, a sensitive habitat, and protecting it is the whole point.

The Conservancy is a global organization with a chapter in every state; in Vermont, Frankel said, the nonprofit is the secondlargest landowner, with a network of 58 such natural areas. Perhaps the public needs no extra incentives to take a walk in these wilds. But visitors to Raven Ridge, LaPlatte River Marsh Natural Area in Shelburne and Equinox Highlands Natural Area in Manchester will surely find their experience enriched by Billings’ reflective embellishments. The artist’s engagement with those sites began last September; her installations opened to the public last week. In between, Billings walked, studied, mused, made rubbings on trees, took photographs and, finally, created the materials for these works. Her contemplative observations will continue through the summer in journal and photographic form, shared on the Conservancy website. Last week, Billings and Frankel met this reporter at Raven Ridge — or, rather, at the small parking lot across the road from the entrance — for a guided tour up to the installation. And “up” is the operative word. An accessible wooden boardwalk from the road crosses a grassy area that is swampy in the spring, after which the trail ascends. Navigating it requires attention to protruding rocks and fallen branches along the way. As we chatted amiably — three figures speckled with sunlight filtering through the trees — we could hear but not see tiny creatures darting through the greenery. The woods met our human disruption with gentle rustles; when we quieted, it felt like a communion. Twenty minutes in, we glimpsed the first ribbons of blue: cyanotype-treated cotton fabric that is only inches high but more than a thousand feet long, Billings said. It winds around and among the trees, loosely following the ridge line above. The

Mario Sacca at LaPlatte River Marsh Natural Area

Find exhibits, events, talks and call-to-artist listings at sevendaysvt.com/art. If you’re planning a virtual or IRL event or exhibition, submit the details for a free listing using the form at sevendaysvt.com/postevent. You may also email information to galleries@sevendaysvt.com. Accompanied, identified and credited photographs are encouraged where applicable.


Installation detail at Raven Ridge Natural Area

horizontal stripe, placed at roughly eye level, “just calls attention to the place,” Billings said. It enhances the sense of beingness that was already there, creating a shape that embraces but does not enclose. One may initially associate the ribbon with the blue plastic sap lines in a sugar bush, but that’s not quite right. “It’s like the maple syrup lines; it’s ridgeline; it’s Christo,” Billings suggested, referring to the late artist famous for massive wrapped installations. “I thought of blue because of water and sky, and it’s such a nice contrast to the green.” In the winter, of course, this thread of blue will assert itself against white. It seems that Billings, a longtime ikat weaver, has created a weaving of sorts with the elements — “an overlay of human intentionality,” as she put it. She marvels at how this wild area restores itself — “The water coming off the ledge is carrying minerals to the soil,” she said — and how death begets new life in an endless cycle. “It’s temporary,” Billings said of her organic installation. “We’re temporary.” That Buddhist sensibility suits her; Billings is gentle and kind, though her devotion to the Earth is as fierce as it is spiritual. She tears up thinking about the harm humans inflict on the planet. And she has made scientists cry, Newman said, with her “poetic” Zoom presentations to the Conservancy staff. “I want to reconnect people with nature,” Billings said. “I hope the essence of this work is an offering to the courage of reconnection.” Billings has made such offerings in the form of installations around the country — often created with fellow Vermont artist Andrea Stix Wasserman — over 25 years, she said. Her interior works typically use natural materials, such as the mural called “Maple Apple Birch” that she and Wasserman installed at Burlington International Airport in 2001. She has also done eco-oriented artist residencies with her husband, photographer Michael Sacca. At the LaPlatte River Marsh, Billings had occasion to work with her son, Mario Sacca, a woodworker. The project there is more conventional but no less thoughtful: The two conceived of and built a graceful bench that faces and mirrors a curve in the nearby river. Its uprights are tree crotches, its seat a live-edge plank. At Equinox Highlands, Billings again used cyanotype-blue fabric strips, this time to create a labyrinth. It’s unexpected

Elizabeth Billings

in the middle of the woods, she noted, “but people know what to do with it.” One can’t help but wonder whether Billings came by her love of nature and conservation genetically. She is related to the namesakes of the Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park, which encompasses a working farm and heritage museum. It was there that Frederick H. Billings established a managed forest and model farm. His granddaughter, Mary French Rockefeller, and her husband, Laurance Rockefeller, a conservation adviser to presidents, later gifted the property to the U.S. government. Elizabeth Billings does not aim to craft historic landmarks; her work for

the Conservancy is not meant to survive the ages or attract hordes of tourists. Her installations are subtle provocations, reminders that humans are connected to the web of all life. She likes to quote Scottish American naturalist and author John Muir: “[F]or going out, I found, was really going in.” “That’s what it’s all about to me,” Billings concluded. m

INFO “Together: Nature Unites Us,” three installations by Elizabeth Billings, at Raven Ridge, LaPlatte River Marsh and Equinox Highlands natural areas. Find Billings’ journals, photographs and more info at nature.org. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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music+nightlife

Urian Hackney at his Burlington recording studio, the Box

PHOTOS: LUKE AWTRY

Days of Thunder

Urian Hackney reflects on a remarkable year — and gets ready for an even bigger one B Y CHR IS FA RNSWORTH • chris@sevendaysvt.com

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hen he was a kid, Urian Hackney would wait outside his father and uncle’s rehearsal space trying to build up the courage to ask whether he could play the drum kit. “I was pretty young, so I was really shy,” he recalls. “It was this project studio they’d built in the garage, and I’d just sit outside the door psyching myself up and giving myself these little pep talks, like: ‘OK, I’m going to go down there. And I’m going to ask to play drums. I’m going to do it!’” Hackney breaks into a wide, infectious smile as he sits in the sun on a park bench just outside his studio in Burlington’s South End. As a musician and an engineer, his stock is rising astronomically, so to revisit where it all began is especially poignant to the 29-year-old Underhill native. “In my mind, that was the beginning, or the focal point, of it all,” he says. “I hated drawing attention to myself back then, but

I just wanted to play the drums so fucking bad.” His wish was granted, and then some. In the space of a few years, Hackney went from dreaming of playing with his older brothers to being one of the most in-demand drummers in the country. He’s now playing onstage and on records with some of the idols of his youth. And equally sought after are his talents as a recording engineer. The broad strokes of Hackney’s story are well known as a result of the 2012 documentary A Band Called Death. The film told the tale of his father, Bobby Hackney, and uncles Dannis and David Hackney, who in 1970s Detroit formed proto-punk act Death. The New York Times hailed the band as “punk before punk was punk.” As detailed in the film, neither Urian nor his older brothers Julian and Bobby Jr. had any clue as children of their punk pedigree. After finding out, as young men, the

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three brothers formed what is now one of Burlington’s hottest bands, Rough Francis. “What’s funny is, we didn’t have an idea about Death, but we were all already playing in bands and listening to hardcore and skating,” Hackney says. “By then I was old enough to play with Bobby and Jules. They weren’t just these older, untouchable dudes to me anymore, but my brothers.” “I’ve always been blown away by Urian’s musical abilities,” Bobby Jr. writes in an email to Seven Days. “Even as a little kid, his ear was like a tape recorder. He’s always had this unique gift of picking out that thing which makes a song recognizable.” Bobby recalls seeing his two younger brothers play in a local punk group called Punch Out and having a revelation of sorts. “In the back of my mind, I always knew that he, Julian and I would form a band together,” he continues. “It was all about the timing.” Rough Francis have released three fulllength LPs on multiple labels and earned

a reputation as ferocious live performers. Last year, they turned up on the Tony Hawk Pro Skater 1 + 2 video game soundtrack and recently were featured in Thrasher Magazine. Both were especially significant scores for three guys who grew up skateboarding religiously. That was only the start for Urian Hackney, however. His voluminous local credits as a recording engineer and player include artists such as Caroline Rose, Western Terrestrials and Lake Superior. He’s done remixes for scores of Vermont musicians, as well, such as making a dub version of singer-songwriter Marcie Hernandez’s track “Light a Torch.” Hackney’s trademark pounding energy on the drums has led to more opportunities outside the Green Mountains, and in ways his teenage self never would have believed. After Converge drummer Ben Koller was injured, the hardcore punk legends asked Hackney to step in on their 2019 tour. “It was incredible, man,” he recalls,

Well, they’re starting up again, and we’re here to help. Find live music, DJs, comedy and more at sevendaysvt.com/music. If you’re a talent booker or artist planning live entertainment at a bar, nightclub, café, restaurant, brewery or coffee shop, send event details to music@sevendaysvt.com or submit the info using our form at sevendaysvt.com/postevent.


GOT MUSIC NEWS? MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

shaking his head. “It was like a MakeA-Wish Foundation kind of moment. Converge are one of my favorite bands, ever since I started skating and listening to hardcore. And now I’m in Converge for some shows? What?” Shortly after that, Hackney joined Converge guitarist Kurt Ballou’s other project, art-house hardcore act the Armed. That band, a supergroup of sorts with a sometimes rotating membership, released its third full-length LP in April, the critically acclaimed ULTRAPOP. The Armed, which currently also includes Troy Van Leeuwen from Queens of the Stone Age and Chris Slorach from Canadian punk rockers METZ, will embark on a tour in 2022. It will include Barcelona’s Primavera Sound festival, whose lineup is, frankly, bonkers. Hackney admits that playing with Converge and the Armed is “crazy,” but his relationship with Ballou goes deeper. “Kurt is kind of my engineering idol,” he says. “The way his records sound, that’s the way I think records should sound.” The two connected online after Ballou was in Burlington one night on tour and saw Hackney drum in a hardcore band called Alive & Well. “The band was great,” Ballou remembers in a phone call. “But the thing that really struck me was that, at some point, the main side of Urian’s double bass drum had broken, so he was just doing everything with his left foot. And he was having a great time doing it! Most drummers would be losing their minds, but not Urian. He didn’t have a care in the world.” Soon after, Ballou invited Hackney in on a session he was engineering for former Outkast star André 3000. “André never showed up,” Hackney recalls, laughing. So, he and Ballou hung out at Ballou’s Massachusetts studio, God City, recording and talking music. “And the more we hung, the whole façade of the hero thing slowly faded away, until he was just this cool dude and we were working together all the time,” Hackney recalls. “Urian is an amazing musician,” Ballou says. “And he’s always up for working on stuff. But mostly we just talk about corny ’90s movies.” That relationship has helped propel Hackney’s work as an engineer to new heights. With no gigs during the pandemic, he became a one-man entertainment

machine, going viral several times with covers and parodies. Hackney’s reworking of Nirvana’s “Stay Away” into the quarantine-centric “Stay Inside” highlighted his ability to re-create classic sounds and tones faithfully. It also caught the attention of the surviving members of Nirvana, who retweeted the video with their stamp of approval. Cardi B parodies followed, as did a duet with Tony Hawk on the Damned’s “Smash It Up.” “Urian Hackney is one of the most talented humans I have ever met,” Ezra Oklan writes in a text. He plays drums with local indie-soul outfit Dwight &

Vermont Canoe & Kayak

last year’s bruising Urgent Care, the band Canoe, Kayak & Paddleboard Rentals has gone through a turbulent patch. For one, the pandemic made it impossible & Guided Tours on the Lamoille River to effectively promote that album. Then bassist Dan Davine, the only non-Hackney and only white person in the band, was alleged to have attended the January 6 insurrection in Washington, D.C., where rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol. Upon that revelation, Rough Francis fired Davine. The band posted on Instagram: “Rough Francis is first and foremost a Black punk band. So when we heard that our bass player, Dan Davine, held views rooted in white supremacy and had attended the terrorist insurrection at the Capitol, we took swift and decisive action to immediately remove him from Exploring the outdoor wonderland the band.” is a gift we have as Vermonters. Hackney is quick to move past the subject of Come enjoy the beauty Davine, focusing instead of the Lamoille River. on the musical repercussions of Rough Francis Adventure is out there. losing their bassist. The You just have to paddle it. band’s initial plan was to become a three-piece, just the Hackney brothers and some rotating help. “Yeah, we figured we would do the Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers 8v-vtcanoeandkayak061720.indd 1 6/12/20 thing,” Hackney explains. “We sort of romanticized that for a bit. Now we just want a bass player, but adding a member during a pandemic was, um, problematic. We’re going to need one soon, because me, Bobby and Jules have been writing. “No matter what, Rough Francis will always be my priority,” Hackney adds. With that band ramping back up, upcoming shows with the Armed and his continued production work, Hackney has a full plate. Which is exactly how he likes it. “I mean, this is why I do what I do,” he says. Hackney takes a few moments to collect his thoughts, absently scratching his beard as he looks back toward his studio. “I love playing drums. I love helping people make their music better,” he muses. “I like to collaborate. I don’t need a limelight; that’s why I play the drums. Like, I can’t see myself making a solo record or anything like that, you know?” A sly grin breaks out as he offers a parting thought. “Life is weird, though,” Hackney says. “Maybe I’ll change my mind one of these days.” m

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Nicole; fronts his own rock band, Matthew Mercury; and, like Hackney, is also a recording engineer. “You want him at the helm when recording, and you want him behind the kit,” Oklan continues. “Or the bass. Or the guitar. There’s a lot under the hood with Urian.” A by-product of Hackney’s isolationfueled projects is that the extra time spent with his gear helped him develop greater ability as an engineer, along with a sense of confidence and purpose. “This is absolutely what I’m going to do for the rest of my life,” he says. “I don’t promote my studio or even have an internet presence for it. If someone likes what I do, they’ll reach out. And if I like them, I’ll reach out. I’m just going to play and make music. It’s really as simple as that.” With his services so in demand, what becomes of Rough Francis? After releasing

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INFO Urgent Care is available at roughfrancis. bandcamp.com; ULTRAPOP is at thearmed.com.

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music+nightlife

REVIEW this Roan Yellowthorn, Another Life (BLUE ELAN RECORDS, DIGITAL)

In a 61-part series for online music blog Atwood Magazine, Plattsburgh, N.Y., singer-songwriter Jackie McLean of indie-pop duo Roan Yellowthorn documented the making of her band’s sophomore album, Another Life. Her confessional writings began in February 2020 — and we all know what happened the following month. Adapting to new realities, McLean revised her original plan to detail the nitty-gritty of writing, recording and publishing a record to include her own pandemic experience. In an interview with Atwood upon

The Silent Mile/ Sounds & Scenarios, The Silent Mile/ Sounds & Scenarios (JCH RECORDS, CD AND DIGITAL)

Are you ready to feel the raw emotion of being dumped? Ready to scream into the void because your ex sucked so much you had to trash your bedroom? It’s emo time! Hoodies have been stolen and promises broken. Welcome to Emotional Wreck City, population: two very sad bands. It’s the Silent Mile/Sounds & Scenarios brand-new split EP! The Silent Mile are the home team on this release. One of the most angstridden pop-punk acts on the local scene, the Burlington band leads off this

the album’s completion more than a year later, McLean revealed that Another Life is, at least in part, a way of processing a childhood full of mental and emotional abuse. Her father is “American Pie” singer-songwriter Don McLean, who was charged with and pleaded guilty to domestic assault in 2016 against her mother, Patrisha McLean. Following the couple’s subsequent divorce, Patrisha became a public advocate for women who had faced similar violence, amplifying stories of survivors in a project called “Finding Our Voices.” Like her mother, Jackie McLean turns trauma into art. Propulsive cut “Vampire” finds her singing, “I wish I could trust you / I wish you would let me rest / Oh you’re turning me into a monster / I’ve learned from the

best.” Those are some harrowing lyrics, even if the song isn’t about her father. (In a 2018 review of Roan Yellowthorn’s debut, Indigo, I pointed out McLean’s parentage as a “fun” fact. I now regret this word choice.) McLean and her partner, multiinstrumentalist Shawn Strack, epitomize good songwriting. Their songs percolate with tension. They tread apprehensive verses to arrive at unshackled, uplifting choruses. Strack’s various organic and electronic instrumentation bolsters McLean’s piano melodies. Roan Yellowthorn fall in line with Regina Spektor and Inara George, two artists with an overall positive vibe who make sonically rich pop music with emotionally complicated lyrics. “Stranger” is a perfect example. McLean is an observer here, removed from a subject that fascinates her. She never judges, only describes what she sees. Musically, the song brims with optimism, despite hints that its singer

may feel resentment. Glowing mellotron and synths dot a foundation of weighty piano and wisps of guitar. Everything converges to make a refreshing, hopeful sound. Roan Yellowthorn linger in a sweet spot that’s difficult to articulate. Their slight departures from it, like the synth-soaked “Unkind,” are all the more enjoyable. The song brings a mild Americana vibe to the progressive pop throughout the record. The title track does this, as well, expanding musical and lyrical concepts. The song is blurry and beautiful, with McLean stretching out her words over a similarly sustained cradle of synths and gently picked electric guitar. Another Life is an indie-pop album that centers McLean’s search for herself. It’s both an escape and a rescue mission — and a solid entry in Roan Yellowthorn’s growing catalog. Another Life is available at roanyellowthorn.bandcamp.com.

collaborative record with two highoctane songs: “Better Days” and “A Promise Is Forever.” “Better Days” is a dark but deceptively jaunty rocker. Lead singer and guitarist Hunter Phelps sings, “I’m fucking crazy, but not in a fun way / Got no quirky romcom eccentricities / Just insecurities and self-hatred / Go ahead, ask anyone I’ve ever dated.” It’s a startlingly frank song about the urge to hide one’s depression while needing to keep it together to operate in society. The band recently added a second guitarist, Meghan Burke. The twin Telecaster attacks of Phelps and Burke fill out the new songs in more sophisticated ways than in the band’s previous arrangements, adding layers of melody and grit at once. “A Promise Is Forever” is more paintby-numbers emo than the first track. A

clever guitar lick opens the tune, and the rhythm section of Conrad Beckmann and Tyler Jackson comes thundering in with force. But the song itself is a slog. It’s essentially a five-minute mea culpa to a partner but lacks the lyrical intelligence of “Better Days.” Phelps pleads “A promise is forever” just waaaaay too many times. The Silent Mile are, as always, impeccably tight and dynamic. But I’d say they shoot 50 percent here. Next up is Massachusetts outfit Sounds & Scenarios. Despite stylistic similarities between the two bands, Sounds & Scenarios have a more modern take on the genre than the Silent Mile’s faithful brand of pop punk. “Kick the Clock Off the Wall” and “I’m Sick of Crying Over You” feature programmed drums, slickly distorted guitars and anthemic vocals. They also feature a rather large-size chip on the shoulder of singer-songwriter and Vermont native Tyler Chase. “You can’t fool me with your trendy hair / To somehow make me think you care / You’re no princess, you’re just

another curse,” Chase bellows on “Kick the Clock Off the Wall.” The lyrics are a little cringeworthy, as are some Chase shouts on “I’m Sick of Crying Over You.” The band’s distinctive sound is impeccably produced. After playing for years with a full band, Sounds & Scenarios are now a two-piece featuring Chase and bassist Avery Jones. Hopefully, now that clubs and bars are opening for shows again, Chase and Jones will get the gang back together and hit the stage, because it’s clear how good these tunes would sound live. The Silent Mile and Sounds & Scenarios are fine examples of their genre, though both also carry some of the shortcomings associated with emo — namely, juvenile lyrics that are weird to hear belted by grown adults. Still, the energy of the EP carries through all four songs, and it’s hard not to pump your fist at least a few times. The Silent Mile/Sounds & Scenarios split EP is available on CD and for download at jchrecordsnh.bandcamp.com.

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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movies My Love: Six Stories of True Love HHHHH

O

ur streaming entertainment options are overwhelming — and not always easy to sort through. This week, I watched the Netflix docuseries “My Love: Six Stories of True Love,” which premiered in April. Each of the six hourlong episodes profiles a couple that has been together for at least 40 years, following them over the course of 12 months. In the process, the series takes viewers all over the world, with each episode directed by a filmmaker in the couple’s home country. You may have heard about “My Love” because Vermonters David and Ginger Isham represent the U.S. in the first episode, directed by Elaine McMillion Sheldon and featuring ample footage of the WillistonBurlington corridor.

FOR THE DURATION David and Ginger Isham of Williston’s Isham Family Farm celebrate their 60th year together in this Netflix docuseries.

The deal

Will you like it?

If you feel tempted to stop after the Vermont episode of “My Love” — please, don’t. “Ginger & David” is certainly a winning portrait of two people who exemplify the best of a certain Vermont culture — stoicism, hard work, resilience, sly humor. But it’s only the beginning of what this series has to offer. While the concept of celebrating elders in lifelong relationships may provoke a big 50

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

COURTESY OF NETFLIX

In Vermont, “Ginger & David” still live on the farm that has belonged to David’s family for more than a century. The cows are gone, though, and the couple’s son runs the farm as a four-season attraction while they begin making end-of-life arrangements. “Nati & Augusto” takes us to a breathtaking mountainous area in southern Spain. Despite health problems, Augusto is determined to fulfill a promise to bring his wife to see the ocean. In Japan, “Kinuko & Haruhei” have a fascinating and harrowing story about how they met — he was forcibly confined to the leprosy hospital where she worked. “Saengja & Yeongsam” run an abalone farm off the Korean coast; he tries to persuade her to slow down, but work helps distract her from the death of their son. In a Brazilian favela, “Nicinha & Jurema” preside over a household brimming with children and grandchildren while dreaming of retiring to the country. Finally, in rural India, “Satyabhama & Satva” eke out a precarious living on a cotton farm threatened by the climate crisis.

REVIEW aww, there’s nothing cutesy about “My Love.” Presented without sentimental framing, these are fly-on-the-wall documentaries that achieve an unusual degree of intimacy with their subjects without milking that intimacy for emotional payoffs. We see the Ishams reading in bed together, and then matter-of-factly making cremation arrangements. We see several people at doctors’ appointments or pre- or post-surgery. We watch Nicinha and Jurema joke about how Jurema misrepresented her smoking habit to the doctor treating her for diabetes. Later, the pair reminisce tenderly about a family member who accepted their same-sex relationship without question. For these filmmakers, love isn’t about grand gestures, despite the occasional anniversary celebration. Love is in the details of a couple’s everyday interactions — the reminiscing, the teasing, the bickering and the countless hours of nonverbal communication. “My Love” chronicles all of these with patience and gentleness. The Vermont, Korea and India episodes, in particular, emphasize how the seasonal rhythms of agricultural work keep people connected to the land and each other. There’s no one universal notion of what

it means to be a couple, and viewers of “My Love” may find themselves noting cultural, generational and personal differences. But the common denominator is clear: the willingness to undertake a partnership for life. The series has a travelogue aspect, with each episode showcasing what’s most beautiful about its location. Even the urban favelas and a nondescript Japanese apartment block become poetic via panoramic shots or glimpses of Mount Fuji. For all that surface sheen, though, the filmmakers make a point of reminding us that their subjects’ “golden years” aren’t all golden, whether because of declining health or social conditions or simple regrets. The Brazil and India episodes, in particular, add a refreshingly direct political aspect. The filmmakers establish that their subjects are poor with a bracing lack of condescension and just enough information to put their stories in context. When Satyabhama and Satva care for their young granddaughter, for instance, it’s because her parents had to leave her behind to take factory jobs that pay more than farming. That painful choice in turn results from drenching rains that have devastated the harvest.

“My Love” showcases the parts of romance that rom-coms leave out, the long tail of “happily ever after.” While these stories have no meet-cutes and little drama, they might make even a die-hard anti-romantic shed the occasional tear — and reflect on the manifold manifestations of love.

If you like this, try...

• My Love, Don’t Cross That River (2014; Kanopy, rentable): “My Love” was inspired by Jin Moyoung’s documentary about an elderly couple facing death, a surprise blockbuster in South Korea. The filmmaker also directed episode 4. • “Last Tango in Halifax” (2012-20; Netflix): Two widowed septuagenarians rediscover the love that they never acted on in their youth in this BBC comedy-drama series. • Dick Johnson Is Dead (2020; Netflix): A filmmaker finds unusual ways to grapple with the impending death of her father, who suffers from dementia, in this oddball documentary celebrating family love. MARGO T HARRI S O N margot@sevendaysvt.com


Offeri NEW IN THEATERS 12 MIGHTY ORPHANS: Luke Wilson plays a football coach who leads a team of orphans to the state championship during the Great Depression in this drama from director Ty Roberts, also starring Robert Duvall and Vinessa Shaw. (118 min, PG-13. Savoy Theater) THE HITMAN’S WIFE’S BODYGUARD: In this sequel to the hit action comedy The Hitman’s Bodyguard, Salma Hayak complicates the bromance between Samuel L. Jackson and Ryan Reynolds. Patrick Hughes directed. (99 min, R. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas)

NOW PLAYING THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO ITHH1/2 A murder suspect uses demonic possession as a defense in the latest installment of the horror franchise, starring Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga. Michael Chaves directed. (112 min, R. Bijou Cineplex, Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Sunset Drive-In) CRUELLAHHH Disney gives the villain of 101 Dalmations her own live-action prequel, with Emma Stone playing her as a young aspiring fashion designer. Craig Gillespie (I, Tonya) directed. (134 min, PG-13. Bijou Cineplex, Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In) GUNDAHHHH1/2 Calling farm fans! Viktor Kosakovskiy’s festival fave documentary takes a black-and-white deep dive into the daily life of a sow, her piglets, two cows and a one-legged chicken. (93 min, G. Savoy Theater, Sat only) IN THE HEIGHTSHHHH Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical about the dreamers of New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood comes to the screen, directed by Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians). (143 min, PG-13. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Marquis Theater, Savoy Theater, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In)

COURTESY OF WARNER BROTHERS

PETER RABBIT 2: THE RUNAWAYHH The titular bunny meets some shady characters in the city in the second family animation based on Beatrix Potter’s tales. Will Gluck directed. (93 min, PG. Bijou Cineplex, Essex Cinemas, Marquis Theater, Sunset Drive-In)

Call u today!s

A QUIET PLACE PART IIHHH1/2 Terrorized by monsters that hunt by sound, a family must venture outside its farm enclave in this sequel to the horror hit, starring Emily Blunt. John Krasinski again directed. (97 min, PG-13. Bijou Cineplex, Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Fairlee Drive-In, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In) SPIRIT UNTAMEDHH1/2 In this animated adventure, a city girl displaced to a small town tries to save her new mustang friend. With the voices of Isabela Merced and Jake Gyllenhaal. Elaine Bogan and Ennio Torresan directed. (87 min, PG. Essex Cinemas, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In)

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WED.16 business

SOCIAL MEDIA ADS MADE EASY: In this Center for Women & Enterprise webinar, businesspeople pick up tips for boosting revenue through online advertising. 8:50-9:50 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

TRUCKS, TAPS & TUNES: Each Wednesday, the Essex Experience Green serves as the grounds for a mini festival featuring food trucks, a beer trailer and live bands. Essex Experience, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@doubleevermont.com. VIRTUAL ABENAKI HERITAGE WEEKEND: The Vermont Abenaki Artists Association presents a five-day cultural celebration complete with conversations and demonstrations centered on art, tradition, language and stories. Free; preregister. Info, heritage_weekend@ abenakiart.org.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: An offbeat 2021 documentary delves into metaphysics via humorist Emily Levine’s live performance. Available for online viewing via the Vermont International Film Foundation. $12; free for VTIFF members. Info, info@vtiff.org. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: Following two siblings’ parallel lives in New York and Havana, this film shown by the Vermont International Film

Foundation reveals how family bonds can transcend politics. $12; free for VTIFF All Access and Patron members. Info, info@vtiff.org.

grape variety, style of wine or producer’s offerings. Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2368.

‘RED HEAVEN’: An out-of-this-world documentary follows four scientists, an engineer and an architect who endeavor to spend 366 days in isolation on an active volcano in Hawaii to help humanity get to Mars. Tickets include a Q&A with filmmaker Katherine Gorringe. $12; free for VTIFF All Access and Patron members. Info, info@vtiff.org.

language

‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: Shot in secret and smuggled out of Iran, this 2020 anthology film comprises four moral tales about men faced with the choice to follow orders or resist and risk everything. Presented by Vermont International Film Foundation. $12; free for VTIFF All Access and Patron members. Info, info@vtiff.org.

food & drink

BROCCOLI BAR HAPPY HOUR: Foodies top off their Pingala Café vegan meals with Sisters of Anarchy Ice Cream scoops, as well as friendly games of frisbee golf. Fisher Brothers Farm, Shelburne, 5-8 p.m. Prices vary. Info, 846-7370. MARKET ON THE GREEN: Meat, cheese, ice cream and veggies are among the local products available for purchase at this weekly marketplace. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3555. WEEKLY WINE TASTING: Themed in-store tastings take oenophiles on an adventure through a wine region,

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! All submissions must be received by Thursday at noon for consideration in the following Wednesday’s newspaper. Find our convenient form and guidelines at sevendaysvt.com/postevent. Listings and spotlights are written by Kristen Ravin. Seven Days edits for space and style. Depending on cost and other factors, classes and workshops may be listed in either the calendar or the classes section. Class organizers may be asked to purchase a class listing. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE OF THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION SOCIAL HOUR — ‘TROISIÈME MERCREDI’: Francophones fine-tune their Frenchlanguage conversation skills via Zoom. 5-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@aflcr.org.

SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate on Zoom for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Free. Info, jack_cr2@yahoo.com. WILLIAM PARKER TRIBUTE TO DAVID BUDBILL: A bassist, composer and writer, Parker honors the late Vermont poet in a concert including a musical setting of Budbill’s poem “Corot’s Pool.” $5-10. Info, leby@loiseby.com.

seminars

CHANGING THE GAME WITH IMPACT INVESTING: ALIGN YOUR MONEY WITH YOUR VALUES: Webinar participants learn how individuals, families and institutions can achieve market rates of return with their investments while serving as catalysts for positive social and environmental change. Noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, info@copperleaffinancial.com.

tech

BASIC ZOOM TRAINING: From scheduling meetings to sharing screens, the chief functions of the video chat platform become clear in a Technology for Tomorrow

seminar. 2-3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 448-0595.

theater

‘CANDIDE’: Opera Company of Middlebury presents an imaginative interpretation of Leonard Bernstein’s comic operetta. $35-60. Info, 388-1436. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: Presented by Project Y Theatre and the Women in Theatre Festival, this new musical takes audience members on a comedic journey into the world of online dating in the coronavirus era. Donations. Info, michole@projectytheatre.org.

COURTESY OF GREATER TALENT NETWORK

fairs & festivals

1 6 - 2 3 ,

trio kicks off a new outdoor concert series presented by ArtisTree Community Arts Center. Picnics are welcome. Artistree Community Arts Center, Woodstock, 6:30-8 p.m. $5; free for kids under 5. Info, 457-3500.

montréal

ST-AMBROISE MONTRÉAL FRINGE FESTIVAL: A hybrid inperson and virtual festival offers music, theater and everything in between from some of the world’s most offbeat performers. See montrealfringe.ca for details. Various Montréal locations. Prices vary. Info, 514-849-3378.

music

ALLMAN BETTS BAND: The sons of Gregg Allman and Dickey Betts join forces for a concert of new music, solo works and classic Allman Brothers tunes. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $3555. Info, 760-4634. BCA SUMMER CONCERTS: VERMONT JAZZ TRIO: Pianist Remi Savard of Montpelier, double bassist Jeremy Hill of Waterbury and percussionist Peter Schmeeckle of Stowe hit all the right notes in an al fresco concert. Burlington City Hall Park, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. MUSIC ON THE HILL: HOT PICKIN’ PARTY TRIO: The Burlington bluegrass

JUN.23 | TALKS

FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at theaters in the movies section.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section online at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are published in Kids VT, our free parenting magazine. Look for it inserted in Seven Days monthly and check out the calendar at kidsvt.com.

Business Plan How did fashion designer Eileen Fisher turn $350 into an international company? How did a trip to Argentina inspire Blake Mycoskie to start the popular shoe brand TOMS? Journalist Guy Raz seeks the answers in his NPR program “How I Built This.” In addition to Fisher and Mycoskie, Raz has interviewed entrepreneurs such as Fubu founder Daymond John, the late Kate Spade, and Ben & Jerry’s cofounders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, digging into the stories behind their enterprises. Norwich University hosts Raz for a virtual talk and Q&A as part of its Todd Lecture Series.

AN EVENING WITH GUY RAZ Wednesday, June 23, 7-8:30 p.m., online. Free; preregister. Info, 485-2633, norwich.edu/tls.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

THU.17 business

CELEBRATING WOMEN WHO LIFT UP THE WORLD: The Center for Women & Enterprise marks 26 years of helping women entrepreneurs realize their dreams with a virtual fundraiser featuring guest speaker Barbara Lynch, as well as an award presentation, live and silent auctions, and an online happy hour. 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870. MARKETING BEYOND BUSINESS AS USUAL: In a five-session series with the Center for Women & Enterprise, instructors dissect business fundamentals, branding, messaging and connecting with customers. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 391-4870.

community

ASIAN AMERICANS: THE VERMONT EXPERIENCE: A screening of “Breaking Through,” episode five in the “Asian Americans” film series from PBS, paves the way for a live discussion with Asian Americans living in Vermont. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, azielinski@ vermontpbs.org. PUBLIC MEETING: Area residents join the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, Vermont Department of Health and Lake Champlain Committee for a discussion of cyanobacteria. Zoom Meeting ID: 485 258 725#. 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-7667.

conferences

VERMONT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION SPRING CONFERENCE: Speakers elaborate on the theme of “Reimagining Our Public Spaces.” 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, christine@golden consultingllc.com.

environment

GREEN DRINKS: Jim Shallow, director of strategic conservation initiatives for the Nature Conservancy in Vermont, explains the Family Forest Carbon Program and how landowners can get involved. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, programs@sustainable woodstock.org. URINE MY GARDEN: Students of this weekly webinar learn how nutrients from urine can promote flourishing gardens and a healthier watershed. 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, julia@richearth institute.org.

etc.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Prepared foods and Celtic music by Eloise & Co. are on the menu at a pastoral party. See calendar spotlight. Fable Farm Fermentory, Barnard, food and bar service begin, 5:30 p.m.; music begins, 6 p.m. $5-20;

preregister; limited space. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com. VERMONT SKI & SNOWBOARD MUSEUM VIRTUAL HAPPY HOUR & ANNUAL MEETING: A brief discussion of future goals and past highlights sets the stage for a short film. 7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@vtssm.com.

fairs & festivals

VIRTUAL ABENAKI HERITAGE WEEKEND: See WED.16.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16. ‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

food & drink

ST. PATRICK’S DAY BREAKFAST: Speakers Chris Barbieri, Tim Hayward, Jay Hooper and Burr Morse honor Gary Hass for his contributions to the central Vermont community as guests enjoy festive fare. Farr’s Field, Waterbury, 8-9:30 a.m. $25; preregister. Info, 229-5711. THURSDAY NIGHT TAKEOUT: South Burlingtonians fill their bellies with mouthwatering fare from a rotating lineup of food trucks. Veterans Memorial Park, South Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 846-4108. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local foods, crafts and hot eats spice up Thursday afternoons. Vergennes City Park, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 233-9180.

montréal

ST-AMBROISE MONTRÉAL FRINGE FESTIVAL: See WED.16.

music

WILLIAM PARKER TRIBUTE TO DAVID BUDBILL: See WED.16.

seminars

WELCOME TO MEDICARE: Age Well’s State Health Insurance Assistance Program coordinator, Sharon O’Neill, offers an overview of the federal health insurance program for seniors. 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, selsky@ nefcu.com.

theater

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16.

words

SHARON M. DRAPER: The author reads between the lines of her Coretta Scott King Book Award-winning novel Copper Sun during an online presentation and Q&A hosted by Fletcher Free Library. 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, rthompson@burlingtonvt.gov. VIRTUAL VISITING WRITER READING: CHRISTOPHER CASTELLANI: Lit lovers lend their ears to the author of the 2019 novel Leading

Men. Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, renee.lauzon@vermontstudio center.org.

june 25 & 26

• RockFireVT.com

FRI.18 etc.

SOURDOUGH BREAD & HAND PUPPET GIVEAWAY: Social distancing and masks are required as folks pick up complimentary loaves and puppets from the socially conscious theater group. Distribution takes place in front of the theater farmhouse with signs for guidance. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 525-3031.

An Elemental Experience! Friday is Granite Heritage night with an immersive

story walk lit by luminaries. Saturday’s 2-mile FireWalk experience features thousands of luminaries, bonfires, art and performances from Bow Thayer, DJ Disco Phantom, Iron Guild, Dragons Breath and other fire performers, Scott Forrest and many more! RockFireVT.com

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fairs & festivals

VIRTUAL ABENAKI HERITAGE WEEKEND: See WED.16.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16. ‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

food & drink

RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, info@ richmondfarmersmarketvt.org.

JUNETEETH

montréal

ST-AMBROISE MONTRÉAL FRINGE FESTIVAL: See WED.16.

music

BACKSIDE 405: MAX CREEK: Food trucks and bar service complement an outdoor concert behind BCA Studios. BCA Studios, Burlington, 7 p.m. $2530; $99 for season pass. Info, 652-0777.

REMEMBER HONOR CELEBRATE

BCA SUMMER CONCERTS: KERUBO: Originally from Kenya, the Afro-jazz artist captivates audience members with her blend of blues, jazz and traditional African music. Burlington City Hall Park, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166.

We identify with your struggle and stand with you.

CONCERTS IN THE COURTYARD: PATRICK SARGENT: Toting blankets or chairs, audience members assemble outside for a rousing performance by the Sunderland guitarist and singer. Bennington Museum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 447-1571. MORETOWN OPEN MIC: Family-friendly music, short plays and spoken-word pieces entertain audience members. 7-10 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, shloinky@gmail. com.

“Lovers of Justice”

TWILIGHT SERIES: MYRA FLYNN: Strong vocals and poignant lyrics move body and soul as part of Burlington City Arts’ new concert series. Burlington FRI. 18

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City Hall Park, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166.



GREEN MOUNTAIN VETS FOR PEACE SUNDAYS > 12:00 P.M.

Hosting virtual or in-person classes?

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talks

‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16.

WEEKLY DISCUSSIONS ON CURRENT EVENTS: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal discussion led by Sandy Baird. Meet on the library lawn. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bshatara@burlingtonvt.gov.

theater

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16. STREET PERFORMER SERIES: THE FLYIN’ HAWAIIAN: Paradise meets the circus in Sara Kunz’s dazzling display of contortion, clowning and hula hooping. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, boxoffice@highlandartsvt.org.

words

VIRTUAL VISITING WRITER CRAFT TALK: CHRISTOPHER CASTELLANI: Hosted by the Vermont Studio Center, the novelist and essayist lets listeners in on his creative process. 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, renee.lauzon@vermontstudio center.org.

SAT.19

etc.

DOG MOUNTAIN FOUNDERS CELEBRATION DOG PARTY: Canines and their human companions celebrate the lives of founders Stephen and Gwen Huneck with live music, games, and treats from Makin Maple and Sweet Seasons Farm & Artisan Confections. Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, contact@dogmt.com.

Healthy adult volunteers needed for a research study to test a polio vaccine

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film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

FATHER’S DAY MARKET: Shoppers are sure to find the perfect present for Dad amid items from vendors selling pottery, woodwork, local spirits and more. Strand Center for the Arts, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, education@strand center.org.

VIRTUAL ABENAKI HERITAGE WEEKEND: See WED.16.

WILLIAM PARKER TRIBUTE TO DAVID BUDBILL: See WED.16.

bazaars

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SUMMER PICNIC DAY #2: CENTER OPEN HOUSE & OUTDOOR BOOKSTORE SALE: Bring a blanket and lunch for an afternoon of reading, walking and learning about the Tibetan Buddhist retreat center. Milarepa Center, Barnet, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, milarepa@milarepacenter.org.

fairs & festivals

BREW GRASS FESTIVAL: Beer lovers get a dose of mountaintop hops while grooving to live music and sampling local eats. No dogs or children, please. Sugarbush Resort, Warren, noon-4 p.m. $135; for ages 21 and up. Info, 583-6590.

‘GIRL SHY’: Composer Jeff Rapsis improvises a live score for the 1924 silent film starring Harold Lloyd as a bachelor who pens a guidebook for men. Brandon Town Hall, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 603-236-9237. ‘GREASE’: Sandy and Danny find summer love in the famed musical about the students of Rydell High School. Shown on a drive-in screen. Estabrook Park, Brandon, 8:45 p.m. $25 per vehicle; limited space. Info, 775-0903. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16. ‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

food & drink

BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. 345 Pine St., Burlington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, manager@ burlingtonfarmersmarket.org. CRAFTSBURY FARMERS MARKET: Food, drink, crafts and family-friendly entertainment are on the menu at an emporium of local merchandise. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 755-9030. WAITSFIELD FARMERS MARKET: A bustling bazaar boasts seasonal produce, prepared foods, artisan crafts and live entertainment. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, waitsfieldmarketmanager@ gmail.com.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at theaters in the movies section.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section online at sevendaysvt.com/ music. All family-oriented events are published in Kids VT, our free parenting magazine. Look for it inserted in Seven Days monthly and check out the calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

= ONLINE EVENT

WEEKLY WINE TASTING: See WED.16, Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Stowe, noon4 p.m. Info, 585-7717.

holidays

BURLINGTON’S JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION: Empowerment, education and entertainment are the three tiers of the first annual citywide celebration of Black liberation in the United States. See juneteenthbtv.org for the full schedule of musical performances, art installations, food vendors and learning opportunities. Various Burlington locations, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Free. Info, juneteenth@burlingtonvt. gov.

montréal

ST-AMBROISE MONTRÉAL FRINGE FESTIVAL: See WED.16.

music

GLORIOUS LEADER & GREASEFACE: Two local acts serve up indie-folk and raucous garage rock, respectively. The Barrage, Holland, 7-9:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, borderline.vt.us@ gmail.com. TWILIGHT SERIES: DWIGHT & NICOLE: Burlington City Arts hosts the local rock-soul trio as part of its new summer music series. Burlington City Hall Park, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. WILLIAM PARKER TRIBUTE TO DAVID BUDBILL: See WED.16.

sports

MAD RIVER VALLEY ROTARY CLUB GOLF TOURNAMENT: Players hit the links to benefit Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports. Sugarbush Resort Golf Club, Warren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $20. Info, 249-4312. VERMONT SENIOR GAMES BARBARA JORDAN TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS: Athletes ages 50 and up compete in foot races, pole vault and other field events. Burlington High School, 8:15 a.m.-5 p.m. $40. Info, 779-5119.

tech

OLD NORTH END REPAIR CAFÉ: Volunteers fix malfunctioning devices (or help folks fix them themselves) for free. Laboratory B, Burlington, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free; preregister to volunteer. Info, info@laboratoryb.org.

theater

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16.

SUN.20 etc.

SUMMER SOLSTICE COMMUNITY CEREMONY: Folks bring flower offerings to Lake Champlain to celebrate the season with the Green Mountain Druid Order. Burlington Earth Clock, Oakledge Park, 6 p.m. Free. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

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Playing Outside Feast & Field Market checks all the boxes for a classically Vermonty event. Meals made with locally grown ingredients? Check. Live music from a diverse lineup of performers? Check. An idyllic outdoor setting? Definitely. Held on a working farm in rural Barnard, this weekly all-ages mini festival features a fresh musical act each week in partnership with BarnArts Center for the Arts’ Music on the Farm series. On June 17, folks enjoy food and bar service amid acoustic traditional tunes from fiddle-andaccordion duo Eloise & Co.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET Thursday, June 17, food and bar service begin, 5:30 p.m.; music begins, 6 p.m., at Fable Farm in Barnard. $5-20; preregister; limited space. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com, feastandfield.com.

fairs & festivals

STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL: Families relish the ripe red fruit with shortcake amid offerings from area artisans. Middletown Springs Historical Society, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 235-2421. VIRTUAL ABENAKI HERITAGE WEEKEND: See WED.16.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16. ‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

food & drink

FEAST FROM THE FARMS: Foodies visit three Norwich farms on a self-guided tour by car or bike. Rain date: June 27. Norwich Historical Society and

Community Center, 8-11 a.m. & 1-4 p.m. $15-25; additional cost for farm ingredients and recipes; preregister. Info, 649-1419, ext. 5.

montréal

holidays

music

FATHER’S DAY CELEBRATION: Dads get free admission for a day of field games and crafts, fueled by root beer floats, burgers and hot dogs. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $8-16; free for dads, members and kids ages 3 and under. Info, 457-2355.

lgbtq

PRIDE HIKES: SHELBURNE BAY PARK: LGBTQA+ hikers meander past woods and rolling meadows on their way to the Lake Chaplain shore. A creemee outing follows. Shelburne Bay Park, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, gwendolyn.causer@ audubon.org.

ST-AMBROISE MONTRÉAL FRINGE FESTIVAL: See WED.16.

TRACY MESSER: The New Hampshire-based living history performer channels a former president in his presentation “Calvin Coolidge: Vermont Is a State I Love.” Bennington Museum, 2-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 447-1571. WILLIAM PARKER TRIBUTE TO DAVID BUDBILL: See WED.16.

sports

SOLSTICE RIDE: Cyclists take to class IV roads and gravel on a 50to 80-mile ride. Bootlegger Bikes, Jefffersonville, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, info@bootlegger bikes.com.

SUN.20

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calendar SUN.20

EV E N T S O N SA L E N OW BUY ONLINE AT SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

VCET Lunch & Learn: What Startups Need to Know About Cybersecurity WED., JUN. 16 VIRTUAL EVENT

WED., JUN. 16 VIRTUAL EVENT

VCET Lunch & Learn: Accelerate Your Sales WED., JUN. 23 VIRTUAL EVENT

THU., JUN. 24 VIRTUAL EVENT

The Junction Dance Festival — Summer Fundraiser SAT., JUN. 26 THE BARN IN CORINTH

Ethiopian and Eritrean Cuisine Takeout SAT., JUN. 26 O.N.E COMMUNITY CENTER, BURLINGTON

SUN., JUN. 27 THE CENTER COMMONS, WATERBURY CENTER

VCET Lunch and Learn: Is it Time to Transform Grind Culture?

MAKE MUSIC DAY: Musicians of all ages and experience levels take to sidewalks, porches and public spaces as part of this global gathering. Downtown St. Albans, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, 527-7243. SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Burlington’s own samba street percussion band welcomes new members. No experience or instruments required. Call to confirm location. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

theater

‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16.

TUE.22

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16.

The Chaine Du Vermont Presents: A Bastille Day Fete

‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16.

WED., JUL. 14 HOTEL VERMONT, BURLINGTON

‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

MORE EVENTS ONLINE AT SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

music

film

TUE., JUL. 13 VIRTUAL EVENT

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‘A SENSE OF WONDER’: Available for online viewing for 24 hours starting on June 22, this 2008 biographical film profiles Silent Spring author Rachel Carson in the final months of her life. See a discussion with scientist Tierra Curry at 6 p.m. on June 23. Free. Info, programs@ sustainablewoodstock.org.

HOMESHARING INFO SESSION: Locals learn to make the most of spare space in their homes by hosting compatible housemates. Noon-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@ homesharevermont.org.

SAT., JUL. 10 GREEN STATE GARDENER, BURLINGTON

56

‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16.

community

Green State Gardener Block Party feat. Dead Sessions

No cost to you Local support Built-in promotion Custom options

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

music

EUGENE FRIESEN: With his Royal Chilharmonic project, the Grammy Awardwinning cellist creates a virtual symphony by adding electronics and prerecorded sounds to his trademark solo work. Presented by the Lebanon Opera House. 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@ lebanonoperahouse.org.

talks

POWER OF CONNECTION: STORIES OF STRENGTH & RESILIENCE: Three speakers share stories of trial and success as part of this Mercy Connections celebration. Leslie McCrorey Wells is honored for her work in the community. 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 846-7063.

SELL TIX WITH US!

Contact: 865-1020, ext. 10 getstarted@sevendaystickets.com

language

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATIONS: Francophones and French-language learners meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 343-5166.

agriculture

GARDENING WITH WILDFLOWERS: MAKING SPACE FOR POLLINATORS & OTHER WILDLIFE: Hoping to bring bees, hummingbirds and butterflies to your yard, patio or community plot? Get tips from this complimentary Vermont Land Trust webinar. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, pieter@vlt.org.

business

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16.

fairs & festivals

theater

words

TRUCKS, TAPS & TUNES: See WED.16.

MAUDELLE DRISKELL & ABIGAIL WENDER: Vermont Studio Center’s Writer to Writer: Conversations on Craft & Featured Readings series pairs these two wordsmiths together to read from their work and discuss aspects of life as a working writer. 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, renee.lauzon@vermont studiocenter.org.

film

OUTDOOR POETRY READING: FOUR VERMONT POETS: Galaxy Bookshop celebrates the start of summer with readings from Vermont wordsmiths Lizzy Fox, Samantha Kolber, Scudder Parker and Diana Whitney. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 472-5533.

‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at theaters in the movies section.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section online at sevendaysvt.com/ music. All family-oriented events are published in Kids VT, our free parenting magazine. Look for it inserted in Seven Days monthly and check out the calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

= ONLINE EVENT 6/15/21 12:50 PM

WED.23

VERMONT CENTER FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES LUNCH & LEARN: ACCELERATE YOUR SALES: Businesspeople learn key actions to get from sales preparation to close. Noon-1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 866-232-9423.

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16.

Park Dancing: A Community-Made Dance

• • • •

MON.21

‘THERE IS NO EVIL’: See WED.16.

VCET Lunch & Learn: Strategic Innovation and Disaster Planning for the Future

WE CAN HELP!

‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16.

‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16.

SUN., JUN. 20 VIRTUAL EVENT

Fundraisers Festivals Plays & Concerts Sports

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16.

‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16.

Summer Solstice Ceremonial Film & Meditation

• • • •

theater

film

Seasons of Life: A Supportive Community for Women

SELLING TICKETS?

« P.55

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EMILY @ THE EDGE OF CHAOS’: See WED.16. ‘LOS HERMANOS’: See WED.16. ‘RED HEAVEN’: See WED.16. ‘A SENSE OF WONDER’: See MON.21, 6-7 p.m.

food & drink

BROCCOLI BAR HAPPY HOUR: See WED.16. MARKET ON THE GREEN: See WED.16. WEEKLY WINE TASTING: See WED.16.

music

BCA SUMMER CONCERTS: MARCIE HERNANDEZ TRIO: Latin rhythms enliven indie folk selections from the singer-songwriter’s debut album Amanecer. Burlington City Hall Park, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. MUSIC ON THE HILL: NAT WILLIAMS & EMILY MUSTY: Picnics are welcome at an outdoor recital by the acoustic singer-songwriter cover duo. Artistree Community Arts Center, Woodstock, 6:30-8 p.m. $5; free for kids under 5. Info, 457-3500.

talks

AN EVENING WITH GUY RAZ: Members of the public and the Norwich University community open their minds for a virtual talk and Q&A by the host of the NPR program and podcast “How I Built This.” Raz is the 2021 Residency Conference keynote and Todd Lecture Series speaker. See calendar spotlight. 7-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 485-2633.

theater

‘CANDIDE’: See WED.16. ‘CLOSE (BUT NOT TOO CLOSE!)’: See WED.16. m


ConGRADulate your hardworking student! Let Seven Days salute their accomplishments in Life Lines.

lifelines

Post a celebratory graduation announcement online and in print at sevendaysvt.com/graduates. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 ext.110.

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classes art

gardening

VT FOLKLIFE SUMMER INSTITUTE: Curious about community-led interviewing? Interested in digital media production and cultural documentation? Join the Vermont Folklife Center for a 10-day hybrid online/in person field school. The course includes an introduction to digital media making with a critical lens on documentary work and the ethics of representation. Aug. 2-13, Mon.-Fri., 10:30 a.m.-noon; 1:30-4:30 p.m. Cost: $800/45-hour course, w/ 3 graduate credits avail.; funded fellowships avail. Location: Vermont Folklife Center/Virtual, Middlebury or all Virtual. Info: Sasha Antohin, 388-4964, aantohin@vermontfolklifecenter. org. vermontfolklifecenter.org/ summer-institute.

GROW A REGNERATIVE GARDEN: For backyard gardeners awake to the climate crisis: Our master gardener will teach you how to regenerate your soil with cover crops, bokashi composting and other tested carbonsequestration techniques. Daily guided meditations in the garden, forests and meadows to reconnect you to this precious earth and all its inhabitants. Jul. 31-Aug. 14. Cost: $860/2week regenerative gardening & meditation program. Location: Karme Choling Meditation Center, 369 Patneaude Ln., Barnet. Info: Mike de Give, 633-2384-3122, mdegive@ karmecholing.org. karmecholing. org/program?id=6668.

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: This school was developed to communicate the importance of proper, legitimate and complete Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu instruction. We cover fundamentals of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu with a realistic approach to self-defense training skills in a friendly, safe and positive environment. All are welcome; no experience required. Develop confidence, strength and endurance. Julio Cesar “Foca” Fernandez Nunes was born and raised on the shores of Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Earning his black belt and representing the Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team, Julio “Foca” went on to become a five-time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu National Champion, three-time Rio de Janeiro State Champion and two-time IBJJF World JiuJitsu Champion! Julio “Foca” is the only CBJJP, USBJJF and IBJJF-certified seventh-degree coral belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and self-defense instructor under late grand master Carlson Gracie Sr. currently teaching in the USA. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@bjjusa. com. vermontbjj.com.

language

climbing

LEARN SPANISH LIVE & ONLINE: Broaden your world. Learn Spanish online via live video conferencing. High-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Our 15th year. Personal small group and individual instruction from a native speaker. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com. spanishwaterburycenter.com.

meditation

THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

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martial arts

CLIMBING CLINICS AND LESSONS: Come to Petra Cliffs and start or improve your climbing. We offer evening three-week adult coed and women’s clinics that run regularly beginning the first week of every month. Intro, intermediate and lead climbing levels. Private lessons can be catered to individual needs and schedules. 3-week clinics: weekday evenings. Private lessons: anytime. Cost: $160/3 2-hour sessions for clinics, varying costs for members, multiple sign-ups. Location: Petra Cliffs Climbing Center, 105 Briggs St., Burlington. Info: Andrea Charest, 657-3872, info@petracliffs.com petracliffs.com.

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO DRUMMING: JOIN US!: New hybrid classes (Zoom and in-person) starting! Taiko, Tue. and Wed. Djembe, Wed. Kids and Parents, Tue. and Wed. COVID-19-free rental instruments, curbside pickup, too. Private Hybrid Conga lessons by appointment. Let’s prepare for future drumming outdoors. Schedule/register online. Location: Online & in-person at Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 9994255. burlingtontaiko.org.

MINDFUL HABIT CHANGE: Four-week facilitated group. Daily exercises delivered by apps Unwinding Anxiety, Eat Right Now, and Craving to Quit. Topics: how we form habits, coping with triggers, working with difficult emotions. Facilitated by Mary Ford, nurse, yoga teacher in training with Judson Brewer MD, PhD, a neuroscientist and addiction psychiatrist. Four Wed., starting Jul. 7, 6:30-7:45 p.m. Cost: $75/person for 4 classes & access to one app. Location: Online, Montpelier. Info: Change With More Ease, Mary Ford, 7936221, maryford@change-withmore-ease.com. change-withmore-ease.com.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Whether you are new to yoga or have been at it for years, you’ll find the support you need to awaken your practice. Now offering outdoor in-person classes overlooking Lake Champlain! Livestream and recorded classes continue. Flexible pricing based on your needs, scholarships avail. Single class: $0-15. Weekly membership: $10-25. 10-class pass: $140. New student special: $20 for 3 classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642. evolutionvt.com.

CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES 58

SEVEN DAYS JULY 16-23, 2021

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6/8/21 4:18 PM


COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

Humane

Society of Chittenden County

housing »

Roscoe

AGE/SEX: 9-year-old neutered male AGE: 6 years old REASON HERE: There were behavioral concerns in his previous home. ARRIVAL DATE: June 3, 2021 SUMMARY: Roscoe is a senior gentleman looking for a home where he can spend time with other grown-ups. He’s a laid-back guy who is content to sit back and relax most of the time, but he does enjoy walks, playing fetch and going for car rides. He likes being with his people but doesn’t mind some alone time, either — especially if there’s a window nearby where he can keep an eye on the neighborhood. If you’re looking for a canine companion who’s happy to be by your side or doing his own thing — and who happens to have one of the cutest smiles around — Roscoe would love to meet you!

DID YOU KNOW?

Roscoe is this month’s Pronature Pal! His adoption fee is sponsored by the kind people at Pronature Canada, plus he will go home with six months of free dog food and a $50 gift card from our pals at Pet Food Warehouse to help him get settled!

Sponsored by:

CATS/DOGS/KIDS: Roscoe has done well with other dogs but does not always like sharing resources with them. He has limited experience with cats. He has lived with a young child but is now looking for an adults-only home. Visit the Humane Society of Chittenden County at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 or visit hsccvt.org for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

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INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

59


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2000 SUZUKI 2012 SUBARU INTRUDER FORESTER MASSAGE NEEDED 800 cc cruise, twin Good condition, Massage at my home custom exhaust chrome, sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM 6/14/21 12:01 1 PM standard, 114K miles. SmClassyDisplay-Pierce060921.indd in Burlington, need new battery and tuneFront brakes 64K, new not be licensed but up, wind screen, leather tires 74K, tune-up be good. Call Dave, AUTO INSURANCE saddle bags. Excellent 94K. Rear brakes 103K. 561-629-4990. Starting at $49/mo.! condition, stored inside. Battery 112K. $4K/OBO. Call for your fee rate skyhorse205@yahoo. HEARING AIDS! 203-257-8339. PSYCHIC COUNSELING comparison to see how com. Buy 1 & get 1 free! Psychic counseling, much you can save. Call: High-quality rechargechanneling w/ Bernice 855-569-1909. (AAN able Nano hearing Kelman, Underhill. 30+ CAN). aids priced 90% less years’ experience. Also than competitors. energy healing, chakra DO YOU OWE OVER BECOME A PUBLISHED Nearly invisible. 45-day $10K AUTHOR! balancing, Reiki, rebirthmoney-back guarantee! to the IRS or state in We edit, print & ing, other lives, classes, 2006 KEYSTONE 1-833-585-1117. (AAN back taxes? Our firm distribute your work more. 802-899-3542, KEEN’S CROSSING IS Outback 27 RSDS, 2 CAN). works to reduce the internationally. We do kelman.b@juno.com. NOW LEASING! slide-outs, 1 awning, 1 tax bill or zero it out the work; you reap the 1-BR, $1,026/mo.; 2-BR, A/C unit. Sleeps 6. Info rewards! Call for a free SEE THE WORLD $1,230/mo.; 3-BR, at tvhein@twnemail. TEACHER Author’s Submission $1,422/mo. Spacious com. Asking $2,000. Everyone will soon see Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN interiors, fully appli802-419-9396. the World Teacher (aka: CAN) . anced kitchen, fitness Maitreya Buddha, Christ, center, heat & HW incl. Iman Mahdi, Krishna, Income restrictions etc). Won’t send anyone apply. 802-655-1810, to “hell.” Has perfect, keenscrossing.com. unconditional love EVENTS for everyone. Details: PHOTOGRAPHER share-international.org. Reasonably priced (AAN CAN). photojournalist avail. for special events, weddings. Update your headshot. Training OFFICE SPACE FOR on all aspects of appt. appointment RENT digital photography. LONG-DISTANCE $10 per sqft., up to apt. apartment MOVING Visit boblphoto.com/ 5,000 sqft. avail. White-glove service events & boblphoto. Call Samantha at BA bathroom from America’s top com/headshots for 802-879-1863. billing@ movers. Fully insured samples. Contact: bob@ BR bedroom champlainobgyn.com Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 & bonded. Let us take motorcycle-vermont. the stress out of your com. robbihandyholmes@vtregroup.com DR dining room OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE out-of-state move. Free AT MAIN STREET Client focused quotes! Call: 888-841RAINBOW FAMILY DW dishwasher LANDING GATHERING 0629 (AAN CAN). Making it happen for you! on Burlington’s waterHDWD hardwood front. Beautiful, healthy, In July in Pennsylvania. Nerf / Fern Kitchen. affordable spaces for HW hot water For more information your business. Visit contact vtschool- 16t-Robbihandiholmes061621.indd 1 6/9/21 2:59 PM mainstreetlanding.com LR living room bus151@gmail.com. & click on space avail.

2010 PORSCHE CAYMAN 6 CYL 2.9L, 7-speed auto. RWD. Speed yellow/sand beige leather interior. One owner. Highly maintained. Clean title. Garaged on concrete. Complete service record. Incl. 2nd set of tires/wheels. Original carpeted floor mats: new. Non smoking vehicle. 53K miles. VIN: WPOAA2A89AU760360. 265 HP, 221 lb.-ft. torque, PSM, ABS, ASR, BD, 17-inch tires/wheels. Stainless steel exhaust. New battery. Speed-activated rear spoiler. Cruise, remote entry alarm, Home Link, AM/FM/CD plus more. 16.9 gal tank. $29,000 (Montpelier). Serious inquiries only. Contact info: 802-279-2444 or email: styles.signature@ yahoo.com.

FINANCIAL/LEGAL HEALTH/ WELLNESS

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our

BIZ OPPS

FOR RENT

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readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

HOME/GARDEN

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ENTERTAINMENT DISH TV $59.99 for 190 channels + $14.95 high-speed internet. Free installation, smart HD DVR incl., free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN).

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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FURNITURE ETHAN ALLEN RECLINER Excellent condition, smoke-free home, leather recliner. $1,200 new. $300. Email towndump@tedalbers.net.

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Homeshares CHARLOTTE

Share rural farmhouse w/ senior woman who enjoys literature & classical music. Seeking housemate to cook 2-3 meals/wk, assist with gardening & share companionship. $300/mo. Furnished bdrm; private BA. Must be cat-friendly; no add’l pets.

FLETCHER Delightful, travelled senior gentleman offering reduced rent of $200/mo. in exchange for household help & transportation. Private BA.

UNDERHILL Nature-lover in her 80s seeking housemate to help weed gardens, shovel in the winter & cook twice a week. $300/mo. Must love pets! Private BA.

Finding you just the right housemate for over 35 years! Call 863-5625 or visit HomeShareVermont.org for an application. Interview, refs, bg check req. EHO Homeshare-temp2.indd 1

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MARTIN MASONRY & CONTRACTING Insured/protected. Walkways, fireplaces, chimneys, brick, block, stone, slate, etc. New builds, repairs. Chimney services. martinmasonry.802@gmail.com. Visit our website today! Our work is rock-solid.

6/7/21 12:51 PM


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Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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Restaurant Equipment Online with Lots Closing Monday, June 21 @ 12PM 131 Dorset Lane, Williston, VT

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES

Antiques & Collectibles Online with Lots Closing Tuesday, June 22 @ 10AM 131 Dorset Lane, Williston, VT

Wednesday, June 30 @ 11AM 118 Barre St., Montpelier, VT

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Katie, 865-1020, ext. 110, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

QUEEN ANNE COTTAGE

NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE Lakeview Terrace. Park your car & stroll along the many sales to be held on the Terrace this Sat., Jun. 19, beginning at 9 a.m. Lots of bargains, art, furniture, tools, toys & unique items. At least 12 families participating. 3 blocks north of Battery Park, 1 block west of North Ave. No rain date, so hope for good weather & come out home stove and alcove.” for some fun treasure $500. Tel 802-578-4601. hunting! FSBO-Reagan061621.indd 1

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WOOD STOVE FOR SALE Avalon Model 1190. Black w/ brass/glass door. Owner’s manual states, “Approved for masonry fireplace, hearth mount stove to masonry fireplace, residential freestanding stove, freestanding mobile

MISCELLANEOUS

Charming, cozy, Queen Anne Cottage (1894) on 45 Howard Street (Five Sisters Neighborhood) in Burlington. 1,177 SF on 7,365 SF corner lot – 2 BR, 2 Bath - Queen AnneFiveSisters. com. Open House on Jun. 19, noon-2 p.m. $499,950 802-504-4545 you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo.! 1-888-519-0171. (AAN CAN).

4 FIRESTONE RADIAL TIRES P225 / 60R 18; $200 for all 4. From Chrysler 300; less than 10K miles. Call 802-989-7279 or email shovelthree@ comcast.net.

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HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET Finally, no hard data limits! Call today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. (AAN CAN).

FOR SALE PLAYER PIANO FOR SALE Functioning, refinished, refurbished electric Duo Art player piano. Valued at $4,000, selling for $1,000. 200 + rolls, service manual. More info: carpenterg@ myfairpoint.net. Subject: player piano.

SAVE UP TO 80% ON YOUR MEDICATION Eliquis, Xarelto, Viagra, Cialis & more. Licensed & certified. Lowest price guaranteed. Call 855-750-1612 & get free shipping on your first order. (Open Mon.-Fri.) (AAN CAN).

GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

STILL PAYING TOO MUCH for your medication? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today & receive free shipping on first order. Prescription required. Call 1-855-7501612 (AAN CAN).

gift card! Get more channels for less money. Restrictions apply. Call10:31 AM 6/15/21 now. 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN).

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DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting trucks, motorcycles & RVs, too! Fast, free pickup. Running or not. 24-hour response. Maximum tax donation. Call 877-2660681 (AAN CAN).

HYDROGEN VERMONT Stop greenhouse gases entering Earth’s atmosphere. Join action group devising public information strategies advocating banning fossil fuel exhaust by switching to hydrogen fuel. Contact: hydrogen. vermont@gmail.com

BANDS/ MUSICIANS LIVE LOCAL MUSIC & POTLUCK Jun. 18, 6-8 p.m., Church of God of Prophecy, Quarry Hill, Barre, Vt. Music: the L & B Girls,

Open House: Thurs., June 17, 11AM-1PM FROM P.61

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52 Mt. Mansfield Ave.,Colchester, VT

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c mmercialworks

Christopher Preston 802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

High traffic/visibility in this newly converted/renovated garage, class A office complex. ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic. Hookups include a NEMA 14-50 outlet and a standard cold-water spigot with anti-siphon. Daily/Weekly/Monthly rates available, includes trash/ recycling and 100% of CAM, lessee responsible for electric.

1 6/8/21 CW-NotchGroupOffice1-060921.indd 10:02 AM

The District 4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51— Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0329-17P.” No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before July 1, 2021, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing, or the Commission sets the matter for a hearing on its own motion. Any person as defined in 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1) may request a hearing. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or sub-criteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other person eligible for party status under 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1)(E) must include a petition for party status under the Act 250 Rules. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law may not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this

BURLINGTON | 187 SOUTH WINOOSKI AVE.

Christopher Preston 802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

The Shambhala Buddhist Center seeks a health/wellness organization or individual/s to sublet all or part of our spacious, attractive multi-room space, on the top floor, 187 South Winooski Ave, Monday-Friday, during regular business hours. Evenings, weekends negotiable. Utilities, kitchenette, bathrooms, stair lift, air purifiers, Wi-Fi. Price negotiable.

Scott Perry, 802-238-7656, raymondsperry@gmail.com

Legal Notices ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C032917P 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On June 3, 2021, Heco Rentals LLC, 9 Colonel Page Road, Essex, VT 05452 filed application number 4C0329-17P for a project generally described as construction of three new 6,000 sf (18,000 sf total) warehouse buildings with associated parking and stormwater improvements on Lot 10 in Phase II of the Saxon Hill Industrial Park. The project is located at 10 Corporate Drive in Essex, Vermont.

COMMERCIAL SUBLET

JEFFERSONVILLE | 185 CHURCH ST.

JEFFERSONVILLE | 185 CHURCH ST.

CW-NotchGroupOffice060921.indd 1

40 WORDS + PHOTO). SUBMIT TO: KHODGES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM BY MONDAYS AT NOON.

FOOD TRUCK SPOT!

CLASS A OFFICE SPACE

Newly converted/renovated garage, class A office/retail. ~520 SF of usable office, ~150 SF of usable patio, and ~175 SF. rentable/shared lobby and bath (ADA Compliant). ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic per VTRANS. Monthly/Yearly modified gross leases available, includes radiant heat, trash/recycling, and 100% of CAM. Lessee responsible for electric/internet.

ATTENTION REALTORS: LIST YOUR PROPERTIES HERE FOR ONLY $45 (INCLUDE

6/8/21 CommercialWorks-Perry051921.indd 9:55 AM 1

PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110.

case, please contact the District Coordinator as soon as possible, and by no later than July 1, 2021.

(bed and breakfast) and two-bedroom boarding house within duplex. No construction proposed.

If you have a disability for which you need accommodation in order to participate in this process (including participating in a public hearing, if one is held), please notify us as soon as possible, in order to allow us as much time as possible to accommodate your needs.

3. ZP-20-72; 15 Rockland Street (RL, Ward 7N) James Daigle

Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent that they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the Act 250 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 8th day of June, 2021. By: _/s/Rachel Lomonaco__________ Rachel Lomonaco, District Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Rachel.Lomonaco@vermont.gov BURLINGTON DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2021, 5:00 PM AMENDED PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Physical location: 645 Pine Street, Front Conference Room, Burlington VT 05401 Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84713629087 ?pwd=Z29nZDd3ekc2U3pNdmVpVW4yVnJrUT09 Password: 350327 Webinar ID: 847 1362 9087 Telephone: +1 312 626 6799 or +1 929 205 6099 or +1 301 715 8592 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 253 215 8782 1. ZP-20-671; 41 Pine Place (RM, Ward 5S) Sam Catalano 2. Request for three-bedroom short-term rental

5/14/21 3:33 PM

Request extension of ZP# 20-0687CA to construct new duplex. Two-car garage under each unit. Each unit having own driveway, front porch and rear porch. 4. ZP-21-421; 12-22 North Street (NMU, Ward 3C) Draker Solar Properties LLC Converting basement space to small brewery and tasting counter. 5. ZP-21-213; 38 Latham Court (RL, Ward 1E) Mark McGee Two-story addition; first floor shop and second floor office space. Roof replacement. Patio door and window replacements. 6. ZP-21-446; 501 Pine Street (ELM, Ward 5S) Vermont Gas Systems Inc Construct parking and service area for food truck stop (cafe). Plans may be viewed upon request by contacting the Department of Permitting & Inspections between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Participation in the DRB proceeding is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. Please note that ANYTHING submitted to the Zoning office is considered public and cannot be kept confidential. This may not be the final order in which items will be heard. Please view final Agenda, at www.burlingtonvt.gov/dpi/drb/agendas or the office notice board, one week before the hearing for the order in which items will be heard.

IF YOU HAVE OWNED REAL PROPERTY IN OR AROUND BENNINGTON OR NORTH BENNINGTON, VERMONT, IN THE AREA OF PFOA EXPOSURE, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE AFFECTED BY A CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT. You may be affected by a class action lawsuit called Sullivan, et al. v. Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation, No. 5:16-cv-125, in the United States District Court for the District of Vermont. Residents of Bennington and North Bennington have sued

Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation (“Saint-Gobain”). They allege that Saint-Gobain contaminated their property and drinking water with a chemical called Perfluorooctanoic Acid (“PFOA”). The Court has allowed the lawsuit to proceed as a class action. The Property Class includes any natural person (not a corporate entity) who owned real property on March 14, 2016 in the Zone of Concern, an area delineated by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (“DEC”) in and around Bennington and North Bennington, or who purchased real property after March 14, 2016 that was subsequently added to the Zone of Concern by the Vermont DEC. The Property Class is seeking compensation for loss of value of real property and other property-related damages. A map of the Zone of Concern can be found at www. BenningtonVTClassAction.com. If you are a property owner in the Zone of Concern, your legal rights are affected, and you must decide whether to stay in the lawsuit and be bound by the results of the lawsuit OR ask to be excluded no later than August 2, 2021 and maintain your right to pursue your own separate lawsuit against Saint-Gobain. More information, including a detailed notice, is available at: www.BenningtonVTClassAction.com or by calling 855-711-2079. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LEIN SALE: FORT ETHAN ALLEN MINI STORAGE 120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446 8026547779 Notice is hereby given that the contents of the following will be sold to the public by sealed bid. The sale is being held to collect unpaid fees ,late charges and expenses of the sale. Elizabeth Lowe unit 68 Donald Nicoles unit 147 Anita Vorsteveld unit 112 Storage unit sale will take place on June 19th, 2021

LEGALS » SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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Legal Notices PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110.

[CONTINUED] beginning at 10A.M, at Fort Ethan Allen Mini Storage ,120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446. The winning bidder must remove all contents.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT PROBATE DIVISION CHITTENDEN UNIT DOCKET: 21-PR-00761 In re ESTATE OF Grant Gundlach Late of Burlington, Vermont NOTICE TO CREDITORS

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STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT PROBATE DIVISION CHITTENDEN UNIT DOCKET NO.: 21-PR-02399 In re ESTATE of Florence C. Paris NOTICE TO CREDITORS To the creditors of: Florence C. Paris, late of Shelburne, Vermont. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Dated: June 9, 2021 Signature of Fiduciary: /s/ Donald Messier Executor/Adminstrator: Donald Messier 10 Beech Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-272-4339 dilbertdonald@yahoo.com Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: June 16, 2021 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT PROBATE DIVISION CHITTENDEN UNIT DOCKET NO.: 765-720 CNPR In re ESTATE of Dianne Rosen Pallmerine NOTICE TO CREDITORS

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To the creditors of: Dianne Rosen Pallmerine late of Colchester. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

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Dated: 6/8/2021 Signature of Fiduciary: /s/ Kathi J. Monteith Executor/Adminstrator: Kathi J. Monteith P.O,.Box 193 Shelburne, VT 05482 802-448-3735 kathi@kjmguardianship.net Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: 06/16/21

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Name of Probate Court: Chittenden Probate Court Address of Probate Court: P.O. Box 511., Burlington, VT 05402

To The Creditors Of: Grant Gundlach late of Burlington, Vermont I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to us at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim will be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Dated: __June 8, 2021 Signed /s/ Bruce Quay Bruce Quay, Administrator Address: c/o Little & Cicchetti, P.C. P.O. Box 907, Burlington, VT 05402-0907 Telephone: 802-862-6511 Email: ben.luna@lclawvt.com Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: June 16, 2021 Address of Court: Chittenden Unit Probate Court 175 Main Street P.O. Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402-0511 TOWN OF ESSEX PLANNING COMMISSION – PUBLIC HEARING AGENDA JULY 8, 2021-6:30 P.M. This meeting will be held remotely. - Join via Microsoft Teams https://www.essexvt. org/869/Join-Teams-Meeting-Essex-PC Depending on your browser, you may need to call in for audio (below). - Join via conference call (audio only): (802) 377-3784 | Conference ID: 590 879 654 # - Public wifi is available at the Essex municipal offices, libraries, and hotspots listed here: https:// publicservice.vermont.gov/content/ public-wifi-hotspots-vermont 1. Discussion & Election of Officers 2. Public Comments 3. CONSENT AGENDA: - MINOR SUBDIVISION: Lois Kenney: Proposal to transfer 10 acres from 126 Brigham Hill Ln to 154 Brigham Hill Ln located in the C1 Zone. Tax Map 13, Parcels 20 & 21-4. - SIMPLE PARCEL: Thomas & Karen Whitcomb: Proposal to split a 7.18-acre parcel into 2 lots, 3.07-acres & 4.11 acres located at 125 Weed Rd in the AR Zone & the SRPO. Tax Map 8, Parcel 4-7. 3. Minutes: June 24, 2021 4. Other Business Visit our website at www.essex.org.

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS:

jobs.sevendaysvt.com 64

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x121.

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65 JUNE 16-23, 2021

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POST-A-JOB PRINT DEADLINE: NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) FOR RATES & INFO: MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X121, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM CONANT METAL & LIGHT IS HIRING PRODUCTION MAKERS AND A SHOP MANAGER. You must be a creative problem-solver, team player, good with your hands and capable of mastering a broad array of processes. Please visit our website: conantmetalandlight.com/ employment for more information or send a resume detailing your interest, experience, and skills to jolene@conantmetalandlight.com. 2h-ContantMetal&Light060921.indd 1

• Full time year round employment • Good benefits • EOE/M/F/VET/Disability employer • Pay negotiable with experience

Wednesday, June 16, Noon.

Electro-Mechancial Assemblers

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Vermont Tent Company

Meat Cutter SIGN-ON Bonus is available in most Vermont stores.

Apply online

Hannaford.com/Careers

For full descriptions and to apply: https://careers.agilent.com/

We are seeking experienced educators full of character and drive. Team members will contribute to an educational model with the goal of producing responsible and driven individuals. For more information, please visit: greenmountaincommunityschool. org/home-2/current-opportunities

5/28/21 4:16 PM

HIRING IN ALL DEPARTMENTS!

Currently Hiring: •

E.O.E.

We have part time, full time, and key leadership roles available throughout our stores in Vermont.

Find out more at our Hire Up Session:

CNC Machinists

Apply in person: 252 Avenue C, Williston, VT 05495 802-862-6473

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BioTek, now a part of Agilent is a market leader in detection and imaging instrumentation for life science and drug discovery research. Our global customers include academic, government, and biotech/pharmaceutical companies.

EDUCATORS

CDL CLASS A DRIVER/ROOFER

or contact your local Hannaford and ask to speak to a hiring manager.

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5/10/21

is currently accepting applications for the following positions for immediate employment. We have full time, part time, and weekend hours available for each position. Pay rates vary by position with minimum starting wage ranging from $15$20/hour depending on job skills and experience with an hourly retention bonus available for hours worked August through 10:27 AM October.

Opportunities include: • Tent Installation/ Delivery Team

Line Cook at Dedalus Wine in Stowe We are looking for ambitious, creative team players who are eager to create exciting food to pair with great wine. Dedalus seeks to create a jovial, celebratory atmosphere and a great cook is a key player in fostering that energy and enthusiasm. A great line cook should be quick, focused, detail-oriented, and be able to remain calm under pressure. Benefits include: $18-$25/HR, $500 sign-on bonus after 3 months, Health Care benefits including vision and dental, PTO, Sick Days, 35% discount on products offered in store For a more detailed description and how to apply: https://dedaluswine.com/pages/jobs-line-cook

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• Driver/Warehouse Team – Event Division

Hardwick, Vermont — Full Time

Individuals with experience in HACCP plans, inventory management, and pest management. Leadership and project management skills are essential to the role.

Other Full Time Positions Available

Fulfillment Specialist | Goat Farm Team Member HTST Operator | Apprentice Cheesemaker Experienced Cheesemaker | Milk Truck Driver

For more details and to apply online, visit:

JASPERHILLFARM.COM/EMPLOYMENT 6/7/21 4t-JasperHill061621.indd 10:11 AM 1

• Drivers/Delivery • Linen Team • Inventory Maintenance – Wash Bay & Warehouse • Load Crew Team Members

For job descriptions and application: vttent.com/employment

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6/14/21 6:33 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

66

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

CHARLOTTE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

Athens Diner, Colchester VT is now hiring.

JEWELRY SALES ASSOCIATE

Wait Staff

We are looking for PT or FT wait staff, open 7 days per week, 6am-2pm.

Dishwasher/Line Prep Cook We are looking for experienced dishwasher(s) and line prep cook(s), willing to train the right candidate. Weekends are required. Apply: athensdinerHR@ dairbhre.com

Hiring Super Star CAREGivers Like You!

Charlotte Congregational Church E mbr a c e d by t h e h ealing love

Don’t miss our

Fine Jewelers located in Stowe has an opening for a sales associate. Jewelry sales experience required. Graduate gemologist preferred but not mandatory. E-mail resume to bferro@ferrojewelers.com.

of Je su s C h r i st a nd i nsp i r e d by H is t each ing s,

PA R T- T I M E

we c om m i t t o p r aye r f u l , c o m pas s io nat e and

B O O K K E E P E R 2h-FerroJewelers061621.indd c ou r a g e ou s a c t i on i n t h e wo rld.

The Charlotte Congregational www.CharlotteCongregationalChurch.org Church is looking for a part802-425-3176 charlotteucc@gmavt.net time bookkeeper. 15-20 hours/ week. Pay is negotiable and commensurate with experience. For more information, go to www.CharlotteUCC.org

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6/15/21

JUNE GROUP INTERVIEWS! Visit our website:

homeinstead.com/483 Caring for seniors is a labor of love. Home Instead is awaiting 10:49 AM your talents. Flexible scheduling. No experience necessary. P/T and F/T positions. Let’s get to know each other. Sign up today! $14-$18.50 per hour. FT starts at $15/hour.

Associate Housing Director

VHCB is seeking an experienced and collaborative housing professional to join our team, supporting the development of affordable housing in Vermont. Work on policy and program development, new 2v-AthensDiner061621.indd 1 6/14/212v-CharlotteCongoChurch052621.indd 3:38 PM 1 5/24/21 5:43 PM 2v-HomeInstead050521.indd 1 initiatives, and deliver support and funding to VHCB’s housing partners. Coordinate training and technical assistance programs; evaluate affordable housing applications, make recommendations for VERMONT STATE COURTS action, and support the overall effectiveness of VHCB housing programs. Qualifications: demonstrated commitment to affordable Burlington, St. Albans, White River Junction, Barre-Chelsea, Newport, Brattleboro housing, prior experience and training in housing development, financial analysis, and project underwriting, strong communication Looking to enter the legal world and make a difference? $17.11 per hour, permanent full-time positions. The Judicial branch of skills, and a commitment to collaborative problem solving. Experistate government is rapidly expanding. We offer a competitive ence working with non-profit organizations, municipalities, housing rate with top-notch health, dental, paid time off and pension. development groups, and state agencies important. Experience with The successful candidate has 2 years’ general office experience, project management and coordination of housing programs prebe a team player, good communicator, able to use technology, www.placevt.com organized, and seeking a prestigious and professional atmosphere. ferred.

LEGAL ASSISTANTS

6/1/21 4:22 PM

Place Place is seeking is anseeking account an account manager. manager.

vermontjudiciary.org/employment-opportunities/staff-openings

The Vermont Judiciary is an equal opportunity employer.

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6/14/21

CAMPUS STEWARD Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Waitsfield is looking for an organized and reliable individual to help maintain our facilities and campus grounds. Responsibilities include maintenance, housekeeping and custodial duties. As Campus Steward, you will be responsible for keeping our campus looking its best both inside and out. Basic carpentry and computer skills are required. Painting, plumbing, electrical, mechanical, landscaping and chainsaw experience is a plus. We offer paid health insurance, 401k, paid holidays, vacation and sick time, and the opportunity to take courses. This position is 30-40 hours per week and will include evenings and weekends. To learn more and apply, visit yestermorrow.org/jobs.

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resumes and links to: www.placevt.com jobs@placevt.com resumes and links to: jobs@placevt.com

Senior Housing Analyst

For a more detailed description and how to apply see:

Are you motivated to work with a collaborative team to address the housing needs of Vermonters? Do you have experience in housing development, financial analysis, architecture, construction, servicesupported housing, training and technical assistance, or working2v-PlaceCreative052621.indd 1 5/24/21 6:30 PM with federal funds? Housing production in Vermont is ramping up with the influx of federal funding. Help us put state and federal funds to work to create housing in communities across Vermont. QualificaPRODUCTION tions: Substantial prior experience and training in housing developWORKER ment, financial analysis of housing development budgets, and multiWe are a very busy screen family housing underwriting, as well as strong communication skills, printer looking for help in the attention to detail, and a commitment to the multi-goal mission of area of production. Hours are VHCB. Experience working with non-profit organizations, municipalrelatively flexible but with 35-40 ities, housing development groups, and state agencies is important. hours expected. Work days are Read the full job descriptions at vhcb.org/about-us/jobs TO APPLY: Reply with letter of interest and résumé to: Laurie Graves, VHCB, 58 E. State Street, Montpelier, Vt. 05602 or by email to jobs@vhcb.org. Positions open until filled. Full-time positions with competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package. EOE.

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9:53 AM

Monday through Friday. Must provide your own transportation to Essex Junction. Send resumes to: dennis@ eastcoastprinters.com

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6/7/21 2:08 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

67 JUNE 16-23, 2021

Parks Maintenance Crew Member Want to make a difference this summer, work outside, and be a part of a talented team providing recreation access and natural resource management? Winooski Valley Parks District seeks selfmotivated, hardworking, energetic individuals to assist in maintaining 19 Natural Areas in the Winooski River watershed, based in Burlington, Vermont. Applicants must be able to work 40 hours/week (M-F, 8am-4pm). The position runs from mid-May until the end of October (some flexibility with start/end date.)

Williston, VT Craft food & beverage producer Hiring for multiple positions

LINE CHEF

Looking for positive and progressive team members.

Full Time Opportunities The Line Chef is responsible for the coordination, preparation, and successful completion of meals as determined by established procedure. High school graduate or equivalent and minimum of one year experience in quantity food preparation required.

PRODUCTION LEAD OR ASSISTANT & WAREHOUSE MANAGER OR ASSISTANT Starting at $15/hour and up:

(based on experience and prior training)

Learn more and apply:

Duties include landscaping uvmhealth.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/EXTERNAL and carpentry, and equipment, and search “Chef” trails, buildings, and grounds maintenance. Experience or a desire to learn about mower use/ maintenance and trails upkeep 4t-UVMedCenter061621.indd 1 5/28/214t-ADropofJoy060921.indd 4:33 PM necessary. Applicants must be able to work outside in all weather Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital has a conditions, lift 50 lbs., and be on your feet all day. variety of open positions including:

MULTIPLE POSITIONS OPEN

Please e-mail a resume and brief letter of interest to timlarned@wvpd.org. Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

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6/3/21 3:16 PM

Highway Maintenance

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6/8/21 12:09 PM

WORK AT CCS AND SUPPORT OUR MISSION TO BUILD A COMMUNITY WHERE EVERYONE PARTICIPATES AND BELONGS

RNs, LNAs, Diagnostic Imaging, Coding & Administrative. Full-time, part-time and per diem schedules available. Shift differentials and per diem rates offered. FT and PT employees are eligible for excellent benefits including student loan repayment, generous paid time off, wellness reimbursement, low cost health insurance and 401k with company match! APPLY TODAY AT NVRH.ORG/CAREERS.

Contact us:

HIRING@ADROPOFJOY.COM

Champlain Community Services is proud to be voted as one of the “Best Places to Work in Vermont” for the third year in a row and we want you to be a part of our team! At CCS, employees find a positive work culture, excellent training and support, opportunities for personal development and professional advancement, as well as a strong benefits package including paid time off, affordable health insurance, paid holidays and more. Why not have a job you love? Join our dedicated team and together we’ll build a community where everyone participates and belongs.

ccs-vt.org

E.O.E.

The Town of Hinesburg is 5/14/214t-ChamplainCommServices060921.indd 2:15 PM LITTLE MULE EQUIPMENT 1 6/4/21 10:53 AM currently seeking individuals to 4t-NVRH051921.indd 1 fill various positions within the Fabricator/Operations Coordinator Highway Department. While not required, a Class B CDL Little Mule Equipment is a distributor and CONSUMER LOAN PROCESSOR – BURLINGTON (commercial driver’s license) with manufacturer of innovative excavation equipment. We sell tree Vermont Federal Credit Union is recruiting for a Consumer Loan tanker endorsement is preferred. shears and tiltrotators, which expand the capabilities of excavators Processor out of our Burlington branch. and improve safety and efficiency. We design, produce and sell Full-time and seasonal positions The Consumer Loan Processor does a variety of lending support accessories that provide abilities that no other equipment does. are available. Full-time positions functions including: Little Mule Equipment is a small, nimble, creative, and growing offer competitive pay, post winter • Process approved loans, coordinate and close loans company in Huntington, VT, and we pride ourselves on excellent bonuses and an excellent benefits and finalize loan disbursements. customer service, innovation, fun, and collaboration. package. If you would like to learn more about these opportunities, • Contact Members to obtain and follow-up on required paperwork We have an immediate need for a hands-on Fabricator/Operations processing and loan closing documents. please contact the Town Manager Coordinator to make, assemble, test, and ship products. This is an at todit@hinesburg.org or • Verifies accuracy of information on loan applications. opportunity to help the company deliver on our promises, learn 482-4206. A job description and and grow, and operate state-of-the-art excavation equipment. • Files loan documentation with the appropriate agencies. employment application are located Wage is $20-$30 per hour depending on experience, with the on the town website hinesburg.org. Qualified candidates should apply online via our website: possibility of profit sharing. This position has the potential to Questions may be directed to vermontfederal.org become a management position as the company grows. Todd Odit at 802-482-4206. Please be sure to attach your resume. Applications without More info: littlemuleequipment.com an attached resume will be considered incomplete. The Town of Hinesburg is Apply: Nils@LittleMuleEquipment.com Vermont Federal Credit Union is an Equal Opportunity Employer. an equal opportunity employer.

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6/7/21 1:22 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

68

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

Want to make a positive impact on people’s lives?

Administrative Assistant The Town of Hinesburg, Vermont is seeking a qualified person to fill an Administrative Assistant position that supports the Town Manager and Planning and Zoning Departments. This position provides administrative and clerical support for those departments. The Administrative Assistant is responsible for assisting applicants, processing development applications, scheduling meetings and hearings, filing, coordinating distribution of correspondence and materials, responding to public inquiries, processing overweight permits, posting committee minutes and agendas to the website and other general office duties as assigned. This position reports to the Town Manager and Director of Planning and Zoning. For an employment application and a full job description with requirements and education/training, visit the Town Manager Department on the Town website (hinesburg.org) or contact the Town Manager’s office (todit@hinesburg.org; 482-4206). The Town of Hinesburg is an equal opportunity employer.

SD Associates is hiring Behavioral Instructors (BIs)! SD Associates is an Applied Behavior Analysis company that has been serving children and families in Vermont since 1990.We provide direct services in the form of ABA therapy for clients with a wide variety of behavioral challenges across the state of Vermont. We are currently seeking compassionate, energetic individuals who are dependable, professional, enthusiastic, and who have a strong commitment to co-workers, clients and their families.The Behavioral Instructor (BI) role is the most important, influential and valued position in our company.They are the individuals who work each day to make impactful, positive behavioral changes for the population that we serve. No experience necessary! Bachelor’s degree preferred! Currently hiring in Chittenden, Franklin,Washington, Lamoille and Windsor counties. Exclusively, for a limited time: Choose between $500 or 2.5 paid days off sign on bonus! Apply today at sdplus.org or email us your resume to employment@sdplus.org.

This is a part-time position of approximately 16 hours/week with a starting pay range of $17.00 to $19.00 per hour based on qualifications and experience. This position is not eligible for benefits.

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Hinesburg (population 4,400) is a vibrant community located in northwest Vermont, approximately 12 miles from the City of Burlington. Hinesburg is a rural Chittenden County community with a thriving village center surrounded by rural agricultural and forest lands.

Full-time Guest Services Specialist

Sheehey Furlong & Behm P.C.

Norwich, VT Sheehey Furlong & Behm is accepting applications for a legal assistant in its Norwich office. The successful candidate will be detail-oriented, possess strong written and verbal skills and the ability to work in a fast-paced environment. Proficiency in MS Office applications is required. 1-3 years of legal experience 1:30 PM is preferred. Competitive pay and comprehensive benefits package. Please forward cover letter and resume to hiring@sheeheyvt.com, subject “Legal Assistant.”

$1500 Sign-On Bonus

Apply online: http://bit.ly/HinesburgAdminAsst. Hinesburg is an equal opportunity employer and values diversity and inclusiveness in the community and workplace.

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6/3/21

LEGAL ASSISTANT

6/3/21

We are currently looking for an extraordinary individual to join our Guest Services Team. He/She will be consulting with our guests via phone and e-mail while providing an outstanding level of service and booking trips. On joining, this position will be eligible for $1500 Sign-On Bonus* after 30 days. *Conditions Apply. 1:07 PM 3v-SheeheyFurlongBehm061621.indd

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6/14/21 4:40 PM

Full-time Product Manager $2500 Sign-On Bonus

We are currently hiring for a Product Manager for specific product management and tour-related operations. On joining, this position will be eligible for a $2500 Sign-On Bonus* after 30 days. *Conditions Apply. Send resume & cover letter to jobs@gosojourn.com. No phone calls please. Full descriptions: gosojourn.com/jobs/

United States Probation Seeking Treatment Providers

GROCERY BUYER

The U.S. Probation Office in the District of Vermont believes 4t-SojournBicycling061621.indd that federal defendants and offenders under our supervision deserve access to quality, evidence-based treatment in the community. To that end, the District of Vermont will be soliciting for drug and alcohol, mental health and sex offender specific treatment services for fiscal years 2022, 2023 and 2024. We will also be soliciting for drug testing services. Requests for Proposals in these service categories will be made available on vtp.uscourts.gov/solicitations and mailed/ emailed to those interested on June 28, 2021. An Offeror’s Conference will be held via Zoom on July 12, 2021 to provide more information about the solicitation and application process. Interested parties should contact Shawna Lapierre at: Shawna_Lapierre@vtp.uscourts.gov or by phone at 802-951-0625 to request an invitation link and be added to the Bidder’s Mailing List.

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6/14/21 11:54 AM

Equipment Service Manager, Herd Manager & Farm Chore Person Vermont Compost Company, a leading compost and potting soil company, is looking to hire an Equipment Service Manager, a Herd Manager and a Farm Chore Person. All opportunities provide competitive wages & full benefits. For more information, visit: vermontcompost.com/careers

Equal Opportunity Employer

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Plainfield Co-op seeks experienced grocery buyer for our small co-op. Buyer will cover several departments, grocery being the largest. Research, purchase, stock and maintain a high quality mix of natural , local, and/or organic products that meet department and store product and profitability standards. Works with buyer team to gather and analyze information and design sales promotions. Attention to detail and ordering deadlines a must. Est. 30 hours/wk. $15-16/hr, commensurate with experience. PTO, holidays, generous staff discount. Send resume and three professional references to Peter@PlainfieldCoop.com.

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6/3/21 4:30 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Program Director/ Program Associates UP for Learning is expanding! We are hiring a Program Director with a focus on restorative approaches/justice, and 1-2 Program Associates. If you have a deep belief in the power of youth and adults working together to transform education, please check out all the details at upforlearning. org/about-us/work-with-us.

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS MULTIMEDIA INTERNSHIP

69 JUNE 16-23, 2021

PRINT PRODUCTION TEAM LEAD

Saint Michael’s is an NCAA Division II institution sponsoring 21 varsity sports, and is a proud member of the Northeast-10 Conference, the Eastern Intercollegiate Ski Association, and the New England Women’s Hockey Alliance. The successful candidate will gain valuable comprehensive knowledge and experience in various facets of the college Athletic Communications business, with a particular focus on visual storytelling and multimedia, while assisting the Director of Athletic Communications in day-to-day operation of the office. This is a one-year, full-time hourly paid internship. The anticipated start date is August 16, 2021, with completion of the internship on May 6, 2022. For full job description and to apply online, please visit: interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=131526

The Production Team Lead will be a valuable member of the production team. Major responsibilities included the use, repair, and maintenance of printing and related production equipment. They will have production floor tasks as well as assisting the team to accomplish daily goals and drive the continuous improvement agenda in the areas of responsibility through teamwork, skills, and capability development. As well as staff, train, evaluate and develop team members to include temporary hires during peak seasons. During peak times of business the Team Lead will work the 2nd shift and weekends. This includes but is not limited to the Christmas and Father’s Day seasons. Work is performed while standing or walking and requires the ability to lift, carry, push, or pull weights, up to 50 pounds.

FINANCIAL ASSOCIATE 2v-UPforLearning061621.indd 1

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6/10/21 11:50 AM

Assistant Director of ECM for Community Services (MOVE)

LINE COOKS WANTED Hiring to fill open line cook position! Experience preferred but not required, willing to train applicant with a great, positive attitude! Mandatory personal qualities include punctuality, collaboration, strong work ethic, responsibility, and reliability. Position requires night and weekend availability including Sundays with shifts being a mix of prep and cooking.

Saint Michael’s College is seeking an Assistant Director of Edmundite Campus Ministry for Community Services (Mobilization of Volunteer Efforts -- MOVE) to assist in the development and implementation of our Community Service program. MOVE is dedicated to providing our students, staff, and faculty with a wide range of local, national, and international community service opportunities as they reflect Catholic Social Teaching. Foundational to MOVE’s practice is community service/engagement, social justice education, spiritual formation, and student leadership development. The Assistant Director will act as a liaison with various affiliations to identify, promote, and arrange community service programs. Position requires weekend and evening work and some extended travel. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership.

Offering very competitive starting hourly up to $18/hour & $500 sign-on bonus after 3 months! Apply at: Jason@ontapbargrill.com

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ATHLETIC TRAINER INTERN

interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=131884

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Please send resumes to holly@subatomicdigital.com.

Providing Innovative Mental Health and Educational Services to Vermont’s Children & Families.

CLINICAL CASE MANAGER $300 Sign on Bonus

6/14/21

Seeking a Clinical Case Manager to join our amazing team of mental health professionals and our positive and supportive work environment. Responsibilities 12:07 PM include working with children, adolescents, and families with mental health challenges both in the community and in their homes. Ideal candidates work well both autonomously and collaboratively on treatment teams, have a bachelor's degree in mental health or social work, have related work experience, a valid driver’s license, and reliable transportation. This is a full-time, 40 hour per week position with benefits, including tuition reimbursement.

Applications are being invited for the position of Athletic Trainer Intern at Saint Michael’s College, a private, Catholic liberal arts and Sciences College located in the greater Burlington area of Vermont. Saint Michael’s is an NCAA Division II institution sponsoring 21 varsity sports, and is a proud member of the Northeast-10 Conference. This is a full-time hourly temporary position (38 weeks). This position will require regular work hours, as well as evening, weekend, and holiday times. Job responsibilities include addressing prevention, care, evaluation, and treatment of injuries for intercollegiate studentathletes. Duties include staffing home practices, home and away contests, and documenting treatment plans. This hourly temporary position is not eligible for regular College provided fringe benefits. Hiring is contingent upon the successful completion of a background and driving record check and eligibility to work in the United States. For additional information and to apply online, please visit:

The Financial Associate is responsible for bookkeeping tasks involving accounts payable, accounts receivable and some general ledger items. Maintains cash reporting daily. Data research and reporting as required by the Controller and/or CEO. Works with Controller on many daily and operational projects.

Looking for an exciting new opportunity? Community Based Services in South Burlington has one for you!

For a full job description and to apply online go to: interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=131737

We have remained open throughout this difficult year 4t-StMichaelsCollegeADECM061621.indd and with sales increasing, we are looking to grow our team!

(Part-Time)

COMMUNITY INTEGRATION SPECIALISTS $300 Sign on Bonus

Seeking Community Integration Specialists to join our talented team of mental health professionals. Responsibilities include doing individual and group activities with youth both in the community and their home. The ideal candidate would have a desire to help kids and families reach their goals, be flexible, and enjoy working as part of a team and independently. Bachelor’s degree or two years’ relevant experience, valid driver’s license, and reliable transportation required. This 32 hour per week position requires afternoon and early evening availability. A generous benefits package is provided, which includes tuition reimbursement. Please apply online at nfivermont.org/careers. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and celebrate the diversity of our clients and staff


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

70

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

CONSERVATION SPECIALIST

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

Orleans County NRCD, based in Newport VT, seeks a full-time Conservation Specialist to join our team! This is a dynamic position driven by conservation science, high quality service and a passion for VT Agricultural and Natural Resource Conservation to work with agricultural producers. Applications are due by the end of Friday July 2nd.

The Director of Development provides strategic leadership and oversight More info on our website. To apply, send cover letter & resume as one for all aspects of College Development, including fundraising, alumni PDF to sarah.damsell@vt.nacdnet.net. No phone calls, please. relations and development communications. Together with the Director of Marketing and Director of Admissions, the Director of Development ensures integrated College messaging, with specific responsibility for 2h-OrleansCountyNRCD061621.indd 1 Office and Program Coordinator6/15/21 communicating with alumni and donors. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE an undergraduate degree. Graduate degree preferred. Demonstrated leadership ability and fundraising practices that embody a commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice. Supervision or people management skills. Exemplary written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills. Basic database management skills, ability to develop proficiency with eTapestry or similar software. High-level proficiency with Microsoft Office suite, Constant Contact or similar software. Sensitivity to and understanding of the diverse academic, socioeconomic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds of students, faculty, staff and greater community. Ability to accommodate a flexible and changing work schedule, including travel and weekend work; ability to travel by air, train, car or bus for Development business for up to a week at a time, throughout the year. Compensation for this position is a salary of $60,000-$75,000 per year, a generous paid leave package, and health and other insurances.

goddard.edu/about-goddard/employment-opportunities

This is a full time and year-round position. It is a salaried position with benefits. This is also an in-office position at our headquarters in Berlin, Vermont.

Seven Days Issue: 6/16 IT SPECIALIST Due: 6/14 by 11am VCFA welcomes applications for the Size: 3.83Postion. x 5.25 Responsibilities IT Specialist include supporting staff,1faculty, Cost: $476.85 (with week and online)

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Engaging minds that change the world

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. Senior Microsoft Systems Engineer - Systems Architecture & Admin. - #S2856PO - The University of Vermont is looking for an experienced Microsoft system engineer with skills in on-premises and hybrid M365 cloud deployments, as well as expertise with modern device management (MDM) and end user computing solutions (EUC). UVM is a comprehensive research university, and offers its employees competitive salaries and outstanding benefits including tuition remission. Qualifications: • Bachelor’s degree in technical field (or equivalent experience) and five years of systems administration and scripting experience in a large-scale, complex Microsoft server environment. • Expertise with Microsoft Server and desktop operating systems and demonstrated ability to manage integrated Microsoft services in a highly available environment. • Experience with scripting, including PowerShell. • Effective troubleshooting skills. • Effective written and verbal communication skills. • Endpoint management and Windows deployment services expertise. • Experience administering Microsoft 365 services. • Experience with SCCM, Intune, Autopilot or similar systems. • Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) expertise, ideally VMware Horizon. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit www.uvmjobs.com. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Open positions are updated daily. Please call 802-656-3150 or email employment@uvm.edu for technical support with the online application. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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www.vtvast.org/vast-staff.html

To be considered, you must send a full cover letter and resume to Cindy Locke, VAST Executive Director no later than June 21, 2021.

TO REVIEW THE COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTONS FOR THIS POSITION AND TO APPLY PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE:

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The Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST) is currently looking to fill an important position on our team. If you are interested, go to our website to get a link where you will find a detailed description.

6/14/21

students on campus and remotely; e-learning coordination for virtual and hybrid residencies; desktop support including new computer setup, deploying printers, software installation both in person and remotely, and support for PC & Mac computer labs. Successful candidates will have a Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent work experience; minimum 3 years’ experience within Information Technology, preferably in higher education; experience in the following technologies/ products: Video Conferencing, Networking, Microsoft Technologies, Apple Technologies, Google Apps for Education; detail-oriented with exemplary interpersonal, communication and organizational skills. Candidates are encouraged to consult VCFA’s website to acquaint themselves with our distinctive institution, learning processes, and educational philosophy. Please see full job description: vcfa.edu/about/jobs-at-vcfa To apply send the following to vcfacareers@vcfa.edu: • Cover Letter, CV/Resume • Statement on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, outlining your professional skills, accomplishments, experience, and willingness to engage in activities to enhance diversity, equity, and inclusion. For full consideration, submit application by June 30, 2021. Position will remain open until filled.

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TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 11:55 AM

The Town of Fairfield Selectboard is seeking a Town Administrator. The administrator assists the five-member Selectboard in the general administration of the town. Day-to-day responsibilities include supporting all departments as needed, monitoring budgets, attending and participating in all Selectboard meetings, public relations, and coordination with the town’s elected and appointed officials.

The starting salary for this full-time position is negotiable but is expected to be in the range of $35,000 to $40,000 depending on experience and qualifications. The 4:21 PM town offers an excellent benefit package. The successful candidate will have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in public administration, political science, or business management or at least five years’ experience in an administrative or managerial capacity in either municipal government or business, or a combination of relevant experience and education. To apply in confidence, please email a cover letter, resume, and contact information for three references to townadmin@ fairfieldvermont.us with Fairfield Town Administrator as the subject, or mail to: Town of Fairfield Selectboard Fairfield Town Administrator Search PO Box 5 Fairfield, VT 05455 Resumes accepted until position is filled. E.O.E.

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5/25/21 10:49 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Database Administrator/ Development Associate The Keewaydin Foundation seeks to hire a Database Administrator/Development Associate, a key member of the successful Keewaydin Foundation Development Team. This staff member is responsible for all aspects of the donor database, including maintaining the integrity of the data, creating queries, report preparation, and gift processing. This position also supports staff in the areas of fundraising, communications, and constituent relations.

IS CURRENTLY SEEKING

SUPPORTED HOUSING YOUTH COACH https://bit.ly/3oSDlH9 2v-Spectrum061621.indd 1

6/15/21 11:22 AM

Bartender

3-4 shifts/week Experience a must.

2-3 shifts/week Experience preferable, but 5v-KeewaydinFoundation061621.indd may train the right person. Weekends and nights. Great starting pay and teammates. Resume or letter of interest to: 3needs@comcast.net

1

6/10/21 12:09 PM

WORKSITE WELLNESS ASSOCIATE An excellent and flexible opportunity for a passionate, responsible professional. This part-time position (5-10+ hours a week) will promote our worksite wellness and mental health supports to our employers in the Connecticut Valley. Our ideal candidate will have:

The Vermont Wine Merchants Company, a Burlington-based wholesale distributor of fine wine and specialty beer, is looking for full-time (plus OT) warehouse/ driver position(s), 4-5 days a week. Employment for drivers pending a driving record check. Warehouse only positions do not require driving record check. Some benefits included.

Please send a resume to: info@vtwinemerchants.com $500 starting bonus after 30 days

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• Outstanding presentation skills, both in-person and via video conference • The ability to engage busy decision makers by phone • Strong time management skills while also working with our multi-disciplinary team on many deliverables and deadlines • Articulate and engaging communication style This position is great for a semi-retired or part-time individual who would like to stay involved in the marketplace, has an interest in health/wellness, enjoys meeting and working with new people, and would like the flexibility of managing their own part time work schedule. Reliable transportation is required. Please submit cover letter and resume to Karre Paterson at karrep@investeap.org by July 1. We are an equal opportunity employer that is committed to diversity and inclusion in the workplace. We are part of the State but operate as an independent and creative enterprise.

6/10/21 12:15 PM

For additional information, interested candidates are asked to apply electronically via SchoolSpring.com (job ID#3521285) or email a letter of interest and resume to wendy.cunningham@mvsdschools.org In matters related to employment, the school district does not permit or condone discrimination

6/3/21 3:08 PM

Help Vermonters pursue their education goals!

Centers for Wellbeing

WAREHOUSE DRIVER/ PICKER PACKER

The Missisquoi Valley School District Early Childhood Program is seeking three licensed (or eligible for Vermont educational license) Early Childhood Special Educators to form a new team to serve the Franklin, Highgate and Swanton communities.

based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, genetic information, religion, sexual This position reports to the Director of Development. orientation, gender identity, marital/civil union status, HIV status, or any other characteristic Applicants are required to have a minimum of three years’ protected by Federal or State Law. EOE recent database management; Raisers’ Edge experience is a plus but other database experience will be considered. The successful candidate will work out of our Keewaydin Foundation Office in Salisbury, VT. This is a full-time, 4t-MissisquoiValleySchoolDistrict060921.indd 1 year-round position with a generous compensation and benefits package. Applicants will need to send a cover letter, resume and three references to Mary Welz at mary@keewaydin.org. Candidate screening will begin on July 1; this position will remain open until filled with a suitable candidate.

Read the full job description at: keewaydin.org/employment/

Doorperson

71 JUNE 16-23, 2021

COMMUNICATIONS AND MYFUTUREVT MANAGER Advance Vermont, an organization dedicated to increasing the number of Vermonters who have completed education and training after high school, seeks an experienced and innovative communications professional to serve as its Communications and MyFutureVT Manager. This role is an important part of a small and dynamic team, with responsibility over many of the public facing aspects of the organization. It is an exciting opportunity for someone interested in helping drive the conversation about education and workforce in Vermont. The Communications and MyFutureVT Manager will lead the planning, execution, and evaluation of Advance Vermont’s communications and marketing efforts geared toward raising awareness of the importance of post high school education and training, and the diversity of pathways and supports. This work includes driving the continued development and refinement of MyFutureVT.org, Advance Vermont’s newly launched free online one-stop for career and education resources in Vermont. The ideal candidate will have excellent communications skills and demonstrated experience planning and executing marketing efforts. Additionally, the candidate will be skilled at website management, including content creation and day-to-day site maintenance. The position comes with competitive pay and excellent benefits, including health and dental, retirement, and paid time off. To learn more and to apply visitadvancevermont.org/jobs.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled

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6/14/21 11:00 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

72

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

VSJF Program Coordinator

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

PERSONAL CARE SUPPORT Seeking adventurous, caring personal care support people for our engaging young adult autistic son. These part-time positions are 8-10 hours a week supporting in all aspects of home care. Hours are one weekday 5-8:30pm, one weekend night 5-10:00pm and every other Sunday 5-8:30pm. Pay rate is competitive at $20/ hr. Great job for a college student seeking a professional job. We have been fortunate that most of our support staff in the past have worked the last 2-3 years of their college life with us. Experience is not a must as we train greatly and are mostly looking for engaging, mature, friendly personnel. Tell us a bit about yourself and contact us. Do you sing? Play drums? Run? All the better!

HR GENERALIST

When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. A career with the State puts you on a rich and rewarding professional path. You’ll find jobs in dozens of fields – not to mention an outstanding total compensation package.

FISCAL ANALYST POSITION STATE REVENUES

The Vermont Office of LegVocRehab Vermont is looking for an energetic, self-initiator. Theis VR islative Human Resources Project Coordinator will work closely with project managers to create comprehensive action plans concerning resources, budgets and time seeking a Legislative Human frames for projects. This position coordinates meetings, resources, equipment, and information. Must possess strong project management and leadership skills, be very organized, have excellent technology Resource Generalist who willskills as well as writing, proof reading and editing skills. For more information, contact Amanda Arnold at amanda.arnold@vermont.gov or 802-279-8310. help to create, integrate and Department: Disabilities Aging & Independent Living. Status: Full Time. Location: Waterbury. Job ID# 16786. Application Deadline: June 14, 2021. sustain solutions related to M E N T A L H E A LT H S E R V I C E S D I R E C T O R – W A T E R B U R Y Managerial work at an executive level. Provides organizational HR This development, full-time, leadership for functions. Department priorities including planning and implementation requirements for the state-run facilities. Provides leadership through extensive collaboration position with other Agencyis benefit-eligible departments and various community non-profit organizations. Extensive interaction at the state and federal levels with mental health and health initially solicited forandaformer care leaders, advocates, being board members, citizens, legislators patients. For more information, contact Mourning Fox at Mourning.Fox@ vermont.gov orperiod 802-241-0137. Department: Mental Health. Status: Full of three years. Time. Location: Waterbury. Job ID #16417. Application Deadline: June 15,

The Vermont Legislative Joint Fiscal Office is seeking a legislative fiscal analyst to provide support and research on state revenues, economic development, education finance, and other fiscal issues.

Interested applicants can visit: legislature.vermont.gov/ links/hr-job-posting for more details.

A full job description can be found at ljfo.vermont.gov/ misc/2021-rev-job.pdf

VR PROJECT COORDIN ATOR – WATERBURY

2021.

Please send your resume, cover letter and 3 references with their contact information to nbgteamvt@gmail.com. It will be necessary that you are fully COVID-19 vaccinated at the time of employment.

M U LT I P L E U I P O S I T I O N S – M O N T P E L I E R

The Vermont Department of Labor is hiring for several positions in the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Division. if you possess strong analytical skills and enjoy complex problem solving, this might be a great position for you. We are hiring a team of people to help investigate suspected UI fraud. if you have strong customer service skills and would enjoy helping people through application and eligibility processes, consider applying for one of these openings. To find out what positions are available please follow the link https://www.careerarc.com/job-search?job_group=67350. For more information, contact Beth Meyer-Ehrich at beth.meyer-ehrich@vermont. gov. Status: Full Time. Location: Montpelier.

Learn more at :

careers.vermont.gov

RN OR LPN - FULL TIME (DAYS) HOME HEALTH CARE OPPORTUNITY

Full job description at vsjf. org/about-vsjf-vermont/ job-openings. Apply by 5pm, 6/29/21 at jobs@vsjf.org.

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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Are you interested in a fulfilling experience in home care away from institutional stress? Do you want to be able to give the quality of care that you know you can provide?

6/8/21 9:09 AM

COME GROW WITH US!

We’re looking for a compassionate and reliable RN or LPN to make a difference in the quality of life for our special needs son in our home. He is a very mild-mannered individual with no behavioral issues.

LOAN SERVICING SPECIALIST VEDA is looking to hire a full-time Loan Servicing Specialist to work at any of our four Vermont office locations. This is an excellent opportunity for someone who has experience working with loan systems, is comfortable working in a paperless environment, is talented at problem-solving independently, and who takes pride in the accuracy of their work.

Please talk to us about working in a peaceful and pleasant home environment. The relaxed and personal one-to-one care enables you to develop a close patient connection instead of the overloaded, multi-patient expectations that can leave you frustrated. Care includes administering meds, daytime personal care, companionship, community outings, strolling down a country lane, and reading books by the lake. Nurse assessments, health status monitoring, and caregiver oversight are part of this gratifying care. As the nurse manager, you will coordinate care with the family and doctors and communicate the nursing plan, and provide training to other direct care staff. Critical thinking and effective teaching skills are positive attributes for this opportunity.

VEDA is Vermont’s statewide economic development lender and a non-profit, mission-oriented workplace. We provide financing to businesses and farms across Vermont, often in partnership with private financial institutions and government agencies, to help create jobs and help advance Vermont’s public policy goals. The Loan Servicing Specialist is an integral member of the VEDA team.

Work independently and feel appreciated knowing that you are a critical part of keeping someone safe, healthy, content, and well-cared for. Lasting patient and family relationships are part of this rewarding experience. Quiet lakeside home with separate suite creates an enjoyable working environment, yet provides close proximity for family and support. Cheerful setting has bath, galley kitchen, and sitting areas. Full Time Position: $39.78/hr (RN), $33.81/hr (LPN). Differential for weekends/holidays. COVID-19 vaccination required. Call, text, or email Don. Cell: 802-578-5888 Email: dpierson79@comcast.net.

Join our values driven team and be responsible for program coordination, contracts management and some office management for our innovative programs an services aimed at strengthening Vermont’s economy. Employee health and dental insurance, generous paid time off, and retirement contribution. VSJF is an equal opportunity employer.

This position requires knowledge of loan systems and processes, and information technology. Primary responsibilities include inputting and analyzing loan data; processing loan payments; preparing reports, reconciliations, and information dashboards; and synthesizing data for, and responding to, inquiries from varied audiences. The right job applicant will be skilled at finding solutions to drive operating efficiencies. In return, the successful candidate will be rewarded with a breadth of experience and the opportunity for career progression within VEDA. VEDA offers a competitive salary and excellent health and retirement benefit packages. Other perks include a flexible work environment, opportunities for professional development, generous tuition reimbursement, and access to networking opportunities around Vermont. VEDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer interested in increasing staff diversity. We welcome job applications from all qualified candidates. Email resume/cover letter to Cheryl Houchens: chouchens@veda.org.

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The UVM Foundation is expanding and we invite you to grow your career with us. We are a collaborative, people centered organization, committed to diversity and building an inclusive environment for people of all backgrounds and ages. We especially encourage members of traditionally underrepresented communities to apply, including women, people of color, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities.

MAJOR GIFT PROGRAM COORDINATOR, ACADEMIC HEALTH SCIENCES Provide administrative and strategic support to a team of fundraisers committed to fueling access and growth through philanthropy. Be solutions oriented, technically fluent, a collaborative member of the team and focused on getting the job done. This is a great opportunity for a creative, motivated, and ambitious professional that will help drive our programs towards success. Application review will begin immediately and will be accepted until the position is filled. For a detailed description of this opportunity, please visit our website: UVMFoundation.org/Careers

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6/15/21 11:26 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

READY TO HIRE FULL-TIME HELP FOR YOUNG MAN Positions available to work as a team with a young adult autistic man in the community and at his home. The successful candidate will be a responsible person who enjoys helping others, has good athletic skills, and has a musical repertoire. Highly skilled training will accompany this job. A college degree is required. This is a 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Monday - Friday schedule with great summer hours. However, the job is year-round. Pay is very competitive, starting at $25/hr. This is a full-time position and one that will allow you to grow professionally. Please send your resume, cover letter and 3 references with REGISTER NOW their contact information to the nbgteamvt@gmail.com. Resumes submitted without cover letters or reference contacts will not be considered. It will be necessary that you are fully AT WWW.CCV.EDU OR COVID-19 vaccinated at the time of employment.

AT interest, THE CCV LOCATION Thank you for your NBG Team NEAREST YOU

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

73 JUNE 16-23, 2021

STAFF NURSE (LPN OR RN) AND LNA’s Flexible Shifts Wake Robin seeks health care staff who are licensed in Vermont to work collaboratively to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and longterm care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” We offer an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. We offer flexible schedules, tuition reimbursement, loan programs, great benefits, amazing community setting, all at a pace where you can be your best. Starting your nursing career? We always welcome new nurses! Not yet an LNA? Our next LNA Training Course starts in July! Interested candidates please email a cover letter and resume to hr@wakerobin.com or complete an application online at wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer. 5h-WakeRobin061621.indd 1

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6/15/21 11:45 AM

5/25/21 10:04 AM

Executive Director of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Academic Center Location Flexible

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY - OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

Provide administrative support to the Office of the Provost including assisting committees; planning events; and preparing correspondence and reports. This position facilitates daily office functions: front desk communications, timely financial processing, data gathering, and Provost Office email and reporting.

BENEFITS SPECIALIST – PAYROLL SPECIALIST

Reporting to the President, the Executive Director of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion will lead all human resources functions, serve as the College’s chief diversity officer, and cultivate a vibrant culture that values and promotes diversity, equity, and inclusion across all aspects of the College. This position provides counsel to senior leadership on cultural competency and employee relations and serves as a strategic leader and catalyst to nurture a culturally proficient, equitable, and inclusive community. The person in this position will move between leadership, management, and hands-on engagement, and will oversee the development and implementation of human resources’ strategies, plans, and processes for professional development; legal compliance; employee recruitment, selection, & retention; benefits and compensation; and employment practices.

Join our HR Team! Current openings (2) include Benefit Specialist and Payroll Specialist positions. The Benefits Specialist provides assistance in administering benefits including enrollment, claims, COBRA and employee leaves. The Payroll Specialist processes University payrolls, prepares reports and audits, and serves as the main contact for payroll matters.

The successful candidate will be an innovative, strategic, and results-oriented leader with a broad vision for the role of diversity in achieving institutional excellence. The person in this role must have demonstrated success as a collaborator and relationship builder, with strong interpersonal skills and the ability to cultivate effective working relationships with a broad range of diverse individuals and groups. The Executive Director of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion will be adept at facilitating difficult discussions, shepherding change, and creating and strengthening partnerships.

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR RECRUITING & LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS

The Office of Admissions seeks a qualified individual to join our team in recruiting students. The job entails a number of functions including contacting and cultivating prospective participants and their families by telephone, mail, text, and email, travel to the Service Academy Night, training cadet staff, as well as managing and evaluating participant applications.

To view the full posting and apply: ccv.edu/learn-about-ccv/employment/

We have a great benefit package! Norwich University offers medical, dental, vision, group life and long term disability insurance, flexible-spending accounts for health and dependent care, 403(b) retirement plan with employer match, employee assistance program, paid time off including parental leave, and tuition scholarships for eligible employees and their family members.

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6/14/21 6:38 PM

USER SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Responsible for providing computing, technology and telecommunication support for the Norwich community via email, walk-ins and telephone; answers questions directed to the Help Desk accurately, concisely and in a timely fashion in accordance to the ITS Service Level Agreements.

SYSTEMS ANALYST II

Work with stakeholders to develop and maintain the University’s administrative systems. Responsibilities include utilizing and enhancing existing software cooperatively with team members; monitoring and analyzing incoming tickets daily; and analyzing data.

For further information and to apply for these and other great jobs:

norwich.interviewexchange.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

74

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

Executive Assistant to the Superintendent Assists the Superintendent and School Board Members by performing projects and clerical duties, including meeting agendas and maintaining files. Works in a highly visible office, frequently dealing with sensitive communications and information while serving as a liaison between the Superintendent and the greater school community.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEVELOPER Evernorth has created a new position for a Developer to join our amazing development team. This position reports to the Sr. Vice President of Real Estate. The successful candidate will be an excellent communicator with multiple years of experience in real estate development, advanced user of excel and demonstrated experience in financial analysis. We believe in equal access to affordable housing and economic opportunities; the power of partnerships based on integrity, respect, and professionalism; a collaborative workplace with professional, skilled and dedicated staff and value promoting a culture of diversity, equity and inclusion.

To review the detailed job description on our Human Resources site at maplerun.org/page/humanresources. All applications will be accepted through School Spring at schoolspring.com and search for job reference number 3565202. The district will start to review applications by June 23rd.

Please send a cover letter and resume with salary requirements to Kathy Beyer, hr@evernorthus.org. Full job description at evernorthus.org. E.O.E.

The Vermont Legislative Joint Fiscal Office is seeking an information technology (IT) policy specialist or consultant to conduct independent reviews of State IT projects and operations. A full job description can be found at ljfo.vermont.gov/ misc/2021-it-job.pdf

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES PROGRAM DIRECTOR

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STUDENT LIFE MANAGER

The Vermont Natural Resources Council (VNRC) has an exciting opportunity for a motivated individual to help guide policies and programs related to community development, land use planning, natural resource conservation and climate resilience. Working with a committed staff in Montpelier, the Sustainable Communities Program Director will oversee VNRC’s work on local and state land use and community development policy; provide technical support to members, state and regional agencies and municipalities; and work closely with our other programs on an integrated approach to meeting the challenges facing Vermont’s environment, communities and people. Occasional in-state travel and evening meetings will be required.

This position supports and is responsible for upholding a diverse, equitable, and culturally responsive environment. The Student Life Manager collaborates with students, staff, faculty, academic leaders, and administrators to develop, deliver, and assess student support services at Goddard College. This position will manage sensitive and confidential information and interact with multiple constituents within the College. This position has an office located on Goddard's campus in Plainfield, VT. When students are on campus, on campus work is expected full time. When the college does not have students present on campus this position has the flexibility to work remotely. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE Bachelor degree plus professional experience working with crisis response. Demonstrated cultural humility and use of cultural responsiveness in in work settings. Ability to understand the concepts and impact of institutional and structural racism and bias. Excellent interpersonal and listening skills and an ability to interact professionally with people from diverse backgrounds. Demonstrated commitment to supporting communities who have experienced systemic oppression and bias. Ability to show empathy and be nonjudgmental toward distressed individuals. Experience maintaining confidentiality. Computer literacy (primarily Google, Microsoft, Zoom platforms, and telecommunication software). Ability to document, research, analyze data, and write reports. Valid driver's license and ability to safely operate vehicles in inclement weather. This is a full time, staff union position compensated at $20.00/hour plus a generous paid leave plan and health, dental, vision, life and disability insurances.

The successful candidate must be self-directed and have excellent communication skills; the ability to work collaboratively in a busy work-environment; a practical understanding of smart growth principles; the skills necessary to advocate for smart growth policies before state and municipal agencies; a passion for protecting the environment; and a belief that individuals working together can affect positive change. We welcome applications from those with academic training in community planning, and we recognize that formal education is not the only pathway to gaining relevant experience. We invite candidates with any combination of academic, professional, and life experience who can demonstrate outstanding ability and commitment to building sustainable communities.

HEALTH SERVICES COORDINATOR

The Health Services Coordinator provides services to prevent COVID 19 infection on Goddard's Plainfield, VT; Seattle, WA; Port Townsend, WA; and Tacoma, WA campuses and responds to any outbreak. Travel to all four sites and some evenings, weekend and holidays work are required. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE Bachelor's degree or certifications in student affairs, public health, nursing or other related field. Commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice, sensitivity to and understanding of the diverse, academic, socioeconomic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds of students, faculty, staff, and the broader community. Excellent interpersonal and listening skills and ability to interact professionally with people from diverse cultural, racial, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic backgrounds during a time of crisis and distress. Experience working with health related community organizations. Experience with data collection, reporting, and analysis. Proficiency in navigating computer systems; ability to learn new data systems quickly and to comply with data integrity and security. Strong communication and organizational skills. Project management experience preferred. Second language proficiency preferred. This is a Full Time, Union, Temporary 9-month position compensated at $30.00/hour.

VNRC is committed to a process of centering equity, diversity and inclusion in our work through such values as humility & reciprocity, collaboration and power sharing, and integrity and accountability, and applicants should share a commitment to this effort. Starting salary is commensurate with experience, with total salary and benefits package ranging between $70,000-$80,000. Email a letter of interest, resume and three references to aconnizzo@vnrc.org. Letters should be addressed to Brian Shupe, Executive Director. Position will remain open until filled. VNRC is an EOE. Learn more at vnrc.org.

TO REVIEW THE COMPLETE JOB DESCRIPTONS FOR THESE POSITIONS AND TO APPLY PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE: goddard.edu/about-goddard/employment-opportunities/ 9t-GoddardCollege061621.indd 1

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY POLICY SPECIALIST/ CONSULTANT

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6/7/21 11:49 AM


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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JUNE 16-23, 2021

The Francis Foundation

PRODUCER/ DIRECTOR

COME BE PART OF A TEAM THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE

The Producer/Director will help develop and create content for long-format, short subject, on-air promotions, fundraising video content and other broadcast or digital productions. This position requires someone who has a history of managing multiple projects simultaneously. The position also requires the ability to think creatively, ideate and craft stories for multiplatform distribution, be technically proficient, be flexible and adaptable, work within a team environment, and possess superb communication and planning skills. Bachelor’s Degree in Film/Television Production, Communications, Creative Media, or related field and a minimum of 5 years of progressively responsible professional experience in television and digital video production and storytelling.

A Full-time 40 Hour benefited Service Coordination position to empower people with intellectual differences is available at THE FRANCIS FOUNDATION a service provider in Middlesex VT. Within a case load of 5-6 individuals, responsibilities include oversight of provided services, outreach contacts, and maintenance of healthy team relationships. Bachelor’s degree desired. Prior experience in the fields of health care, education, or mentorship helpful. Benefit’s include: Health Insurance, Vision Insurance, 401k, and paid-time off that increases based on years of service. Salary range is 36,000 to 41,000 depending on experience. Send a letter of interest & resume to Eileen@thefrancisfoundation.org or to: 16 Church Street, Middlesex, VT 05602. Closing date 6/30/21. COVID measures are in place and respected. Equal Opportunity Employer. All employment positions are contingent on results of criminal background checks. 5h-FrancesFoundation061621.indd 1

PRODUCTION TECHNICIAN

6/15/21 11:17 AM

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

The production technician will support the video production process at all stages of content creation. They work closely with production department staff to help the team complete and deliver content on time and up to standards. Candidates should be familiar with the most popular digital video formats as well as possessing an understanding of digital acquisition and delivery (web and other media). Experience with post-production/non-linear editing is required. A solid understanding of digital video camera use, proper handling, and technology is expected. A basic understanding of sound acquisition, lighting, and broadcast TV systems is desirable. College degree preferred as well as two or more years in television, cable, agency and/or production company.

BURLINGTON

Head Start is a federally-funded, national child and family development program which provides comprehensive services for pregnant women, children from birth to age five, and their families. Services for children promote school readiness, and include early education, health, nutrition, mental health, and services for children with special needs. Services for parents promote family engagement, and include parent leadership and social service supports.

For more information and full job description: vermontpbs.org/careers

As the Administrative Coordinator, you will provide clerical and administrative support for the CVHS Director and management staff; conduct word processing, data entry and generate reports; facilitate document production and mass mailings; coordinate special projects; communicate with staff, parents, vendors, and various agencies; and oversee office management and organization.

Submit resume, cover letter and required material by June 25th to: hresources@vermontpbs.org OR: Vermont PBS, Attn: HR Dept. 2 10 East Allen Street, Suite 202 Winooski, VT 05404 An equal opportunity employer and provider

REQUIREMENTS: Associate’s degree (Bachelor’s degree preferred) in relevant field, as well as 3 to 5 years of relevant work experience. Also required are excellent verbal and written communication (bilingual abilities a plus!), intermediate skills in Microsoft Office; speed, proficiency and accuracy with word processing and data entry; strong, proven note-taking, writing and proofreading skills; customer service skills; exceptional organizational skills and attention to detail; a commitment to valuing diversity and contributing to an inclusive working and learning environment; a valid driver’s license, clean driving record and access to reliable transportation; physical ability to carry out required tasks; and a can-do, extra-mile attitude.

40 hours/week, full year. Health plan and excellent benefits. Please submit cover letter, resume, and three work references to: CVHSAdminCoord@cvoeo.org. No phone calls, please. CVOEO / Head Start is interested in candidates who can contribute to our diversity and excellence. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal.

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB PRINT DEADLINE: NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) FOR RATES & INFO: MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THIS INSTITUTION IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 16-23, 2021

LINE COOK

We have FOOD JOBS WITH A WORK/LIFE BALANCE! For over 20 years, we have been providing career opportunities in the food industry. Get in touch with us if your passion is making great food, but your needs include:

Looking for a Sweet Job?

We're hiring for a line cook position. We are looking for someone who is focused and detail-oriented as well as being great a communicator. One year of professional kitchen experience is preferred, but we are willing to teach anyone. Most importantly, we are looking for a good work ethic and an excitement for learning. Send resumes and inquiries to cassy@redhenbaking.com.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

• A consistent schedule with 40 hour weeks • Health care • Paid time off • Retirement plan with company match

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6/15/21 12:05 PM

LAMOILLE RESTORATIVE CENTER SEEKS EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS TO JOIN OUR GROWING TEAM. LRC is a small, dynamic nonprofit organization with a mission to uphold the dignity and resilience of individuals and families through restorative justice principles and programs. LRC employs professionals who thrive in an inclusive and equitable environment.

MORTGAGE BANKER

COURT DIVERSION AND VICTIM SERVICES CASE MANAGER Are you committed to applying restorative approaches to increase accountability, promote safety, and support those impacted by crime?

There is no better time to join NSB’s team!

Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We strive to serve our employees as well as our communities. We are seeking a professional to join our Mortgage Banking team in Chittenden County.

LRC is hiring a full-time Court Diversion and Victim Services Case Manager to coordinate restorative processes and support services for individuals and communities impacted by crime. The case manager will work in a team to create more trauma-informed and victim-centered responses and supports, and be responsible for supporting participants in a range of pre-adjudication programs. This position is ideal for someone with excellent communication, collaboration, and organizational skills, and those who possess an understanding of trauma-informed and victim centered practices in Vermont’s justice and human service systems. A bachelor’s degree or equivalent work experience is required, and preference will be given to those with experience working with justice-involved individuals and/or with victims of crime.

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS • The Mortgage Banker will be responsible for originating a variety of new residential loans. • The successful candidate will understand the borrower’s needs and aid our customers with their purchase from application to closing.

RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN SCHOOLS TRAINER AND COACH

• A bachelor’s degree or two to four years of experience in a financial institution or related area is required along with registering with the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System.

Can you see yourself working with students and staff to create more inclusive and equitable learning environments? LRC is hiring a full-time Restorative Practices (RP) Trainer and Coach to coordinate and support the implementation of restorative practices in local schools. This position is ideal for someone with a strong understanding of restorative practices, familiarity with the whole-school approach to restorative work, training experience, strong communication skills, and an ability to work both independently and on a team. The successful candidate for this new position will become an integral part of LRC’s existing youth team and will work collaboratively with LRC’s other restorative justice trainers and practitioners.

OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH • NSB encourages career development and has a variety of training platforms available, including tuition reimbursement. • Average Years of Service at Northfield Savings Bank is above 9! If you’re looking to settle down in your career, join our team!

WHAT NSB CAN OFFER YOU

SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT SPECIALISTS

• NSB offers competitive compensation; combination of base salary plus commissions.

Do you have passion for supporting students' school success? Do you enjoy collaborating with others to solve problems?

• Benefits package including medical, dental, vision, combined time off, 10 paid holidays, a wellness program and more!

LRC is hiring three full-time School Engagement Specialists (SES) to expand its School Engagement Program team. Responsibilities include providing outreach and support to Lamoille Valley students ages five to 15, and their families, struggling with school attendance. The SES helps students re-engage with school by working together to identify causes of school absences and address attendance barriers. This position is ideal for someone with a strong understanding of Vermont’s education and human services systems, excellent communication and collaboration skills, and the ability to work both independently and on a team.

• Profit sharing opportunity and an outstanding employer-matching 401(K) retirement program. • NSB offers professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. • Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00am to 5:00pm. We understand the importance of having evenings and weekends with our friends, families, and our community.

All positions are based in Hyde Park, and come with a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefit package that includes employee health, dental, and life insurance. Other benefits include paid sick and vacation leave, 15 paid holidays, and a retirement plan. Interested individuals can apply by email – with the job title in the subject line – by sending a cover letter and resume to: info@lrcvt.org.

Please send an NSB Application + your resume in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com, or mail to:

Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

Northfield Savings Bank H.R. P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT LAMOILLE RESTORATIVE CENTER GO TO LRCVT.ORG.

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77 JUNE 16-23, 2021

RETAIL AND GUEST SERVICES MANAGER ECHO is seeking an experienced Retail and Guest Services Manager. The Retail and Guest Services Manager is essential for managing the front end of ECHO’s daily operations. This position works to support the guest service team in providing excellent customer service while also managing multiple revenue streams by buying merchandise for the museum store and cafe. This position will work with the Director of Sales to continuously increase retail offerings as well as work with the Development and Communications team to create and deliver strong social media marketing for retail offerings. The ideal candidate will have significant experience in retail buying, ability to multitask while working on multiple projects, and demonstrate leadership skills in a fast paced work environment. This position will be full time, non-exempt and will be generally scheduled Tuesday through Saturday. Occasionally, this position will be required to work full weekends, holidays and evenings. For a full job description please visit echovt.org/jobs.html

VTrans is actively seeking entry-level Transportation Maintenance Workers in the White River, Londonderry, Jamaica and Dummerston areas. Permanent, full-time positions. Great benefits package including medical, dental, and life insurances; pension and retirement plans; paid vacations and earned time off; and a winter snow season bonus. To learn more, follow the corresponding links below:

   

Journeyman: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/White-River-Junction-Transportation-JourneymanMaintenance-Worker-VT-05001/736608100/ Apprentice: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/White-River-Junction-Transportation-ApprenticeMaintenance-Worker-VT-05001/736607800/

   

Journeyman: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Londonderry-Transportation-Journeyman-MaintenanceWorker-VT-05148/715794400/ Apprentice: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Londonderry-Transportation-Apprentice-MaintenanceWorker-VT-05148/715798700/

   

ECHO is an Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes candidates for employment who will contribute to our diversity.

Journeyman: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Jamaica-Transportation-Journeyman-Maintenance-WorkerVT-05343/744327400/ Apprentice: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Jamaica-Transportation-Apprentice-Maintenance-WorkerVT-05343/744327500/

     

Journeyman: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Dummerston-Transportation-Journeyman-MaintenanceWorker-VT-05357/724921800/ Apprentice: https://careers.vermont.gov/job/Dummerston-Transportation-Apprentice-MaintenanceWorker-VT-05357/724921100/

Please submit a cover letter and resume to jobs@echovermont.org with Retail and Guest Services Manager in the subject line. Apply by June 15th.

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TRANSPORTATION MAINTENANCE WORKERS

6/3/21 4:51 PM

Medical Lab Scientists:

Wish you had more time to enjoy the great outdoors? Come work for us, and spend more time doing what you love. Work two 12-hour weekend shifts, get paid for three - plus full time benefits. That’s 36 hours pay for 24 hours work!

Vermont is home to some of the best hiking, swimming, kayaking, bicycling, and mountain climbing in New England. Start enjoying more of what you love to do. Find out about the opportunities for Medical Lab Scientists at Copley Hospital

For more information, visit www.copleyvt.org/careers or apply in person: Human Resources Office Health Center Building, 2nd Floor 528 Washington Highway Morrisville, VT 05661

E.O.E


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JUNE 16-23, 2021

WAREHOUSE MANAGER

ORDER FULFILLMENT ASSOCIATE

Bag Riders, an industry leader in automotive e-commerce, is searching for a talented and passionate individual to join our team as a Warehouse Manager. -$40,000 annual salary, 401K w/ employer contribution, health benefits, PTO + more

Bag Riders, an industry leader in automotive e-commerce, is searching for a talented and passionate individual to join our team as an Order Fulfillment Associate. -$15/hr + OT, great benefits and a fun, fast-paced work environment.

Position Summary The individual in this full-time salary position is responsible for managing the warehouse and warehouse staff.

Position Summary The individual in this full-time hourly position is responsible for the pulling, packing and shipping of customer orders and performing hands-on warehousing operations.

Required Skills and Abilities 2+ years experience managing a warehouse 2+ years experience managing a team Essential Functions Scheduling shifts for Warehouse Staff Developing and implementing Training Procedures Daily prioritizing of tasks for staff ("laying out the day for staff") Performing "rolling" Inventory Recounts and Quarterly Recounts Designing and Optimizing Warehouse Storage Management and processing of Inbound Shipments Management and processing of "Return to Stock" items (from customer returns) Signing off on B2B Freight Shipments Conducting regular Performance Reviews

LEGAL TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANT

Required Skills and Abilities -Ability lift heavy boxes up to 50 pounds without assistance -Ability to walk or stand for extended periods of time, including ascending and descending stairs -Strong attention to detail -Excellent communication skills in a team environment -Comfortable operating Microsoft Windows Essential Functions -Loading and unloading product delivery trucks -Reading and understanding packing slips -Accurately retrieving products from inventory -Packaging products carefully into shipping containers -Using computer software to print shipping labels and process orders -Performing warehouse functions utilizing pallet jacks

Sheehey Furlong & Behm P.C. - Burlington, VT Sheehey Furlong & Behm is accepting applications for a Legal Technology Assistant in its Burlington office. The Legal Technology Assistant will support all aspects of the legal practice in general and the technology and litigation support tools specifically. This position does not require experience in technology support, as we will train the right candidate. The most important qualifications for the job are a “can do” attitude and the ability to handle pressure. What the right candidate will need to be is technologically savvy, familiar with Microsoft Office and have a basic knowledge of networking. Experience with technology support, document management platforms (ideally Worldox), litigation support tools (such as Eclipse SE or Relativity) or cloud computing are highly desired. If you feel like you would be a good fit and are willing to learn, send your resume to dwilson@sheeheyvt.com. You must send your resume in PDF format attached to your email. The cover letter should only be in body of the email.

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER... M E N T A L H E A LT H S E R V I C E S D I R E C T O R – W A T E R B U R Y

Managerial work at an executive level. Provides organizational leadership for Department priorities including development, planning and implementation requirements for the staterun facilities. Provides leadership through extensive collaboration with other Agency departments and various community non-profit organizations. Extensive interaction at the state and federal levels with mental health and health care leaders, advocates, board members, citizens, legislators and former patients. For more information, contact Mourning Fox at Mourning.Fox@vermont.gov or 802-241-0137. Department: Mental Health. Status: Full Time. Location: Waterbury. Job ID #16417. Application Deadline: June 22, 2021.

FIN ANCIAL ADMINIS TRAT OR III – WATERBURY

B U S I N E S S A P P L I C AT I O N A N D AU D I T S U P P O R T S P E C I A L I S T – W AT E R B U R Y

We are currently seeking an Internal Auditor to contribute to the fulfillment of the Team’s mission in promoting efficient and effective operations across the Agency. An ideal candidate will be a “people person” coupled with strong skills in business process analytics, root cause and risk analysis. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this position will work remotely from home. However, it is expected a combination of remote and in-person office work will begin in 2021. For more information, contact Peter Moino at peter.moino@vermont.gov. Department: Human Services Agency. Status: Full Time. Location: Waterbury. Job ID #17103. Application Deadline: July 6, 2021.

Interested in putting your Finance skills to work in support of critical public safety programs for Vermonters? The Department of Public Safety has two opportunities! One is a permanent Financial Administrator III position, and one is a limited-service Financial Administrator III position in our Grants Management Unit. These positions will be responsible for the financial management of their assigned grant programs. Tasks may include preparing grant applications, federal draws, program financials, and execution of subgrant agreements. For more information, contact Melissa Austin at melissa.austin@vermont.gov. Department: Public Safety. Status: Full Time and Limited Service. Location: Waterbury. Job ID# 13261. Application Deadline: June 30, 2021.

ADMINIS TRATIVE SERVICES COORDIN ATOR I - MONTPELIER

PUBLIC GUARDIAN – HYDE PARK

EPIDEMIOLOGIST III – VARIOUS

Seeking Administrative Services Coordinator to assist in the operations of the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Responsibilities will include public assistance, grant processing, coordination for project review & National Register nominations, duties related to 3 governor-appointed boards, organization of events and general operations related to state historic preservation office. For more information, contact Laura Trieschmann at laura. trieschmann@vermont.gov. Department: Commerce & Community Development. Status: Full Time. Location Montpelier. Reference Job ID #17462. Application Deadline: June 24, 2021.

The Office of Public Guardian seeks an independent, enthusiastic and organized person to protect and monitor the legal and human rights of individuals under court-ordered guardianship. This position is located at the Hyde Park OPG regional office and covers a caseload of individuals with developmental disabilities or age-related cognitive impairments in Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille and Orleans counties who require assistance and judgment for critical decision making in a number of life domains. For more information, contact Maryann Willson at maryann.willson@vermont.gov. Department: Disabilities Aging & Independent Living. Status: Full Time, Interim. Location: Hyde Park. Job ID #17003. Application Deadline: June 22, 2021.

Want to make a difference in the lives of Vermonters? The Vermont Department of Health has an exciting opportunity for you to improve population health. Local Health is seeking enthusiastic public health professionals with experience in epidemiology to join our district office team. The Epidemiologist will conduct surveillance and investigation of reportable infectious diseases, serve as the District COVID-19 subject matter expert, investigate instances of COVID19 in facilities. For More information, follow this link https://www.careerarc.com/jobsearch?job_group=67504 for contacts and details of the 12 open positions. Location: Various to all 12 District Offices. Status: Full Time, Limited Service. Application Deadline: June 24, 2021.

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer


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79 JUNE 16-23, 2021

COMMUNITY BANKER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

There is no better time to join NSB’s team!

HIRING MANUFACTURING OPERATORS

Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We strive to serve our employees as well as our communities. We are seeking professionals to join our team as Community Bankers at several of our locations.

$17.50/hour on Day Shift $19.69/hour on Night Shift

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS

• The Community Banker will be responsible for receiving and processing customers’ financial transactions, matching customers’ needs with appropriate products and services, protecting customer information and maintaining customer confidentiality. • We are looking for someone who will consistently provide outstanding customer service, has excellent communication skills, and will build rapport and develop relationships with our valued customers. • A high school diploma, general education degree (GED) or equivalent is required.

OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH

• NSB encourages career development and has a variety of training platforms available. • Average Years of Service at Northfield Savings Bank is above 9! If you’re looking for a career in the Banking industry, this is a great place to start!

WHAT NSB CAN OFFER YOU

• NSB offers a competitive compensation based on experience. • Benefits package including medical, dental, vision, combined time off, 10 paid holidays, a wellness program and more! • Profit sharing opportunity and an outstanding employer-matching 401(K) retirement program. • NSB offers professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. • Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00am to 5:00pm. We understand the importance of having evenings and weekends with our friends, families, and our community. Please send an NSB Application + your resume in confidence to: Careers@ nsbvt.com, or mail to: Northfield Savings Bank H.R. P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer

Offering $2,250.00 Sign-on Bonuses for limited time! Our company produces microelectronic chips, right in your backyard. These chips go into cell phones, computers, tablets, vehicles, medical devices, and much more! Come be a part of a company that is changing the industry that is changing the world through our high-end technology. No experience required; we will train you when you join our team. Location: Essex, VT Schedules: 7pm-7am or 7am-7pm *Work approximately only 14 days per month: Three days one week and four days the next week. Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental & Vision • 401k matching up to 4.5% • Paid Vacation Time: Approx. 3 weeks • Paid Sick Time: 80 hrs per year • Paid Parental Leave: Up to 20 weeks • Gym Reimbursement • Quarterly Bonuses • Occasional Overtime • Opportunity for Growth

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concert

Waterfront Concert Series THURSDAY NIGHTS IN JULY & AUGUST Doors at 7:30 | Shows at 8pm | Free admission | Donations encouraged

the untold, the compelling, the extraordinary & the authentic.

July 15: THE ADAM EZRA GROUP July 22: CHRIS BARRON OF SPIN DOCTORS July 29: KAT WRIGHT August 5: MICHAEL GLABICKI OF RUSTED ROOT August 12: SEAN KELLY OF THE SAMPLES Proceeds benefit Umbrella NEK (umbrellanek.org) Donations accepted during the show, as well as from each evening’s dinner and room proceeds. Waterfront space is limited, make your reservations today.

Info & Reservations: lakemoreyresort.com Lake Morey Resort | 82 Clubhouse Road Fairlee, VT | 802-423-1211

Help us remain that way.

SCAN QR CODE TO DONATE

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CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.61) CROSSWORD (P.61)

fun stuff HARRY BLISS

“I don’t know about you, but I feel terrific.” JEN SORENSEN

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

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fun stuff RYAN RIDDLE

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Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY REAL JUNE 17-23

ion, you and the people in your life have more than a mild need for magic. Your ability to thrive depends on you all getting big doses of magic.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20):

“I remember wishing I could be boiled like water and made pure again,” writes poet Jeffrey McDaniel. Judging by the current astrological omens, Gemini, I think you could be made reasonably pure again without having to endure an ordeal like being boiled like water. Do you have ideas about how to proceed? Here are mine: 1. Spend 15 minutes alone. With your eyes closed, sitting in a comfortable chair, forgive everyone who has hurt you. Do the best you can. Perfection isn’t necessary. 2. Spend another 15 minutes alone, same deal. Forgive yourself of everything you’ve done that you think of as errors. Perfection isn’t required. 3. Spend another 15 minutes alone. Imagine what it would be like to unconditionally love yourself exactly as you are. 4. Spend another 15 minutes alone. Remember 10 amazing moments that you enjoyed between ages 5 and 13.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries playwright

Tennessee Williams was honest about the trickery he engaged in as he composed his entertaining masterpieces. “I don’t want realism,” he exclaimed. “I want magic! Yes, yes, magic! I try to give that to people.” I fully support you, Aries, if you would like to make that your goal in the next three weeks. In my astrological opin-

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): On my wall is a poster that says, “Avoid the Tragic Magic Triad: taking things too personally, taking things too seriously, and taking things too literally.” This advice doesn’t refer to important matters, such as my health or my ongoing fight against our culture’s bigotry. I take those issues very personally, seriously and literally. Rather, the motto refers to trivial and transitory issues, such as the new dent made in my car by a hit-and-run driver in the Whole Foods parking lot, or the bad review of my book on Amazon.com, or the $18 that a certain Etsy seller cheated me out of, or the joke about the size of my nose that some supposed friend made on Twitter. According to my reading of astrological omens, Taurus, you would benefit right now from meditating on things like these that you take too seriously, personally and literally. Here’s Don Miguel Ruiz: “There is a huge amount of freedom that comes to you when you take nothing personally.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): On June 23, 1940, Wilma Rudolph was born prematurely to a family that already had 19 other children. During her childhood, she suffered from pneumonia, scarlet fever, polio and infant paralysis. The latter two diseases damaged her left leg, and she wore a brace until she was 12 years old. Nevertheless, by the time she was in high school, she had become a very good athlete. Eventually she competed in the Olympics, where she won four medals and earned the title “the fastest woman in history.” I propose that we name her your official role model for the rest of 2021. May she inspire you to overcome and transcend your own personal adversity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo-born P.L. Travers wrote the children’s books about Mary Poppins, a nanny with magical powers. She was thoroughly familiar with folklore, ancient myths and the occult. The character of Mary Poppins, Travers said, was a version of the Mother Goddess. But in her writing process, she drew inspiration mainly from what she thought of as the vast dark nothingness. She wrote, “I’ve

become convinced that the great treasure to possess is the unknown.” To generate her tales, she listened to silence and emptiness. I recommend you emulate her approach as you create the next chapter of your life story.

ter, rhapsodize, improvise, beguile and lyricize. Catch my drift? You won’t simply laugh, but will chortle, cackle and guffaw. In other words, Sagittarius, you are authorized to imbue everything you do with style, panache and imagination.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo poet Melissa Broder writes, “Romantic obsession is my first language. I live in a world of fantasies, infatuations and love poems.” I wouldn’t normally authorize you to share her perspective, but I will now. The astrological omens suggest you have something important to learn from being more enamored and adoring than usual. If you say yes to the deluge of yearning, you’ll gain access to a type of power that will prove very useful to you in the coming months.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Congratula-

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran author Oscar Wilde disproved the misconception that Libras are wishy-washy, overly eager to compromise and inclined to overthink everything. His writing had wit and flair, and his life was vivid and daring. He wrote, “There are moments when one has to choose between living one’s own life, fully, entirely, completely—or dragging out some false, shallow, degrading existence that the world in its hypocrisy demands.” I suspect that one of those pivotal moments will soon be coming up for you. Be Wilde-like! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Philosopher Simone Weil wrote, “Only the light that falls continually from the sky gives a tree the energy to push powerful roots into the earth. The tree is actually rooted in the sky.” As you bolster your foundations in the coming months, as you deepen your roots, I hope you keep Weil’s brilliant observation in mind. Like a tree, the nourishment that will help you grow the stamina and strength and structure you need will come as you turn to the brightest, warmest, highest sources of inspiration. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): To be in

groovy alignment with cosmic rhythms, you won’t merely walk, and you certainly won’t trudge. Rather, you will saunter and ramble and promenade. You will strut and rove and prowl. Likewise, you won’t just talk, and you certainly won’t mutter or grumble. Instead you will ban-

tions on being such a duty-bound, no-nonsense adult. May you continue to ply your dogged persistence and beast-of-burden attitude as long as it gets important tasks done, helps you feel useful and doesn’t make you sick. But if you do get tempted to depart from the sacrificial path anytime soon, please know that you will not offend any gods or demons. Nor will you incur a karmic debt. In fact, I believe you have cosmic clearance to dabble with lightheartedness for a while. You should feel free to experiment with fun and games that appeal to your sense of wonder.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I can barely

conceive of a type of beauty in which there is no melancholy,” wrote poet Charles Baudelaire. What?! That makes no sense. I’m aware of millions of beautiful things that aren’t tinctured with melancholy. California’s Mount Shasta in the late spring twilight, for example. New York City’s Guggenheim Museum, a gorgeous gleaming building designed by genius architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The Marmore waterfalls in central Italy. The gardens of painter Claude Monet in Normandy, France. David Byrne’s gloriously hopeful website, ReasonsToBeCheerful.world. I mention this, Aquarius, because I expect life to bring you a flood of non-melancholic beauty in the coming days. Take advantage of this grace to replenish your trust in life.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean author César Aira praises the value of escaping one’s memories. He writes, “Forgetting is like a great alchemy free of secrets, transforming everything to the present.” I’d love to see you enjoy alchemy like that in the coming weeks, dear Pisces. It’s a favorable time to lose at least some of the inhibitions and limitations you think you have to accept because of what happened in the past. As Aira says, forgetting “makes our lives into a visible and tangible thing we hold in our hands, with no folds left hidden in the past.”

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LOOKING 4 FRIEND I’m looking for someone to spend time and hang out. Bluewaves, 31, seeking: W

Respond to these people online: dating.sevendaysvt.com WOMEN seeking... SEEKING KIND MALE COMPANION Funny. Love my family, my friends, my dog. Looking for my last first date, a great guy for a woman who deserves him. Nonsmokers, no drinkers, no drugs. Just honest, intelligent, hardworking guys. Seriously. Augustsummersky, 64, seeking: M SEARCHING FOR MY BEST FRIEND Hi, I’m new at this online dating. I love being outside, kayaking, camping, hiking. On the not-so-nice days, I like reading, cooking/baking or cuddling on the couch with a good movie. It’s all more fun when we have someone we enjoy spending time with. I’m looking for that special someone. BlueEyes421, 50, seeking: M, l EDUCATED, KIND, FUNNY, AUTHENTIC I’m a mom of two, teacher, kind, liberal lady looking for a man who is kind and has a great sense of humor. I like true crime podcasts, public radio, relaxing, vegan food, comedy shows and great conversation. Not looking for someone to complete me, just looking for someone to enjoy time with. No hookups. INFP. Be well! Starryskies, 39, seeking: M, l CREATIVE, NURTURING, PERSEVERANT 65-y/o looking to meet man with sense of humor, slightly adventurous, who likes to take walks and explore Vermont. Amma243, 65, seeking: M, l

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TYPE A ADVENTURER FOR LIFE Enjoy outdoor activities: gardening, photography, reading. Strong supporter of learning, growing knowledge of the arts, books on the universe (e.g., The Holographic Universe [Talbot], crime fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, thrillers [favorites authors: Preston and Child]). Like Bruce Springsteen’s Western Stars album. Looking for companion to tour Vermont mountains, reservoirs, lakes. Please, no narcissists. Thank you for reading this. Carol, 73, seeking: M, l LIFE TO SHARE Active life and wanting to share fun times. Alone is lonely. Not a stay-athome person. I enjoy music and theater and, while I found many online options this past year, am looking forward to live shows this summer. Having someone special to go with would make it more enjoyable. Time4Me2, 63, seeking: M, l VACCINATED, AFFECTIONATE SEEKS FORT-BUILDING TEAMMATE Curvy BBW seeks good company — a fun, chill, down-to-earth, very affectionate man to build living room forts with. Music, laughter, cuddling, witty repartee, adventure and outdoor sojourns are on the itinerary. Come enjoy the journey. The fully vaccinated and those equipped with a kind, accountable heart, a sense of humor, and an orientation toward facts and health, please inquire. middeg, 49, seeking: M, l READY TO EXPLORE I am ready for a new adventure. I am interested in exploring a relationship with a women or couple. I enjoy being in the woods, camping and just sitting in a brook or at a waterfall. I also like to get a bit of wind in my hair. I have a good sense of humor and am attractive and fun. Newadventures2021, 47, seeking: W, Cp IRREVERENCE WELCOMED My passions are travel, food, art, music and more. I like to spend as little time being serious as possible. I’m curious about a lot of things. Do you share these passions and have others of your own? Do you like family time, being in nature or people-watching as you sit at an outdoor table on Church Street? summerplease, 64, seeking: M, l MERGING HEARTS AND MINDS Looking to add a new best friend and partner to my beautiful tribe to share those intimate moments and maybe grow old with. I believe in great love but know those roots are in the platonic. I like to move, sit, keep it fresh. I love music and silence. Looking for a brave, messy, youthful, mature human with emotional intelligence. Overhere, 56, seeking: M, l JOYFUL Looking for a funny person ’cause I’m funny, too! Creative type! I love going to galleries and museums. Kind, compassionate, like to travel, go boating and be on beaches. I see life through optimistic eyes. Scout, 68, seeking: M, l

OUTDOORSY, HONEST, HEALTHY, MUSIC LOVER Vibrant, mature, independent, welltraveled person who is interested in nature, music, culture, arts, travel and enjoying life. Looking for a gent who is positive, kind, honest and enjoys the same. Bella2020, 63, seeking: M, l FRIENDLY, SOCIAL, INDEPENDENT, EASYGOING Very honest, loyal, friendly. Enjoy cooking, traveling, walking, driving with no destination, exploring the beauty of the Green Mountains. Would enjoy finding the same in my partner. dyniska, 80, seeking: M MILLENNIALS INQUIRE WITHIN. YEEHAW. Looking for a hot, nerdy dude who has an adventurous, sensitive, techie soul. Good with his hands. Must love cuddles. I don’t mind if you prioritize your alone time as long as you don’t mind that I can be an endearing space case. Be warned: I will ask for your natal chart and when your most recent STI test was. starsaligned, 26, seeking: M CUCKOO ABOUT ADVENTURES I’m just looking for a new friend. I’m somewhat new to the area and would like to find someone who likes to talk, hike, or do anything that doesn’t involve going to the bar or lots of drinking! NDrootsNYbuds, 38, seeking: M, l

MEN seeking... I’LL KEEP IT SEXY 4 U Single guy, tall and slim. Hot body, looks like a swimsuit model. I don’t look like Granny’s old boyfriend: old man, baggy pants, suspenders, looks like Larry King. Granny’s new boyfriend is tall and slim, wears a belt, has a hot body, looks younger, sexier, more fun. I look like the new model. Write me for a date. eyecandy, 65, seeking: W, l ENERGETIC AND CREATIVE My life revolves around my four children and four grandchildren. I teach at Champlain College part time and love it. My other passions include mountain biking, cross-country skiing, hiking and photography, and if I can find a tennis group again, you may find me on the court. I am physically and emotionally fit. Trek, 74, seeking: W, l ADVENTURE BUDDY OR FWB Hello ladies, are you looking for someone to do things with? Mostly outdoorsy stuff, but not always outside. I like hiking, walks, beach, beach and beach, swimming holes, and fishing. I have a boat for exploring Vermonts waterways. I have a dog as a companion. If we get along, maybe a FWB, too, but that’s not a priority. I live in Stowe but am in Burlington daily. Norm, 59, seeking: W, l LONELY. COVID SUCKS. SUNBATHING NAKED. Looking for fun in the sun. Enjoy being nude. Fires outside. Cut, trimmed and shaving. Woman or a couple. Good times and laughter and sex. Toohorny11, 53, seeking: W, Cp, l

SAILOR SEEKING CREW AND/OR MATE Wondering who else is out there. Ideally someone who loves a life in/on the water. The last 15 months have taught me a lot, so trying to switch it up. Carpe diem, etc. Enjoy laughter, dining out. Not really sure how to describe myself. Let’s meet, and you can tell me what I’m like. sailfarlivefree, 57, seeking: W, l INTELLIGENT, COMPASSIONATE, CUDDLY, GOOD KISSER Educated SWM (50s) looking to enjoy more free time with someone special. Fully vaccinated and ready to reenter the post-COVID world. Love to walk, hike, travel, dine out, watch movies, cuddle and have good conversation, to name a few. On the more intimate side, I love naked afternoon lounging, playful teasing and some role-playing. Tall_Guy69, 56, seeking: W, l HAPPY TO BE HERE Seeking a happy, intelligent, honest woman open to possibilities. No drama queens or heavy drinkers. I like women who enjoy the outdoors, dining out on the weekends and staying in the house during the week. I like women who think a healthy sex life is important. pintoburk, 64, seeking: W, l EXPERIENCED IMPACT PLAYER SEEKS SPANKEE If you know, you know. If you are intrigued, please reach out. I seek a partner who can balance intellectual connection with erotic physical exploration. Be a good girl and do as you are told, and you will be rewarded. Be a bad girl, and you will be punished. Both situations will be intense and sexy. I promise. kinderedspirit, 52, seeking: W, l BREAKING OUT OF LOCKDOWN Somewhat of a homebody, though I do like an outside adventure. Ready to break out of lockdown and go traveling, or rummage through a few thrift stores in Lebanon or Estrie Aide in Sherbrooke. This follows my complete Moderna vaccination schedule. The COVID scare has kept me isolated beyond belief and devoid of a relationship. greytail2020, 65, seeking: W, Cp, Gp, l FREE SPIRIT WHO ENJOYS LIFE I enjoy skydiving, hiking, biking, photography, printing, cooking and much more. Looking for someone to share some of this life in a positive manner — friendship or more. Just turned 50 years young. jayspring, 50, seeking: W, l GEEKY MAKER DAD, SUPER POSITIVE I’ve always pushed myself. Sometimes I do stop to reflect on why, and then, refreshed, I move forward some more. Built my own house. Adding to it now. But not married to it. Almost done with my master’s degree. I love travel and have been waiting out this pandemic to visit places again. Go visit places with me. Descanso, 53, seeking: W, l WHERE ARE YOU? I like to think of myself as kind and smart, curious and adventurous, athletic and musical, and much more. A “renaissance person” is what I’ve always considered the ideal. Many years ago, I through-hiked the Appalachian Trail, and that experience, and my many adventures since, have shaped my life and my values in profound ways. somethingdifferent, 62, seeking: W, l

TRYING TO PAY ATTENTION Moved to Vermont on a whim many years ago. Appreciate nature and animals. I am on a lifelong learning curve. NPR and live music (once upon a time). Find me at the ocean in Wellfleet, driving on Highway 1 in California or in a Chinese restaurant in NYC. I listen more than speak. Hoping to meet a kind, compatible soul. Mindfully, 67, seeking: W PIN ME ... EROTIC WRESTLING? Hi all, I’m a discreet, masculine submissive who wants to be dominated, pinned down, tied up, used, played with, you name it. I’m very kinky with few limits, DD-free and play clean. I always have good 420 to share, too. You must host. Hit me up, and let’s party and have some kinky fun. Hlplss, 56, seeking: M, TM, TW, Q, Cp, Gp, l

TRANS WOMEN seeking... LAND NARWHAL SEEKS UNICORN(S) Tall, beautiful, brilliant trans woman (just starting hormones) with long brown hair seeking trans women for friendship and fun. I’m well read, love cinema and theater. Newly single and finally fully coming out! Kind people only, please. jenesequa, 51, seeking: TW DEPTH AND DESIRE Finding both is not easy. Active TG seeks motivated, aroused, real playmate for trysts of all sorts. Inside, outside, day, night. If you are 50ish to 60ish, very fit and hot to trot, get in touch. 2PartsofDesire, 64, seeking: M, Cp, l

TRANS MEN seeking... COUNTRY BOY SEEKS FRIENDS Not looking for a sexual relationship. I am very happily taken by a wonderful woman for over 20 years. I am just looking for people to go hunting and fishing with. Kayaking in the summer or hitting the trails. My wife has friends she does her hobbies with. Just looking for someone who shares mine! Islander68, 52, seeking: TM, TW, Q, NC, NBP

NONBINARY PEOPLE seeking... SUB MASO FOR DOM SADIST Bio-female, nonbinary gendered, sub/ masochist looking for her Dom/Sadist. Looking for a local sadist who is looking for TPE and to play with the same person! Experienced older men preferred. I have 15 years of experience in BDSM. Looking for that open-minded someone who is OK with some jiggle with their wiggle, looking for full-time TPE and nonmonogamy. CallMeParker, 34, seeking: M, W, TM, TW, Q, NC, NBP, Cp, Gp, l

COUPLES seeking... 420-FRIENDLY COUPLE SEEKING WOMAN He’s the chocolate. I’m a vanilla dream. We need to find that special cookie to fulfill our everything in between. If you want a flavorful treat, let’s warm up the chocolate together and let him make us cookies and cream. Nawna, 39, seeking: Cp, l FIT COUPLE SEEKING SEXUAL CARDIO We are a fit, attractive couple (bi 41y/o female and straight 35-y/o male) in a secure relationship looking to add some fun to our sex life. Looking for an adventurous woman to help us explore our sexual fantasies. Fitcouplevt, 41, seeking: W, l INQUISITIVE, WANTING MORE I would like to meet a lady I can become friends with. You can learn more about me when we talk. Adventurewithus2, 45, seeking: W, l


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JAZZ FEST REDHEADED ASIAN LADY Saw you with your two friends when we were both leaving. You look sooo fine. Pretty sure you noticed me noticing you. Let me know if you see this. When: Sunday, June 13, 2021. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915306 NORTH BEACH You had an orange bikini with a blue bottom and glasses. Really liked what I saw and couldn’t stop checking you out. You seemed to appreciate my attention but weren’t alone. Let’s get together alone and appreciate each other. When: Sunday, June 13, 2021. Where: North Beach. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915305 CUTE BOY AT SHELBURNE BEACH Hi. I saw your ad in the paper. I’m the cute blonde. I believe you were the tall, black-haired man sitting on the bench observing the world around you. You seemed inquisitive. Thoughtful. Mysterious. Come find me again on a nice summer evening. It’s almost guaranteed I’ll be there again soon. When: Tuesday, June 1, 2021. Where: Shelburne Beach. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915304 HANDSOME AT HANNAFORD I’m not one to be very shy, but your good looks stopped me in my tracks. We were in the baking aisle, and I said “Excuse me” as I walked by. Wish I had said hello! Your tan complexion and strong demeanor were very attractive. Hopefully I’ll run into you again, so keep shopping at Hannaford in South Barre. :) When: Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Where: Hannaford, South Barre. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915303 SPRING ROLLS AT... We were in line together for takeout. You were very cute and talkative. Want to continue the conversation? Mention something we talked about. When: Tuesday, June 8, 2021. Where: Pho Hong. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915302

BURTON ISLAND HAND SHAKE P, your delightful demeanor and appreciation of dogs warmed our hearts. Glad that the first handshake I shared with someone in well over a year was with you. C, let me know you departed happily on the ferry. Cheers to more balmy, sunny days ahead! A, Pippa and Bandit. When: Friday, June 4, 2021. Where: Burton Island. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915301 WINOOSKI RIVER MERMAID I was on my paddleboard. You told me where I could easily exit the river, then asked how my paddle was. As I left the area, you were sauntering through a field picking flowers. Care to spend another afternoon by the river? When: Monday, June 7, 2021. Where: Jonesville Bridge. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915300 POST-COVID KARAOKE AT JP’S You had a cool back tattoo and originated from South America. I had the dragon on my left arm and was wearing a colorful long dress. You’d never been to Costa Rica, so I showed you pics from my April vacation. Karaoke was so fun — hope to see you there again, or downtown, or wherever! When: Saturday, June 5, 2021. Where: JP’s, downtown Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #915299 ETHAN ALLEN PARK TRAILS BIKER 9:30 a.m. You were riding a bike with a bright light, helmet-free, long dark hair blowing behind you. Your smile was even brighter than your light. I was a blonde with my hair pulled back in a ponytail, walking the trail. We said good morning. Your energy is strong. I would love to meet you. When: Sunday, June 6, 2021. Where: riding the bike path that’s near Ethan Allen Park parking lot. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915298

CUTE BLONDE AT SHELBURNE BEACH You were standing down by the fence looking over the water. I was sitting up on a bench. You had lovely dark blond hair and a sweet face. I tried not to stare. I imagined you turning your head and smiling at me, but you simply went back to your car and left. Hopefully we meet again. You’re beautiful. When: Tuesday, June 1, 2021. Where: Shelburne Beach. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915297 MUSTACHE MAN Seen by riverside. Arrived by Guzzi. Sexy legs and Moz tee. Me: with dogs and Volvo. To me, you are a work of art. I would give you my heart, if I had one. Maybe next time we can make eye contact. VG? When: Monday, May 24, 2021. Where: Strangeways Sound Lounge. You: Man. Me: Gender nonconformist. #915296 VISIONS OF YOU Summertime and the wind is blowing outside in lower Chelsea, and I don’t know what I’m doing in this city / The sun is always in my eyes / It crashes through the windows, and I’m sleeping on the couch when I came to visit you / That’s when I knew. When: Wednesday, June 12, 2019. Where: through time and space. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915295 MIDDEG Did you mean to send me that flirt? Waited for you to get your profile online. I am interested, very interested! When: Sunday, May 30, 2021. Where: Seven Days. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915294 RYOBI GIRL Long shot, I know, and not expecting to go anywhere. We had an awesome conversation, and you’re gorgeous. We related demographically. Just wanted you to know. :) When: Sunday, May 30, 2021. Where: Williston. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915293 TO HELL AND BACK Your: 1987 Yamaha Clavinova keyboard. Me: seven feet, six inches of sunburned charm, forked tail tucked into my Carhartts, faded Led Zep tee and silver goatee. Bumped into each other twice now. You were asking about the “tobacco” products, and I couldn’t help but notice your dulcet tones. Love to show you my toolshed. 420-friendly. When: Friday, May 21, 2021. Where: Good Times in Rutland. You: Gender nonconformist. Me: Group. #915292

Ask REVEREND Dear Not-So Socialite, the

Irreverent counsel on life’s conundrums

Dear Reverend,

Over the past month or so, my friends have been going back out to the bars a lot. They often invite me, but I always decline. I’m fully vaccinated, but I’m just not ready to mingle with a bunch of strangers yet — especially drunk ones. How do I keep my friends and find the courage to go out again?

Not-So Socialite

(FEMALE, 24)

The world has been a pretty scary place for the past 15 months. Now that COVID-19 restrictions are starting to be lifted, some people are ready to whip off the mask and dance in the streets while others are still hesitant to leave the house. Both reactions are perfectly fine. Last time I checked, there was no handbook for how to get back to normal after a pandemic, so you can write your own rules. Be honest with your friends about why you haven’t been

E. THETFORD TRAVELER5656 I spied you on Fitness Singles. You emailed me: vidadulce. Yes, life is sweet, better with someone. Fingers crossed you see this and respond. When: Tuesday, May 4, 2021. Where: Fitness Singles. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915291

DELIGHTFUL START TO SUMMER Your bright smile and friendly wave as I was leaving the party lightened my heart and danced in my thoughts. Thank you for sparking some beginning of summer happiness. When: Friday, May 21, 2021. Where: Waitsfield backyard party. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915284

DITTO We are two perfectly imperfect people! You have been my compass when I’m lost, and we must trust this process. When: Thursday, May 27, 2021. Where: in every moment. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915290 ROCK POINT HUMAN You were looking for the right spot to enjoy the sunset, so I offered you the rock I had been hogging. We were both alone, shoes off, with white shirts, and even your mood seemed to mirror mine. As I left, I kept wanting to turn back but was too shy. Just curious about you! When: Monday, May 17, 2021. Where: Rock Point cliff. You: Nonbinary person. Me: Non-binary person. #915289 MUD POND MID FAT We started a conversation about wheel size and mountain biking (at the Mud Pond entrance around noon). You were just finishing up a ride, and I was heading into the woods with an older friend. Would enjoy talking more or taking a ride together. When: Tuesday, May 25, 2021. Where: Mud Pond Conservation Area. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915288 VACCINE CHECKOUT AT THE FAIRGROUNDS You pointed me toward the exit. Not sure if you were just checking me out or also checking me out. Maybe both. Perhaps this is a second chance for us to connect, seeing as I can’t go back for a third shot? When: Monday, May 24, 2021. Where: Essex Junction. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915287 TO THE BEAUTIFUL MORETOWN WINDBREAKER You are down-to-earth, kind to all who cross your path. Girl next door with a mind as big as the whole world and a smile that makes my heart flutter. You will always be my person. When: Saturday, May 15, 2021. Where: Moretown. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915285

feeling so social. Let them know you need their help getting your going-out groove on again and you want them to keep inviting you. It can be a drag to always get turned down, so assure them that you’ll say yes sooner or later. Why not make a pact and promise to buy them a round of drinks on your first night out? In the meantime, think of things you can do with your pals that don’t involve going

TANGLED UP IN YOU What are the chances it’s you? Maybe handwritten words inspired; most likely I’m just a foolish sap. Bob and Jim both wrote about the Jack of Hearts. Is it still a card you’d ever play? Your eyes always had a way of reciting profound poetry. I wonder if I will ever again gaze into that blue abyss. Float within the soulful dreamscape, always wondering, Is this reality? When: Friday, May 1, 2020. Where: photo strip on your fridge. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915283 REI PARKING LOT, MAY 17 You parked next to me, and I had to wait for you before I could leave. Didn’t mind because you were nice to look at. You said you were becoming more like your dad every day. I joked you needed a purse to keep your stuff together. Meet up so we can keep you from turning into your dad too quickly? When: Monday, May 17, 2021. Where: REI parking lot, Williston. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915282 SHORT GIRL AT JOLLEY’S, SHELBURNE ROAD You walked behind me, and I didn’t notice you. You were buying Truly, I think, but wow, you are the most stunning woman I’ve ever seen. Don’t even need a reply, since you got into a gray Tundra and you are most likely taken. Just wanna say you are beautiful. When: Sunday, May 16, 2021. Where: South Burlington Jolley’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915281 NORTHFIELD NURSE I don’t think you read this paper, but here goes. We have known each other for years and got close for a while, then our paths separated us. I was hoping to reunite, but that hope was lost with one word from you. I wish you the best in the future, from the guy who gives the best hugs. When: Monday, September 12, 2016. Where: my place. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915277

to places with close-proximity people. Have a get-together at your house. Pack up some snacks and drinks and go to the beach. Thankfully, it’s summertime, and there are plenty of things to do outside. When you’re ready to venture back into the bar scene, head out on a weeknight to a place that might not be super busy. Somewhere with outdoor seating might be best for dipping your toe back in. Most importantly, be gentle with yourself. If you don’t feel comfortable doing something just yet, don’t do it. There’s no rush. Your friends — and the bars — will be there when you’re ready. Good luck and God bless,

The Reverend

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Senior male, mid-60s, seeking older males 65 to 80 for carefree and fun moments of pleasure. Must be DD-free and have completed both COVID shots. Safe and kind. Life is too short to not have moments of pleasure. It’s been a rough past year. #L1511

DWW seeks divorced/single man of appropriate age range. I am 59 and still fine. Active, down-to-earth poet and educator. Would like to start with a coffee or a walk first. Life is short and stranger than fiction. #L1516 SWM seeking SWM any age. Must love top and fem bottom. Looking for steady lover. Gay or bi, any race. Phone. #L1515 Male widower looking for woman for FWB/LTR, maybe more. Please be 18+. Send me your name, info and phone number. I will return all calls back to you. Look forward to meeting you. #L1513

GM 60-y/o seeks sexually active 70-plus male. I love giving and receiving oral. Virgin but would love to bottom to a lover. Enjoy all activities nude. #L1514 Male, 55, seeking woman to cocreate a beautiful life/ family close to the Earth on the land with plants, animals and wildlife. Together a vessel of love to manifest the dormant ancestral pulse of people living close to nature absent the turnkey life mayhem. Wolcott. Clearing the woods. #L1512 Traveling companion wanted. I would like to see the U.S. using an RV or motorhome with the possibility of relocating. #L1508

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David, 73, Vermont gentleman. Growing, enjoying a healthy life mentally and physically. We are so blessed with a home like Vermont! Chemistry, spirit, health! I will listen to all you say and believe all you do! #L1510

Widower man looking for woman for FWB, possible LTR and more. Send me your name and number; I’ll return your calls. Looking forward to meeting you! Please be over 18. Race is not an issue. Thank you! #L1503

Discreet oral bottom. 54y/o SWM, 5’8, slim, dark hair, blue eyes. Seeking any well-hung guys, 18 to 55 y/o, who are a good top and last a long time for more than one around. Phone only, but text. Champlain Valley. #L1500

I like to listen and learn. I’ve been lucky enough to travel a lot in business. I’d like to adventure more, maybe to Western Europe. I’d like to find someone who appreciates the little things and a best friend who is truthful and trustworthy. #L1509

Mid-60s, tall, strong SWF in NEK with gardening skills seeks cultivating a relationship with similar SM or platonic friend. Crafts, common sense, Carhartt, nudist Buddhist, bicycling, kayaking, woodworking, science, hammocks. Be true to who you are, perhaps not always clothed in ego. I will dress the same, alongside my faux pas. #L1502

38-y/o SWM seeking male for LTR. Must live near the Plattsburgh, N.Y., area. I am average but cute-looking. I enjoy reading, videos and time with friends. Talking a must. Your age: 35-plus. Nonsmoker. Stability required. #L1499

58-y/o SWF seeks SM 55 to 65. I enjoy outdoor activity in all types of weather, reading, conversation and travel. NEK location. #L1507 Seeking thin guys 18 to 30 y/o. Slender. Talk first. Phone number, please. #L1506 Old woman (70s) wants to meet old or young man for only interesting conversation and coffee. Old woman is well educated and well traveled. Would like old or young man to be smart and funny. Phone number, please. #L1504

I live in Rutland. I truly believe in honesty. Caring, understanding, independent, generous, easygoing, active, fit, fun, flexible. I’ve traveled the world extensively. Allergic to cats. I like to believe I’m a family man. Friends tell me I’m a clean-cut guy. #L1501 I’m a man seeking new friends for adventure. I hike Mount Philo almost every day and love to cross-country ski.  #L1478

GWM, mid-60s, 5’11, slim build. Blue eyes, decent looking. Like walking, hiking, swimming. Enjoy music, movies, gardening. Mindful and kind. Looking for LTR. 420-friendly. Southwest Vermont. Seeking GM, 55 to 70, tall, intelligent, humorous, energetic with integrity. Nonsmoker who enjoys nature. #L1498 This week’s ancient as the great Madonna! Hollywood movie extra of the year. Community college art school dropout. Stop making sense. Where’s my music man? #L1497

Describe yourself and who you’re looking for in 40 words below:

Required confidential info:

(OR, ATTACH A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER.)

__________________________________________

I’m a _________________________________________________ __ ____

NAME

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

seeking a__ ___________ __________________________________________

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________ ADDRESS

__________________________________________ ADDRESS (MORE)

_______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________

__________________________________________ CITY/STATE

__________________________________________ ZIP

__________________________________________ PHONE

_______________________________________________________ MAIL TO: SEVEN DAYS LOVE LETTERS • PO BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402 OPTIONAL WEB FORM: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LOVELETTERS HELP: 802-865-1020, EXT. 110, LOVELETTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THIS FORM IS FOR LOVE LETTERS ONLY. Messages for the Personals and I-Spy sections must be submitted online at dating.sevendaysvt.com.


DREAMING OF A NEW HOME? Take the first step at the next... Wednesday, June 23, 6-8 p.m. A free online workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts and ask questions from home!

ATTORNEY Daniel N. Farnham, Esq.

BROKER

party! Katrina E. Roberts

MORTGAGE LOAN OFFICER Christine Corbett

Bauer Gravel Farnham, LLP Attorneys at Law

REGISTER TODAY: 1T-HouseParty060221.indd 1

sevendaysvt.com/houseparty SEVEN DAYS JUNE 16-23, 2021

87

6/1/21 10:42 AM


Celebrate Dad with savory surf ‘n’ turf! Father’s Day is Sunday, June 20th.

7

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

SAVE

SAVE AT LEAST $3.50 LB.

99

179

AT LEAST

1

$ lb.

lb.

Market 32 Boneless & Skinless Chicken Breasts or Thighs

Butcher’s Promise Beef Bone-In NY Strip Steak

Savings Pack•Certified Angus Beef Savings Pack Bone-In Strip Steak $9.99 Lb.

Savings Pack•Market 32 Savings Pack Chicken Tenders $2.99 Lb.

5

5

$ lb.

or Market 32 Cooked Shrimp 31-40 Ct. $7.99 Lb. 3 Star BAP Certified

4 oz.

249

350 lb.

SAVE

AT LEAST

1

lb.

$ lb.

with AdvantEdge Card

SAVE

48 oz.•All Varieties

Fresh Express Salad Kits

Full Circle Organic Full Circle Organic Salad Blends Grape Tomatoes

7.7-11.7 oz.•All Varieties 5 oz.•All Varieties

1399

A Dad Favorite! 8" Chocolate Addiction, Caramel Iced Chocolate Cake or Boston Creme Cake

Turkey Hill Ice Cream 48 oz.•All Varieties Excluding Naturals

Dry Pint

PRICE CHOP

with AdvantEdge Card

MIX & MATCH

48 oz.•All Varieties

MIX & MATCH

499

5

2/$

Hood Ice Cream

with AdvantEdge Card

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

with AdvantEdge Card

PICS Ice Cream

5

2/$

198 on 2

lb.

Fresh Asparagus

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

98¢on 2

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

SAVE

AT LEAST

with AdvantEdge Card

Sweet Cherries

AT LEAST

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

199

lb.

Market 32 26-30 Ct. Farm Raised Raw Shrimp

Cold Water Lobster Tails

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

699

AT LEAST

99

AT LEAST

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

SAVE

SAVE $5

SAVE

lb.

Budweiser, Bud Light, Miller Lite or Coors Light 18 Pack

12 oz. Bottles or Cans•We ID Plus Deposit Where Required

COUPON SAVINGS on family favs! COUPON Expires 6/19/21

COUPON Expires 6/19/21

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

99

¢

CLU# 1215

with AdvantEdge Card AND A PURCHASE OF $15 OR MORE

Betty Crocker Fruit Snacks 4.5-8 oz.•Select Varieties OR

Nature Valley Granola Bars

6.75-8.94 oz.•Select Varieties or Fiber One Bars 4.1-7 oz.•Select Varieties

OR

General Mills Cinnamon Toast Crunch 12 oz., Lucky Charms 10.5 oz., Reese’s Peanut Butter Puffs 11.5 oz. or Pokémon 10.3 oz.

Limit 1 Price Chopper coupon per customer, per offer, per day; may be combined with one manufacturer coupon per product purchased, unless prohibited. Void if copied or altered. Not valid on Instacart delivery or pickup orders. Offer effective thru Sat., June 19, 2021 in our VT stores.

Additional Quantities $2.50

COUPON Expires 6/19/21

WEEKLY SPECIAL!

4

99

CLU# 1216

with AdvantEdge Card AND A PURCHASE OF $15 OR MORE

Green Mountain Maxwell House Coffee® K-Cups Coffee OR 10-12 Ct.®

24.5-30.6 oz. or or Bagged Coffee Decaf 22 oz.•All Varieties 10-12 oz.•Select Varieties Limit 1 Price Chopper coupon per customer, per offer, per day; may be combined with one manufacturer coupon per product purchased, unless prohibited. Void if copied or altered. Not valid on Instacart delivery or pickup orders. Offer effective thru Sat., June 19, 2021 in our VT stores.

Additional Quantities $5.99

STOCK-UP SAVINGS

59¢

ea.

WHEN YOU BUY 8 CLU# 1217

with AdvantEdge Card AND A PURCHASE OF $15 OR MORE MIX & MATCH

Chobani Greek Yogurt 5.3 oz. Flips 5.3 oz., Drinks 7 oz. or Less Sugar 5.3 oz Limit 1 Price Chopper coupon per customer, per offer, per day; may be combined with one manufacturer coupon per product purchased, unless prohibited. Void if copied or altered. Not valid on Instacart delivery or pickup orders. Offer effective thru Sat., June 19, 2021 in our VT stores.

Additional or Lesser Quantities $1.00 Ea.

Offers effective thru Saturday, June 19, 2021 in our VT stores. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not sold to dealers or retailers. Not responsible for typographical errors. Prices and promotions may vary on delivery or pickup orders. 1T-GolubPC/Mkt32061621 0616_BurlingtonROP.indd 11

6/11/21 6/11/21 12:33 4:39 PM PM

Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, June 16, 2021  

After a Year in Hotels, Homeless Vermonters Prepare to Live in Tents and Cars; After a 30-Year Lull, Gypsy Moths Infest the Champlain Valley...

Seven Days, June 16, 2021  

After a Year in Hotels, Homeless Vermonters Prepare to Live in Tents and Cars; After a 30-Year Lull, Gypsy Moths Infest the Champlain Valley...

Profile for 7days

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