__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

n e t h c i h c s e g r e u s a e i r M o t S l l Wa


ft e n a h c Bots erfalls d n au nu e M g s n e eru gd n a t n i s r e E s on hr e a J g . a 25 ess M d zum an sary l s r e e i v r i l o n Mem 25th An erlin Wa the he B t f o all F e h of t Gewidmet den Ballonpaten Dedicated to the balloon patrons


Die LICHTGRENZE entlang von Spree, Reichstag, Brandenburger Tor und Potsdamer Platz.

The LICHTGRENZE along the river Spree, the Brandenburg Gate, Reichstag, and Potsdamer Platz.


2— 3


Die LICHTGRENZE auf dem Schwedter Steg.

The LICHTGRENZE on Schwedter Steg.


4— 5


Die LICHTGRENZE an der Kronprinzenbr端cke im Regierungsviertel.

The LICHTGRENZE at Kronprinzenbr端cke near the parliament and government buildings.


6— 7


Inhalt


Content

8— 9

10

Grußwort Preface

12

Einleitung Introduction Entlang der Mauer — 9 Orte im Blickpunkt Along the Wall — 9 places in the spotlight

16

Bornholmer Straße — Die Mauer fällt The Wall falls

18

Mauerpark — Überwachung und Freiräume Surveillance and creative spaces

34

Bernauer Straße — Gewaltsam getrennt Forcible separation

48

Humboldthafen — Schüsse auf Flüchtlinge Shots fired at escapees

64

Brandenburger Tor — Teilung und Wiedervereinigung Division and reunification

80

Potsdamer Platz — Im Niemandsland No man’s land

92

Checkpoint Charlie — Im Fokus der Weltöffentlichkeit The eyes of the world

104

Engelbecken — Kunst und Protest im Kreuzberg der Achtzigerjahre Art and protest in eighties Kreuzberg

116

East Side Gallery und Oberbaumbrücke — Grenzgebiet Spree The Spree border area

132

Weltweit gegen Mauern The next walls to fall

146

Blick aus dem All The orbital perspective

152

Making of Making of

156

7.—9. November 2014 7 November to 9 November

166

Impressum / Bildnachweis Acknowledgements /  Photo credits

190


GruĂ&#x;wort


Preface

1 0 — 11

Grußwort

Preface

Der Mauerfall am 9. November 1989 war der glücklichste Tag in der jüngeren Geschichte unserer Stadt. Er beendete die widernatürliche Teilung Berlins, besiegelte den Untergang des SED-Regimes und läutete das Ende des Kalten Krieges ein. Vom 7. bis 9. November 2014 haben die Berliner und Berlinerinnen zusammen mit Gästen aus aller Welt dieses welthistorische Ereignis gefeiert und an jene Menschen erinnert, die mit ihrem Mut, ihrer Kreativität und ihrem Widerstandsgeist die diktatorischen Regime jenseits des Eisernen Vorhangs zu Fall gebracht haben. Hunderttausende haben sich drei Tage lang an der LICHTGRENZE eingefunden, sind dem Sog der Ballons gefolgt, haben Geschichten und Filme angeschaut und sich die Teilung der Stadt in Erinnerung gerufen. Jung und Alt, Menschen, die im Osten und im Westen aufgewachsen sind, Berliner und Berlinbesucher kamen miteinander ins Gespräch. Schließlich haben sie alle zusammen am Abend des 9. November den emotionalen Moment erlebt, als die Ballons zum Himmel aufstiegen und sich die LICHTGRENZE auflöste. Zahlreiche Berliner Schulen, Kirchengemeinden, Vereine und Unternehmen haben als Ballonpaten an diesem Jubiläumsfest mitgewirkt. Sie alle haben in den 25 Jahren nach dem Fall der Mauer auf ihre Weise zur Wiedervereinigung beigetragen. Heute können die alten und neuen Berlinerinnen und Berliner stolz sein auf das, was sie in und mit ihrer Stadt erreicht haben. Berlin ist zur weltoffenen, toleranten und kreativen Metropole geworden. Wir leben in einer Stadt, die jedes Jahr Millionen von Gästen anzieht und viele junge Menschen anregt, sich bei uns niederzulassen. Hoffen wir, dass das Berliner Beispiel Menschen auf der ganzen Welt ermutigt, sich gegen Mauern aller Art und für Freiheit, Demokratie und Menschenrechte zu engagieren.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989 was the happiest day in the city’s recent history. In one fell swoop, it ended the unnatural division of Berlin, sealed the fate of the SED regime, and heralded the end of the Cold War. Over three days, from 7 November to 9 November 2014, thousands of Berliners joined with visitors from around the globe to celebrate both this momentous event in world history and all those people who – buoyed up by a spirit of resistance, courage, and creativity – brought about the fall of dictatorial regimes in all the countries behind the Iron Curtain. Hundreds of thousands flocked to see the LICHTGRENZE. They traced the course of the balloons, read the eye-witness stories, watched films, and remembered the division of the city. Young and old, people from East and West, Berliners and visitors to the city – they all swapped their impressions and memories of that time. The weekend closed with an emotional moment that brought everyone together, when, on 9 November, the balloons were released, erasing the LICHTGRENZE as they rose up into the night sky. Countless Berlin schools, parishes, associations, and companies enabled the anniversary celebrations to get off the ground by volunteering as balloon patrons. In their own way, each of these organizations has contributed to the reunification process that has unfolded in the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Today, old and new Berliners can be proud of what they have achieved, both in and with their city. Berlin has become a cosmopolitan, tolerant, and creative metropolis. We live in a city that every year attracts millions of visitors. Filled with a sense of hope, scores of young people are deciding to make Berlin their home. Let us now hope that the shining example of Berlin compels people around the world to take action against divisions of all kind and to campaign for greater freedom, democracy, and for human rights.

Klaus Wowereit Regierender Bürgermeister von Berlin

Klaus Wowereit Governing Mayor of Berlin


Introduction

Peaceful Revolution and Fall of the Wall — 25 Years Later When East Berliners forced the opening of the Berlin Wall in the autumn of 1989, the event marked the dawn of a new era. But the people streaming to the inter-city crossing points on the evening of 9 November 1989 did not know this yet. Overwhelmed border guards at the checkpoint on Bornholmer Strasse were the first to yield to pressure from the masses, and opened the barrier. Not a single shot was fired. Shortly after midnight, all crossing points were passable. The Wall had fallen. This was the culmination of an unprecedented process of self-liberation which captured the imagination of the world. By 1989, hundreds of thousands of East Germans, dissatisfied with communist rule under the SED, wanted to leave the country. For them, the GDR offered no prospects for the future. More and more East Germans demanded freedom and democratic rights. They bravely defied the authorities, and what started as a protest by a handful of people steadily grew to encompass thousands – even though the protestors knew that previous demonstrations in other cities had been quashed with brutal force. When over 70,000 ordinary citizens gathered in peaceful protest in the city of Leipzig on 9 October, the police and army withdrew. It was a watershed moment. More demonstrations took place in many cities across the country. They culminated in Berlin on 4 November 1989 at Alexanderplatz, in what became the largest demonstration by opponents of the system in the history of the GDR. SED leaders struggled to restabilize their rule, and finally announced at an international press conference on 9 November that they would be relaxing the travel restrictions: every East German should be able to apply for a passport and travel permit. Yet Western television reports announced ‘GDR opens border’. Right away, countless East Berliners gathered at the border crossings and pressured the surprised border guards to immediately open the Wall. The power struggle was far from decided after the fall of the Wall. The SED asserted their claim to leadership and demonstrations did not subside. There were strikes and prison revolts, and Stasi buildings were occupied. The people demanded democratic participation. At the same time, hope dwindled to a reformed system. The first free and democratic GDR parliament election in March 1990 finally marked the end of the communist dictatorship. The election set the stage for a democratization of East German society and paved the way for German reunification. In 2014 Berlin held an impressive symbolic action in commemoration of these events that changed the course of world history. From 7 November to

9 November, some 8000 balloons formed a barrier of lights, tracing the course of the Wall that had separated Berliners for 28 years. Fifteen kilometres long, the LICHTGRENZE delineated the former inner-city border and gave the public a palpable sense of the scale of the partition. In those three short days, more than two million visitors came to see the route. Many of them talked to the people they encountered along the way, sharing personal memories, and watching with baited breath as the balloons rose into the sky, carrying their patrons’ messages into the atmosphere. Numerous organizations and initiatives around the world joined in with the celebrations, because, if anything, the fall of the Berlin Wall remains an international symbol of hope for a more peaceful world and for overcoming injustice and dictatorships. The balloon patrons include schoolchildren and youth groups, members of local parishes and sports clubs, company employees and foundation staff, Berliners and foreign visitors. This book is dedicated to them all. Each balloon patron has his or her own personal story to tell – be they older people who experienced the Wall in the East or West, or younger people who have grown up in an age of the new opportunities and horizons opened up by the disintegration of the Iron Curtain. A handful of those many messages are included here as a sample survey. We have selected sixteen people whose lives were particularly affected by the Wall to tell their story in more detail. Some of them had to cope with the sight of the ugly concrete wall in front of their window every day, while for others the Wall represented an invisible immurement of the mind and spirit. For some the sense of confinement was painful, others saw it as a form of protection. However different their perspectives on the border may be, the fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989 was for each and every one of them a seismic event that brought great joy. We wish to thank the mayor of Berlin for his political backing of the project, and the Stiftung Deutsche Klassenlotterie in Berlin and all our sponsors for their financial support of the events marking the anniversary of 25 years since the fall of the Wall. A special word of thanks goes to our partner, the Stiftung Berliner Mauer. We are also indebted to the staff at Kulturprojekte Berlin and the Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft. Without the tireless and often very personal commitment of hundreds of supporters, the project would never have got off the ground. We are thus extraordinarily grateful to everyone involved. Moritz van Dülmen  and  Tom Sello


Einleitung

1 2 — 13

Friedliche Revolution und Mauerfall — 25 Jahre danach Als Ostberliner im Herbst 1989 die Öffnung der Mauer erzwangen, stand die Welt am Beginn einer Zeitenwende. Doch das konnten die Menschen, die am Abend des 9. November 1989 zu den innerstädtischen Grenzübergängen strömten, noch nicht ahnen. Am Grenzübergang Bornholmer Straße gaben die überforderten Grenzposten als erstes dem Druck der Menge nach und öffneten den Schlagbaum. Kein einziger Schuss fiel. Kurz nach Mitternacht waren alle Übergänge passierbar. Die Mauer war gefallen. Dies war der Höhepunkt einer beispiellosen Selbstbefreiung, die weltweit Beachtung fand. Hunderttausende, die mit der kommunistischen Herrschaft der SED unzufrieden waren, wollten 1989 das Land verlassen. Sie sahen in der DDR keine Perspektiven mehr. Immer mehr Ostdeutsche forderten Freiheit und demokratische Rechte. Mutig stellten sie sich den Machthabern entgegen, aus Wenigen wurden stetig mehr – selbst als die SED-Führung vielerorts brutal auf die Demonstranten einknüppeln ließ. Als sich am 9. Oktober über 70 000 Menschen in der Leipziger Innenstadt zum friedlichen Protest versammelten, wurden die Einsatzkräfte zurückgezogen. In zahlreichen Städten fanden weitere Demonstrationen statt. Sie gipfelten am 4. November 1989 auf dem Berliner Alexanderplatz in der größten systemkritischen Demonstration der DDR-Geschichte. Die SED-Spitze versuchte ihre Herrschaft wieder zu stabilisieren und verkündete auf einer internationalen Pressekonferenz am 9. November Reiseerleichterungen: Jeder Ostdeutsche solle einen Antrag auf Pass und Reisegenehmigung stellen können. Das Westfernsehen meldete jedoch „DDR öffnet Grenze“. Daraufhin versammelten sich spontan unzählige Ostberliner an den Grenzübergängen und drängten das überraschte Grenzpersonal zur sofortigen Öffnung der Mauer. Nach dem Mauerfall war der Machtkampf keineswegs entschieden. Die SED behauptete ihren Führungsanspruch, und die Demonstrationen rissen nicht ab. Es kam zu Streiks und Gefängnisrevolten, Stasi-Gebäude wurden besetzt. Die Bevölkerung forderte demokratische Mitbestimmung. Zugleich schwand die Hoffnung auf eine Reformierbarkeit des Systems. Die erste freie und demokratische DDR-Volkskammerwahl im März 1990 besiegelte schließlich das Ende der kommunistischen Diktatur. Die Wahl stellte die Weichen für eine Demokratisierung der ostdeutschen Gesellschaft und machte den Weg für die deutsche Einheit frei. 2014 erinnerte Berlin mit einer beeindruckenden symbolischen Aktion an diese Ereignisse, die die Welt veränderten. Dort, wo die Mauer Berlin 28 Jahre lang trennte, leuchteten vom 7. bis 9. November 8000 Ballons.

Auf einer Länge von 15 Kilometern zeichnete die LICHTGRENZE den ehemaligen innerstädtischen Mauerverlauf nach und führte die Dimension der Teilung vor Augen. Mehr als zwei Millionen Besucher zog es in diesen Tagen an die Strecke. Viele Menschen kamen ins Gespräch, tauschten persönliche Erinnerungen aus und verfolgten gebannt, wie die Ballons in den Himmel aufstiegen und die Botschaft ihrer Paten in die Welt trugen. Zahlreiche Organisationen und Initiativen schlossen sich weltweit der Jubiläumsfeier an, ist doch der Mauerfall ein internationales Symbol für die Hoffnung auf eine friedlichere Welt, auf das Überwinden von Unrecht und Diktaturen. Unter den Ballonpaten sind Schüler und Jugendgruppen, Mitglieder von Kirchengemeinden und Sportvereinen, Mitarbeiter von Unternehmen und Stiftungen, Berliner und auswärtige Gäste. Ihnen ist dieses Buch gewidmet. Jeder Ballonpate hat seine eigene Geschichte zum Mauerfall zu erzählen – die Älteren, die ihn auf der Ost- oder der Westseite erlebt haben, ebenso wie die Jüngeren, denen sich durch den Fall des Eisernen Vorhangs neue Möglichkeiten und Horizonte eröffnet haben. Stellvertretend für ihre vielen Botschaften sind hier einige nachzulesen. 16 Menschen, in deren Leben die Mauer eine besondere Rolle gespielt hat, erzählen ihre Geschichte ausführlicher. Den einen stand die hässliche Betonwand täglich vor Augen, für andere war sie eine unsichtbare, doch ständig bewusste Einmauerung. Einige empfanden das Eingeschlossensein als schmerzhaft, andere als Schutz. Die einen haben sich künstlerisch an der Mauer abgearbeitet, die anderen haben sie mit illegalen Radiosendungen überwunden. So unterschiedlich ihre Perspektiven auf die Grenze waren, der Mauerfall am 9. November 1989 war für sie alle ein großes Glück. Wir bedanken uns beim Regierenden Bürgermeister für die politische sowie bei der Stiftung Deutsche Klassenlotterie Berlin und allen Sponsoren für die finanzielle Förderung der Veranstaltungen zum Jubiläum „25 Jahre Mauerfall“. Besonderer Dank gilt unserem Partner, der Stiftung Berliner Mauer. Ein herzliches Dankeschön geht schließlich an die Teams von Kulturprojekte Berlin und der Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft. Ohne den unermüdlichen, oft sehr persönlichen Einsatz Hunderter Mitstreiter wäre das Vorhaben nicht zu stemmen gewesen. Dafür danken wir allen Beteiligten außerordentlich. Moritz van Dülmen  und  Tom Sello


2 Millionen Menschen besuchten am Jubil채umswochenende die LICHTGRENZE.

2 million people visited the LICHTGRENZE during the anniversary weekend.


1 4 — 15


 Seite / page 18 Bornholmer StraSSe  Die Mauer fällt  The Wall falls  Bösebrücke

 Seite / page 48 Bernauer StraSSe  Gewaltsam getrennt  Forcible separation 

 Seite /page 34 Mauerpark Überwachung und Freiräume Surveillance and creative spaces

Wedding

 Seite / page 64 Humboldthafen  Schüsse auf Flüchtlinge  Shots fired at escapees 

Prenzlauer Berg

 Seite / page 80 Brandenburger Tor Teilung und Wiedervereinigung Division and reunification

Mitte Tiergarten

 Seite / page 92 Potsdamer Platz  Im Niemandsland  No man’s land 

Lichtgrenze

Ost-Berlin East Berlin

Friedrichshain

 Seite / page 116 Engelbecken Kunst und Protest im Kreuzberg der 80er Art and protest in eighties Kreuzberg

Oberbaumbrücke

Kreuzberg

 Seite / page 104 Checkpoint CHarlie Im Fokus der Weltöffentlichkeit The eyes of the world

 Seite / page 132 East side Gallery Und Oberbaumbrücke Grenzgebiet Spree The Spree border area


1 6 — 17

—  r e u a M r t  e k d n u g p n k a l c t i l n B E m i e t —  l l a 9 Or W light  e h t t g o n p o s l A he t n i s e c a l 9p Dieses Kapitel rückt neun Orte an der ehemaligen innerstädtischen Grenze in den Fokus: von der Bornholmer Straße, wo sich am 9. November auf Druck der Ostberliner der erste Grenzübergang öffnete, bis zur Oberbaumbrücke, die erst seitdem wieder Friedrichshain und Kreuzberg verbindet. An diesen Orten fanden in den 28 Jahren, in denen die Mauer Berlin teilte, viele Fluchtversuche statt. Es gab Protestaktionen, Maßnahmen zur Perfektionierung der Grenzanlagen, aber auch Alltag im Schatten der Mauer. Davon erzählen die kurzen, mit historischen Aufnahmen illustrierten Geschichten in diesem Buch. Sie stammen aus der Open-Air-Ausstellung „Hundert Mauergeschichten – Hundert Mal Berlin“, die die Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft zum Mauerfall-Jubiläum erarbeitet hat. Einige der Menschen, die für dieses Buch interviewt wurden, haben die in diesen Geschichten geschilderten Ereignisse miterlebt. Andere haben in der Opposition daran mitgewirkt, dass die Mauer fiel. Und wieder andere haben dafür gesorgt, dass die zerrissene Stadt Anfang der 1990er-Jahre wieder zusammengefügt wurde.

This chapter takes a closer look at nine places on the former inner-city border: from Bornholmer Strasse in the north, where on 9 November the first border-crossing opened, to Oberbaumbrücke in the south, which has connected Friedrichshain and Kreuzberg ever since that night. During the 28 years in which the Berlin Wall divided the city, these places were the sites of numerous escape attempts. They formed the backdrop for protests, the military enhancement of border fortifications, but also the day-to-day occurrences of life in the shadow of the Wall. These things are related in the short stories contained within this book and illustrated with historical photographs. They have been compiled from the open-air exhibition “A Hundred Stories of the Wall – Berlin a Hundred Times”, which has been organized by the Robert-HavemannGesellschaft to mark the commemorations of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Some of the people interviewed for this book witnessed the events described in these pages at first hand. Others were active in the opposition movements that helped bring about the Wall’s collapse, while others took the task upon themselves of piecing together the divided city in the early 1990s.


Bernauer StraĂ&#x;e — Gewaltsam getrennt


Bernauer Straße — Forcible separation

Be

4 8 — 49

r e u rna

  e ß S t ra


-W eg

ße ra St er au

ße ra St

er am

do

rn

ße

ich

An

m kla

er

Str

aße

nenst

M

Be

kl

ße ra St hric -U ax M tz Ga

eo

e

Th

ß t ra rS

Fe

Brun

e-

ra

hs

t ra

ße

e

st

irc

An

lin

er

sk

aße

tr rS

ro

Ernst Mundt 4. Sept. 1962

ck

on

Str

tze

ße

Ca

A

Zi

er

eli

t ra Kapelle der Versöhnung

Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer

nd

ns

Früherer Standort der Versöhnungskirche

Rudolf Urban 19. Aug. 1961

Park am Nordbahnhof

Arkonaplatz

Str

rte

e

aße

Ga

e

ß t ra

s

tr rS

Egon Schultz 5. Okt. 1964

Dokumentationszentrum Berliner Mauer

Leo Lis 20. Sept. 1969

ein

hr

be

lli

ne

rS t

Zionskirchplatz

ra

ße

lis -S

ra ß e

ae

Friedhof der Sophiengemeinde

t ra ße

Fe

Ch

Heinz Cyrus 10. Nov. 1965

aß e

e

sw

ne nst

e

ra ß

ße

e

Ost-Berlin East Berlin

gs

ee

rsi

ss

tr

aße

Bo

au cks

Rosenthaler Platz

HeinrichZille-Park

ße

Rest der Berliner Mauer

t ra

ße

str

Ti e

ra ß

e

e

s t ra

Ch

Lichtgrenze

hl

t ra

Ze

un

tr

Sc

ls ge

erst

ns

Berg

te

ße

röd

t ers

e ra ß

Br

ar

Ack

G

t ra

Volkspark am Weinbergsweg

e n s t ra ß

Sch

ns ide

ra ße

Todesopfer an der Berliner Mauer Victims at the Berlin Wall

s To r

t ra ß

e

rg

str

I nva li d

Elisabeth-Schwarzhaupt-Platz

ll

be

ee

Nordbahnhof

be

W ein

ss

Inva lid en st

Otfried Reck 27. Nov. 1962

hr

eg

au

al

Nordbahnhof

e

ine

ss

Rh

ll Wo

eu

ße

ge ber

ine

r- H

Bernauer Str.

S

s

Sw

rn

er

ein

tr rS

aße

Be

r

ra

olz

Rh

ge ber

aße

Str

Dieter Brandes 9. Juni 1965

e au

St

nh

ße t ra

Str

er

e

ö Sch

e

ner

nd

ße

Kr

ra

tr rS

e mm

S

Be

ue rna

aße ine

la

St

Sw

np

a

ß t ra rS

rte

aße

Str

Fenstersprung Olga Segler 25. Sept. 1961

tze

st

tr rS

er

a

e

nd

eli

en

St

su ra l

Str

Str

sit

e

er

ße

us

nd

Str

t ra

ed

H

tr rS

su ra l

er

ns

Us

e om

ße

ße

ast

rte

ße

ße

e

Ga

ra

Ida Siekmann 22. Aug. 1961

Bernd Lünser 4. Okt. 1961

lg Wo

t ra

st

ine

ens

Str

er

oll

e

er

ck

Vinetaplatz

e

aße

nd

A

ra ß

Str

er

nn

str

m edo

Bru

tt Wa

Us

mu

as

e

Ja s

lt Vo

ß t ra

hd

en

ick

er

Str

e

e


Bernauer Straße — Forcible separation

5 0 — 51

 Zwangsgeräumte und zugemauerte Häuser auf der OstBerliner Seite der Bernauer Straße. Die übrige Straße einschließlich der Gehwege gehört zu West-Berlin. Aufnahme vom März 1962. This photo shows buildings on the East Berlin side of Bernauer Strasse from which residents were evicted. The house fronts were then bricked over. The rest of the street, including the pavements, were part of West Berlin. Photo from March 1962.

 Mahnmal für Olga Segler an der Bernauer Straße 34. Aufnahme vom 5. Juni 1962. Memorial for Olga Segler at no. 34 Bernauer Strasse. Photo from 5 June 1962.

Sprung aus dem Fenster

Jumping out the window

Olga Segler, geboren 1881, wohnt 1961 auf der südöstlichen Seite der Bernauer Straße im Ost-Berliner Bezirk Mitte. Hier stehen die Häuser direkt auf der Sektorengrenze. Der Gehweg vor Olga Seglers Haus und die gegenüberliegende Straßenseite gehören bereits zu West-Berlin. Seit dem 13. August 1961 verbarrikadieren DDR-Behörden die Wohnungen. Wachposten in Fluren und Treppenhäusern kontrollieren die Bewohner und versuchen, Fluchtaktionen zu verhindern. Am 24. September beginnen sie, gegen den Willen der Bewohner die Wohnungen zu räumen. Am Abend des 25. September entschließt sich Olga Segler zur Flucht. Vor dem Haus wartet ihre Tochter. Sie wohnt nicht weit entfernt auf West-Berliner Seite. Die 80-Jährige springt aus dem Fenster ihrer Wohnung im zweiten Stock in ein Sprungtuch, verletzt sich jedoch beim Aufprall am Rücken. Im Krankenhaus erliegt sie einen Tag später einem Herzleiden aufgrund der Aufregung, die sie bei der Flucht erlitten hat.

Olga Segler was born in 1881. In 1961 she was living on the southeast side of Bernauer Strasse in the East Berlin district of Mitte. At that location, the buildings directly abutted the sector border, while the pavements in front of Olga Segler’s building and the opposite side of the street were part of West Berlin. On 13 August 1961, East German authorities barricaded the apartments. Guards in the hallways and stairwells monitored the inhabitants, trying to prevent escapes. On 24 September, they began to clear out the apartments, against the will of residents. On 25 September, Olga Segler decided to escape. Her daughter lived on the West Berlin side, not far away, and on that evening she was waiting in front of the building. The 80-year-old jumped out the window of her second floor apartment into a safety net, but injured her back on impact. She died in the hospital the next day from heart trouble caused by the exertion of her escape.


Bernauer Straße — Gewaltsam getrennt

Ò Ingrid und Heinz Langkavel vor einem Mauerstück an der Spree in Moabit. Ingrid and Heinz Langkavel in front of a piece of the Wall near the river Spree in Moabit.


Bernauer Straße — Forcible separation

5 2 — 53

Ingrid und Heinz Langkavel geboren 1943 und 1940, erlebten als junges Paar den Mauerbau. born in 1943 and 1940 respectively, witnessed the building of the Wall as a young couple.

Heinz und ich sind nahe der Bernauer Straße aufgewachsen. Bei der Teilung Berlins hatten wir „Glück“: Die Grenze verlief 200 Meter südöstlich unserer Wohnungen, wir wurden Westberliner. Seit der Kindheit hatten wir uns viel in Ost-Berlin aufgehalten. Die Schwimmhalle und der Eislaufplatz lagen dort, und meine geliebte Oma, bei der ich zeitweilig lebte, wohnte Brunnenstraße 145/Ecke Rheinsberger. Als die Mauer 1961 gebaut wurde, bin ich dreimal am Tag dort vorbeigekommen, und wir haben uns jedes Mal über Stacheldraht und Mauer hinweg gegrüßt: Sie stand am Fenster ihrer Wohnung, ich unten auf der Straße auf West-Seite. Heinz und ich haben uns oft an der neuen „Grenze“ aufgehalten. Wir haben viele dramatische Szenen erlebt. Ein Freund ist in einem unbewachten Moment über den Stacheldraht gesprungen, wir haben ihn in Sicherheit gebracht. Die Szene, die später als Foto um die Welt ging, in der ein Volkspolizist in die Freiheit sprang, sahen wir auch. Nicht immer endeten solche Aktionen glücklich. Einmal stand die West-Berliner Feuerwehr mit Sprungtuch vor einem fünfgeschossigen Haus. Ein Flüchtender war oben auf dem Dach, Volkspolizisten verfolgten ihn. Er ist gerannt und gesprungen, hatte aber zu viel Schwung und ist neben dem Sprungtuch aufgekommen. 1962 haben wir auf dem Standesamt Wedding geheiratet. Oma hatte einen Zeitungsstand, sie kannte Gott und die Welt. Sie hat allen stolz erzählt: „Meine Ingrid heiratet heute!“ Als wir dann frisch getraut zur Mauer kamen, war sie mit Freunden am Fenster, und alle haben mit Blumensträußen gewunken. Bis Mitte der 80er-Jahre waren wir überzeugt, dass die Wiedervereinigung kommen würde. Dann aber bekamen wir Zweifel. Als am 9. November 1989 die Mauer fiel, war ich krank. Wir konnten das nur vom Fernseher aus verfolgen, uns sind die Tränen gelaufen. Am Tag darauf gingen wir zum Brandenburger Tor. Wir haben Walter Mompers „Berlin, nun freue dich!“ sehr wörtlich genommen.

Heinz and I grew up near Bernauer Strasse. When they partitioned Berlin, we were “lucky”: the border ran to the southeast of our flats, just 200 metres away, making us West Berliners. As kids we’d spent a lot of time in East Berlin. The swimming pool and the ice rink were there – and my grandmother, who I was very close to. I even lived with her for a time, in her flat at no. 145 Brunnenstrasse, on the corner of Rheinsberger. In the days after the thirteenth of August, while the Wall was being built, I would pass by her flat three times a day and each time we’d wave to each other, over barbed wire and the Wall. Heinz and I would often stop at the new “border” on the way to or from our house. There were many dramatic scenes that we ended up seeing with our own eyes. Once, a friend jumped over the barbed wire, when the soldiers weren’t looking and we brought him to safety. You know that famous image of the East German policeman leaping over the barbed wire? We were there. But there were also many events that didn’t end happily. Once I saw a group of West Berlin fire officers standing in front of a five-storey house holding a life net. A man was trying to escape. He was on the roof and the police were chasing him. He jumped, but he leapt too far and landed on the ground next to the net. We got married in 1962. My grandma ran a newspaper stand, she knew literally everybody that went past. She told all her customers: “My Ingrid is getting married today.” When Heinz and I went to the Wall straight after the ceremony, she was at her window with her friends. They all waved, clutching bouquets of flowers. Until about the mid-80s, we were convinced that reunification would happen. But then we started to have our doubts. I was sick on the night the Wall fell so we followed events on TV. Both of us wept. The next day we went to the Brandenburg Gate. When Walter Momper said, “Berlin, now rejoice!”, we had very good reason to do so.


Checkpoint Charlie — Im Fokus der Weltöffentlichkeit

t n i o p k c Che rlie Cha


Checkpoint Charlie — The eyes of the world

1 0 4 — 105


Checkpoint Charlie — Im Fokus der Weltöffentlichkeit

 Knochenschau im Niemandsland: die Aktion „Transplantation“ zwischen Wall Street Gallery und Mauer. Aufnahme Juli /August 1989 Display of bones in no man’s land: the action “Transplantation” between the Wall Street Gallery and the Berlin Wall. Photo taken July /August 1989.

Ò DDR-Grenzer auf Kontrollgang an der Mauer vor der Installation „Spiegelzimmerstraße“. Aufnahme aus der Galerie auf die Mauer vom Juli/August 1989. East German border guards patrol the Berlin Wall in front of the installation “Zimmerstrasse Mirror”. Photo taken from the gallery looking out at the Wall, from July/August 1989.

Die Mauer als Leinwand

The Berlin Wall as a canvas

1986 zieht der Westberliner Künstler Peter Unsicker in die Zimmerstraße 12, die in der Nähe des Checkpoint Charlie und direkt an der Mauer liegt: „Ich habe vom ersten Tag an die Mauer als eine unglaubliche Herausforderung empfunden.“ Am 9. November 1986 eröffnet er hier seine Wall Street Gallery. Die Grenzlinie läuft unmittelbar über seine Türschwelle, die Stufen zur Galerie gehören bereits zu Ost-Berlin. Nur knapp fünf Meter liegen zwischen Schaufenster und Mauer. Gerade genug Platz für die Grenzpatrouillen, die hier regelmäßig Streife fahren. Nachts entfernen DDR-Grenzer die Masken, die Peter Unsicker als Installation direkt auf die Mauer bringt. Obwohl sie drohen, sein Schaufenster zuzunageln, erneuert der Künstler sie immer wieder. Später beginnt Peter Unsicker mit der Verspiegelung der Mauer aus vielen kleinen Spiegelsplittern: „Das war meine Antwort auf Gorbatschows Glasnost, das für Klarheit und Transparenz stand.“ Inzwischen sind Mauer und Spiegelinstallation verschwunden. Nach wie vor aber ist Peter Unsickers Galerie „geöffnet nach Osten, nach Westen und nach Vereinbarung“.

In 1986, West-Berlin artist Peter Unsicker moved into no. 12 Zimmerstrasse, close to Checkpoint Charlie and right beside the Berlin Wall. On 9 November 1986, he opened the Wall Street Gallery. To avoid infringing territorial rights, the Wall was always built a few metres behind the actual border, which in this case ran straight across the threshold of the property, with the steps to the gallery officially in East Berlin. A space of just under five meters separated the Wall from the shop window – just enough room for the border patrols that regularly passed by. During the night, East German border guards removed masks that Peter Unsicker had set up in front of the Wall as part of an installation. Although they threatened to board up his window, the artist replaced the masks every time they were removed. Later on, Peter Unsicker began using small shards of broken mirror to reflect the Wall. “It was my answer to Gorbachov’s glasnost, which stood for clarity and transparency.” The Berlin Wall has since disappeared. But Peter Unsicker’s gallery is still open – to visitors from east and west.


Checkpoint Charlie — The eyes of the world

1 1 0 — 111


Checkpoint Charlie — Im Fokus der Weltöffentlichkeit

Ò Peter Unsicker vor seiner Galerie in der Zimmerstraße. Peter Unsicker in front of his gallery in Zimmerstrasse.


Checkpoint Charlie — The eyes of the world

1 1 2 — 113

Peter Unsicker wurde 1947 geboren. Der Bildhauer betreibt seit 1986 die Wall-StreetGallery am Checkpoint Charlie. was born in 1947. The sculptor has run the Wall-Street Gallery at Checkpoint Charlie since 1986.

Meine Galerie in der Zimmerstraße 12 befand sich zu Mauerzeiten auf dem Hoheitsgebiet der DDR. Ich erreichte sie über die Wilhelmstraße oder den Checkpoint Charlie, wo ein Schild warnte: „Betreten auf eigene Gefahr.“ Die Mauer stand fünf Meter vor meinem Atelierfenster. Schon kurz nach dem Einzug war mir klar, dass ich sie nicht einfach ignorieren konnte, und bezog sie in meine künstlerische Arbeit ein. Unter dem Titel „Die Arbeit am Verdorbenen“ – er stammt aus dem alten chinesischen Buch der Wandlungen I Ging – entstanden viele Performances und Aktionen, bei denen ich Gipsmasken, Steine und Spiegel an der Mauer anbrachte. Deshalb standen immer wieder Volkspolizisten vor meiner Tür und forderten: „Stellen Sie den ordentlichen Zustand der Mauer wieder her!“ Das I Ging half mir, souverän mit solchen Situationen umzugehen. Sozusagen fernöstliche Weisheit gegen nahöstliche Dummheit. Am 9. November lief am frühen Nachmittag ein Fernsehteam vor meinem Fenster vorbei und rief mir zu: „Die Mauer fällt!“ Abends um neun Uhr saßen schon ein paar Leute auf der Mauer. Ich setzte mich dazu und wir verfolgten das Geschehen von oben. Uns war bewusst, dass wir eine gute Zielscheibe abgaben. Wir hörten hinter den Absperrungen auf der Ostseite die Leute schreien. Ein Grenzsoldat rief der wartenden Menge auf der Westseite zu: „Wenn Sie nicht zurückgehen, können wir den Schlagbaum nicht öffnen!“ Im nächsten Augenblick kamen Hunderte Ostberliner durch den Checkpoint gelaufen. Das Verrückteste war, dass mich wenige Minuten später eine Freundin aus Kapstadt anrief und fragte: „Ist es wahr, ist die Mauer gefallen?“ Da kapierte ich das eigentlich erst richtig. Den Beton vor meiner Tür habe ich nie vermisst. Mein Begriff von Bildhauerei hat etwas mit Platz und freiem Raum zu tun. Wir haben so viele Mauern im Kopf, da gibt es noch viel Arbeit.

When the Wall was still up, my gallery at no. 12 Zimmerstrasse was located on East German sovereign territory [because the Wall was built several metres behind the actual border]. I had to access it via Wilhelmstrasse or Checkpoint Charlie. There was a sign warning people: “Enter at your own risk”. The Wall stood just five metres in front of my studio window. After three days, I realized that I simply couldn’t ignore it, and so I decided to incorporate it into my art. A string of performances and actions followed, in a series I titled “Work on What Has Been Spoiled”, which I got from the ancient Chinese “Book of Changes”, I Ching. My work entailed me attaching plaster masks, stones, and mirrors to the Berlin Wall. So of course it wasn’t long before the People’s Police started appearing at my door. They would tell me to remove the objects to “restore order” to the Wall. I Ching helped me to master such situations. On the ninth of November sometime in the early afternoon, a television crew ran past my window and shouted that the Wall was about to fall. By nine o’clock there were already a few people sitting on the Wall. I climbed up and joined them and we watched events from up there. We knew we made good target practice, sat like that in a row. Behind the barriers on the eastern side we could hear the people shouting. One border guard shouted at the crowd that had assembled on the western side: “If you don’t move back, we can’t open the barrier!” Suddenly we saw hundreds of East Berliners streaming through the checkpoint. The crazy thing was that just a few minutes later a friend from Cape Town rang up and asked, “Is it really true; has the Wall really fallen?” It was only then that I fully grasped what was happening. I’ve never missed that strip of concrete outside my door. The way I see sculpture, it’s all about space to move around in freely. But like I always say: our minds are so full of walls, there’s still a lot of work to be done.


7.—9. November 2014

N . 9 7.—

Niederkirchnerstraße

e b m ove

  4 1 r 20


7 November to 9 November

1 6 6 — 167


7.—9. November 2014


7 November to 9 November

1 7 4 — 175

Eindrücke und Erlebnisse an der LICHTGRENZE: Anziehungspunkte sind die Pulte der Ausstellung „Hundert Mauergeschichten“, die Informationsstelen an den Publikumsorten, die Videoleinwände und die Veranstaltungen der Ballonpaten, hier das Konzert des European Union Youth Orchestra am Mauerpark.

Cameras are out in force at every twist and turn of the LICHTGRENZE. Key attractions are the info-lecterns that form part of the exhibition “A Hundred Stories of the Wall”, the video screens, and events such as the concert of the European Union Youth Orchestra at Mauerpark.


9. November 2014

Mauerpark


9 November 2014

1 8 8 — 189


Impressum

Acknowledgements

Eine Publikation der Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH anlässlich „25 Jahre Mauerfall“ / A publication by Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH on the occasion of “25 Years Fall of the Wall”.

„25 Jahre Mauerfall. Mauergeschichten – LICHTGRENZE – Ballonaktion“ ist eine Initiative des Landes Berlin. Ein Gesamtprojekt  der Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH in Kooperation mit der Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft, Stiftung Berliner Mauer, Whitevoid und bauderfilm. Die Lichtinstallation basiert auf einer Idee von Christopher Bauder und Marc Bauder.  Gesamtkonzept — Moritz van Dülmen, Simone Leimbach, Tom Sello, Frank Ebert, Hans Reitz

Herausgeber / Published by — Moritz van Dülmen und / and Tom Sello Konzeption / Conception — Annette Meier, Simone Leimbach, Moritz van Dülmen Redaktion / Edited by — Annette Meier Redaktionelle Mitarbeit / Editorial assistance — Eckhard Gruber, Christoph Tempel, Julia Alice Treptow, Josephine Natalie Weisflog Bildredaktion / Picture editing — Antje Schröder Mitarbeit / Assistance — Eric Engelbracht

“25 Years Fall of the Wall. Wall Stories – LICHTGRENZE – Balloon Event” is an initiative of the Berlin Senate. A project of Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH in cooperation with the Robert-Havemann-Society, Berlin Wall Foundation, WHITEvoid and bauderfilm. The light installation is based on an idea by Christopher Bauder and Marc Bauder. Overall concept — Moritz van Dülmen, Simone Leimbach, Tom Sello, Frank Ebert, Hans Reitz

Gestaltung / Design — Daniel Büche Art Direction / Art Direction — Georg von Wilcken Grafische Mitarbeit / Graphic assistance — Ines Ebel Interviews / Interviews Texte / Texts — Eckhard Gruber (S. 39, 53), Anja Karrasch (S. 23, 27, 31, 59, 75, 89, 101, 113), Christoph Tempel (S. 71, 143), Julia Alice Treptow (S. 45, 125, 129, 139) Porträtfotos / Portrait photography — Lena Giovanazzi

Kooperationspartner / partners:

Unterstützer und Sponsoren / supporters:

„Hundert Mauergeschichten – Hundert Mal Berlin“ /  “Hundred Wall Stories – Berlin a Hundred Times” Texte / Texts — Frauke Miera, Doris Müller-Toovey, Ilona Schäkel, Tom Sello, Stefanie Wahl Bildrecherche / Picture research — Frank Ebert, Christoph Ochs Übersetzung / Translation — Büro LS Anderson Druck / Printed by — Königsdruck Service GmbH 2. erweiterte Auflage © 2014 Kulturprojekte Berlin GmbH Klosterstraße 68, D–10179 Berlin, www.kulturprojekte–berlin.de

Medienpartner / media partners:


Bildnachweis

 Photo credits

Archiv Bundesstiftung Aufarbeitung, Fotobestand Klaus Mehner, 71_0826_POL_GueG_Wall_06 — Seite / page 135 Asisi — Seite / page 122 Bundesarchiv / 183-85458-0001 — Seite / page 83 Bundesarchiv / 183-1989-1109-030 / Thomas Lehmann — Seite / page 21 Bundesbeauftragter für die Stasi-Unterlagen der ehemaligen DDR — Seite / page 41, 68, 108, 109, 120, 136 Bundesregierung / Engelbert Reinecke — Seite / page 87 Robert Conrad / www.lumabytes.com — Seite / page 98 / 99 Frank Ebert — Seite / page 159 Fotoarchiv Alex Weidmann Berlin — Seite / page 69 Jörg Fried — Seite / page 14 / 15 Gerhard Gäbler — Seite / page 86 Ron Garan — Seite / page 152 / 153 José Giribás / www.giriphoto.com — Seite / page 119 Paul Glaser — Seite / page 123 Harald Hauswald / OSTKREUZ — Seite / page 43 Kulturprojekte Berlin — Seite / page 146 / 147, 149 oben rechts, 149 unten, 150, 151, 155, 160 links oben, 160 Mitte, 161 unten Mitte Kulturprojekte Berlin Hamish John Appleby — Seite / page Umschlagvorderseite, 18 / 19, 64 / 65, 92 / 93, 170 links unten, 175 Mitte, 180, 183 David von Becker — Seite / page 166 / 167, 171 links oben, 174 rechts oben, 178 rechts oben, 179 Mitte, 179 links, 187 Camilo Brau — Seite / page 4 / 5, 6 / 7, 80 / 81, 162 Mitte oben, 162 unten, 163 Mitte, 171 Mitte, 174 links oben Till Budde — Seite / page 184/185 Grand Visions – Martin Diepold — Seite / page 104/105, 174 links unten, 186 Eric Engelbracht — Seite / page 163 links oben Lena Giovanazzi — Seite / page 10, 22, 26, 30, 33, 38, 44, 47, 52, 58, 63, 70, 74, 79, 88, 91, 100, 112, 124, 128, 138, 142, 145, 172 / 173 Oana Popa — Seite / page 168 / 169, 170 links oben, 170 rechts oben, 170 Mitte unten, 171 Mitte rechts, 174 Mitte, 175 links oben, 175 rechts oben 178 links oben, 178 Mitte unten, 179 rechts oben, 188 / 189 Fabian Matzerath — Seite / page 181, 182

Alexander Rentsch — Seite / page 34 / 35, 48 / 49, 132 / 133, 171 links unten, 174 Mitte unten, 174 rechts unten, 175 links unten, 176 / 177 Antje Schröder — Seite / page 156 / 157, 160 unten Mitte, 160 unten rechts, 160 oben rechts, 161, 162 links, 162 rechts unten, 163 links unten, 163 Mitte unten, 163 rechts oben Jan Totzek — Seite / page 116 / 117 Landesarchiv Berlin / Karl-Heinz Schubert — Seite / page 67 Landesarchiv Berlin / Gert Schütz — Seite / page 51 rechts Jutta Matthess / Umbruch Bildarchiv — Seite / page 126, 127 Mitte Museum / Bezirksamt Mitte von Berlin — Seite / page 54 NASA — Seite / page 154 One Young World — Seite / page 149 oben links Toni Nemes / www.toninemes.de — Seite / page 121 picture-alliance / akg-images — Seite / page 37 picture-alliance / ZB / Sven Barten — Seite / page 72 picture-alliance / ZB / Paul Glaser — Seite / page 141 picture-alliance / Chris Hoffmann — Seite / page 84, 85 picture-alliance / dpa / Roland Holschneider — Seite / page 96 picture-alliance / ZB / Berliner Verlag / Kilian — Seite / page 40 picture-alliance / Jürgen Ritter — Seite / page 95 Polizeihistorische Sammlung des Polizeipräsidenten in Berlin — Seite / page 51 links, 73 Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft — Seite / page 137 Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft / Uwe Dähn — Seite / page 42 Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft / Andreas Kämper — Seite / page 25 Robert-Havemann-Gesellschaft / Siegbert Schefke — Seite / page 24 Matthias Schubert — Seite / page 28 Hans-Peter Stiebing — Seite / page 97 Stiftung Berliner Mauer — Seite / page 56 Julia Alice Treptow — Seite / page 140 ullstein bild / dpa — Seite / page 107 ullstein bild / Klaus Lehnartz — Seite / page 57 ullstein bild / Günter Peters — Seite / page 29, 55 Peter Unsicker © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014 — Seite / page 110, 111 visitBerlin / C. Mathesius — Seite / page 163 rechts unten

1 9 0 — 191

Profile for 25 Jahre Mauerfall

25 Jahre Mauerfall - Mauergeschichten, Leseprobe  

25 Jahre Mauerfall - Mauergeschichten, Leseprobe  

Advertisement