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EXPERT KNOWLEDGE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS OCTOBER 2012 – ISSUE 22

Feeder Preference of Broilers Investigated Significant differences were observed in the behaviour of broilers using a new type of feeder compared to conventional tube and automatic types, according to experiments carried out in Brazil.

In their paper published in Revista Brasileira de Ciência Avícola, D.P. Neves and colleagues explain that their study compared three types of feeders for broilers: Fênix, tube and automatic feeders.

Researchers at the School of Agriculture Engineering at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in Brazil have investigated the feeding behaviour of broilers with different types of feeder.

Tube and automatic feeders tested were of a conventional type, widely used in commercial broiler production, the researchers explained. The Fênix feeder was a manual feeder developed by Neves and Trevisan This feature is continued on page 4

NOVEDAD: Enfoque latinoamericano del editor principal de ElSitioAvicola, Chris Wright


October 2012 – Issue 22

COVER STORY

Feeder Preference of Broilers Investigated Significant differences were observed in the behaviour of broilers using a new type of feeder compared to conventional tube and automatic types, according to experiments carried out in Brazil.

P1 Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it - P7 Annual growth in chicken output in Africa since 2000 is expected to average 4.4 per cent, compared to the global average of 3.7 per cent, according to Terry Evans. He turns his attention to the future prospects for the chicken industries in African countries and for Oceania, where production has expanded to match this worldwide increase.

Brazil: Free is the Magic Number - P15 Murilo Quintiliano of Food Animal Initiative (FAI) Brazil describes the benefits of combining freerange broiler production with sheep and timber production - a Model Farm Project.

Water Intake Behaviour of Broiler Chickens Exposed to Heat Stress and Drinking from Bell or Nipple Drinkers - P18 Researchers from West Lafayette in the US showed that infrared equipment for beak trimming can be adjusted to optimise pullet performance whilst also allowing birds to exhibit natural behaviour.

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EDITORIAL

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Editorial Our theme in this month’s edition of ThePoultrySite Digital is ‘Housing and Equipment’, with a focus on feeders and drinkers. An investigation in Brazil of the feeder preferences of broilers is the basis for the lead feature. Researchers found significant differences in the behaviour of broilers using a new type of feeder compared to conventional tube and automatic types. Not surprisingly, the feeder type affected eating behaviour, such as meal size and timing, but it also impacted the amount of time the birds spent standing and lying down.

Housing & Equipment

Other researchers have reported that the drinking behaviour and water intake volume by broilers were affected by drinker type, age and temperature.

The latest chapter in our series, Global Poultry Trends, by industry watcher, Terry Evans, examines the trends in chicken meat production in Africa and Oceania. Jackie Linden Annual growth in chicken output in Africa since 2000 is expected to average 4.4 ThePoultrySite.com Senior Editor per cent, compared to the global average of 3.7 per cent while for Oceania, projackie.linden@5mpublishing.com duction has expanded to match this worldwide increase. Last but by no means least, Murilo Quintiliano of Farm Animal Initiative (FAI) describes the benefits of combining free-range broiler production with sheep and timber production - a Model Farm Project in Brazil. He explains that, as there is no current legislation covering free-range certification, farmers wanting to produce birds this way have to follow organic regulations, which add significantly to the costs of production. The article demonstrates that free-range could be a good option for small and medium producers if combined with other sources of income on the farm. Jackie Linden

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Feeder Preference of Broilers Investigated feature continued from page 1

Figure 1. Activities of broilers with different feeders types, compared pair-wise Percentage of birds performing each activity - feeding, standing and lying down (The differences in behaviour between feeder types were all significantly different (P<0.05) except for standing with the Fenix and tube feeders.)

Figure 2. Median meal time (in seconds) of birds eating at the Fenix, tube and automatic feeders according to period (morning or afternoon) (The differences between the time of day were only statistically significant (P<0.05) for the Fenix feeder.)

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FEATURE ARTICLE

and still at the testing and simulation phase. It differs from manual feeders, mainly in relation to handling and ergonomics, which allow the feeder to be used throughout growing, without the need for a special equipment for very young chicks. This feeder has a partition grid above the plate for the growing and finishing phases but this can be removed for the first few days to allow young chicks easy access to the feed. The automatic feeder also incorporated a grid partition on the trough. The birds' feeding behaviour and preference were evaluated from three weeks of age; preferences were assessed by examining birds' behavioural activities, such as eating, standing and lying around the equipment, and meal duration as function of the environmental variables. Data on the behavioural activities and meal size were collected in a broiler commercial farm using a portable video camera, and the direct footage was analysed.The time spent in each activity, feeding bout duration and time spent near the trough were statistically analysed using the test of means and medians. Pearson's correlation test was used to evaluate the relationship between ambient environmental data

and the time of feeding. A prospective scenario was established and data were compared to it pair-wise. Interactions were observed between environmental characteristics and the activities of feeding and resting during the experiment (Figures 1 and 2). Eating behaviour was more frequent in the area around the tube feeder. The duration of feeding time was higher when the birds used the tube feeder (214±28 seconds), followed by the use of the Fênix feeder (123±17 seconds) and the automatic feeder (77±29 seconds). The researchers commented that eating was more frequent during the morning and at low ambient temperatures, with the exception of the birds surrounding the automatic feeder, which ate more frequently when environmental temperatures were high. Eating bout and meal duration were generally higher for the tube feeder than the other two feeders, which Neves and colleagues suggested may be related to the fact that this feeder does not have the partition grid, allowing the bird full access to the feed.

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Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it

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FEATURE ARTICLE

Feature Article

Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it Annual growth in chicken output in Africa since 2000 is expected to average 4.4 per cent, compared to the global average of 3.7 per cent, according to Terry Evans. He turns his attention to the future prospects for the chicken industries in African countries and for Oceania, where production has expanded to match this worldwide increase. AFRICA'S OUTPUT HEADS TOWARDS FIVE MILLION TONNES Chicken meat production in Africa expanded by 4.6 per cent a year in the decade to 2010, which compares with the global figure of 3.9 per cent. Growth has since slowed such that, based on our estimates for 2012, the annual rate of expansion for the 12 years since 2000 will have averaged 4.4 per cent against a worldwide increase of 3.7 per cent. Consequently, Africa's contribution to the global total has increased from 4.7 per cent to exceed five per cent. In tonnage terms, the regional total is now around 4.7 million tonnes as against 2.8 million tonnes in 2000, while the world total has escalated from a little below 59 million tonnes to almost 91 million tonnes (Table 1). By 2015, Africa's production should exceed five million tonnes. The most recent data for all the countries in the region (Table 2 and Figure 1) reveals that just seven countries produced more than 100,000 tonnes of chicken meat - table birds plus culled layers - a year in 2010, and they accounted for almost 3.4 million tonnes or 77 per cent of the total for all Africa of nearly 4.4 million tonnes. This is not to say that production in the other countries has stood still. Far from it, as their combined output has expanded from 614,000 tonnes to a million tonnes over the decade.

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Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it

Table 1. World chicken meat production (million tonnes) Region

2000

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011E

2012F

2.8

3.4

3.4

3.7

4.0

4.2

4.4

4.6

4.7

Americas

27.2

32.7

33.7

35.3

37.4

36.7

38.4

39.2

39.4

Asia

18.7

22.5

23.5

24.9

26.4

27.2

28.6

29.9

31.0

Europe

9.4

10.7

10.8

11.7

12.1

13.4

13.8

14.2

14.5

Oceania

0.7

0.9

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.3

1.3

58.7

70.2

72.3

76.7

80.8

82.5

86.2

89.2

90.9

Africa

WORLD

E and F, author's estimates Source: FAO

Clearly, South Africa is the leading producing nation (Tables 2 and 3 and Figure 1), accounting for almost 1.5 million tonnes in 2010 or more than one-third of the regional total. During the 10 years to 2010, chicken meat production in Africa grew by 1.6 million tonnes with South Africa easily the major contributor to the expansion accounting for 654,000 tonnes (41 per cent) of the total. South Africa's poultry meat industry is the largest individual agricultural industry, contributing almost 18 per cent to its Agriculture Gross Domestic Product, according to a USDA GAIN Report. Table chicken production has expanded by around four per cent annually over the past decade, according to the South African Poultry Association (SAPA). However, the growth rate has contracted sharply recently, reflecting higher feed costs and that a strong Rand has attracted more imports. Hence, chicken meat output in 2012 is unlikely to exceed 1.5 million tonnes. For 2011, table chicken slaughterings were assessed at 979 million - just one per cent more than in 2010 - while output amounted to 1.37 million tonnes. Slaughterings of culled layers and parent stock added a further 56,000 tonnes to push total chicken meat output up to almost 1.43 million tonnes. Among the challenges facing this industry are: an increase in imports that now represents the biggest single supplier of chicken products in the market; combating higher input costs through increased efficiencies; the continuous threat of poultry diseases, and limited disposable income may have a negative effect on the level of consumption per capita. Hence, it is possible that the industry may witness negligible growth in 2013. The region's second largest producer is Egypt. Al-

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The chicken industry in Morocco, third in the production league of African countries, recorded a massive annual increase of more than eight per cent as output climbed to 560,000 tonnes in 2010.â&#x20AC;? though chicken meat output in this country increased by around three per cent annually over the years 2008 to 2010, production in the latter year, at an estimated 685,000 tonnes, still failed to match the 2007 level of almost 705,000 tonnes. High feed prices and a ban on the transport of live poultry between districts, aimed at preventing the spread of H5N1 avian influenza, are making life difficult for producers. Since the virus hit Egypt in February 2006, some 60 million birds have been killed. Good news on this front is that the National Research Centre (NRC) in Cairo has manufactured a vaccine against this virus using technology based on genetic engineering. It is claimed that this vaccine has a much higher efficacy than those imported by the government. One report states that the first quarter of 2012 witnessed a sharp drop in production of some 500,000 birds a day as the daily number fell to 1.1 million, which compared with 1.6 million a year earlier. During 2010, the number of birds killed averaged almost 1.4 million a day. Despite a recession and a high percentage of the human population being poor, the industry is optimistic about growth in the long term. At least one forecasting body has calculated that an


FEATURE ARTICLE

Table 2. Chicken meat production in Africa ('000 tonnes eviscerated weight; 2011 figures in million tonnes) Country

2000

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011E

Algeria

240.0

253.0

253.0

254.0

254.0

254.0

254.0

0.3

Angola

7.8

8.6

7.7

7.9

8.0

8.2

8.2

-

Benin

12.2

15.4

16.0

16.6

17.1

17.9

17.9

-

8.8

4.8

5.4

5.6

6.6

5.8

6.8

-

26.5

30.9

31.9

33.0

33.8

35.4

35.4

Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi

5.8

6.8

6.8

6.8

6.9

7.0

7.0

-

Cameroon

21.2

53.2

60.8

64.6

67.7

63.9

68.0

-

Cape Verde

0.4

0.4

0.5

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.6

-

Central African Rep.

3.2

4.4

4.4

5.0

5.2

5.5

5.7

-

Chad

4.7

4.9

5.0

5.1

5.2

5.2

5.2

-

Comoros

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

-

Congo

5.8

5.7

5.6

5.7

5.9

6.0

6.3

-

Congo Dem. Rep.

11.6

10.7

10.7

10.7

10.7

10.8

10.9

-

Cote d'Ivoire

22.1

22.5

22.4

22.6

22.8

23.4

24.0

-

513.3

632.8

616.0

704.7

628.8

671.1

685.0

0.7

Equatorial Guinea

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

-

Eritrea

1.9

2.2

1.9

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

-

Ethiopia

37.7

42.6

45.2

46.2

48.6

50.9

53.0

-

Gabon

3.8

3.7

3.9

3.9

3.8

3.8

3.8

-

Gambia

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

-

Ghana

19.5

28.8

31.5

41.7

44.5

48.0

48.7

0.1

Guinea

4.2

5.6

5.9

6.4

6.8

7.2

8.1

-

Egypt

Guinea-Bissau

1.2

1.5

1.5

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

-

13.3

18.2

22.5

24.0

24.3

25.2

27.1

-

Lesotho

1.8

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.3

2.3

2.3

-

Liberia

6.4

8.5

9.0

9.5

10.0

10.4

10.9

-

Libya

98.5

99.1

93.5

120.0

120.2

124.8

128.7

0.1

Madagascar

32.0

35.5

36.5

36.6

36.8

37.5

37.5

-

Malawi

15.3

16.0

11.2

13.7

19.1

21.3

21.6

-

Mali

29.2

36.0

37.1

34.0

39.4

40.6

40.6

-

Mauritania

4.1

4.4

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

-

Mauritius

21.0

33.0

36.2

40.2

42.2

44.2

46.2

-

Morocco

250.0

370.0

370.0

380.0

440.0

490.0

560.0

0.6

31.1

19.0

21.7

22.1

22.1

22.1

22.7

-

8.6

9.5

9.7

12.8

11.0

11.2

11.6

-

11.0

11.7

10.5

10.7

10.8

11.0

11.5

-

Nigeria

160.0

218.8

232.1

243.3

243.3

256.5

256.5

0.3

Reunion

13.3

14.1

14.4

14.5

15.0

15.7

16.8

-

Rwanda

1.4

2.3

2.0

2.2

2.4

2.4

2.4

-

Sao Tome/Principe

0.6

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

-

23.2

29.0

31.7

37.0

41.1

43.1

49.2

-

1.0

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.7

-

10.5

11.3

11.6

11.8

11.8

11.9

11.9

-

3.2

3.7

3.6

3.6

3.6

3.6

3.6

-

816.9

948.8

971.3

1,125.0

1,327.6

1,387.6

1,471.6

1.5

26.0

30.5

25.0

26.0

27.0

28.7

28.7

-

3.5

8.1

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.3

5.4

-

Tanzania Un. Rep.

41.8

51.8

52.7

49.1

50.3

48.2

48.5

-

Togo

12.0

17.6

19.0

20.6

20.1

26.0

28.4

-

Tunisia

87.0

87.4

78.8

96.1

103.0

103.0

113.2

0.1

Uganda

44.1

52.7

37.1

43.7

44.9

46.2

48.8

0.1

Zambia

35.0

39.0

36.5

36.5

38.5

40.0

42.5

-

Zimbabwe

25.3

51.8

53.5

56.9

61.0

61.9

61.9

0.1

Kenya

Mozambique Namibia Niger

Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Somalia South Africa Sudan (former) Swaziland

AFRICA

2,780.2

3,371.2

3,377.8

3,729.2

3,960.2

4,156.2

4,369.4

4.6

WORLD

58,698.2

70,208.0

72,319.7

76,676.9

80,785.7

82,511.5

86,205.0

89.5

E=estimated, * less than 50 tonnes, - less than 100,000 tonnes Source: FAO

9


Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it

Table 3. Chicken meat production ranking in Africa and Oceania in 2010 ('000 tonnes) Europe ('000 tonnes)

expansion of some 17 per cent is possible between now and 2020, which would put production in excess of 800,000 tonnes a year at that time. The chicken industry in Morocco, third in the production league of African countries (Table 4), recorded a massive annual increase of more than eight per cent as output climbed to 560,000 tonnes in 2010. If this rate can be maintained, annual production will soon exceed three-quarters of a million tonnes. Of the other nations with annual outputs in excess of 100,000 tonnes, the broiler industry in Nigeria recorded the fastest rate of annual increase at almost five per cent for the decade although recently, this has contracted to less than two per cent. OCEANIA MATCHES WORLD GROWTH Production in Oceania, currently at around 1.3 million tonnes a year, accounts for a little over one per cent of global chicken meat production. Annual growth for the decade to 2010 at 3.7 per cent just failed to match the global figure. However, as production in just one country - Australia - represents 84 per cent of the regional total, clearly changes in this country have a major impact on developments in this region as a whole. Chicken meat production in Australia topped one million tonnes in 2010/11 according to the Australian

10

Country South Africa Australia Egypt Morocco Nigeria Algeria New Zealand Libya Tunisia Cameroon Zimbabwe Ethiopia Senegal Uganda Ghana Tanzania Un. Rep. Mauritius Zambia Mali Madagascar Burkina Faso Sudan (former) Togo Kenya Cote d'Ivoire Mozambique Malawi Benin Reunion Fiji Sierra Leone Namibia Niger Liberia Congo Dem. Rep. Angola Guinea Burundi Botswana Congo Papua New Guinea Central African Rep. Swaziland Chad Mauritania Gabon Somalia Rwanda Lesotho Guinea-Bissau Eritrea Gambia New Caledonia Seychelles Sao Tome/Principe Samoa French Polynesia Cape Verde Vanuatu Kiribati Comoros Tonga Solomon Isl. Equatorial Guinea Micronesia Fed. St.

1,471.6 881.0 685.0 560.0 256.5 254.0 143.1 128.7 113.2 68.0 61.9 53.0 49.2 48.8 48.7 48.5 46.2 42.5 40.6 37.5 35.4 28.7 28.4 27.1 24.0 22.7 21.6 17.9 16.8 14.4 11.9 11.6 11.5 10.9 10.9 8.2 8.1 7.0 6.8 6.3 5.9 5.7 5.4 5.2 4.5 3.8 3.6 2.4 2.3 1.6 1.6 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 Source: FAO


FEATUREâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;ARTICLE

Table 4. Leading chicken meat producers in Africa and Oceania ('000 tonnes)

2000

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Algeria

240.0

253.0

253.0

254.0

254.0

254.0

254.0

Egypt

513.3

632.8

616.0

704.7

628.8

671.1

685.0

Libya

98.5

99.1

93.5

120.0

120.2

124.8

128.7

Morocco

250.0

370.0

370.0

380.0

440.0

490.0

560.0

Nigeria

160.0

218.8

232.1

243.3

243.3

256.5

256.5

South Africa

816.9

948.8

971.3

1,125.0

1,327.6

1,387.6

1,471.6

Australia

610.0

760.0

772.6

811.6

800.2

831.4

881.0

New Zealand

104.9

157.0

149.0

147.3

145.5

135.0

143.1 Source: USDA

Table 5. Chicken meat production in Oceania ('000 tonnes eviscerated weight; 2011 figures in million tonnes) Country

2000

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Australia

610.0

760.0

772.6

811.6

800.2

831.4

881.0

0.9

Cook Isl.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

Fiji

8.1

12.1

13.6

14.4

14.4

11.9

14.4

-

French Polynesia

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

-

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

Kiribati

0.3

0.5

0.8

1.0

0.5

0.5

0.5

-

Micronesia Fed. St.

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

0.7

1.0

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.8

0.9

-

104.9

157.0

149.0

147.3

145.5

135.0

143.1

0.2

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

Papua New Guinea

5.4

5.7

5.9

5.9

5.9

5.9

5.9

-

Samoa

0.4

0.5

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

-

Solomon Isl.

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

-

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

Tonga

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

-

Tuvalu

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

-

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

732.1

938.9

945.4

983.6

970.1

988.1

1,048.5

1.1

58,698.2

70,208.0

72,319.7

76,676.9

80,785.7

82,511.5

86,205.0

89.5

American Samoa

Guam

Nauru New Caledonia New Zealand Niue

Tokelau

Vanuatu Wallis/Futuna Isl. OCEANIA WORLD

2011F

F = forecast, * less than 50 tonnes, - no data Source: FAO

13


Oceanian Chicken Output Growth Matches World Average, Africa's Exceeds it

Figure 1. Leading chicken meat producers in Africa and Oceania ('000 tonnes)

Chicken Meat Federation. Slaughterings in 2012/13 are forecast at almost 590 million birds, yielding some 1.07 million tonnes of meat. For 2015/16, the number of birds killed is expected to come close to 630 million with output projected at 1.16 million tonnes although a rapid rise in feed prices mid-2012 might apply a brake to short-term growth.

contracted towards 135,000 tonnes in 2009. However, 2010 witnessed a recovery to 143,000 tonnes. This seems to have continued such that poultry meat output in 2012 could come close to, and might exceed, the 2005 record of nearly 163,000 tonnes, of which chicken meat could account for some 158,000 tonnes.

Average slaughter weights have increased by almost 20 per cent in the 10 years to 2010/11 to average 1.85kg. Today, it takes around 35 days to produce a 2-kg live weight bird compared with some 41 days back in 1995. Just two companies account for an estimated 70 per cent of national output, the remainder being produced by a further six medium-sized operations. Approximately 800 growers, under contract to the processors, produce about 80 per cent of national output. It is estimated that some 15 per cent of chicken meat comes from free-range enterprises, a sector that looks set to expand.

Forecasts by America's Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) anticipate poultry meat output rising to around 178,000 tonnes by 2020 and further towards 191,000 tonnes by 2025. The corresponding figures for chicken meat would be around 171,000 tonnes and some 183,000 tonnes. As in Australia, the bulk of production is in the hands of two companies.The proportion of free-range production is considered to be small, possibly less than two per cent.

After peaking in 2005 at 157,000 tonnes, chicken meat production in New Zealand appears to have

12


Brazil: Free is the Magic Number

14


FEATURE ARTICLE

Feature Article

Brazil: Free is the Magic Number Murilo Quintiliano of Food Animal Initiative (FAI) Brazil describes the benefits of combining free-range broiler production with sheep and timber production - a Model Farm Project. In some countries, free-range chicken production is on the up. In the UK, for example, according to Defra, free-range and organic products make up six per cent of the poultry market and this figure is rising. Elsewhere however, it is a different story, despite demand. Brazil is a case in point. “Currently, there is no legislation regarding free-range certification, so free-range producers – known as ‘caipira’ – must follow organic regulations,” explains Murilo Quintiliano, Executive Director of FAI Brazil. “For that, there is a federal law (Law 10.831) and more than 30 organic certification systems. Of these, the most respected is the Instituto Bio Dinâmico (IBD). However, less than 0.1 per cent of chicken meat production in Brazil is currently organic.” The thing is, Brazil is considered well suited to free-range broiler production due to its climate. “The weather in our region – the South East – changes little during the year and here in São Paulo State, temperatures range from 18–32°C with an average of 22°C,” explains Mr Quintiliano. So why are there not more farmers choosing free-range? He blames higher costs.

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Brazil: Free is the Magic Number He said: “Organic regulations originally set slaughter age at 80 days. Now it’s been reduced to 70 days – better but not enough. It still means costs of electricity, feed and storage can be 50 to 80 per cent higher than with conventional production. The feed used, containing no animal by-products, also adds to costs.” Fear of avian flu is another factor despite, says Mr Quintiliano, a lack of scientific research to justify these concerns. Also, because the product is more expensive, the market is restricted. He explained:“People are interested in free-range but standard chicken is fou-r to five times cheaper. That said, current production doesn’t provide enough freerange chicken for the market.”

Mr Quintiliano believes only reduced prices plus standardisation of certification will substantially increase free-range/organic production. This is why he helped launch the Free-range Broiler Development System at Santa Terezinha farm, as part of the Model Farm Project, to find ways to improve production and boost economic viability via diversification of production. The 4,000-bird unit was built in 2010 in partnership with Korin, which also provides feed, medication and technical assistance. Mr Quintiliano said: “Korin is the most important contract company in Brazil producing and selling what they call ‘natural’ chicken. It also has organic chicken. Through our partnership, they will also be able to develop free-range chicken.”

Table 1. Key features and benefits of Free-range Broiler Development System at Santa Terezinha farm in Brazil Key features

Benefits

1.6-hectare range split into two (but can be split into four) areas used by sheep and chickens, rotated throughout the year.

Provides one square metre per bird and accommodates sheep (62 animals per hectare in summer, 30 animals per hectare in winter). Provides enrichment for birds due to variation in environment. Rotation benefits soil by avoiding nutrient overload and improves health of animals by avoiding build-up of diseases.

Standard shed (12 × 33 metres) with open sides, curtains regulated according to temperature, vents, nebulizers and pop holes (10 × length: 2 metres; height: 0.5 metres) providing access to range.

Climate inside sheds can be controlled during summer when temperatures can reach 34–36°C and in winter, when low air humidity levels can be problematic. Reduces problems with litter (leg and foot health) and chance of cannibalism. Improves ability to express natural behaviour.

Stocking density is 27.5kg (10 birds) per square metre. CPK broilers.

Better feed conversion ratio and carcass yield grade and appeared less aggressive than other strains trialled. This slower growing breed also has fewer leg health issues associated with fast growth rate seen in standard commercial broilers.

Chickens arrive at day-old, with access to range after 24 days (at least one square metre per bird). Slaughter age: 70 days.

Range access improves conditions and helps animals express natural behaviour. Meat quality also improved.

Birds fed on corn- and soy-based feed provided by Korin. Quantities vary according to age; total for 70 days 15.8kg per 4,000 birds. Medication (organic acids) provided by Korin. Water sourced from well on the farm. Standard manual feeders (40 adult birds per feeder) and bell drinkers (70 adult birds per drinker).

Non animal-origin based feed is perceived as more natural and reduces risk of contamination of the birds. Quality is higher than with other source

Santa Inês sheep

Easy lambing and more resistance to endo and ecto parasites.

Rotational grazing; sheep use same range as chickens (but not at the same time) as part of total range area.

Efficiency of land-use is improved.

Sheep fed on grass and mineral salt in rainy season (October to April). Corn and soybean supplement provided in dry season (May to September). Feed mixed on farm. Body condition monitored in order to provide sufficient feed according to pasture availability.

Costs are reduced and a good nutritional condition is maintained throughout the year.

Weaned lambs sold on at 15–20kg

Good weight for selling to feedlots or to be raised by other producers.

Fruit and timber trees to be added during 2012.

Additional source of income and provision of shade for the animals.

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FEATURE ARTICLE Table 2. Outcome measures for the Free-range Broiler Development System Outcome measure (best to worst scale)

Result Average (% birds with score 0)

Gait Score: 6-point scale (0–5)

0.13 (91)

Hock burn: 5-point scale (0–2)

0 (100)

Pododermatitis: 5-point scale (0–2)

0 (100)

Plumage cleanliness: 4-point scale (0–3)

0.25 (76)

Feather cover: 5-point scale (0–2)

0.04 (95)

THE RESULTS The welfare benefits of the system are being monitored using the FAI Outcome Measures, adapted from Welfare Quality® 2009 (see Table 2). The main benefits are that this slower-growing breed has fewer leg health issues associated with the fast growth rate seen in standard commercial broilers,” explains Dr Ashleigh Bright of the Model Farm Project. “Also, the range provides more space and enrichment due to variation in environment and due to Brazil’s warm climate, birds will actually want to go outside.” There are economic benefits too. “The price paid per chicken is 30–50 per cent higher than with standard chicken,” explains Mr Quintiliano. “Integration of the sheep and timber can also increase overall income. The economic impact of adding the sheep is still being assessed, but weaned lambs are currently sold on for R$6 to R$8 per kilo liveweight.” NEXT STEPS The system is at an interesting stage of development. Integration of the timber and fruit trees will take place in 2012, with trees planted at a rate of around 700 trees per hectare. Eucalyptus is being considered due to its fast growth rate and commercial opportunities; rubber trees may also be planted. “It is really about efficient use of land – using the same area for the trees, sheep and chickens,” explains Dr Bright. “The trees provide shade for the animals. Plus diversification can provide a better return for the farmer. Tree-planting may also be good for soil stabilisation, biodiversity and carbon sequestration.” The team is also working to improve welfare and

Do you know your chicken? Natural, organic, free-range, alternative... In Brazil, chicken comes with all kinds of labels. Murilo Quintiliano explains the differences. Organic broilers: No animal-origin feed, non-organic fertilizers, herbicides, additives, antibiotics, anticoccidials or growth hormones. Stocking density inside shed: 10 square metres per bird; range access: 5.0 square metres per bird. Slaughter age: 70 days. Natural or alternative broilers: Conventional system but without use of animal-origin feed, antibiotics, anticoccidials or growth promoters. Stocking density inside shed: 27.5kg per square metre; no range access. Slaughter age: 42–46 days. Free-range broilers: No animal-origin feed, antibiotics, anticoccidials or growth promoters. Birds stay inside shed until 25 days of age at 10 birds per square metre (27.5kg per square metre) then access to range at one square metre per animal. Slaughter age: 70 days.

production (mortality rates and feed conversion) and address disease. “The main issue is bacterial contamination which must be continually controlled due to non-use of antibiotics,” explains Mr Quintiliano.Thus, the team is ensuring litter is well composted between flocks and kept dry and friable, and are ensuring good ventilation and appropriate temperatures. Mr Quintiliano is also keen to revisit the slaughter age. He said: “In the EU, free-range legislation for broilers allows birds to be slaughtered at 56 days of age. It’s more suitable than the 70 days for free-range in Brazil because slower growing strains can reach slaughter weight (2.2kg) by 56 days of age and have good welfare. In Brazil, we need to find the correct age to improve the cost-benefit ratio; I believe it’s nearer this number.”

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Water Intake Behaviour of Broiler Chickens Exposed to Heat Stress and Drinking from Bell or Nipple Drinkers

Feature Article

Water Intake Behaviour of Broiler Chickens Exposed to Heat Stress and Drinking from Bell or Nipple Drinkers Drinking behaviour and water intake volume by broilers were affected by drinker type, age and temperature, according to researchers in Brazil. The aspects involved in broiler water intake are not well known, according to Dr Luis Bruno of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias (UNIOESTE) in Brazil and co-authors there and at the federal universities of Paranà, Sao Paulo (UNESP) and Paraíba. In a paper published in Revista Brasileira de Ciência Avícola, they explain that this lack of understanding is despite the importance of water in animal nutrition and physiology. Drinking behaviour should be taken into account when deciding on different types of drinkers. Bell and nipple drinkers are the most commonly used in commercial broiler production today, they added.

In their experiment, broilers were housed in cages equipped with two different drinker types and raised at two different environmental temperatures (25 and 34°C) to evaluate water intake behaviour and volume. Drinking behaviour was influenced by drinker type. Birds visited bell drinkers less often but presented higher total water intake per visit to the drinker than those drinking from nipple drinkers. Bruno and co-authors concluded that their results suggest both broilers drinking behaviour and water intake volume should be taken into account when deciding on drinker type to install in broiler houses. In this work, broilers using nipple drinkers may expend more energy to consume water than those

Total water intake (mL) by broilers from bell and nipple drinkers and at 25 and 34°C

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FEATURE ARTICLE Frequency of visits to drinkers (FAD; number of visits during a 10-minute interval); total water intake(TWI, mL) and water intake per visit to the drinker (WIA, mL/visit) for broilers drinking from bell or nipple drinkers and reared at 24 or 35°C) Treatment

FAD

TWI

WIA

25°C

102.16±8.70

13.98±1.45

0.405±0.04

34°C

89.67±5.45

17.85±1.74

0.478±0.05

7 days

72.67±8.24

7.54±1.16

0.20±0.03

14 days

74.83±10.02

10.21±1.96

0.32±0.06

21 days

116.00±16.45

13.56±2.06

0.30±0.06

28 days

97.24±13.09

18.75±3.54

0.51±0.09

35 days

96.95±13.73

17.67±2.93

0.46±0.09

42 days

101.25±13.32

21.06±3.62

0.60±0.10

49 days

112.54±16.12

22.62±3.74

0.67±0.13

Drinker (D)

**

**

**

Temperature (T)

**

**

**

Age (A)

**

**

**

D xT

**

**

**

D ×A

**

**

**

A ×T

NS

NS

**

D ×A ×T

NS

NS

**

CV (%)

31.31

50.91

31.96

TYPE OF DRINKER

AGE

SOURCE OF VARIATION

drinking from bell drinkers. Furthermore, young broilers anatomy – beak size and shape - present some challenges to drink from nipple drinkers and the differences will be more profound under heat stress conditions. Adequate water supply is critical for broilers under different situations, the researchers stressed. In their paper, the researchers added that, physiologically, these results have important implications to broiler performance because water is the most important nutrient for animal nutrition. Low water intake results in reduced feed intake, which limits the availability of water and nutrients required by biochemical and physiological function that are essential for body homeastasis and growth. Water loss is also the main mechanism used by broilers for thermoregulation.

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Poultry Industry News INTERMITTENT LIGHTING COULD HELP COUNTER RISING FEED PRICES UK - The benefits of intermittent lighting programmes on broiler welfare and performance are shown up in a Bristol University study conducted in collaboration with David Filmer and a UK broiler integrator. The study, funded under the SPARK award scheme linking smaller enterprises with research organisations, showed significant gains in bird health and consistently improved productivity. Bristol University observed commercial broiler-strain chicks reared naturally by broody hens. Compared with chicks raised with a heat-lamp, brooded chicks were more active. A 24-hour study of individuallymarked chicks revealed that they rested under the hen during dark periods at night. During the remainder of the day, frequent transitions between active and resting behaviour occurred averaging around 50 transitions per day. Read More...

CONTRAST IN LIGHT INTENSITY RATHER THAN DAYLENGTH INFLUENCES BROILER BEHAVIOUR AND HEALTH US - Light intensity had a greater effect than daylength on broiler behaviour and health, according to new research from the University of California, Davis. Researchers observed that low-contrast light intensity appeared to dampen behavioural rhythms and may have an imapct on bird health. Day length and intensity are commonly manipulated aspects of the light environment in commercial broiler production, say R.A. Blatchford and colleagues at the Department of Animal Science at the University of California, Davis. In their paper published recently in Poultry Science, they explain that both of these factors influence circadian rhythms but it is unclear if they do so independently or synergistically. Read More...


Housing & Equipment

Picture Courtesy of Lubing Maschinenfabrik.

Assurance Schemes Cover Bathing Equipment for Ducks UK - The UK's poultry industry body has explained the thinking behind the latest standards for duck production, following allegations from an animal charity that they mean a backward step in animal welfare terms, particularly in respect of the provision of water. Like all farm animals, ducks reared commercially indoors in the UK must have access to water for drinking but they also need to be able to toss water onto their heads and feathers.This requirement means that there is less standardisation across the duck industry in terms of the equipment provided for drinking and this essential bathing than, for example, for broiler production.

For ducks, drinking water is usually provided by nipple drinkers or troughs; larger troughs or baths offer the birds the opportunity to preen their feathers and keep their eyes and nostrils clean and healthy. Assurance schemes give more detailed specifications on how this water is provided but the launch of a new scheme in the UK prompted a public debate between the national industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organisation and an animal charity regarding the equipment required for the provision of water for commercially reared ducks as well as the need for bedding. In September, the British Poultry Council (BPC) announced that the Duck Assurance Scheme (DAS),

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Poultry Industry News which was launched in 2010, is to become a partner of Red Tractor Assurance, the country's umbrella assurance scheme that covers farmed animals. Around the same time, one of the country's animal charities, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), launched a campaign criticising commercial duck production methods. The RSPCA campaign followed a poll, which revealed that eight out of 10 people are 'appalled' that farmed duck can be reared without bathing water and think it should be illegal. As more ducks are being farmed in the UK and RSPCA alleged welfare has taken a backward step with millions of ducks being deprived of the very basics like bathing water, the Society launched its 'Like a duck to water' campaign to improve conditions for British ducks. The poll for the RSPCA revealed that more than four out of five of those polled were 'appalled' that by law farmed ducks may never get access to bathing water and agreed that supermarkets should only sell duck meat from farms that provide bathing water. In response, the British Poultry Council (BPC) stated that the RSPCA was making incorrect claims about the actual rearing standards for British ducks and that it is seriously misleading the public in its attempt to promote its own Freedom Foods brand. BPC clarified that the DAS for ducks reared indoors and the RSPCA Freedom Foods scheme both require the ducks to have access to open water to be able to dip their heads under, to preen and to allow the ducks to toss water onto their feathers for conditioning.This bathing is necessary for the ducks' general health and particularly for good eye and nostril condition. DAS standards also specify that where drinking water is provided by nipple drinkers, additional bathing water must be provided in the form of troughs, wide-channel type bell drinkers, baths or showers. According to the BPC, RSPCA standards do not

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mention bathing or any requirement for full body access to water but give minimum measurements for troughs, which provide both drinking and bathing water. BPC said that ducks reared in the UK are all provided with fresh litter as bedding and this is topped up on a daily basis. Nipple drinkers can be used for provision of clean drinking water but sufficient open water sources must also be provided for the bathing requirements. Separate nipple drinkers have the advantages that the drinking water remains clean and are less likely to making the bedding wet. There is no scientific evidence that provision of windows is a welfare benefit to the ducks, says BPC, but the DAS Technical Advisory Group is considering the need for research on this topic. British duck companies have worked closely with welfare researchers at Oxford and Cambridge universities, the RSPCA and Defra on the water preferences of ducks. DAS standards reflect the published findings of this research and the experience of the duck producers. Duck companies have taken on the findings of scientific research, says BPC, and shoppers can be assured that the high standards required by the DAS properly provide for the health and welfare needs of ducks reared in the UK. Peter Bradnock, Chief Executive of the British Poultry Council said: "Great research advances have been made by the duck industry for the development of new facilities to ensure ducks are given the best possible growing conditions that fulfil all their health and welfare needs. "This is an exciting time for the duck industry with more people choosing to eat duck. Consumers can be assured the ducks they choose have been reared to strict animal health and welfare standards, in line with Red Tractor Assurance standards."


Poultry Industry News PERUVIAN SALES TEAM FOR SANTREV

KOOZII: NEW COMMUNITY NEST FROM ROXELL

PERU - Santrev has continued to increase its presence on the worldwide poultry stage by setting up a Peruvian sales team and meeting with the top five local poultry companies.

BELGIUM - Koozii™ is Roxell’s new automatic nest for broiler breeders and commercial layers.

Luke Trevanion and fellow Santrev director Richard Sanday recently travelled from Australia to attend the Peru Poultry Congress that was held early in September. Along with the sales team, they attended farm visits to tunnel ventilated and conventional poultry sheds and the outcomes from the visit looks bright. Full time agents Aralli Villanueva and Jason Kelly are proud to be representing such a proven innovative team and are keen to progress the industry to worlds best practice. “I am very excited to be part of the Santrev team in South America especially at this time when the industry and in fact the economy on the whole is booming. We’ve had a great response,” says Aralli. Read More...

FREE-RANGE BROILERS CAN PICK UP, CARRY LISTERIA

Koozii is especially developed for the production of super quality hatching or table eggs. The community nest was therefore built around the optimized comfort and welfare of the hens. The nest boxes are spacious and oxygen rich for a maximum acceptance by the birds. A special positioning of the slats at the entrance avoids accumulation of manure in front of the nest. A wood protection on the entrance board excludes leg and breast injuries. The expulsion of the birds happens extremely gentle. For broiler breeders this done through a movable back, while for layers the... Read More...

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US - Free-range chickens and their environment can be contaminated with L. monocytogenes and haemolytic L. innocua, according to new research from Arkansas. Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, saprophytic, Gram-positive bacterium and occasional food-borne pathogen, often associated with ready-to-eat meat products, according to University of Arkansas researchers, S.R. Milillo and colleagues. In the latest issue of Poultry Science, they explain that, because of the increased consumer interest in organic, all-natural and free-range poultry products, it is important to understand L. monocytogenes in the context of such systems. Pasture-reared poultry were surveyed over the course of two eight-week rearing periods. Caecal, soil and grass samples were collected for Listeria isolation and characterization. Read More...

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Poultry Industry News INFLUENCE OF ENCLOSURE SIZE ON GROWTH OF BREAST AND LEG MUSCLE FIBRES IN DOMESTIC FOWL BRAZIL - Bodyweight gain was greater for broilers raised to 42 days with more space but other performance measures were unaffected, according to new research from Sao Paulo University in Brazil.The researchers found that space allowance for older birds affected hypertrophic growth and metabolic characteristics of breast and leg muscle fibres. In a recent issue of International Journal of Poultry Science, Michaela F.R. Alves and colleagues at Brazil's SĂŁo Paulo State University report at experiment to evaluate the growth of breast and leg muscle fibres of domestic fowl raised in two enclosure sizes (SE = Small Enclosure, 1.125 square metres for 10 birds; or LE: Large Enclosure, 5.25 square metres per 10 birds).

TERMOTECNICA PERICOLI: 45 YEARS AND STILL INNOVATIVE GERMANY - Termotecnica Pericoli has many reasons to celebrate this year at Euro Tier 2012.The company will be celebrating its founding and development over a long and very illustrious 45 years of Innovation, Quality and Performance in their range of heating, ventilation and cooling products and systems. They will also take the opportunity to introduce a number of both new and newly upgraded and improved products to the European and international markets.

In breast muscle, the number of fibres per area decreased over time and higher values were observed in broilers housed in SE compared to LE.

The recently upgraded range of exhaust fans with their improved performance and unique capacity ranges which provide a seamless transition between models will be on display, showcasing many of the features of the innovative Pericoli branded â&#x20AC;&#x153;Original Design Manufacturedâ&#x20AC;? fans, such as new aerodynamic shutters and drive pulleys, light and airtight shutter blade sealing and many more.

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SODEXO ANNOUNCES SHIFT TO CAGE-FREE LAYERS

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US - Sodexo Inc. has announced that by July 2014, all of the 39 million shelled eggs it purchases each year will be sourced from cage-free hens. It is a decision applauded by The Humane Society of the United States, which says the shift will improve the welfare of nearly 150,000 hens annually. The announcement comes just weeks after Sodexo committed to the removal of gestation stalls from its pork supply chain. "Shifting to cage-free eggs is just one more way Sodexo is proactively implementing commitments under The Better Tomorrow Plan, our roadmap for sustainability," said Deborah Hecker, vice president, sustainability and CSR, Sodexo. "Our decision to source shelled eggs exclusively from hens in a cagefree environment specifically addresses our commitments to buy local, seasonal or sustainably grown or raised products."

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Housing & Equipment AGRILAMP IN SPACE FRANCE FRANCE - The SPACE Agriculture Show France was a spectacular success for French distributor Plasson Europe. Plasson has now been representing Agrilamp in France for the past year and has continued growth in sales throughout this period. Agrilamp commented:“It is the second show we have attended in support of Plasson. This year’s show was expected to demonstrate how well we had done over the past year, we had a very positive response from the French market as all of the installers and distributors we had worked with in 2011 returned to place new orders and discuss our product development schedule." Plasson has also been supplying lamps to up and coming markets in across Europe for Agrilamp and will continue to hold stocks to supply developing markets in europe. Read More...

SPACE-RAY INTRODUCES TUBE HEATERS WITH SAFETY SYSTEM US - Space-Ray has introduced a line of positive pressure radiant gas tube heaters with an innovative, patented Tube Integrity Safety System (TISS), that provides additional safety for poultry houses. TM

The TISS system is offered only by Space-Ray. Available in natural or propane gas, the new PCA/PCS Series Radiant Gas Tube Heaters from Space-Ray saves in fuel costs, reduces maintenance and permits higher mounting in the poultry house for broader coverage and added efficiency. The Space-Ray PCA/PCS Tube Heaters use positive pressure to push products of combustion through the heavy-duty, calorized, aluminized steel combustion chamber. Calorized or heat-treated emitter tubes are offered as an option by Space-Ray. Calorized tube material offers improved corrosion resistance and greater radiant output. Read More... Fuel Efficient Radiant Gas Heat For Poultry Applications

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Poultry Industry News WEEKLY OVERVIEW: MEXICO COUNTS THE COST OF BIRD FLU MEXICO - With no new outbreaks of H7N3 bird flu reported in Mexico for the last three weeks, the poultry industry there must be holding its breath and hoping that the crisis is over. In the last week, it has been reported that the cost of the outbreaks, which mainly affected the egg industry, has been estimated at the equivalent of around US$860 million, the lives of more than 22 million poultry that either died or had to be culled and upwards of 7,500 jobs. H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza broke out in Mexico's top egg-producing state, Jalisco, in late June. Since that first outbreak,ThePoultrySite has been following developments, which have included major disruptions to the egg market in this country that is among the leading egg-consuming countries of the world. Egg prices to consumers rose on fears of tight supplies and the country was forced to import significant quantities of eggs for the first time, mainly from the US and under a quota system. Read More...

IEC DISCUSSES BIRD FLU, INTERNATIONAL CHALLENGES UK - Forty-one countries were represented in London at the International Egg Commission (IEC) conference, and on 11 September, representatives from 14 countries addressed delegates and discussed the challenges and the opportunities that their national egg industries are currently dealing with. Representatives from Europe, South Africa, Asia, North and South America shared their experiences and discussed current market trends and conditions. One of the resounding messages, repeated time and again from representatives from egg industries right across the globe, is that rising commodity prices are making life very difficult for egg producers everywhere. Delegates were particularly interested to hear from Cesar de Anda and Sergio Chavez from Mexico, as they described in detail the impact of Avian Influenza. Read More...


Health & Welfare News SCIENTISTS, FARMERS CALL FOR END TO ANTIBIOTIC USE

ASSURANCE SCHEME LAUNCHED FOR DUCK PRODUCTION

US - Hundreds of scientists, farmers and agriculture professionals have signed a petition calling for an end to the imprudent use of antibiotics in animal agriculture.

UK - The Duck Assurance Scheme (DAS) launched by the British Poultry Council in 2010 is to become a partner of Red Tractor Assurance.

They say that resistance to antibiotic drugs is a growing health crisis, fuelled by widespread overuse of antibiotics in both agriculture and in human medicine. And they add that leading health experts and scientific bodies agree that nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in animal agriculture leads to antibiotic-resistant infections in humans. In their statement the farmers said: "As American farmers and ranchers raising beef cattle, dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry, we are doing our part to address this crisis by avoiding unnecessary uses of antibiotics on our farms and ranches. Read More...

Duck Assurance Scheme standards are founded on scientific knowledge and practical experience, and recognise production standards for food safety, animal welfare, environmental protection and continuous professional development for all personnel involved in the business, according to the British Poultry Council. The standards include requirements in line with government recommendations for sufficient sitting and moving space as well as easy access to feed, drinking water and bathing water. The Duck Assurance Scheme permits a range of bathing resources that allow a range of bathing activities that meet the needs of the birds. Read More...

MINIMISING PAIN IN FARM ANIMALS: THE 3S APPROACH FRANCE - The French National Institute for Agricultural Research, INRA, has appointed an expert committee to review the issue of pain in food-producing farm animals. To minimise pain, the authors developed a ‘3S’ approach accounting for ‘Suppress, Substitute and Soothe’ by analogy with the ‘3Rs’ approach of ‘Reduction, Refinement and Replacement’ applied in the context of animal experimentation, according to a report from FAO. Thus, when addressing the matter of pain, the following steps and solutions could be assessed, in the light of their feasibility (technical constraints, logistics and regulations), acceptability (societal and financial aspects) and availability. The first solution is to suppress any source of pain that brings no obvious advantage to the animals or the producers, as well as... Read More...

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Poultry Industry News USPOULTRY, FOUNDATION APPROVE RESEARCH GRANTS

DOES HIGHER WELFARE MEAN BETTER NUTRITION?

US - USPOULTRY and the USPOULTRY Foundation has approved a total of $290,762 for eight new research grants at six institutions.

GLOBAL - Higher-welfare animal products were shown to have a number of nutritional benefits over intensively-reared animal products, in a new study by Compassion in World Farming (CIWF).

The research funding was approved by the boards of directors of both organizations, based on recommendations from the Foundation Research Advisory Committee. The committee evaluates research proposals to determine their value to the industry, and then makes recommendations to the boards for funding. Committee members are professional specialists from different segments of the poultry and egg industry who represent a variety of disciplines. The Association’s research programme dates back to the early 1960s, when funds were first approved for poultry disease research. It gradually grew into a comprehensive programme incorporating all phases of poultry and egg production and processing. Since the inception of the research... Read More...

MERCK PARTNERS WITH LAYER OPERATIONS ON SALMONELLA CONTROL US - Merck Animal Health is committed to partnering with egg producers to find an effective and FDA-compliant solution for the prevention of Salmonella. Commercial egg-laying operators are keenly aware of how important effective disease management is to the health and production of their flocks, especially when the disease has the potential to result in foodborne illness.That’s why Merck Animal Health is committed to partnering with egg producers to find an effective and FDA-compliant solution for the prevention of Salmonella. “At the end of 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration published final guidelines for egg producers to help them further comply with the FDA egg safety rule. That ruling, coupled with the concerns we hear from our customers, has affirmed our commitment to developing vaccines that enable the producers to effectively protect not only... Read More...

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Having looked at findings from over 200 studies based on the relationship between the welfare of the animals and the nutrients from the animal products, CIWF then used data from 76 of the strongest results. The report shows that higher-welfare animal products are often significantly lower in fat than equivalent products from intensively-reared animals. This includes pasture-reared beef, free-range and organic chicken and chicken of slower-growing breeds, and wild salmon and trout. By opting for higher welfare animal products rather than factory farmed ones, consumers could significantly reduce their dietary... Read More...

FEED PRICES AND POULTRY HEALTH: HOT TOPICS AT THE UK POULTRY MEAT CONFERENCE UK – On 18 September 2012, the UK poultry industry gathered at Stoneleigh Park in Warwickshire for a one-day conference, which covered the hottest topics in the industry, from feed and grain prices to health issues, writes Nuria Martínez Herráez. John Cessford, from BOCM PAULS, was the chairman for the session and he opened with remarks about the papers which would be presented that day and thanking the organisers and sponsors of the event. The main sponsors for the event were: MSD Animal Health, Cobb, Aviagen, P.D. Hook, BOCM PAULS and Elanco. Graeme Dear, General Manager at Aviagen Ltd, took the lead with his paper "Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll" on breeding and use of antibiotics within the poultry industry. Read More...


Health & Welfare News BENCHMARK HOLDINGS ADDS ANIMAL HEALTH VACCINES PLANT TO PORTFOLIO UK - Benchmark Holdings has announced that it has agreed to acquire the Novartis Animal Health vaccine manufacturing plant in Braintree. The acquisition is effective immediately and ensures both continuity of production and all the jobs at the facility. The Braintree plant has been producing licensed veterinary vaccines for Novartis and other major pharmaceutical companies for over 25 years. Under Benchmark, the plant's role as a toll manufacturer will be expanded. Following a major investment in production and R&D capability at the plant, new specialist small- to medium-scale products will be manufactured for developing world markets. Benchmark Holdings is delighted with the addition of the Braintree plant to the Benchmark family, an excellent team in a first... Read More...

EU, US WELFARE ORGANISATIONS MEET GLOBAL - Members of the leading EU and US animal welfare organisations have met for the third year in Washington DC. The Transatlantic Animal Welfare Council aims to increase the dialogue between organisations and facilitate co-operation to improve the welfare of millions of animals. This meeting discussed a number of issues that affect animal welfare including the report of the EU-US High Level Working Group for Jobs and Growth, US citizens’ attitude towards trade and the EU/US relationship on World Trade Organisation’s sanitary and phytosanitary measures. • Caroline Smith DeWaal, Director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, US co-chair of the Food Policy Committee of the Trans-Atlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD); • Professor Thomas Hartung of John Hopkins University, Bloomberg School... Read More...

2013 WELFARE CONFERENCE: CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

EUROTIER: UNIQUE PROGRAMME FOR ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

SPAIN - The UFAW International Animal Welfare Science Symposium will be held in Barcelona in July 2013; the organisers have put out a first call for abstracts.

GERMANY - This year over 2,300 exhibitors from 51 countries will be represented at the Exhibition Grounds in Hanover for EuroTier 2012.

'Science in the Service of Animal Welfare: Priorities around the world' is the theme for next year's UFAW International Animal Welfare Science Symposium, to be held at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in Spain on 4 to 5 July 2013. Around the world the importance of science in elucidating and tackling animal welfare problems is increasingly recognised, but priorities, concerns and approaches vary between nations and cultures. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for all those active or interested in animal welfare science and its application around... Read More...

All the internationally leading companies from the cattle, pig and poultry sectors will be presenting a complete programme covering machinery, equipment, facilities and installations, as well as farm inputs and genetic resources. In addition visitors will find a broad aquaculture programme and, for the first time, a programme for professional horse stables too. With BioEnergy Decentral the world platform for decentralized energy supply is integrated into EuroTier once again.The exhibitors will be providing information about the entire bandwidth of technological developments in the field of bioenergy and renewable energy sources, as well as machinery and equipment for decentralized energy supply. Read More...

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Poultry Industry News KNOWLEDGE OF ANIMAL GENOMES CONTRIBUTES TO FOOD SECURITY NETHERLANDS - It is now possible to measure the complete DNA pattern in individual animals used for breeding purposes.This allows much more scope for breeding and selecting for favourable characteristics related to health, life duration, natural resistance and lowered environmental burden in pigs, cows and chickens, according to Wageningen University. We are therefore on the threshold of major developments that will enable us to respond to world food needs as well as to consumer demands. This was the substance of the lecture Professor Roel Veerkamp delivered on 6 September when he assumed his position as Professor (by special appointment) for Numerical Genetics and Genomics at Wageningen University, part of Wageningen UR. The world population has grown during the last 50 years from over three billion to more than 7 billion people. At the same time, in relative terms the number of people suffering from... Read More...

NETHERLANDS REINFORCES POSITION IN INNOVATIVE LIVESTOCK BREEDING NETHERLANDS - Four Netherlands-based international companies - CRV (beef cattle), Hendrix Genetics (poultry and pigs), TOPIGS (pigs) and Cobb Europe (poultry) and Wageningen University & Research have committed themselves to reinforcing the Dutch position as an innovative livestock breeding country through the Breed4Food initiative. To this end, they signed a declaration of intent on 3 September 2012 in Wageningen.The four companies, based in the Netherlands, are all among the world leaders in their areas of breeding. Wageningen University & Research centre is a globally-renowned research and education institution.The initiative will be supported financially through the Dutch Topsector Policy. The ambition is to form a top-ranking institute: Breed4Food. This institute... Read More...


Breeding & Genetics HENDRIX OPENS NEW GENOMICS LAB IN FRANCE

AVIAGEN INCLUDES GENOMICS INFORMATION

FRANCE - Hendrix Genetics is dedicated to delivering Better Breeding Today. Consequently, they have established a new world-class Research & Development centre in France.

UK - After eight years of sustained investment in unravelling the relationship between the chicken genome and broiler and breeder performance traits, Aviagen has now included genomics information in the routine selection of its elite lines.

The new Genomics Laboratory is a central hub for global molecular DNA work for all Hendrix Genetics divisions, and is already producing new innovations in breeding. Blood and tissue samples are taken from the pig, poultry and aquaculture divisions, and also from customers’ stocks. Samples are then transported to the Genomics Laboratory, where DNA is extracted and stored in a BioBank. After in-house analysis and genotyping, geneticists of Hendrix Genetics use these to develop breeding programmes for the divisions or directly into customer breeding programmes. Read More...

Genomics information will complement existing selection techniques, adding to the continuous improvement of Aviagen products year-on-year. Launched in 2004, before the chicken genome sequence was released, Aviagen’s genomics project is concerned with identifying naturally occurring markers within the genome of elite birds and using those markers to help breed stronger and more productive birds through the current selective breeding programme, a completely natural process. In line with Aviagen’s tradition of innovation and dedication to R&D, this major... Read More...

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Poultry Industry News FOSSILSHIELD COMBATS RED MITE UK - Signs of red mite can include bird restlessness, pale combs, loss of feathers and blood spots on eggs. With a risk of egg production being affected, there would undoubtedly be an economic loss. Some poultry farmers regard treating red mite as an expense to be avoided. Perhaps because they think they won’t get red mite, or they haven’t quantified the potential economics losses. If, for example, one egg per week per bird at peak production was lost due to the effect of red mite, the cost per egg on average was six and a half pence; a typical 12000 free-range layer unit could lose just under £800. There are many red mite control products on the market, however, FOSSILSHIELD is a non-toxic diatomaceous earth and is unique in its ability to accept an electrostatic charge due to its high resistance to moisture. Read More...


Biosecurity & Hygiene BIOSECURITY FOR ORGANIC LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS

EMAI BIOSECURITY CENTRE ATTRACTS INDUSTRY RECOGNITION

AUSTRALIA - Practical tips on everything from property planning to day-to-day management by Karen Omalley of IDO Organic Farming in a factsheet from New South Wales Department of Primary Industries.

AUSTRALIA - The recent laboratory construction at New South Wales (NSW Department of Primary Industries’ (DPI) biosecurity facilities at Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute (EMAI) has been recognised with three awards in the Australian Institute of Project Management – NSW Chapter Annual Awards.

Biosecurity means 'safe life' and is the protection of people, animals and the environment from infectious disease, pests and other biological threats like invasive weeds. Additionally, for organic farmers, good biosecurity will help prevent chemical or GMO contamination and loss of certification. Managing an organic farm requires farmers to plan and prepare actively for possible risks in the future. Certified organic farmers are obliged to keep good records of farm activities, stock history and to demonstrate a commitment to animal welfare. A robust biosecurity system is vital to this activity. In its active form, biosecurity is a set of habits designed to reduce the risk of introducing diseases or contamination of the farm environment. Read More...

“This is fantastic recognition of the efforts of all involved in the DPI project management team,” DPI Executive Director Biosecurity NSW Bruce Christie said. “The project was named Best Project Under A$100 million, and Best Project of the Year, while Tony McCabe of NSW Department of Public Works was named Best Project Manager. “The awards were presented at a gala NSW: Project Management Achievement... Read More...

SEOUL TO STEP UP BIRD FLU PREVENTION EFFORTS SOUTH KOREA - Korea will begin monitoring all its ports of entry to intercept any possible inflow of avian influenza (AI), the government has announced. The Korea Times reports that a special inspection will also take place at all air and sea ports on September 17-25 to check the ports' monitoring and quarantine capabilities. The move comes as new outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza have already been reported in many Asian countries, including China and Hong, as well as in Mexico. "The government is stepping up its prevention measures due to an expected rise in the number of people going overseas during the Chuseok holiday along with an increase in the number of Chinese tourists coming to the country during... Read More...

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Poultry Industry News QUANTUM BLUE HITS MEXICO MEXICO - A major launch event on 20 September saw AB Vista introduce its revolutionary phytase enzyme, Quantum Blue, to Mexico. First launched to the US market in January 2012, Quantum Blue has now been launched with great success across a number of markets, delivering unprecedented performance benefits for pig and poultry producers around the world. Hosted at Mexico Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JW Marriott Cuidad de Mexico hotel, the Mexican launch included a technical introduction to Quantum Blue by AB Vista Research Director, Dr Mike Bedford. In separate presentations, the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Global Technical Manager Tiago Dos Santos will talk about the anti-nutritive effects of phytate and the benefits of superdosing with Quantum Blue. Guest speaker Dr Ricardo Cuetos, from the National Autonomous University of Mexico, discussed the latest research findings on avian influenza. Read More...

USE OF SYNTHETIC METHIONINE IN ORGANIC FEEDS EXTENDED US - The National Organic Program (NOP) has published a final rule that extends the allowance for synthetic methionine in organic poultry production - but at reduced levels. Methionine is classified as an essential amino acid for poultry because it is needed to maintain viability, specifically for proper cell development and feathering. The National Organic Standards Board determined that while wholly natural substitute products exist, they are not presently available in sufficient supplies to meet poultry producer needs. Therefore, some allowance for synthetic methionine is necessary to comprise a nutritionally adequate diet for organic poultry. Previously set to expire on 1 October 2012, the rule's effective removal of the date allows poultry producers to continue to use limited amounts of synthetic methionine at... Read More...


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Poultry Industry News HENS EAT HEMP DENMARK - Hens at the University of Aarhus are being fed silage made from hemp, alfalfa, maize and grassy herbs. In organic egg production, hens are offered roughage in the form of pasture vegetation in the hen yard, silage or vegetables as a supplement to their organic ration. Scientists from Aarhus University are now developing a new feeding concept whereby the rough, green forages are not simply used as a snack but as an integral and nutritious part of the diet. "Roughage has a nutritional value of its own, which can provide additional nutrients to that supplied in the ready-mixed feed. Since the ration is formulated to cover all the requirements of the hens, the roughage only provides extra nourishment. In the new concept roughage is considered as an ingredient that contributes its own nutrients," explains senior scientist Sanna Steenfeldt from Aarhus University. Read More...

DANISCO ANIMAL NUTRITION DEBUTS UNDER DUPONT BRANDING AT WPC 2012 BRAZIL - Historic Salvador, located on the northeast coast of Brazil in the state of Bahia, played host to the XXIV World’s Poultry Congress (WPC). Organized by FACTA and the Brazilian branch of the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA-BR), the WPC is considered to be the most important global event focused on the dissemination of poultry science and technology. This year’s event attracted more than 9,000 visitors and 3,000 scientific professionals from all corners of the world; including Brazil, US, China, South Africa, and various countries in Europe. As silver sponsors of WPC, Danisco Animal Nutrition, part of DuPont Industrial Biosciences, participated with a booth for the first time under our new DuPont branding. The core messages being promoted were: providing sustainable... Read More...

WATER - THE THREAT AND THE CHALLENGE GLOBAL - It is not news that global water resources are becoming scarcer and that there is increasing competition between agriculture and other industries. However a new report, 'The Global Water Crisis: Addressing an Urgent Security Issue', calls on government and policy makers to reform radically attitudes towards water and how it is managed globally, writes Charlotte Johnston, ThePoultrySite editor.

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Poultry Industry News FEEDING MICROBIALS LEADS TO MYSTERY IMMUNE RESPONSE

HIGH FEED PRICES HIT POULTRY PRODUCERS HARD

US - A paper recently published in 'Journal of Animal Science' helps explain how microbials and probiotics affect poultry health.

BANGLADESH - Poultry feed industry owners have sought a ban on export of maize, the key raw material of poultry feed, in a bid to stabilise the prices of poultry birds and eggs in the local markets.

Researchers at the North Carolina State University and Chung Jen College of Nursing, Health Sciences and Management (Taiwan) conducted a study to investigate the effects of direct fed microbials on energy metabolism in different tissues of broiler chickens. The researchers wanted to learn how consuming microbials and probiotics could change energy use and immune function. Typically, direct fed microbials and probiotics are used to improve livestock health, but how they actually work is not fully understood. These findings could have long standing implications as producers feel the pressure to move away from the sub-therapeutic use of antibiotics. “Microbials are not a direct replacement [for subtherapeutic antibiotics] but an opportunity through a different mechanism... Read More...

MIXED PROBIOTIC REDUCES CAMPYLOBACTER COLONISATION IN CHICKS GLOBAL - An international collaboration of scientists has shown, in two experiments, a reduction in caecal colonisation by Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chicks after the administration of an avian-specific probiotic. Campylobacteriosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease in humans worldwide, and the contaminated poultry meat by Campylobacter jejuni can be considered one of the important sources of enteric infections in humans, according to K. Ghareeb of the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria and co-authors there and at Egypt's South Valley University, CESAC in Reus, Spain and Biomin Holding and Research Center. In their paper in Poultry Science, they continue that the use of probiotics, which can help to improve the natural... Read More...

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Industry owners said if the government does not put a ban on maize exports at least for an interim period, poultry feed prices will go up, further affecting the local eggs and meat supply, reports The Financial Express. Prices of poultry feeds have recorded substantial rises in the international market in the backdrop of an increase in maize prices. Feed Industry Association of Bangladesh (FIAB) President Ihtehsham B. Shahjahan said prices of poultry feeds swelled by nearly 80 to 100 per cent in the last month. If the government does not impose ban on the export of locally produced maize... Read More...

BPC SUPPORTS FRENCH BIOFUELS HALT UK - On September 12, the French government called for a pause in the global development of biofuels to help ease rapidly rising food prices. Now, the British Poultry Council (BPC) has expressed its support. Peter Bradnock, Chief Executive of the British Poultry Council (BPC), said: “The French government’s call for a pause in biofuel development is a welcome response to rapidly increasing feed costs.The wasteful use of food crops for biofuels instead of farming has a direct impact on food prices and already hardpressed consumers. The BPC and its international partners has been calling on politicians worldwide to step in. “It isn’t fair to ask low-income families without cars to pay more for food while subsidising biofuels. Politicians in the UK and EU must... Read More...


Health & Welfare News NOVEL INSECT PROJECT COULD PROVIDE PROTEIN FEED SOLUTIONS

ULTRABOND – OPTIVITE’S ULTIMATE MYCOTOXIN BINDER

NEW ZEALAND - A project to develop novel insectderived feed protein that could help replace expensive soyabean meal and fishmeal in poultry and pig diets has been announced by ABN’s parent company, AB Agri.

UK - Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by fungi belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium species growing in crops under unfavourable conditions. The mycotoxins of greatest agriculture concerns include aflatoxin, ochratoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, and fumonisins. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that approximately 25 per cent of world crops are contaminated by mycotoxins annually.

The project involves entomologists, biochemists and nutritionists, combining the expertise within ABN with that of scientists at the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera). Insect larvae will be grown on organic waste materials, then processed for use in animal feeds and initially evaluated in poultry. “With global protein supply currently struggling to keep up with worldwide demand, and protein prices sky-high this year as a result, there’s a real need to develop new, sustainable alternatives,” explains ABN technical director Angela Booth. “This project is an exciting opportunity to see if the highly digestible protein in insect larvae could help meet that need. “As a bonus, the organic waste substrate is reduced in mass by around 50%, and can be used as a valuable fertiliser.” Read More...

The succession of fungal contamination and mycotoxin bio-synthesis are influenced by environmental conditions.These include: crop health status pre-harvest, meteorological conditions, harvesting practices, post-harvest meteorological conditions before storage, and storage conditions. Furthermore, no region or country is immune from mycotoxin contamination because of the ubiquitous nature of fungus. Ingestion of contaminated feed or forage presents numerous challenges throughout the digestive tract of the animal, affecting both health status and performance. Research indicates that mycotoxin contamination may... Read More...

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Poultry Industry News CHICKS DEVELOP FEED PREFERENCES AS EMBRYOS FRANCE - Adding to our understanding of olfactory development in birds, researchers in France found that stimulating the sense of smell at the end of embryonic development had an impact on the feed preferences of chicks after hatching. Like mammals, bird embryos are capable of chemosensory learning but the ontogeny of their feeding preferences has not been examined, according to a paper published recently in Chemical Senses. Aline Bertin and colleagues at INRA in Nouzilly tested whether the timing of stimulation in chicken embryos modulates the impact of in-ovo olfactory stimulation on later food preferences. They exposed chicken embryos to an olfactory stimulus for a four-day period in the middle or towards the end of the incubation period. The chicks were tested for their preference between feeds, with and without the olfactory stimulus... Read More...


Incubation & Hatching CHERKIZOVO CHOOSES SMART FOR RUSSIA’S LARGEST HATCHERY RUSSIA - Russia’s Cherkizovo Group will place Pas Reform’s Smart single-stage incubation and hatchery technologies at the heart of Russia’s largest and most progressive new poultry complex. The installation, due towards the end of next year, will include 108 SmartSetPro™ setters, each with capacity for 115,200 eggs, 20 smaller 57,600 capacity SmartSetPro™ setters and 152 SmartHatchPro™ hatchers.The comprehensive installation also includes a complete line of hatchery automation systems, with automated egg receiving, egg transfer and chick handling and a hatchery climate control system that incorporates energy-saving heat recovery systems. Each setter will be equipped with Pas Reform’s Adaptive Metabolic Feedback (AMF™) – the company’s latest innovation to ensure that specific conditions are maintained throughout the metabolic development of each embryo. AMF™ maximizes uniformity by optimizing airflow, the evaporation of moisture and air redistribution. Read More...

EGG FORCE READER AIDS GOVERNMENT TEST SHELL STRENGTH GLOBAL - Dan Dan Bachrach, an expert in raising laying hens with the Training Service at Israel's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development purchased ORKA’s Egg Force Reader (EFR) for research purposes a year ago. Instruments manufactured by ORKA Food Technology (better known as “EggTester.Com”) are being used extensively in QC laboratories operated by egg producers, packers, universities, regulatory authorities, and primary breeders all over the world. Here is a report from Dan Dan Bachrach, an expert in raising Laying Hens, Training Service, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Israel, which purchased ORKA’s Egg Force Reader (EFR) for research purposes a year ago. EFR (Egg Force Reader) was purchased a year ago in order to improve the measurement of the strength of the eggshell. EFR is used in experiential farms located in northern Israel, where many experiments are conducted simultaneously, Read More...

FEWER EGG-, BROILER-TYPE EGGS HATCHED US - Declines are continuing in the numbers of eggs hatched for the egg and broiler flocks, down six and one per cent, respectively from the year previously. Egg-type chicks hatched during August 2012 totalled 41.4 million, down slightly from August 2011, according to the USDA 'Chickens and Eggs' report for September 2012. Eggs in incubators totalled 36.8 million on 1 September 2012, six per cent fewer than a year ago. Domestic placements of egg-type pullet chicks for future hatchery supply flocks by leading breeders totalled 234,000 during August 2012, down 26 per cent from August 2011. Broiler-type chicks hatched during August 2012 totalled 758 million, down slightly from August 2011. Eggs in incubators totalled... Read More...

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Poultry Industry News AVEC: MOST SUCCESSFUL MEETING EVER ITALY - The general assembly of a.v.e.c., the European association of poultry producers and processors, was described as the "most successful ever" by the organisation's outgoing President, Jan Odink in Naples, Italy today, 21 September. Senior editor, Jackie Linden, reports from the meeting. In his welcome speech to delegates to the 55th General Assembly of a.v.e.c., Mr Odink said that around 120 delegates were present at the meeting in the city of Naples, representing 14 European countries. Adding his welcome was Aldo Muraro, president of UNA, the Italian poultry producers' association, which hosted the meeting. Mr Odink started the meeting by highlighting the most important trends and developments in the European poultry meat industry, as he summarised the latest annual report from a.v.e.c. Read More...

NEW FOOD SAFETY GUIDE FOR SMALLER PROCESSORS US - The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has published a guide for smaller poultry meat processors producing ready-to-eat (RTE) products, with the focus on food safety, particularly on the control of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella and Listeria. FSIS says the guidance document â&#x20AC;&#x201C; entitled 'FSIS Salmonella Compliance Guidelines for Small and Very Small Meat and Poultry Establishments that Produce Ready-to-Eat (RTE) Products' â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is intended to assist small and very small meat and poultry establishments that manufacture ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products in understanding the regulatory requirements associated with safe production of these products with respect to Salmonella and other pathogens. It also provides information about processing and safe handling of RTE products after the lethality step to control pathogens, such as... Read More...


Processing & Packaging COALITITON URGES USDA TO WITHDRAW POULTRY SLAUGHTER PROPOSAL US - A coalition of 23 groups and 16 individuals has urged the Department of Agriculture to withdraw a proposal that increases poultry processing line speeds and removes hundreds of federal inspectors from poultry processing plants. The proposal, which would modify USDA’s poultry slaughter inspection programme, increases the poultry line speed to an unsafe level and allows plant employees to replace federal government inspectors for certain inspection activities. In addition, the proposal reduces the numbers of federal inspectors working at poultry plants. While the poultry inspection programme does need improving, the proposal was developed with limited public input. USDA did not consult with its inspection advisory committee prior to issuing its proposal; nor were public meetings held... Read more...

FOCUS ON EGG PROCESSING AND ECONOMICS UK - The final day of the International Egg Commission (IEC) London 2012 conference focussed the industry’s attention on egg processing and economics. Steve Manton, Chair of the IEC’s Egg Processors International Committee, opened the final morning’s speaker sessions; he told the IEC audience: “Egg processors fully support the industry’s commitment to CSR. With egg products we must think smarter; how can we get more with less, improving functionality year on year? There will be 9 billion people to feed on this planet by 2050; so we’ve got a lot to do”. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been mentioned time and again during this conference, as the international egg industry takes its responsibility to provide a safe, affordable food supply to people throughout the world very seriously. Throughout the day, delegates... Read more...

REDUCING WATER USAGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT US - As part of an effort to sustain innovation in poultry production and processing, six continuation projects are focused on novel types of engineering and technology research activities that address critical issues facing poultry production from the growout house to the processing plant, says Dr Doug Britton, manager of the Agricultural Technology Research Program (ATRP), Georgia Research Tech Institute. Here he discusses reducing water usage and environmental impact. ATRP’s Dynamic Filtration project is investigating techniques to more selectively capture target impurities from liquid streams in a way that facilitates the recovery of value-added byproducts while still meeting or exceeding water reuse guidelines. Researchers are focused on three primary applications: poultry chillers, marinations, and brines. A bench-scale dynamic filtration device has been constructed and evaluated. Read more...

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Poultry Industry News

í Noticias y Análisis

Articulos

Multimedia

Directorio de Empresas Eventos Acerca de

La vacunación frenó la influenza aviar en México La situación de la influenza aviar H7N3 en Los Altos, de Jalisco, México se ha estabilizado: han sido más de 40 días desde que se ha aislado el virus. Esto gracias a la veloz identificación del virus y producción de una vacuna que se utilizó con éxito para detener la enfermedad

Bienvenido

El efecto de este brote, que se describe como el peor brote de influenza aviar (IA) en aves de corral en el mundo, ha sido devastador para el sector de huevo de plato de Los Altos. Jalisco representa el 55% de la producción mexicana de huevo. Las cifras oficiales indican una pérdida de más de 22 millones de gallinas debido a la IA, lo que representa el 37% de la producción de Los Altos.

Chris Wright Editor principal, ElSitioAvicola.com chris.wright@5mpublishing.com ElSitioAvicola.com, publicado por 5m Publishing, es el portal del sector avícola para Latinoamérica y España, con noticias y análisis de todo el mundo actualizados a diario. Algunos de los temas más importantes que se han presentado en el sitio recientemente incluyen: • El reto de las enfermedades emergentes. • ¿El maíz ha alcanzado su precio pico? • Cambio climático, ¿aumentaría la influenza aviar?

Los varios temas de impacto de este brote fueron tratados en el “Curso de Enfermedades Emergentes en Avicultura” organizado por ANECA (Asociación Nacional de Especialistas de Ciencias Avícolas de México) y Senasica en la Ciudad de México el 27 y 28 de septiembre, que contó con la participación de 150 personas (evento en el cual tuve el placer de participar). El caso de la identificación del virus y de la producción de la vacuna, muestra el importante nivel de cooperación entre el sector académico, la industria avícola y el Gobierno para controlar esta enfermedad. En 2006 como parte de un proyecto de investigación en la UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México) se obtuvo e identificó un virus de influenza aviar H7N3 de baja patogenicidad en un ave acuática silvestre. Ese virus resultó ser muy parecido, aunque no el mismo, que afectó a Los Altos. Una vez que se tenía el virus semilla listo, se mandó a cuatro laboratorios. Pasado un mes de recibir la semilla de vacuna, los laboratorios habían producido la vacuna y se estaba vacunando gallinas en Los Altos. Gracias a la vacunación, el brote ahora está controlado.

Lea más aquí

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ElSitioAvicola.com VENEZUELA SE UNE AL MERCOSUR Venezuela ahora forma parte del Mercosur, el Mercado Común del Cono Sur. Se une a Argentina, Brasil y Uruguay en lo que ahora es el quinto poder económico más grande del mundo. Solo le ganan Estados Unidos, China, Alemania y Japón, en ese orden. Con la incorporación de Venezuela, Mercosur tendrá un territorio de casi 13 millones de kilómetros cuadrados, una población de 271 millones – con 7 de cada 10 sudamericanos - y un PIB de US$ 3,3 billones o sea el 82,3% del PIB total de Sudamérica. Además, el bloque es el productor más grande de alimentos del mundo, cuenta con las mayores reservas probadas de petróleo, y su tasa media de empleo es mejor que el la de la Unión Europea (UE). Aun esperando para ser miembros quedan Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.Todo indica que Bolivia será el próximo en ser admitido. Paraguay, mientras tanto, fue suspendido del Mercosur, lo que permitió la entrada de Venezuela. Lea más aquí

CONGRESO LATINOAMERICANO DE NUTRICIÓN ANIMAL – CLANA El V Congreso del Colegio Latinoamericano de Nutrición Animal – CLANA – tomará lugar en Puerto Vallarta, México, del 23 al 26 de octubre de 2012. En paralelo al V CLANA tendrá lugar la I Expo Latinoamericana Industrial y Tecnológica en Nutrición Animal. CLANA fue formado en el 2002 a partir de la iniciativa del Colegio Brasileño de Nutrición Animal (CBNA) y la Asociación Mexicana de Especialistas en Nutrición Animal (AMENA) con el objetivo de ser un foro de discusión sobre la problemática Latinoamericana en temas de producción y alimentación animal. A partir del 2003, cada dos años se ha llevado a cabo el Congreso CLANA alternando la sede, hasta el momento, entre Brasil y México. AMENA está comprometida a hacer de éste un foro plural de discusión con la participación... Lea más aquí

ALIMENTOS BALANCEADOS Y SALUD AVIAR EN EL CANDELERO A mediados de septiembre, la industria avícola británica se dio cita para celebrar una conferencia que abordó los temas más candentes del momento en la industria, desde los alimentos balanceados y el precio de los granos hasta temas sanitarios. Por Nuria Martínez Herráez, editora de El Sitio Avícola. Graeme Dear, director de Aviagen Ltd, dio inició a la jornada con su presentación sobre reproducción y uso de antibióticos en la industria avícola. Señaló los cambios que se han producido en la reproducción de las aves con el paso del tiempo y lo importante que son, económicamente hablando, las mejoras genéticas para la industria avícola. Steve Wilson, jefe del departamento de desarrollo de monogástricos en BOCM PAULS, ofreció una presentación sobre nutrición. La volatilidad en el mercado de las materias primas tradicionales debería hacer que los productores... Lea más aquí

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

58th Annual Conference of National Chicken Council Washington D.C, US, 10th to 11th October

The National Chicken Council invites you to join other senior executives from US chicken processing companies and allied industries to address current legislative, regulatory, political, business, agricultural, economic and international trade issues affecting the chicken industry.

FIGAP/VIV Mexico 2012 Guadalajara, Mexico, 17th to 19th October

FIGAP/VIV Mexico 2012 showcases the industry's developments by the Feed to Meat concept. Feed to Meat brings together supply and demand within the complete animal protein chain. The animal protein industry in Latin America is on the upward move. Promising business opportunities can be found throughout the Feed to Meat chain in this region.

INDUSTRY EVENTS Each month we bring you the most important poultry industry events taking place around the world For more events please visit www.thepoultrysite.com/events

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INDUSTRY EVENTS

Poultry Fest 2012 Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, 18th to 20th October

Poultry production constitutes a vital component of agricultural economy in India. It is significant from the fact that India contributes a major share in poultry production in the world. The exponential growth in the poultry sector is termed as Silver Revolution in India.

Aviana Uganda 2012 Kampala, Uganda, 1st to 2nd November

“AVIANA Uganda 2012" will present a Gateway to East Africa by providing a platform to exhibit products, services and innovative technologies to top decision makers and create business partnerships, With serious and potentials exhibitors from more than 20 countries. Aviana Uganda a Poultry and Livestock Expo will exemplify a single aim of prosperity in African animal health sector, with the mission “Animals Health, Nations Wealth".

World Nutrition Forum 2012 Singapore, 10th to 13th October

The World Nutrition Forum, an established event on the animal nutrition industry’s calendar hosted by Biomin, is now at its 5th edition and heads for the first time out of Europe, taking place in October in Singapore. The congress will be attended by more than 700 industry representatives and opinion leaders from all over the world, opening the floor to challenging discussions on and around 'NutriEconomics®: Balancing Global Nutrition & Productivity'.

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS HEALTH & WELFARE Ceva Animal Health Tel: +33 (0) 557 554 040 Fax: +33 (0) 557 554 198 info@ceva.com www.ceva.com

Areas: Pharmaceuticals Vaccines Equipment:Vaccination and Medical) Feed: Additives

CEVA SantĂŠ Animale is a global veterinary health company focused on the research, development, production and marketing of pharmaceutical products and vaccines for pets, livestock, swine and poultry.

MSD Animal Health Tel: +31 485 587961 Fax: +31 485 587643 Fredric.David@merck.com marc.Coulier@merck.com www.msd-animal-health.com

Areas: Feed: Safety Products Feed: Additives Feed Cleaning/Disinfectants Pharmaceuticals

MSD Animal Health offers veterinarians, farmers, pet owners and governments the widest range of veterinary pharmaceuticals, vaccines and health management solutions and services

Pfizer Animal Health Tel: +1 919 941 5185 pgp.marketing@pfizer.com www.animalhealth.pfizer.com

Areas: Pharmaceuticals

Pfizer Animal Health had developed and launched 18 new veterinary drugs since 2000, including several flagship products today considered indispensible.

BREEDING & GENETICS Aviagen Tel: +1 256 890 3800 Fax: +1 256 890 3919 info@aviagen.com www.aviagen.com

Areas: Breeding Genetics

The Aviagen Group is the global market leader in poultry genetics. As the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier poultry breeding company, Aviagen develops pedigree lines for the production of commercial broilers and turkeys.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS To feature your business in here please contact alex.guy@5mpublishing.com For more businesses please visit www.thepoultrysite.com/directory

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS Areas: Breeding Genetics

Cobb broiler breeding stock has the sustained advantage of the most efficient feed conversion and highest potential for profitability for the company’s global customers.

Grimaud Frères Sélection Areas: Tel: +33 (0)2 41 70 36 90 Breeding Fax: +33 (0)2 41 70 31 67 Genetics grimaudfreres@ grimaudfreres.com www.grimaudfreres.com

Grimaud Frères are a multi-species selection and breeding operator in the service of the watefowls and festive poultry field.

Hubbard Tel: +33 296 79 63 70 Fax: +33 296 74 04 71 contact.emea@ hubbardbreeders.com www.hubbardbreeders.com

Areas: Breeding Genetics

Hubbard provides solutions that focus on the economic performance, health and well-being of breeding stock. Hubbard specializes in state-of-the-art selection programs to improve the performance of their pure lines.

Hy-Line Tel: +1 515 225 6030 Fax: +1 515 225 6030 info@hyline.com www.hyline.com

Areas: Breeding Genetics

Hy-Line International is a world leader in poultry layer genetics with a rich history of innovation. Hy-Line was the first poultry breeding company to apply the principles of hybridization to commercial layerbreeding.

Novogen Tel: +33 296 58 12 60 Fax: +33 296 58 12 61 contact.novogen@ novogen-layers www.novogen-layers.com

Areas: Breeding Genetics

NOVOGEN offers a new alternative giving the egg producers more choice and possibilities to fit their specific market requirements.

Indbro Poultry Tel: +91 (40) 241 5594 drkotaiah@ indbropoultry.com www.indbro.com

Areas: Breeding Genetics

Started off as a Broiler breeding company, with pure line birds developed and bred under Indian Climate, feed & management since 1990.

Cobb Vantress Tel: +1 479 524 3166 Fax: +1 479 524 3043 info@cobb-vantress.com www.cobb-vantress.com

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS BIOSECURITY & HYGIENE CID LINES Tel: +32 5721 7877 Fax: +32 5721 7879 info@cidlines.com www.cidlines.com

Areas: Biosecurity Cleaning Feed: Additives Health and Safety Pest Control Welfare

CID LINES offers VIROCID, the most powerful disinfectant, which is part of a hygiene program for poultry, written by hygiene specialists.VIROCID has a proven record in preventing and fighting disease outbreaks for many years.

PCS Poultry Services Tel: +44 (0) 1386 701 812 Fax: +44 (0) 1386 701 376 admin@pcspoultry.com www.pcspoultry.com

Areas: Biosecurity Hygiene Cleaning Services Pest Control

FOSSIL SHIELD + PCS Poultry, the solution to your red mite problem. Unique professional on-site electrostatic application with Fossil shield, a non-toxic natural diatomaceous powder.

FEEDING & NUTRITION

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AB Vista Tel: +44 (0) 1672 517650 Fax: +44 (0) 1672 517660 info@abvista.com www.abvista.com

Areas: Feed Feed: Additives Feed: Nutrition

AB Vista is an integrated international supplier of new generation micro-ingredients for animal feeds providing visionary solutions for your agribusiness.

Biomin Tel: +43 2782 803 0 Fax: +43 2782 803 30 office@biomin.net www.biomin.net

Areas: Feed Feed: Additives Feed: Nutrition

BIOMIN offers sustainable animal nutrition products such as quality feed additives and premixes, which include solutions for mycotoxin risk management, a groundbreaking natural growth promoting concept as well as other specific solutions

Danisco Tel: +44 (0) 1672 517777 Fax: +44 (0) 1672 517778 info.animalnutrition@ danisco.com www.danisco.com/ animalnutrition

Areas: Feed: Additives

Danisco’s ingredients are used globally in a wide range of industries – from bakery, dairy and beverages to animal feed, laundry detergents and bioethanol – to enable functional, economic and sustainable solutions

Evonik Tel: +49 6181 59 6765 Fax: +49 6181 59 6734 feed-additives@evonik.com www.evonik.com

Areas: Feed Feed: Additives Feed: Safety

Evonik is fully committed to be a reliable partner in delivering feed additives for animal nutrition turning the knowledge of its global team into intelligent solutions.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS Kerry Ingredients & Flavours EMEA Tel: +31 36 523 3100 Fax: +31 36 523 3110 clive.girdler@kerry.com www.kerry.com

Areas: Feed Feed: Additives Feed: Safety

Kerry Animal Nutrition aims to identify and commercialise existing Kerry ingredients and technologies to create potential world beaters in animal nutrition and health

Meriden Animal Health Tel: +44 (0) 1234 436130 Fax: +44 (0) 1234 436130 sales@meriden-ah.com www.meriden-ah.com

Areas: Pharmaceuticals Feed: Additives Feed: Safety Feed: Nutrition Cleaning/Disinfectants

Meriden Animal Health Limited is a British company specialising in the production and distribution of natural feed additives, as well as Meriden-branded animal health prodcucts, specifically developed to maximise performance and increase overall returns.

Novus International Tel: +1 314 576 8886 Fax: +1 314 576 2148 contact@novusint.com www.novusint.com

Areas: Feed Feed: Additives Feed: Nutrition

Novus International is a global leader of animal health and nutrition programs for the poultry, pork, beef, dairy aquaculture and companion animal industries.

Optivite Tel: +44 (0) 1909 537 380 Fax: +44 (0) 1909 478 919 info@optivite.com www.optivite.com

Areas: Feed: Additives Feed: Nutrition

Optivite specialises in the design, development, manufacture and distribution of nonhazardous, drug free ingredients and additives for the maintenance and enhancement of feed quality.

HOUSING & EQUIPMENT Agrilamp Tel: +44 (0) 1332 547 118 Fax: +44 (0) 208 439 1538 info@agrilamp.com www.agrilamp.com

Areas: Equipment: Lighting & Electrical

AgriLampâ&#x201E;˘ is a leading LED manufacturer with years of experience in designing and manufacturing the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most innovative LED (light-emitting diode) lighting solutions for the agricultural industry.

Big Dutchman Tel: +49 4447 801 0 Fax: +49 4447 801 237 big@bigdutchman.de www.bigdutchman.com

Areas: Equipment: Breeding Equipment: Drinking Equipment: Egg Equipment: Feeding Equipment: Weighing

The poultry equipment supplier for layer management, breeder management, poultry growing and poultry climate control.

Space-Ray Heaters Tel: +44 (0) 1473 830 551 Fax: +44 (0) 1473 832 055 info@spaceray.co.uk www.spaceray.co.uk

Areas: Equipment: Heaters

SPACE-RAY manufactures high efficiency infra-red radiant heating solutions (also known as direct gas fired radiant heating), for industrial, commercial, agricultural or leisure purposes

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY LISTINGS Termotechnica Pericoli Tel: +39 0182 589006 Fax: +39 0182 589005 termotecnica@pericoli.com www.pericoli.com

Areas: Climate Control Climate Management Heating, Cooling and Ventilation

A global market leader specializing in climate technology since 1967 in design, manufacture and distribution of efficient/quality heating, cooling and ventilation equipment and systems for the poultry industry with a full range of products to meet all specification and applications.

Vencomatic Tel: +31 (0) 497 517380 Fax: +31 (0) 497 517364 info@vencomatic.com www.vencomatic.com

Areas: Equipment: Breeding Equipment: Drinking Equipment: Egg handling and grading Equipment: Nesting

Vencomatic is a global supplier of innovative and welfare friendly housing solutions for the poultry sector.The flexible and turn key solutions of Vencomatic offer large possibilities for a wide range of poultry production concepts.

INCUBATION & HATCHING Orka Food Technology Tel: +852 8120 9245 Fax: +852 2802 7112 info@orkatech.com www.eggtester.com

Areas: Equipment: Egg Equipment: Hatching Equipment: Incubation

EggTester.com (officially known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Orka Food Technologyâ&#x20AC;?) is a leading worldwide manufacturer of egg-quality testing equipment to be used extensively in QC laboratories operated by egg producers, packers, universities, regulatory authorities, and primary breeders.

Pas Reform Tel: +31 314 659 111 Fax: +31 314 652 572 info@pasreform.com www.pasreform.com

Areas: Equipment: Incubation Equipment: Egg Equipment: Environment Equipment: Hatching Waste Handling

Pas Reform is an international company, which has specialized in the development of innovative hatchery technologies for the poultry sector since 1919. Products and Services: Incubators, Hatchery Automation Systems, Hatchery Climate Control Systems and Hatchery Management Training.

Petersime Tel: +32 9 388 96 11 Fax: +32 9 388 84 58 info@petersime.com www.petersime.com

Areas: Equipment: Hatching Equipment: Incubation

Petersime is a world leader in the development of incubators. hatchery equipment and turnkey hatcheries.

EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS VIV Tel: +31 30 295 28 98 viv@vnuexhibitions.com www.viv.net

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Areas: Events & Exhibitions

With 7 VIV exhibitions all over the world VIV trade exhibitions are recognized for high trade quality in the professional industry.With over a 1,000 international companies exhibiting and visitors from over 140 countries the VIV-shows are also considered as very international.


The PoultrySite Digital - October 2012 - Issue 22  

Global News, Features and Events for the Poultry Industry.

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