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MAY 2017

Rachel SKINNER

The Most Distinguished Winner of 2017


TO ALL THE FINALISTS AND THE WINNERS FROM ZARS MEDIA, PROUD HOST OF TONIGHT'S CELEBRATIONS


Welcome Thank you for being part of the 2017 European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards and for helping to celebrate all the outstanding participants from all over Europe. It is exciting to see that this year’s nominees, finalists and winners work in a diverse variety of fields within architecture, engineering and construction and that they are all making a positive impact in shaping our world for years to come. There is often a perception that successful people are readymade. However, I think it is true that most successful people develop throughout their life and careers. Most of our finalists will likewise have faced great obstacles and challenges in their career journey, a journey which has now brought them to this moment. Their success highlights how truly amazing these people are. As always I would like to thank the companies that nominated this year, and all the nominees who took part. This year we received approximately 300 nominations, of which 150 finalists were shortlisted and 26 winners were announced this evening! Our sincere thanks go to the judges who had the most difficult task of selecting this year’s finalists and winners. I would also like to thank the speakers who kept the finalists engaged and entertained during the judging process, and our media partners for their marketing support. Find latest news about WICE AWARDS and share yout experience of the event at: LinkedIn: european-womenin-construction-&-engineering-awards Facebook: wiceawards Twitter: WICEAwards Google +: +Wiceawardseurope

Congratulations to all the nominees, finalists and winners. I have no doubt you have an incredible adventure ahead of you. Thank you all for celebrating with us this evening and we look forward to seeing you in 2018.

AFI OFORI

Managing Director, Zars Media

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS MAGAZINE - MAY 2017 is published by Zars Media

Official Printer: HART PRESS

On the Cover: RACHEL SKINNER, THE MOST DISTINGUISHED WINNER OF 2017

www.hartpress.com

WICE Awards photographer: 8 Heathfield Court, Fleet, Hampshire GU51 5DX PETER JONES www.peterjones.photography England, United Kingdom Tel.: 01252612025, info@wiceawards.com

Design by: BRANDBEES

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MAY 2017

www.wiceawards.com

Rachel SKINNER

The Most Distinguished Winner of 2017

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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44

16 26

IN THIS MAGAZINE 8 — 5 EFFECTIVE

WAYS TO MAKE CONSTRUCTION HEALTH AND WELLNESS A PRIORITY

10 — THE 5 QUALITIES OF AN EFFECTIVE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER

12 — 10 WAYS TO

36

ATTRACT & RETAIN MILLENNIAL ENGINEERS

14 — HOW TO

PREPARE FOR A NEW GENERATION OF CONSTRUCTION WORKERS

16 — THE FUTURE

OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION IS ALL ABOUT VIRTUAL REALITY

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

26 — SEVEN RAIL

TECHNOLOGY TRENDS SET TO SHAPE OUR INDUSTRY IN 2017

32 — THE JUDGES 36 — THE JUDGING PROCESS 40 — SPEAKERS 44 — 10 MOST PROFITABLE CONSTRUCTION JOBS IN 2017

48 — WHY DON'T WE

SEE MORE WOMEN IN ENGINEERING? BY A WOMAN IN ENGINEERING

50 — 2017 FINALISTS 90 — WICE AWARDS 2017 WINNERS


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120 — HOW DIGITIZATION

IS DISRUPTING CONSTRUCTION: STRATEGIES FORWARD

122 — BUILDING

PRODUCTS INDUSTRY: DON’T NEGLECT SOCIAL MEDIA!

126 — WHY GREEN

130

BUILDING REQUIRES CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES TO DIGITIZE — FACILITY LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT: BIM BENEFITS FOR DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

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132 — 7 WAYS ROBOTICS IS TRANSFORMING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

138 — HOW VIRTUAL

REALITY WILL CHANGE THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

140 — TOP 10

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY TRENDS TO LOOK OUT FOR

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90 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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VOI CE AT THE TABLE F L AGSHIP CO NFEREN CE

Ordinary People, Extraordinary Contributions! Unlock the potential within.

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017


JU LY

21

2017

08:30 - 18:00 The Lansdowne Club

Celebrating The Extraordinary Achievements Of Ordinary Women And Men Corporate Tickets £250 (plus VAT) www.voiceatthetable.com | info@voiceatthetable.com RESPECTING THE INDIVIDUAL AND EVERYTHING WE HAVE TO OFFER IS THE BEST WAY TO COMPETE IN A WORLD WHERE KNOWLEDGE CAN BE EASILY EXPORTED AND REPLICATED

• Join cross-industry senior decision makers, influencers and champions in the Corporate Culture, People and Diversity & Inclusion space.

• Listen to business leaders showcasing their companies’ ambitions and successes of getting more from their workforce by appreciating the whole person and their full span of talents.

• Learn how, when companies embrace their employees as complete individuals, they can maximise role models, increase engagement and attract and retain the talent of the future.

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Join us for a buzzing day of learning, conversations, insights and networking.

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5 Effective Ways to Make Construction Health and Wellness a Priority By CONSTRUCTION WORLD, www.constructionworld.org, @const_world_org

Construction health and wellness is rarely a topic of discussion, but its importance is extremely high. Although much of the focus has been on addressing the effects of sedentary and desk-based jobs, there are types of workplaces that can also lead other health issues, mainly construction sites.

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lthough there is more attention put on health and wellness in the workplace than ever before, there is still plenty of room for improvement. For example, in Japan, people have been attending state-funded fitness classes for many years. This is only one example of how we can work to integrate health and wellness into the everyday lives of busy individuals. For the construction industry specifically, there needs to be more resources in place that promote

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

health and wellness. Although there are a number of programs that acknowledge the importance of workplace safety, especially in construction, personal health and wellness is often on the backburner. Furthermore, with a typically male-dominated workforce, it is easier to lose sight of the importance of rest and recuperation. Below are a few strategies that construction companies can implement that aim to rejuvenate a worker’s health and wellness. Not only will these methods keep workers rested and relaxed, it will aid tremendously in creating a more productive team.


1 — Start with training…and make it on-going The secret to making sure that your employees always operate safely is clear, comprehensive training that doesn’t stop after the first few weeks. You need to make learning an integrated part of the company, and make it an on-going process. This could mean holding weekly or monthly ‘lunch and learn’ meets, where you can plan on watching videos, bringing in speakers or experts in health and wellness. In addition, you can design these sessions to be an open discussion where you can collect recommendations or suggestions on how your workers can enhance their work environment. In addition to spending time on construction safety, which many companies have done a good job of addressing, focusing on personal health and well-being should also become a priority.

4 — Provide health advice and guidance

3 — Don’t only provide rest areas, promote breaks All employees have the right to a safe, comfortable space where they can rest and recharge throughout the workday. Because construction is physically demanding and strenuous in nature, the importance of rest is even more vital. Regular and frequent breaks allow workers to re-energize, rest their eyesight (especially for crane and forklift drivers), and rest their bodies. With many construction teams working long days, providing a quiet, comfortable rest space can impact productivity and morale very positively.

Working in construction can be extremely tough on the body and often takes its toll on physical health. Although the overall number of smokers is going down, construction remains one industry where tobacco use remains high. Not only does smoking hinder productivity, it is an incredibly unhealthy habit that affects those who use tobacco as well as those around them. While it is impossible to force someone to quit tobacco use, offer healthy alternatives like fruits and other snacks.

2 — Try a buddy system to ease in new employees Partnering new recruits with more experienced employees does more than just keep them safe while they’re still learning; it also ensures that everybody has a chance to find their place within the group. Construction health is about more than just the physical. Emotional well-being and social interaction are just as essential, so companies should do their best to encourage long term members to take on greater responsibility. With plenty of construction workers having to go through various contract jobs, they are often thrown into a new environment fairly often. Being constantly unfamiliar with your coworkers and surroundings can be an emotional and mental burden for individuals. One way to curb this is by using your senior staff’s experience to guide and educate new hires.

5 — Walk the walk, and emphasize the importance of health and wellness Despite providing a countless number of resources to promote the importance of health, it is ultimately up to workers themselves to take action. However, as a business owner, manager or supervisor, if you are proactive in promoting the importance of health and wellness, it is likely that your subordinates will follow your lead. By making an effort to change your habits and make health and wellness a top priority for yourself, you create the potential to positively influence workers through leading by example.

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The 5 Qualities of an Effective Construction Project Manager

By CONSTRUCTION WORLD, constructionworld.org, @const_world_org

Construction project managers are often tasked with balancing a variety of duties at once. They are often responsible for overseweing the entire jobsite, but most importantly, must be able to manage and supervise a unique combination of individuals. These projects, whether big or small, rely on construction project managers to provide leadership, coordinate tasks and oversee the completion of the entire project. For a construction manager to be successful, these five qualities below will ensure that each task on the jobsite runs effectively and efficiently.

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1 — Excellent Communication

2 — Ability to Delegate Tasks

3 — Ability to Prioritize Activities

An effective construction project manager should possess excellent communication skills. They must be able to communicate clearly and confidently, to create stronger relationships between workers and managers. This will enable skilled workers, employees and construction personnel to perform their tasks to the best of their abilities. Also, project managers must communicate with team members frequently and on a consistent basis to ensure everyone is on the same page and working towards a common goal. This may help in preventing unnecessary delays in the project so that each task is completed on time.

An effective construction manager should be able to assign tasks to different workers based on their specific capabilities and specialized skills. This will ensure that everyone on the jobsite is given work that best aligns with their particular skill set, not only benefiting the worker, but the entire project as well. A good project manager is also capable of delegating leadership and supervisory roles to others, which helps them oversee specific areas on the jobsite. Great managers acknowledge that they cannot do the entire job on their own, and entrusting other capable leaders will help facilitate the project. In addition to delegating tasks to skilled workers, managers must provide the appropriate timeframe for a given project, which allows employees to maximize their productivity.

Construction projects are multifaceted and complex processes that involve a number of different activities and specialized workers. Understanding the importance of these activities is essential for the success of any given project. An effective construction manager must lay out the most optimal work schedule and execute the plan to the best of their abilities. In many instances however, unforeseen circumstances, like unpredictable weather or logistical issues may arise. In these cases, project managers must assess their new situation and be able to re-prioritize their activities to ensure the project stays on track. Failure to adjust to these circumstances may derail the progress already made.

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017


4 — Value Teamwork

5 — Possess Problem Solving Skills

Final Thoughts

In most large scale projects, an entire team is necessary for its completion, and construction is no different. A good project manager acknowledges this, and regards teamwork as an integral part of the construction process. Not only does this include managing the specific tasks, but also ensures that the entire jobsite operates with values of collaboration and cooperation in mind. By doing this, a more positive atmosphere will be achieved, which boosts team morale and increases productivity among all workers.

In the course of any construction project, problems and obstacles are bound to occur. An effective construction manager should be equipped with excellent problem solving skills to properly address any issue that may arise. More importantly, project managers will be able to predict and forecast what problems a project may encounter, and have multiple options and solutions ready. These problems include everything from weather issues, delivery delays and even personal issues amongst team members. A good construction manager is able to devise strategies that are specific to a particular project and tailored to a unique group of individuals.

The work of a construction project manager is extremely complex and multi-dimensional. Not only are these five skills good to keep in mind, they are essential for the success of any project. Apart from the technical capabilities and skills associated with construction, a project manager must be welcoming and approachable to create an atmosphere that workers enjoy being a part of. Dedication to both work-related and personal development is an integral part of what makes a good construction manager. These five qualities will provide a superior work experience and positive environment for not only managers but for all working on the jobsite as well.

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10 Ways

to Attract & Retain Millennial Engineers By TOMMY REED, VP of Technology, Bliley Technologies, Inc., www.bliley.com, @BlileyTech

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ur workforce is going through one of the biggest transformations ever. Of course, we’re talking about the retirement of the Baby Boomer generation and the rise of the Millenials. Just like every generation before it, the millennial generation requires a special approach to empower them to do their best work. To other generations, millennials have gotten a bit of a bad rep, but the truth is, they’re not bad, just different. Millennials grew up in a world that was very different from that of the parents. Sometimes called the ‘connected’ generation, millennials have spent the majority of their lives hyperconnected, thanks first to the internet, then mobile devices, and ultimately smartphones. They grew up with their own unique set of values and beliefs and expectations about what their jobs should be like. As an employer, it is important to keep in mind these expectations in order to effectively recruit and retain millennials. Here are 10 simple tips companies can use to build an attractive destination for millennial engineers.

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1 — Establish a Personal Connection

5 — Trust Their Intelligence

8 —Value Individuality

Millennial engineers care about who they work with and wish to see the company as more than a faceless, money making entity. Try to connect to your employees on a personal level so they feel part of a dynamic community of like-minded individuals.

Millennials have collected an unfair tag of being shallow, when they are in fact the most well-educated generation to date, with a keen understanding of global trends. Allow them to exercise their intellect in the pursuit of their work.

2 — Project Shared Values

6 — Be Open and Honest

If there is one thing millennial engineers hate, it's being made to feel like mindless robots, only capable of performing the same task day after day until retirement. Learn to recognize and acknowledge individual talents and the value they add to your company. Create opportunities for your employees to stretch outside of their 9 to 5 responsibilities.

Prove to them that your company cares about current events of the world and the collective values of humanity. This includes supporting charities and taking an active interest in the local community. At the end of the day, millennials want to contribute to something bigger than themselves.

Millennial engineers believe they have a right to know about the kind of work their company is involved in, and greatly value and appreciate transparency at the workplace. One of the quickest ways to repel millennials is to make them feel like they’re being lied to or kept in the dark.

3 — Prioritize Continuous Learning

7 — Stop Thinking Entirely in Terms of Money

Millennial engineers understand that the best learning occurs during practical, hands-on projects that allow them to be challenged and to continually learn new skills. Encourage experimentation and rapid prototyping to make them feel most empowered.

4 — Create an Atmosphere That Respects Individuality Don't try to tie your engineers down to arbitrary rules and regulations, but allow them to create their own niche within the workplace.

Previous generations may have been satisfied simply with increasing paychecks, but the present generation understands there is more to life than making money. They look for jobs that allow them to achieve greater worklife balance. To many millennials, compensation is a “hygiene factor;” above a certain point, adding more won’t increase motivation anymore that it already is… like brushing your teach 12 times a day isn’t any better than brushing after every meal.

9 —Foster Team Spirit In order to feel closer to their teammates and foster a feeling of community, encourage and coordinate team-building exercises that allow millennial engineers to get to know other employees throughout the company. Such exercises also help improve work efficiency and increase productivity because they foster greater interdepartmental collaboration.

10 —Offer Interesting Challenges Millennial engineers wish to work in a company that offers them a challenge and pushes the limits of their skill set and knowledge. Try to give them projects that require a different approach, and an out-ofthe-box solution.

Millennial engineers are seeking companies that understand their 21st-century dreams and aspirations, and are willing to work with them to make those dreams a reality. Evolving the company structure to meet their expectations can help you find bright and talented young engineering minds that view the world with energy and optimism, and can add great value to your enterprise. If you're a millennial engineer seeking an opportunity to work for a firm that values your unique capabilities and mindset, contact Bliley Technologies to learn about our current openings.

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How to Prepare for a New Generation of Construction Workers By MICHAEL SHOMBERG, Global Vice President – Construction & Real Estate Solutions, SAP SE

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here is a changing of the guard in construction. Construction workers, like the rest of the U.S. population, are aging. In 2008, the average construction worker was 40.4 years old, compared with 36 in 1985. More than 40% of construction workers are baby boomers nearing retirement. That figure increases to 54% for construction managers. The construction industry is at a crossroads. The generation with decades of real-life experience is retiring, and a new generation of inexperienced, but digitally native workers is entering the construction industry. This shift in workforce skill sets and experience presents unique challenges and opportunities. This shift in experience and skill sets is playing out against the backdrop of profound digital disruption in the construction industry. As a new generation enters the workforce and more experienced craftsmen retire, there is an urgent need to compensate for this experience gap. Capturing and utilizing best practices can no longer be just a goal: it must be reality. Otherwise accidents, rework, and delays will become more commonplace. On the flip side, technology-savvy millennials have little patience for manual, paper-based processes. Construction companies face a major trade-off between employees with deep industry experience (baby boomers) and employees with native technology expertise (millennials). The die is cast: with baby boomers retiring, construction companies must act now to both capture this knowledge before it is lost and appeal to a younger generation of workers with a digitized workplace.

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Working harder, accomplishing less: How workforce changes impact construction Complexity is the enemy of workforce engagement. People are working harder than ever but are not necessarily accomplishing more. Organizational complexity is driving costs up and slowing down progress. At the same time, a shifting workforce is disrupting production. Contingent workers – provisional workers, independent contractors, or consultants that work on a temporary basis – have become commonplace. Eighty-three percent of executives indicate they’re increasingly using contingent workers. Only 34% of executives feel that they’ve made progress in building a workforce that can meet future business goals. Worse, only 30% of executives say their companies give special attention to the particular wants and needs of millennials. That’s bad news for companies that are increasingly dependent on savvy millennial talent recruitment.

over 50%

of the workforce will be from the millennial generation by 2020

THREE ISSUES MUST BE ADDRESSED: CHANGING OF THE GUARD. Over 50% of the workforce will be from the millennial generation by 2020. In the next five to 10 years, as more skilled workers reach retirement age, the millennial generation will dominate the workforce and demand new technological tools versus manual, paper-based processes. CONTINGENT LABOR IS ON THE RISE. To drive agility and lower fixed costs, companies are turning more and more to contractors and service providers. Competing with other industries for the most talented engineers will require new tools and technology. In addition, contractors need to track the compliance and safety records of these workers. COMPLEXITY IS ON THE RISE. Companies do business in more countries across many more channels. Products and services are becoming more complex. Regulations are changing by the day, and understanding the requirements in new markets is critical.

Next steps towards a new generation of construction workers Construction companies must improve total workforce productivity. This includes digitizing best practices and onthe-job expertise from by boomers prior to their retirement. This also includes the use of analytics for smarter recruiting and onboarding, managing performance goals, and fostering career development for millennials. The key is powering digital transformation through strategy alignment, opportunity assessment, solution roadmaps, value realization, and governance. For example, construction companies are using total workforce management suite tools to optimize and engage their workforce while providing advanced analytics. Other technology supports workforce recruitment and onboarding by simplifying work and ensuring regulatory compliance. Still other innovations manage a flexible workforce lifecycle from recruiting to onboarding, performance, compensation, and learning – all in one place. But most of all, smarter apps with better user experience enable the workforce to easily access the right information across any device and through a dramatically simplified user experience. Globalization, shifts in workforce composition, and changing demographics are affecting the way companies approach project execution and facility management. As construction companies respond to the new demands of a digital marketplace, addressing gaps in workforce knowledge and expertise are essential for long-term success.

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THE WOMENInIN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING >> MAY 2017 TheEUROPEAN European Women Construction & Engineering AwardsAWARDS | MAY 2016


The Future of Architecture and Construction is All About

Virtual Reality By RICHARD VAN HOOIJDONK, Trendwatcher & Futurist, www.richardvanhooijdonk.com, www.richardvanhooijdonk.com/en/e-books, @rvhooijdonk

p.18 — The future of architecture – unprecedented possibilities p.19 — Architectural engineering made easy p.20 — Virtual reality is revolutionising construction p.24 — The traditional job-site walk’ will soon’ become a thing of the past THE EUROPEAN WOMEN INEuropean CONSTRUCTION AWARDS >> MAY 2017 The Women&InENGINEERING Construction & Engineering Awards

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magine an artificial world that you can observe, walk through, reach out to touch objects and see everything around you respond in real time. This is immersive virtual reality and these spaces are created using a combination of computer graphics, wireless tracking technology, headsets, HD projectors, polarised glass and more, all working together to create interactive and real-life experiences. The world of 3D virtual design and engineering is a fast growing field and there’s some seriously forward thinking happening in these fields.

Virtual reality technology has seen rapid developments in recent years and this is most apparent in the architectural, engineering and construction industry. Every design will soon be made using virtual reality; enabling the user to fully immerse himself in a 1:1-scale, 3D (BIM) model which can be manipulated and provides an incredibly accurate sense of presence in a space that’s yet to be built.

The future of architecture – unprecedented possibilities

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Within five years, virtual architecture will be as convincing as the real thing. Ty Hedfan (meaning: ‘hovering house’), is a house in Wales that was designed by Featherstone Young Architects. Using plans and photos found on the Internet, Oliver Demangel, Design Director at London based 3D-imaging company IVR Nation, created a 90% accurate VR model of the house. This model shows how virtual reality will revolutionise how architects work. In the demo of Ty Hedfan, the visitor is able to open and close doors, switch the lights on and off and reposition objects. You can also change materials such as wall paper and flooring and experiment with all kinds of environmental elements such as lighting, weather and surroundings. With virtual reality, you can create a series of walk-through movies of a building, but you need a VR headset such as the Oculus Rift to really get an idea of how convincing the virtual model is. Architects who have used 3D headsets say it’s like a full immersion that completely tricks the brain. Demangel says “virtual reality will become an essential tool for architects. This technology is going to be so precise, you’re going to be like a magician. You’ll be able to change the world around you like a god. When architectural VR tech matures, it’s going be more powerful than cocaine.”it’s going be more powerful than cocaine.”


Architectural engineering made easy Areas where construction is to take place need to be surveyed; government codes and environmental factors need to be taken into consideration. Before construction starts, the structural design of a building needs to be safe and the engineer must make sure the design accounts for movements and forces caused by external factors such as weight, wind and temperature. With virtual reality, a site can be surveyed remotely using a drone and a VR headset. This will enable the engineer to carry out a physical survey of the property or the building site. VR can help the engineer with 1:1 scale of interior spaces to survey the location of building systems such as such as HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), electrical, plumbing, fire and lightening protection as well as architectural acoustics.

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Virtual reality is revolutionising construction

The construction industry is known for having very low profit margins and low levels of efficiency. Building a construction project in a virtual reality environment can be extremely useful in this industry. Within a VR space, teams are able to test out a number of stages in the building process without the cost and time factors of regular, real life testing and it will help reduce construction errors. The final structures can be rendered in 3D and the construction workers can experience and explore the space as they would in real life. Another important factor of the construction process is the fact that the viability of an architectural design needs to be tested thoroughly. Up until recently, the viability of a structure could only be tested through scale models and human judgement. As scale models can’t completely simulate the environmental factors that a structure is subjected to and human judgment can be inaccurate and flawed, virtual reality offers incredible possibilities. Below is a list of virtual reality tools that are set to revolutionise the architecture, engineering and construction space and will completely disrupt the workflow in this industry.

01 / PrioVR motion capture device The motion capture device PrioVR helps you experience a VR environment through natural body movements instead of using a keyboard and a mouse. PrioVR is perfect for virtually opening doors, demolishing walls, moving cranes around or building in real time. The device works via body sensors that transmit information about your body’s movements back to the VR software.

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02 / Matterport 3D camera and capture app for iPad The fast and portable Matterport Pro 3D-camera and capture app for iPad is able to scan a space of 90 square metres within half an hour, producing high-quality immersive 3D-models. Matterport’s distribution and management platform allows you to share your 3D-models with others in your team. Using the Matterport Cloud, your 3D spaces can be viewed from anywhere in the world on mobile and desktop devices.

03 / Google Glass VR headset Google Glass runs Google applications as well as many other third-party applications and displays these on a headset. Glass uses natural language instructions such as ‘take photo’, ‘record video’, ‘how tall is that building’, to easily control the device. It displays maps and enables you to share photos and videos. The device opens big doors for architecture and construction. Imagine walking down the street and being able to tell the size of buildings and angular distances between architectural features. If you are going to be designing a new building or even a remodel, you will also want to get a sense of the area in which your creation will be built – which is all possible with Google Glass.

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04 / Roto motorised chair This spinning chair makes virtual reality even more real. With the Roto motorised chair, you can explore a virtual reality environment in various directions, without cables tangling. Instead of using your head to navigate a space, the Roto chair enables the user to rotate and turn around in a VR environment, which is ideal for coordination meetings or for moving around a space in Navisworks.

06 / 3DiO virtual immersive environment

05 / VRSCA – simulating without the lag The VRSCA, developed by Pocketcake, is three times more powerful than your average high-performance computer and enables eight people to experience virtual reality simulations simultaneously, wearing VR headsets such as the Oculus Rift. Not many computers are equipped to handle the vast volumes of data in a typical VR simulation file. VRSCA, however, is capable of processing models at eighty frames per second. A large model with dynamic lighting and defined interior would certainly make the average high-powered computer crash. VRSCA, however, runs the simulation without overheating or lag and is even capable of remotely hosting up to 58 viewers in different locations.

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As global teams are more and more prevalent, researchers at Stanford CIFE have created a virtual, immersive meeting place which is sure to be a breakthrough in the architecture, engineering and construction industry. The VR environment is based on the idea of an Obeya, the Japanese term for ‘big room’ or ‘war room’. 3DiO is a refreshing change for anyone who has ever attended a long and boring BIM coordination meeting. Even though the 3DiO is still in its early creation stages, it’s definitely worth keeping an eye on.


07 / 3D Laser scanner With a 3D laser scanner, laser beams are used for measuring the distance of practically any point in virtually each direction and in any type of environment. The point and distance data gathered via the scanner can be used to create 3D-models. The 3D-laser scanner has endless applications, including environmental assessment, engineering, architecture and construction.

08 / Touchable holograms As a result of smart engineering by the Bristol University’s research team, virtual reality will soon be expanding to include touch. Imagine being able to feel different textures, making it easier to choose exactly the right materials for your interior design project. Using this technology, schlepping around heaps of samples and showroom material will soon be a thing of the past – a ‘touchable’ holographic projection will do the trick.

09 / Microsoft HoloLens With Microsoft’s HoloLens you can use augmented reality to create 3D objects within a real live space – as opposed to virtual reality, which focuses on virtual experiences. It does this by using light to create holographic images. The HoloLens is also the first holographic computer that runs Windows 10. It is also completely untethered; no PC connection, phones or cables required. HoloLens delivers a mixed reality of physical and digital worlds and enables you to pin holograms in a real environment.

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10 / Daqri Smart Helmet The Daqri smart helmet is similar to what Microsoft HoloLens and Google Glass are able to do, but Daqri is perfectly suited to industrial applications. With inertial measurement tools, high resolution depth sensors and 360-degree navigation cameras, the helmet creates an incredible augmented reality experience to help people on the jobsite to complete their projects faster and more efficiently.

The traditional ’job-site walk’ will soon become a thing of the past

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Virtual reality makes it possible to convert building and architectural projects into a 3D-environment which is extremely useful for seeing the space and proportions instead of having to imagine them. Firms can fly drones around, lasers can scan an area, upload the information to a virtual reality headset, giving the traditional ‘job-site walk’ a completely different meaning. When it comes to construction, making any type of alteration once a building is under construction is not only time consuming but very expensive as well. With virtual reality, changes can easily be made before the actual construction work has begun. Projects can become completely interactive as you walk around and observe the recreated environments with hyper-realistic finishes. Virtual reality offers endless possibilities in terms of interacting with a project. With a single gesture you can hide, create or modify walls, windows, doors, light conditions, furniture and decorative items.


Architectural Technology the technology of architecture

The Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists is the lead international qualifying body for Architectural Technology

Find out more at

www.ciat.org.uk

City of Lights, Brewer Smith Brewer Gulf, CIAT Group Membership Practice

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Seven Rail Technology Trends Set to Shape Our Industry in 2017 By LUKE UPTON, Editor, SmartRail World, @SmartRailWorld

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017


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he old Chinese phrase 'may you live in interesting times' is often used in January, and has perhaps never been more fitting than at the start of this year. By any standards 2016 was a year of much upheaval, and its worth remembering that a lot of its dramas are yet to come to fruition... 2017 is by any measure going to be an ‘interesting' one but, putting aside political, cultural or environmental concerns, the past year did see its share of important technological breakthroughs for the rail and metro industry. One thing that always astounds when looking at recent developments, is not just the change but the pace of the change. The digitalization of rail has quickened possibilities, new entrants to the market are not respecting traditional timelines and operators are beginning to enjoy these shortened time-scales. Start-ups are shaking-up what has been considered an at times conservative industry, while larger companies are adapting and consolidating in response. If they don’t, they risk going out of business. So what do we expect from the new year? 2016 did much to damage the prediction business (Trump, Brexit, Leicester City, the Chicago Cubs, etc.) but our Editor Luke Upton, is going to give it a try. There’s a myriad of rail technology trends that he’s watching, but here’s seven that he thinks you should keep an eye on…

◀ Passenger Hyperloop™ Capsule by Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HTT)

1. The real IoT – the Internet of Trains A buzzword long featured in lists like these, and a concept familiar to those of us in rail, expect to see some major advancements on this front in 2017. The Internet of Things (IoT) enables metros, passenger and freight services to use sensors, Machine2Machine learning, the old favourite 'Big Data' analytics, cloud computing and other tech to gather and analyse information from a wide variety of sources and data streams. What is changing now is the pace, accuracy and decreased cost of analysing this data. It is getting cheaper and easier to now use this to help drive efficiencies, better manage operations and from this potentially offer new passenger focussed services. IoT really offers a world of opportunities for the industry and the solutions providers that sell into it. And across all departments, not just IT but also engineering, maintenance, signalling, communications, ticketing and on-board experience. All sectors of the industry will need to ensure they are fully tapped into the potential of the digital revolution, a revolution that has now become the mainstream.

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2. Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) both get real Both these areas logged major steps forward in 2016 and are set to grow further this year. For decades a favourite of sci-fi films and TV shows, last year saw the launch of the Oculus Rift, a virtual reality headset priced at just $599, making VR both accessible and affordable. And who can forget the brief Pokémon Go AR game mania that struck the world, including the rail industry, last year seeing over 100 million downloads in the process. In rail too we also saw genuine, tangible progress, with industry giant Bombardier developing its ‘virtual manufacturing’ technology which allowed designers to create a 3-D model of a product and to also virtually test the efficiency of its performance. "This way, development and installation steps can be accelerated, optimized or done away with entirely,” explained Helmut Dietz, Head of Digital Manufacturing at Bombardier Transportation. Deutsche Bahn have been working with the team at Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HTT) to develop augmented reality windows on their 'Innovation Train'. Whilst in Boston in 2016 Keolis Commuter Services, which has operated the MBTA deployed smart glasses by AMA XPertEye which use “augmented reality lite” and link staff in the field, with technicians at the maintenance headquarters. Images can be transmitted from the glasses back to base and the idea is that the office-based colleagues can offer advice without having to travel to the site of the problem, saving time and money for the company and stopping possible delays for passengers.

3. Intelligent Apps The world already loves apps. In 2009, approximately 2.52 billion were downloaded globally, this year the number is expected to reach 268.69 billion. And now apps can be built that use both historical and real-time data to make predictions and decisions and deliver a personalized experience for users. This new category of apps includes technologies like virtual personal assistants and has a clear link to rail and metro when it comes to booking tickets, organising travel and making the user aware of changes or delays to schedules. They could also be a part of on-board for both passengers and staff offering a real time and accurate view (thanks to our old friend Big Data) of the journey and improving customer experience.

4. More cyber-security breaches Almost all industries suffered from cyber-crime and high-profile hacks in 2016. Perhaps, most prominently the Russian hack of the Democratic National Committee and ensuing leaked e-mails, which some saw as helping sway the election towards Donald Trump. And our industry was no different, with the ransomware attack on the San Francisco Municipal Transport Agency in November, which took all the network’s ticketing systems offline on one of the busiest shopping days of the year a stark reminder of current vulnerabilities. Rail and metro operators are susceptible on two fronts to cyber threats; losing control of the operational aspect of the trains themselves and of the increasingly large data they harvest be it of a technical, passenger or financial nature. Network Rail, the owner and operator of most of the UK rail infrastructure acknowledged the threat stating; “We know that the risk [of a cyber-attack will increase as we continue to roll out digital technology across the network.” And these vulnerabilities are coming from a wide variety of sources, it’s estimated that 90% of IoT devices and unsecured, and one industry insider recently told me that a UK train had been accessed through an unsecured coffee machine on-board. The battle to keep ahead of the cyber-criminals will be a big part of 2017 and beyond. 28

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017


5. It's twins! Digital twins... Okay, perhaps this is a bit of a step forward for 2016, but this is something that by 2020 we’ll see becoming more mainstream and expect to see progress over the next 12 months. So what’s a digital twin? It’s in effect a software model of a physical thing (or system) which can be used to analyse and simulate real world conditions, responds to changes to the original and improve operational performances. Of particular interest for rail and metro, digital twins can help create a deeper understanding and assessment of maintenance, and bring the work of engineers and data scientists closer together. The giant Crossrail (on completion to be known as the Elizabeth Line) in London has a digital twin model of the whole network and these virtual depictions of physical assets combined with digital representations of facilities, systems and environments will increasingly offer a detailed virtual view of the real world.

6. Disruptors keep on disrupting To quote a popular meme seen almost daily on LinkedIn: "Uber, the world’s largest taxi company, owns no vehicles. Facebook, the world’s most popular media owner, creates no content. Alibaba, the most valuable retailer, has no inventory. And Airbnb, the world’s largest accommodation provider, owns no real estate. Something interesting is happening." High profile companies like Uber, Lyft, Ola, Gett and their ilk, have in a short period already shaken up the personal transport landscape. At their heart (along with that of Airbnb) is an ability to leverage spare capacity, monetize it and then expand quickly without large investment. Capacity and investment are two of the biggest challenges in public transport. What will emerge this year to further aid this challenge… or damage public transport? The cost of an Uber is sometime already comparable with public transport. What happens when it becomes cheaper to be chauffeur driven than hop on the train?

7. China are making allies We’ve all closely followed the growth of Chinese rail these past few years, and the amazing statistics that have come with it (more high-speed rail lines in the past decade than the rest of the world ever, etc.) but one change we’ve seen in 2016 and will see more in 2017, is the growth of alliances and partnerships between Chinese firms and Western companies. Anyone who attended Innotrans in Berlin in September couldn’t have failed to spot the huge Chinese exhibition spaces. But perhaps the most interesting development was the announcement of the partnership between China Railway Rolling Stock Corporation (CRRC), the world’s largest rolling stock manufacturer and TÜV NORD the German technical service, with co-operation aiming sharpen the Chinese firm’s adherence to international safety standard (pictured above). And the end of 2016 saw the announcement that State railway group China Railway Corp and Hong Kong-based international transport operator MTR Corp signed a letter of intent to explore strategic co-operation ‘within and outside of’ China aiming to support the Chinese rail industry’s ‘Go-Global’ strategy. The partnership will aim to work across sectors including high speed, rail operations, transport-related integrated property development and staff training. Who needs rivals when you can have allies?

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2017 Judges, the Judging Process and Speakers

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Alastair Smyth Group Engineering Director at J. Murphy & Sons Limited

Amanda Fisher Managing Director, Balfour Beatty, Living Places

2017 Judges 32

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

Alexander Naraian President Elect, CIAT — Alison Baptiste Director, Flood and Coastal Risk Management, Environment Agency

— Andy Downey Partner Elliott Wood Partnership — Ann Watson Chief Executive, Semta

Alison Wring Director, Faithful + Gould —

Benita Mehra President, Women's Engineering Society

Amanda Clack President Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors & Partner EY

Brian Eckersley Director, Eckersley O'Callaghan


Dr Deborah Pullen MBE Group Research Director, BRE —

Louise Brooke-Smith Director at Brooke Smith Planning & past Global President, RICS

Professor Janice Barton Professor of Experimental Mechanics, University of Southampton

Edel Christie Global Solutions Leader, Program Management Arcadis

Louise Williamson Managing Director, Facilities Management, BAM FM

Rachel Cook Practice Director UK & Europe, Transportation Civils SE, Atkins

Elizabeth Rickard Financial Director & Head Engineer, Highwire

Marci Bonham Managing Director & General Manager, Hilti Ireland

— Rina Goldenberg Lynch CEO, Voice At The Table

Emma Head Corporate Health and Safety Director, HS2

Mark Jaggard H&S Director, Bouygues UK

Roberta Downey Partner, Hogan Lovells International

Mary Humiston Group Director, Global Human Resources, Rolls Royce

Hiro Aso Head of Transport and Infrastructure, Gensler

— Mary Rose Griffiths Partner, Gardiner & Theobald

Jack Commandeur Chief Operating Officer, Hitachi Rail Europe

Matthew Cova Operations Director at Skanska

Silvia Boschetto Director, Silvakey and Chair, Equality & Diversity Steering Group, IMechE

James Stewart Chairman, Global Infrastructure, KPMG

Michael Graham Executive Chairman, Graham

Michèle Dix CBE Managing Director, Crossrail 2

Helen Barrow Director Advisory, EY

John Clunes Region Security Director Jacobs Engineering — Bridget Bartlett Deputy Chief Executive, The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) — Caroline Buckingham Director, HLM — Caroline May Partner, Head of Environment, health and safety, Norton Rose Fulbright

Juliette Stacey Group CEO, Mabey

Neesha Gopal Regional Director Façade Engineering, Meinhardt UK

Karen Jones Independent Director

Niall Healy Managing Director, Healycornelius Design Consultancy

— Karin Mueller Founder, Liebfrog Coaching — Kate Beauchamp Group Chief Legal Officer, Mabey

Dana Skelley OBE Director of Asset Management at Transport for London

Katy Ghahremani Partner, Make Architects —

Linda Muzikants Project Field Engineering Manager, Rail Systems Bechtel

David Burge Associate Director, BuroHappold Engineering

— Patrick Flaherty CEO UK & Ireland, Aecom — Peter Jacobs Managing Director Construction and Integrated Solutions Wilson James

judges

2017

Sean Tompkins Chief Executive, RICS —

— Simon Kirby COO, Rolls Royce — Simon Newton Head of Engineering, London Underground — Stephanie Pulles Head of Corporate Responsibility, Bouygues — Steve Hoskins Former Director of Project Management (Retired) Amec Foster Wheeler — Sue Archer Director, Gleeds Management Services — Ted Newell Associate 2degrees —

Tony O'Donnell Engineering Director at Morgan Sindall

Philippa Oldham Head of Transport & Manufacturing, Institution Of Mechanical Engineers

Virginia Rammou Senior Lecturer, University of Westminster

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judges 2017 34

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2017

judges THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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The Judging Process The Judges A group of 58 senior executives from various industries were carefully selected as an evaluation panel of independent judges. Their objective was to review the nominations and interview each of the finalists.

Why An Interview With The Judges? A face-to-face interview allows the judges to further assess each finalist’s skills, strategies and process etc. The interview also complements their review of the submitted nomination forms.

The Judging Day The judges were organised into 19 groups; each group was made up of 3 judges and interviewed a number of finalists within their assigned categories. Nomination forms and any supporting documents were reviewed by the judges prior to a nominee being selected as a finalist. Each nomination was evaluated and scored out of a total of 5 points. The next stage of the process was a face to face interview with the judges.

The Finalists Time With The Judges This was an opportunity for the finalists to engage the judges by telling them the story of their success. Each judge awarded points across the same criteria. After the interview, all finalists answered one final question: “why they should win the award in their category?” All 58 judges scored each finalist on the final question. Each finalist’s overall score was the sum of the scores from the interview with the 3 judges in their category plus the scores from all judges on the final question. The finalist with the highest score in each category was selected as the winner in that category.

The Most Distinguished Winner Of 2017 This award is for the finalist who impressed the judges the most and scored the highest among all the finalists.

FAQs WHAT DO THE JUDGES EVALUATE? WHO ARE THE JUDGES? WHERE DO THEY COME FROM? Zars Media invites judges from countries all over Europe. Judges may be executives with social innovation expertise, business people, educators and university administrators and leading practitioners in the field.

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Judges will review all the entries within their assigned categories and give their scores as per the guidelines. This will include reviewing the nomination forms and any confidential supplemental documents and project information that is included in the application.

HOW DO YOU CHOOSE THE JUDGES?

IS THE JUDGING BY INVITATION ONLY, OR CAN I APPLY TO BE A JUDGE?

We usually look for executives with backgrounds relevant to the event and with more than 15 years’ experience. We actively recruit and also take suggestions from partners, mentors and past judges.

We recruit judges after screening their profiles using LinkedIn and other news sources. We are happy to consider suggestions. If you'd like to be considered, or suggest future judges, please email judges@wiceawards.com

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the judging day 38

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27th

of april 2017 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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2017 Speakers 40

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

— Alison Waterworth Senior Engineer Transportation, Aecom — Athena Livesey Principal Engineering Geologist, Civils, Structures & Ground Engineering, WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff — Bruce Lascelles Director – Environment Planning, Arcadis — Carol Stitchman Technical Director, Rail Sector WSP|PB


2017

speakers

— Casey Rutland UK Director of Digital, Royal HaskoningDHV — Cristina Lanz Azcarate Director and Co-Founder, atelier EURA — Cristina Savian Customer Success Manager, Autodesk EMEA VP Autodesk Leadership Board — Francesca Berriman MBE CEO, Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists

— Jonathan Jarritt Director, Strategic Consulting & Technology, Amey — Gill How Director Buonacorsi Consulting — Maria Coulter Construction Coach — Richard Chapman-Harris Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Manager Mott MacDonald

— Robert Baker Senior Partner, Global Client Director at Mercer, Board Member PWN Global — Ruth Shilston Senior Engineer, RWDI — Sharon Duffy Head of Station Systems Engineering, LU Crossrail and Stations — Tim Fitch Director Invennt Ltd

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ARE YOU WIDITT?


COMING SOON


10 Most Profitable Construction Jobs in 2017 By LUKE UPTON, Editor, SmartRail World, @SmartRailWorld

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Despite being hit hard from the Great Recession, the last few years have shown us that construction jobs are on the rise. Not only has the industry recovered from its worst unemployment dip in the postwar era, there are a number of construction careers that are proving to be viable longterm options. The construction industry remains incredibly diverse, with jobs available in the commercial, industrial and residential sectors. In addition, renovation, repair and maintenance careers have become a consideration for entrepreneurs or tenured construction professionals. With so options to choose from, we have narrowed down 10 of the most profitable and highly-demanded construction careers for 2017.

or electrical. A bachelor’s degree in a related field is a good start, but couple that with accounting experience, certifications and knowledge of BIM (Building Information Modeling) make for the perfect cost estimator. In a world where budgets are shrinking, and costs are going up, cost estimators are needed now more than ever.

Construction Project Manager Construction project managers are highly demanded, but the problem lies in the number of qualified individuals available. Construction project managers are often in charge of planning, and organizing projects, while coordinating with foremen and supervisors as well. Moreover, construction managers must work with cost estimators in the overall budgeting of a project. To become eligible to become a construction manager, a bachelor’s degree in a construction-related program will suffice, in combination with years of construction experience. If you are new to the industry, this job title may be far down the line for you. Construction management is better suited for professionals who have been involved with numerous projects, have experience budgeting and have been given managerial duties. The average salary for a construction manager ranges from 90,000 to 95,000, one of the highest paid positions in the industry.

Cost Estimator The financial and accounting sectors of construction is also seeing growth, which seems to diverge from traditional blue-collar construction jobs. Cost Estimators are invaluable partners with any construction company as they can advise you on all of a project’s budget, ranging from the overall budget to the planning of each small cost. There are a number of types of cost estimators, including professionals who oversee entire projects, to ones who only focus on certain aspects of a job, like plumbing

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

Glaziers Jobs in the glazier industry are quite rare, but can be extremely profitable for the right person. Essentially, a glaziers’ main job is installing and fitting glass into windows and doors. It may sound simple, but glaziers are needed for everything from commercial high-rises to retrofitting and repairing old homes or buildings. The most job openings for glaziers are in cities and metropolitan areas. Becoming a Glazier is a skilled trade so if you select this route, apprenticeship and general installation or construction experience is your best bet.

Painter Another skilled trade you may be interested in is painting. Becoming a painter is typically an entry-level position into the construction industry, and you can do so with a GED or high school diploma. For those who want to get in construction, and are not the academic type, painting provides an ideal alternative. Rather than spending thousands of dollars on tuition fees, becoming a painter, even at a young age allows you to get paid right away


and get your foot in the door as either an independent contractor, or contract worker within a larger firm. In the four years you could be spent buried in text books and lectures, a three to four year apprentice ship that provides you with a certification.

Plumber It’s been well known that jobs in plumbing are fairly profitable, and 2017 is not different. A 3 to 5 year apprenticeship with a plumber will provide an array of skills that go far beyond the stereotypical role of a plumber. After an apprenticeship, plumbers gain knowledge in installation and repair of water and drainage systems, septic tanks and even small appliances. Furthermore, plumbers must be knowledgeable in building blueprints, and safety codes. With the wide set of skills and knowledge plumbers have, they can make an annual salary of $50,000 to $55,000 a year.

job as a mechanic can be done with a high school diploma, but to get a leg up or gather greater skills, many colleges offer an Automotive Service Technician program that can help you land an apprenticeship down the road.

Machine Operator There are many labels for this construction job, but heavy machine operator and heavy equipment operator are the most commonly used ones. Seen in all sectors of construction, like residential, commercial or infrastructure – like roads and bridges – it is common to see a heavy equipment operator nearby. These machines, like backhoes and bulldozers, are often needed for newly paved roads or new built construction sites. There are plenty of jobs in this field, the only downside would be that they are typically seasonal.

Brickmason As the economy continues to recover, the number of residential projects are also on the upswing. In addition, with a number of different types of materials available, brick remains popular because of its durability and affordability. In addition to apprenticeship in this skill trade, a certificate or degree in masonry at a technical institute is a common way to get your foot in the door.

Construction Worker Electrician Vehicle Repair Another sector seeing growth in 2017 are the mechanical trades. Anyone who owns a car knows that having a trusted mechanic is essential. The number of cars on the road only continues to increase, which also gives way for a greater need for vehicle repair workshops and mechanics. In addition, with many people leaning towards more inexpensive vehicle repair options, independent run shops are becoming more popular than dealership or manufacturer-run shops. Getting a

Electricians require a wide range of knowledge and skills that are applicable to many facets of construction. Once you are licensed, electricians are needed to lay out, assemble, install and repair electrical wiring. In addition they need to know how to control certain devices and large amounts of equipment in buildings. Because electricians are required in so many parts of the construction industry, you will be able to find jobs in electrical contracting and maintenance. If you have ample experience and expertise, becoming an independent contractor may be an option.

A construction laborer remains a profitable job, with many openings available. Without the need for formal education, it is relatively easy to enter into the construction labor force. Once you are in however, you may want to begin honing in on what specific trade, or aspect of construction you are interested in. Your first duties on a construction site may be loading and unloading materials, digging ditches, operating simple machines and cleaning up. The best strategy to move up in construction would be to gain experience in as many areas as possible with skilled trade experts like with plumbers, electricians and carpenters, which can help you focus in on what area of the industry you see yourself working in.

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Why don't we see more women in engineering? By a woman in engineering. By JESSICA GREEN, Civil Engineer, Atkins

I

have always been of the view that the huge push for gender diversity we see so frequently in engineering firms is condescending and undermining to women. I don’t need a support network when I see myself as equal. I don’t need motivational sessions from ‘empowered women’ when I see no difference between the ‘empowered women’ and the more competent of my male colleagues around me. Strong and weak people come in both genders, and by categorising ourselves as empowered, we succumb to the stale stereotype that women are weaker than men, and we degrade ourselves whilst complaining that it is the men that are degrading us. In my relatively short experience as an engineer, I have received nothing but respect from my male counterparts; the only sexism I have encountered was from another female engineer who, for some reason, did not like having another woman in the office. I felt patronised when colleagues asked how I thought they could attract more women to the firm. There isn’t an abundance of women with engineering degrees, where did they think they were going to attract them from?! Engineering was simply more for the male-minded amongst us. Recently however, whilst working on an international project with a global workforce, I specifically noticed one very alien concept: the Spanish engineers were an equal male-female balance. In fact, on researching the figures, I discovered that the UK has the lowest percentage of female engineers in the whole of Europe. Whilst I still disagree with the use of the word empowerment, I was forced to reconsider one thing; perhaps engineering isn’t for the maleminded, perhaps there is no such thing, perhaps we are simply brain-washed

by British society into thinking women shouldn’t be engineers. The Joint Council for Qualifications statistics shows girls out-performing boys in STEM subjects at GCSE, yet those choosing engineering in the UK are 90% male on average. Why are so many girls in Britain steering clear of the industry, despite early high achievement?

engineering portrayed like that? The main response when I told people I wanted to be an architect was ‘oh, seven years of studying, I’m impressed’. I wanted that; the challenge, the pride in the achievement of it, and the glamour of the exclusive Royal Institute of British Architects. In reality, it’s a three year bachelor’s degree followed by four years of

“Perhaps engineering isn’t for the male-minded, perhaps there is no such thing, perhaps we are simply brain-washed by British society into thinking women shouldn’t be engineers.” Firstly, I asked myself why I became an engineer in this climate. Truth be told, I never wanted to be an Engineer; I fell in to it through a fortunate choice of university degree. I was a high flyer at school, I excelled at maths, science and art; and I dreamt about being an architect. The idea of being an engineer never competed. I was drawn to architecture; its prestige, its glamour, and its status. We see architecture portrayed in TV and film as a highflying career choice; do we ever see

studying while you work. Engineering is more often than not a four year master’s degree and five years of onthe-job training. It should hold glamour from the exclusive engineering institutions, and even more prestige from achievement. Instead, I turned my nose up at engineering; it wasn’t prestigious enough for my academic history, I didn’t want to spend my career dressed in overalls working in tunnels, I wasn’t captured by the concept perpetrated by British society.

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The 2017 Finalists EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS 2017 IN NUMBERS

Approximately

300

NOMINATIONS

150

FINALISTS

26

WINNERS

1

DISTIGUISHED WINNER THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman

Architect

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JAYNE ROSEN

​CAROLINA DELGADO “In this process I have felt the energy and power that brings us together, an amazing group of women, pursuing what we deserve: recognition and respect as well as the right and pride of being an irreplaceable part of the incredible industry that is Construction”

"The awards have been a great experience, although I am looking forward to the day when we can simply be recognised for achievements irrelevant of our gender."

JENNIFER DE VERE-HOPKINS

JOHANN MULDOON

"Businesses should embrace the opportunity to single out female talent for awards like these, because it is rare for women to shout about their achievements themselves"

“Dream when they say you shouldn't, believe when they say you can’t, achieve what they say you won’t, love what you do and do what you love"

LAURA CARRARA-CAGNI

MARIAM AHMADI-MOGHADDAM

“A day of celebration of women in construction, a fabulous array of women of all ages, with the most varied job roles in the construction industry, encouraged to say how good they are, list their achievements and express passion for their jobs”

“Construction, architecture and engineering is an inspirational field that gives me the strength and conviction to do my work every day. I strive to make a difference, to create change and be an example of female empowerment”

SAMANTHA DEAN "The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today"

SANJA TIEDEMANN “It has been an honour and privilege to have shared this day with so many brilliant women who have made this an utterly invigorating, challenging and enjoyable experience”

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Best Woman

Architectural Technologist

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GIHAN BADI

​​CHLOE OBI “The greatest gift you can give someone is your time, because when you dedicate your time, you areoffering to give a part of your life, knowledge and experience to help, encourage and teach others”

“Receiving an award is a recognition of your achievement, but the real winning is to keep this success, perseverance to continue and never give up”

KATIE WRIGHT

MARY DAVIS

“This entire experience has had a huge impact on how I view myself and my role in both the company I work for and the industry as a whole. Thank you so much!”

“It was heart warming to hear so many women discussing the same topics in one room. Many thanks to HTA and WICE for the opportunity, however the main point is, no-one can stop women achieving but themselves”

NATASHA VERMEULEN

SEPIDEH SHAHLAZADEH

“Such an inspiring day, it’s been both an honour and a privilege to not only be recognised as an inspiration to women in construction but to share it with so many incredible and amazing ladies. The future of the construction industry is in good hands”

“I feel honoured to have been part of this process; it’s been an inspirational and a positive experience and to be recognised alongside so many other talented industry professionals, takes my breath away!”

SOLAM SIZER

STACEY TAYLOR

“What an experience! Taking part in the awards has been thoroughly enjoyable & inspirational. I have enjoyed every minute, along with the opportunity to meet so many amazing, like-minded & professional women”

“I feel privileged to have been part of such a great day surrounded by a group of amazing women it was a fantastic experience and truly inspirational”

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Best Woman

Civil Engineer

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017


​​ EMA G ARAQUE

GEMMA TEALE

“The only way to be truly satisfied is doing what you believe is great work and the only way to do great work is to love what you do. Everything else is secondary”

"She was already learning that if you ignore the rules people will, half the time, quietly rewrite them so they don't apply to you" (Terry Pratchett)

NURIA VENERO SOBREMAZAS

GENAN BINSARITI “Being a part of the infrastructure industry is both fascinating and rewarding. Nothing more satisfying than knowing that my daily job makes commuting easier for millions of rail users between London and Cardiff”

“It was inspiring to see that there are increasingly more women fighting along in this industry and I hope that the day will soon come when our presence becomes so commonplace as to make it unnecessary to highlight our role in the field”

RACHEL SKINNER

OLGA CALVO TASCÓN

"I can't wait for the day when we are judged simply as great people in construction and engineering, rather than as women. Let's not underestimate our collective power to make this change or the role that each of us is already playing to create a more diverse, relevant and attractive industry for today and tomorrow, for all the right reasons"

“Proud to be able to plan a meeting and sew a Christmas pine costume at the same time”

SAMANTHA WICKINS

SARAH FINNEGAN

"I love being part of this industry and just being able to say that I am a Civil Engineer is immensely rewarding in itself. It was humbling to be in the room with so many talented and highly regarded women Civil Engineers."

“This process has been challenging and thought provoking, just like our industry! It’s been fantastic to meet many enthusiastic women with great stories to learn from”

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Best Woman in

Construction Law

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​A MANDA CHILD

AMY CASHMAN

“The construction and engineering industry needs a diverse and dedicated workforce to tackle its many challenges and women have a very important role to play within that”

“The WICE Awards have been an amazing platform for the industry to recognise and celebrate talent. It is an honour to be a finalist amongst such accomplished women”

CATHERINE BURNS

CHARISSA SHEARS

"Being part of this process, having the opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved and what can be achieved by women working in the construction industry, has been inspirational"

"The judging day was a great opportunity to meet like-minded women and I left feeling encouraged to further promote the work women do in the industry and inspire others to do the same. The sense of "girlpower" in the room was awesome!"

KAREN TAN

LAURA DUNSTAN

“I thoroughly enjoyed the judging day and felt really proud to be amongst women in the industry who are passionate, enjoy their work, and are achieving so much in their careers. We are all an inspiration to the next generation of women in the construction industry!”

"It has been such a rewarding experience to be a part of these awards – both by meeting others who are passionate about construction but also to share in the success of all the men and women who are inspiring change in the construction industry and workplace"

SUE RYAN

THERESA MOHAMMED

"What is not to love about a career in construction law? Working with and for people who are passionate about what they do, every case is different and getting a successful outcome brings a real buzz"

“I am so proud to have been a finalist in the WICE awards and was delighted to see so many talented women from our industry obtaining the recognition they deserve.”

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Best Woman

Consultant

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FIONA BRIGGINSHAW

​​​ NNE A McNAMARA

"Never underestimate what passion, drive and commitment allows you to accomplish. It was inspiring to be in the company of so many excellent women for whom achieving success whilst challenging preconceptions is all part of their 'day job'"

“To quote a hero of mine, Nelson Mandela, “I never lose. I either win or learn”

HANNAH SPOTWOOD

JANICE WINDLE

“I have thoroughly enjoyed this process, meeting fantastic and inspirational people, building new networks and connections, I am continually inspired by the dedication and leadership in our industry”

“I am fortunate that I work in a company which supports and promotes good female engineers and felt really appreciated when I was put forward by them for an award.”

KATHERINE BRIGHT

LISA RAMMIG

“I have used this nomination process as an opportunity to reflect back on my career and think about some of my successful accomplishments and to get some feedback from colleagues and clients”

“We can make a difference by inspiring the people we work with to move the world forwards through innovation. We face many challenges - in my case, being German is a far bigger obstacle than being a woman!”

ROSEANNA BLOXHAM

VALENTINA MIREA

“Excitement, fear, anxiety and relief, just a few of the emotions felt during the judging process. An unforgettable experience that introduced me to a group of inspiring women. Congratulations to you all”

“A unique and empowering opportunity to feel appreciated for years of hard work, sacrifice and study”

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Best Woman

Contractor

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AMY MILLER

ANASTASIA SAVIDU

“It was really amazing to share a special day with so many talented women. These awards demonstrate the passion and commitment that we all have and that we are making a difference in construction and engineering”

“It is time for the construction industry to set an example for gender and racial equality. We need to celebrate our differences and take advantage of our diverse skills in order to create a beacon of light in the worryingly emerging darkness of populist thought”

BEATRIZ EIROA FRAIRE

CAROL WHITEFORD

“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek”

“The 2017 WICE awards have been an inspiring and exciting journey. I am thrilled to have been nominated, shortlisted as a finalist and to be part of raising the profile of women in the construction industry”

CLAIRE TRIBE

CLARE AMASS

“I know I picked the right career, each day is different and I am always learning something new. With the right attitude, ambition and thirst for knowledge construction is and can be what you want to make of it”

“Being a finalist and completing the judging day has given me a great confidence boost. More than ever before I want to share my career experience and promote the construction industry further”

CONCEPCION VICENTE

LOUISE CALLER

“Engineering is an amazing and rewarding career. Meeting other like-minded, talented and extraordinary women during the awards process has been an empowering experience”

“I am very proud to have been part of the 2017 WICE Awards; I have found the whole process inspirational and a highlight in my career thus far, thank you for the opportunity to have been a part of something special!” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman

Electrical & Mechanical Engineer

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ANA MARIA BAL OSUNA

ANDREIA GUERRA

"I feel really proud to have been a finalist in the WICE awards. It has been a boost to my self-confidence that makes me face the future with renewed optimism"

“As an Oriental proverb states, "Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life”

CHRISTINE BACKSHELL

ANOUSKA MARTIN "Meeting the amazing women involved in this process has shown me the future of the industry is in safe hands"

“Being an engineer is right for me. Being part of this industry and these awards has been an amazing experience, which I highly recommend”

HELENA RIVERS

LAUREN JONES

“I believe successful role models are critical for inspiring developing engineers. It has been great to meet so many inspirational women passionate about engineering”

“Inspiring the next generation of young people into engineering is a must, and doing so as a finalist in the WICE Awards 2017 is an achievement in itself. I hope this recognition inspires young people, and shows them the opportunities that the industry has to offer”

SASHA KRSTANOVIC

VERONICA KOSELEVA

"I am a great believer in diversity in and out of the workplace. Together we are making it a better place one day a time"

“It was an unforgettable experience being part of WICE awards. I have never seen so many inspiring and incredibly intelligent women in the same room”

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Best Woman in

Environment & Sustainability

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ANGELA GARDNER PLLU

ANITA MITCHELL

“Construction is a great industry to be part of. Read about the winners and be inspired to get involved!”

"I love the construction industry because what you do comes to life in such a tangible way and has the power to change our world for the betterit's an exciting industry to be a part of"

JULIA BAKER

EMMA CLIFFORD “The WICE awards journey has been such a fulfilling and affirming experience that has opened my eyes to my own capabilities and also to the inspirational careers of so many others in the construction industry”

“It was truly inspiring to be part of the WICE Awards and meet so many remarkable women working in construction and engineering”

KATHERINE IBBOTSON

LEANNE TIPPLE

“Being part of the construction industry is rewarding and challenging. If you are passionate, driven, knowledgeable and professional in your field of expertise you can achieve anything you set your mind to”

“Being part of this process has been challenging and thought provoking, allowing me the opportunity to meet inspirational women who are shaping the future of the construction industry”

LORNA HURST

MAGDALINI MAKRODIMITRI

"I always believed that one woman's success can only help another woman's success" (Gloria Vanderbilt)

"It has been an honour to be among such brilliant talented individuals and be given the opportunity to express my own vision for environmental sustainability in the UK through the WICE awards forum" THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman in

Health & Safety

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​ LANA A PATERSON

EMILY GARNETT

“After starting my career as a receptionist, I am very good evidence that giving people opportunities at work can maximize their potential”

"I am very honoured to have been nominated by my colleagues, not to mention becoming a finalist. Determination, passion and a desire to succeed have got me to where I am today - If you think you can do it, then you can"

JULIE VENABLES

KATE ROBSON

“I consider myself to be very lucky in life. I have always pursued studies and work progression in a subject I am interested in, invested in, stimulated by and challenged/rewarded by”

“I know I picked the right career, each day is different and I am always learning something new. With the right attitude, ambition and thirst for knowledge construction is and can be what you want to make of it”

MARY GRIFFIN

KATY BAGNALL

“I feel really privileged that I was nominated and shortlisted in the WICE awards 2017. Judging day was a wonderful experience, it was inspirational, exciting and a great opportunity to meet fantastic female leaders within so many different areas of the construction industry”

"Whatever you are, be a good one" (Abraham Lincoln)

SUKHY HOGWOOD

SUZANNE SMITH

"I had to pinch myself on the judging day, because I was in the presence of such remarkable women that are now part of my network. What an honour and a privilege to be part of it all!"

“I love my job and I'm honoured to have been nominated for a WICE Award. I hope that by showcasing the amazing ladies working in construction and engineering more women will be inspired to join us” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman

Project Manager

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​ NA A BECHERU

BARBARA SCHUTZ

“Let's make this ridiculously obvious – seems to be the only way!”

"The WICE award is a great opportunity to promote and recognise the role of women in construction. I'm proud to be part of it!"

FIONA BARRY

JOANNE MEANEY

“It has been a real privilege to take part in this process and I have been inspired by all of the women I have met, who are brilliant examples of the important role women play in the development of the construction and engineering industry”

“I am proud to be part of a team that continuously strives for excellence. Through hard work and dedication success is possible, and years of reliability following project upgrades will be the legacy my team and I will leave behind”

KATE BRADY

LAURA ALLISON

“I hope that my nomination and shortlisting will demonstrate to other women that a career in Construction and Engineering can be both varied and hugely rewarding”

“I enjoyed meeting so many inspiring woman on the judging day. Having the opportunity to be a part of this allowed me to reflect on my achievements to date which proved to myself that any goal can be achieved through hard work, commitment and passion”

PAULA CHANDLER “The talent we have witnessed is aweinspiring and will only offer a positive legacy for the future of the industry I love”

VIKI JAMES “The whole process has been rewarding and inspiring. The women in this competition are high calibre and I’m honoured to be amongst them”

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Best Woman

Quantity Surveyor

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​​A MANDA REAVILL

CATHERINE EVANS

“I feel privileged to have been nominated and taken part in the WICE awards. I have met so many inspirational women who are role models for the next generation of women in construction.”

“I have always believed that the best approach is simply to get on and do it”

GABY GRANT

ISLA HILL

"A good Quantity Surveyor doesn't just need professional knowledge and commercial skills, but should also be a good leader and role model"

"I love what I do and I love having the opportunity to tell people about it. I believe that the best way to encourage other women is to be the best I can be, lead by example and celebrate the achievements of other woman as mine are embraced by the women with whom I work"

LAURA PALMER

JO SMITH

“Your brilliance awaits you on the edge of your comfort zone - Panache Desai. Push the limits and breakdown the barriers. We will one day live in a world where we are ALL equal if we work together to achieve this”

"Always believe in yourself and push your boundaries in order to flourish. What a fantastic experience! Such inspiring ladies, such an inspiring day. It has been a privilege to be part of the WICE Awards 2017"

LIZZI WEBB “The entire WICE experience has been a wonderful eyeopener to the importance of women in the industry. I am privileged to be amongst finalists who are loud and proud and hugely inspirational”

SARAH TAYLOR "Work hard in silence, let success be your noise” (Frank Ocean)

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Best Young Woman in

Construction

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​​​ GNIESZKA A WISNIEWSKA

ANNA-LOUISA YIANNAKAS

“If you believe in yourself, have dedication, pride and never quit, you will be a winner. The price for victory is high, but so are the rewards!"

“To hear and learn about the challenges and achievements of other inspiring women in the construction and engineering industry was incredibly empowering.”

AURORE VERTUEUX

CHARLOTTE FRANKLIN

“I always strive to give the best of my performance in everything that I do. As my favourite scientist and philosopher was saying ‘Divide each difficulty into as many parts as is feasible and necessary to resolve it” (Descartes)

Underground construction is a demanding and challenging beast, but the successes and achievements which come with handwork and determination are addictive.

MAGDA WASIELEWSKA

LENKA VOSVRDOVA

“This is the secret of life: ... to be completely engaged with what you are doing in here and now, and instead of calling it work, realize it is play, so be a woman, have the voice, be strong and inspire others”

“Persistence is very important. You should not give up unless you are forced to give up” (Elon Musk)

MARYAM CROSSAN

ZHE WANG

“In attracting more women to construction, not only can I be an active and important member of a construction project team but I can create a legacy for many more important females to improve the industry”

“My passion for the industry extends beyond my occupation and I am determined it will make a difference for women working in construction and engineering”

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Best Young Woman

Engineer

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ELENA PEREA DIAZ

​​​​ BBY A NEAL “This experience has exposed me to so many new challenges and opportunities, I have already achieved more than I could imagine and have thoroughly enjoyed every second of the journey”

“I am always keen to learn and improve”

EMILY WOOD

JOANNA BUCKLE

“The award process has allowed me to meet other likeminded women who share the same passion and dedication for engineering. I will continue to encourage other young female engineers to join the industry and promote diversity in the workplace”

“Careers in engineering are not promoted enough or, more importantly, in the right way to young girls at school. Engineering should be promoted to girls studying maths and art at a-level as a creative and versatile industry where opportunities are rife”

NAJWA JAWAHAR

MARINE DUPAS

"There’s more to engineering than muddy boots, No cultural or religious barriers, No fears and no limits, Nothing is impossible. You just have to be a bit stubborn."

"I felt really honoured to attend to this intense and exciting event where I met talented young professionals"

SOFIA AGULLO

VANESSA QUANSAH

"The awards process was motivating and inspiring. It has given me the opportunity to meet incredible Women in Construction. "Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success." (Henry Ford)

“Nothing beats working through a challenging design where I sit on my little desk working on complex spreadsheets and developing sketches all to see it come to life when I walk around London” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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​ MY A KOERBEL

Best Woman

“Creativity, collaboration and communication are as much a part of an engineer’s skillset as technical know-how and I’m proud that my skills as a creative problem-solver have led to such a fulfilling career in the construction industry”

Structural Engineer

CLAUDIA GIL “Although I have been very committed in developing my career, my main priority is still my family”

MANOJA WEERASINGHE

GRACE RICHARDSON “This award is a fantastic opportunity to empower young structural engineers like myself to speak up and inspire women to enter into a career in structural engineering. I make it my responsibility as a practising engineer to inspire the next generation of structural engineers”

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It has been an eye-opening experience taking part in these awards and it was exciting to meet so many like-minded women. All in all the whole experience has been challenging, valuable, and inspiring – and I enjoyed every minute of it!

ROSSELLA NICOLIN

SARAH WILLIAMSON

“The construction industry is an exciting and rewarding sector! It is such a great experience to enter a building that you have designed and you feel it is part of you. We definitely need more women to be part of this and give their own unique creative contribution”

“I believe passionately in improving equality and diversity in both Engineering and Construction”

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​ LAIRE C NICHOLS

Best Woman

Construction Planner

“I am excited to see a new wave of young women being attracted to a career within Construction and Engineering, continuing to expel the myth that this is a male only environment”

DIANA GOMEZ "Being a finalist has been a great opportunity to confirm why I chose Construction. It is never boring, there is always a bigger challenge, new things to learn and great people"

MARIA GARCIA MEDIAVILLA "I am proud to be a part of these awards and proud to be an example for future generations"

ROSE MAKWARA “Determine the plan, plan the logic, build with passion and embrace the success!”

STACEY CAMPBELL “I feel very proud to have been nominated and taken part in the WICE awards. The judging day was both challenging and inspiring and in itself had a positive impact on me” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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​ NA A ASER

Best Woman in

Tunnelling & Underground Construction

“For everyone in the industry: ‘No matter how steep, deep, dark or difficult the journey is, you should never give up because there is always light at the end of the tunnel. And I am very proud to say I’ve seen that light a few times and it is really rewarding”

BETHAN HAIG "I should maybe keep a bit quieter about how much fun tunnelling is, soon everyone will want to do it!"

JUNLEY CHAN “The whole experience has been extremely insightful. It was a great opportunity to have been part of the WICE awards. The stories I heard during the judging day have given me increased motivation and passion to work hard to achieve my goals.”

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ROSER SOLER PUJOL

SOPHIE PAYNE

"Excellent experience! It was exciting to see so much talent, energy and determination during the judging day and be part of it"

"Don't ever be held back by preconceptions or challenges to you as a woman in engineering. Follow your heart, work hard and you'll be amazed at what you can achieve”

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Best Woman

Facilities Manager

​ALISON SQUIRES

FRANCESCA KAVANAGH

“I am confident to try anything once, even if I have no experience and it is out of my comfort zone”

“In societies where men are truly confident of their own worth, women are not merely tolerated but valued" (Aung San Suu Kyi)

LIBBY SIDAWAY

MELISSA LEE-JOHNSON

“I got so much more out of the awards process than I imagined. The judging day was a real opportunity to shine, to be passionate about my achievements and to network with a fantastic group of women. The new shoes were an added bonus!”

"It is a huge honour to be included as finalist, and an even greater honour knowing just how talented my fellow finalists are. I have never been quite so impressed by so many people in a single day before" THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman

Rail Engineer

CLAIRE HULSTONE

EMMA WINSTANLEY

“I am Lead Engineer on a large infrastructure project and love it! Get stuck in and enjoy the challenges and opportunities a career in engineering brings”

“I drew these tides of men into my hands and wrote my will across the sky in stars” (T. E. Lawrence)

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HELEN TEATHER

SHARON YOUNG

“I enjoy sharing my signalling knowledge”

“Here's to strong women, May we know them, May we raise them, May we be them” (Amy Rees Anderson)

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CONSTANCE DESENFANT

GEMMA HINCHLIFFE

"I am genuinely interested in how to make the city better, healthier and safer, especially for women and I strongly believe I can change things at my own scale, raising awareness through teaching or writing, because it's with small actions that big things start"

“Aim high. Pursue your dreams. Always take NO as a positive. Allow it to become your Next Opportunity. WICE allows women to be recognized and strengthens the Women In Construction and Engineering network. Together we can make a difference”

SINEAD McATEER "I feel very honoured to have had the opportunity to take part in this year's WICE Awards"

TRISHA CHAUHAN “Through hard work and determination anything is possible, I want to inspire other women that they are capable of this too. It can be tough in the beginning but the rewards are worth it”

Best Young Woman

Architect

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Best Woman in

Highways

JWEREA MALIK

DIONYSIA CHATZIRAPTI

"I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples" (Mother Teresa)

“What would you do if you weren’t afraid?” was a question I first asked myself when reading a book by Sheryl Sandberg. She was my inspiration to look ahead and not give up”

MARÍA ISABEL ROMERO MACARRO

“The judging day was a great experience, and I felt impressed to be surrounded so many female engineers”

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Best Woman in

Oil & Gas Engineering

​ANNA MARIA PRICH “Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure must be a challenge to others' Amelia Mary Earhart, inspiration taken from my 7 year old daughter's book ' Good night stories for Rebel Girls”

MICHELLE WELLSBURY

“As I tell the students I meet via STEMNet, being part of the engineering industry is just the most fun you can have whilst actually getting paid. Be a part of it!”

Best Woman

Interior Designer

GEMMA EVERS “Careers in construction are exciting, varied and make real differences to everyday lives. WICE encourages women to enter this industry, which in turn provides a more diverse workforce, reflecting society and giving everyone a brighter future.”

RACHEL BOYD “I am determined and ambitious and aim to succeed in every task I undertake”

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​ ELEN H MURPHY “I consider mentoring women and leading the Women in Leadership agenda within WSP as part of my role.”

JULIE BANKES “I’ve had a wonderful experience meeting so many brilliant Women in Construction and Engineering. Any company that taps this resource will have a sustainable future”

Best

Female Mentor

LISA FOSTER

MARIA JOYCE

“I am really proud to be nominated for this award. The judging day was a fantastic opportunity to meet inspiring women and share experiences”

“I have never stopped to think about how many people I have helped throughout my career. Preparing for the judging day made me reflect on this and has made me feel very proud”

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REBECCA MULLENS

WANDA RYTLEWSKA

“I am proud to be part of an Industry that celebrates its successes, encouraging men and women to achieve and fulfil their aspirations”

“Good teamwork is a key factor of any business success. It’s understanding our strengths and weakness, growing and pulling together”

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​GEOFF BEE “The WICE awards is an amazing event, and I'm very honoured to have been nominated. I'm extremely proud of all the young people and I have mentored, and their commitment and achievements inspires me to continue to encourage the growth in diversity in our industry”

JOHN McCLEAN “An excellent event even if just to experience the enthusiasm and comradeship amongst the nominees”

MARTIN ROACH

Best

"I have been mentoring young engineers for over 20 years, but it's always been something I've done quietly in the background; so this recognition for my mentoring work, particularly among women engineers in the organisation was very humbling."

Male Mentor

PETER LUNIW

STEVE KELLY

"I love coaching and mentoring and am very proud of the achievements of my mentees"

“I am an avid supporter and mentor of women in construction at all levels, encouraging women to develop their potential into next generation leaders”

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HELPING TO BUILD AND GROW

SUCCESSFUL GENERATIONS OF FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS.

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The 2017 Winners The 2017 European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards attracted our most diverse group of nominees since its launch in 2015. This year nominations were received from all over Europe, representing some of the leading and most innovative companies in construction and engineering today. After many hours reviewing nomination applications, and a full day of judges interviews, we are pleased to introduce you to the 2017 winners who are breaking down barriers and building new heights.

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Best Woman Architect

JOHANN MULDOON Architect & Director - Manor Architects

The moment I found out I was a finalist was a fairly embarrassing scene of flailing arms with a booming 'yes' resounding through the office. There was a genuine feeling that I had already accomplished so much by getting to the final stage, but awareness that a tough path lay ahead against seven other remarkable women. Almost instantaneously your mind begins to run away to the 'what if', 'what will I say' and importantly 'what is my story' and anxiously 'how can I relay that in five minutes'? These awards have been a myriad of emotions for me, being recognised amongst world leaders, by your peers, makes you aware that, indeed, you have accomplished something fairly amazing. It was also a time of reflection, writing down what I have accomplished, the challenges, adversity, the thrill, the excitement, the determination, the love I have for Architecture and how proud I feel to be an Architect. Winning this category, against this calibre of finalists, across 10 countries and 300 nominees is phenomenal. I feel privileged to be the recipient; it is a momentous time in my career. Winning and achieving, have for me, been about promoting the value of women in the profession, of mothers in the profession, proving the necessity of women in the profession, the economic benefit of women as Architects,

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business people, mothers and generators of growth. Ultimately, I aim to continue to buck trends, ignore percentages, praise and support women in the construction industry and to be the best I can possibly be. Winning has given fodder to my ambition and sustenance to my determination. To anyone considering entering/ nominating for these awards I would say that they are challenging, time consuming, but uniquely allow you an opportunity to sit back and appreciate how far you have come, the challenges you have endured and the strength you have shown. For me, it has been an extremely valuable experience, not only on a personal level, but professionally to engage with such amazing individuals within the construction industry, share their experiences, learn from their achievements and take counsel from their challenges has widened my vision. The impact and the reality of winning will take some time to sink in; unquestionably it is an experience and an accolade that I will carry with me for the remainder of my life. It is something I am and will continue to be extremely proud of. I am grateful to the people who have chosen me, who support and believe in me on this rollercoaster journey that is being a Woman Architect. I wouldn’t change any of it for an instant.


Best Woman Interior Desinger

GEMMA EVERS Interior Designer - NPS Leeds part of NPS Group

When my Operations Director told me the company had nominated me for "best interior designer" in the WICE awards, I was thrilled that my skills, enthusiasm and hard work had been appreciated. Working for NPS Leeds, a public company carrying out work for both the public and private sectors, I get engrossed in projects, and am genuinely passionate about creating the best solutions for my Clients, society and the environment. Therefore, my reaction on hearing that I was a finalist was one of surprise and delight but also determination that I would fit the preparation for it around keeping to my deadlines and not letting my Clients down! What is great about construction is that you have a far-reaching and direct influence on the world around you. It is trulyrewarding to see a design become reality. The more preparation I put into the awards, the more excited I became about judging day and the chance to showcase my work and partake in the discussion on the day. Judging day exceeded my expectations. It was wonderful to hear so many inspirational women all with motivating, thought provoking stories to tell about careers in the construction industry. All these women demonstrated the knowledge, skills, competencies, training and experience they have used to break barriers to progress their careers. It has inspired me to re-evaluate my own priorities and given me the confidence to go for a promotion within my company where I am fully

supported in my ambition by my line manager. Winning "best interior designer" was a fantastic honour. I will use the win to encourage more female architects and designers into the industry by working with local universities to encourage young women to apply for vacant posts within construction companies. I plan to use my work designing school interiors to become a role model for girls, and hope this will encourage them to consider a career in construction or engineering. I work in an office that already supports flexible working hours, but I intend to push forward an even more flexible approach to working to encourage women into the industry. This approach is "win win" as it not only helps women, but also facilitates all employee’s careers within an organisation. If men can work flexibly, childcare responsibilities can be shared so women will no longer need to curtail their careers to look after their children and men will be able to be more involved in their children’s upbringing. The awards experience has been extremely enjoyable. It has helped me re-evaluate my approach to work life balance and become smarter in how I work. Standards will improve as more women are encouraged into the industry, as there will be a larger talent pool and a more diverse workforce. I will be encouraging my company to nominate next year, and already have some strong inspirational women in mind to put forward!

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Best Woman Civil Engineer & The Most Distinguished Winner Of 2017

RACHEL SKINNER Executive Director, Head of Development – WSP

I have to admit that it took me a few hours to spot the email that dropped into my inbox to let me know that I was a WICE finalist, as I was busy finishing some slides before presenting at an industry conference that afternoon. This was followed by a few days off during the March school holiday, when the news began to sink in and I found a moment to read my nomination form with fresh eyes. At that point, my excitement and pride started to build, as did my interest in the many finalists across all of the categories. The judging process was fascinating, not just because of the chance to meet people from such a range of roles across the industry but also because, in itself, it was strong evidence of the number of women working in responsible roles who thoroughly deserve proper recognition for the difference they are making. Today, I bumped into the daughter of a friend who is in the middle of her A-levels. We talked briefly about how she's really struggling with what she wants to do in life. My advice to her? The same as I give to everyone: go with what you enjoy the most and something that genuinely interests you, and leave behind any sense of worry about whether your choice today has a clear route-map to a certain future career path. If you love what you do and jump into it with enthusiasm, you should have confidence that a solid career path will unfold in front of you. I wish that someone had said this to me, but with hindsight it is exactly how I ended up with a 1st class Geography degree and it's also why I fell into – and then stayed – in the industry having only intended to join for a few months before making a 'real' career decision.

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I look back now and wonder if there was an exact point when I really became an engineer (perhaps when I completed my MSc(Eng)? Or chartership? Or fellowship?) and then I look ahead to 2020 when I will become the youngest ever President of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and I begin to realise that perhaps I have always been an engineer at heart. I love the idea of finding ways to making life better for people and I have always had a keen interest in understanding how things work. Being a woman in the industry for nearly twenty years and having been actively engaged with the gender 'issue' for nearly as long, I suspect that it also helps that I have never minded being different, as long as I'm doing something I enjoy and believe in. That said, I can't wait for the day when we are judged simply as great people in construction and engineering, rather than as women. With such a broad range of roles on offer and so much change that creates endless headroom for talented people to shine, there really is something for everyone. I feel very strongly that we mustn't underestimate our collective power to make this change – or the role that each of us is already playing to create a more diverse, relevant and attractive industry for today and tomorrow, for all the right reasons. I will close by passing on the advice given to me by one of my children on the evening before the judging day. She showed wisdom well beyond her seven-and-a-half years when she said, very seriously, "Mummy, just make sure you're very, very nice to the judges, then maybe they'll let you win!"


Best Woman in Construction Law

THERESA MOHAMMED Partner - Trowers and Hamlins LLP​

I was delighted to find out that I was a finalist in my category, which was Best Woman in Construction Law. The first thing I did was read about the award itself, the other finalists and the judges, while telling my husband, colleagues and friends the good news. I was incredibly proud to be in the company of the other finalists in my category who are all accomplished lawyers in our sector and women I have come across professionally over the past few years. It was also really special to have the support of Rebecca Hartshorn of John Sisk & Son and Stephanie Canham of Trowers & Hamlins, who nominated and supported my nomination for the award. Winning this award is amazing, and is a ringing endorsement of the work I have been doing within our sector, particularly as Chair of the National Association of Women in Construction. It has encouraged and motivated me to continue working hard to further the development of women’s careers, change the perception of women in construction and to also continue my passion for sharing knowledge and best practice in my sector. My view is that as construction lawyers we need to do more than establish a successful legal practice; we also need to use our transferable skills to better the industry we are in and encourage others to work with us and remain in construction. The ability to innovate and attract talent is there, and we just need to harness our diverse skill set and put it to use outside of the day job. The awards process really pushed us to showcase what we

have been doing that is exceptional and the comments and reactions to the awards on social media have been hugely positive. It has also opened my eyes to what others are doing, much of which has not received the publicity it deserves, and how important it is to recognise efforts being made using this kind of platform. Former colleagues that I have not seen for years took the time to congratulate me on reaching the finals and just even participating has resulted in so much positive feedback. I also have been touched by comments made by client testimonials and promptly realised that, while I always encourage others to enter awards, I have never before considered entering myself. I had a great time during the judging day forum and met so many talented and passionate women from different disciplines who in my view all deserved to win! We had ample opportunity to network, share our experiences and listen to the various presentations which were all relevant to current issues in construction. There was a really collegiate atmosphere which made everyone more positive, confident and certainly helped settle the nerves before our presentations. I would certainly advise Trowers & Hamlins to support any other entrant to next year’s awards, and would suggest that other companies use this opportunity to show their support for their employees and the impressive work that is being done in construction.

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Best Woman Consultant

ROSEANNA BLOXHAM Senior Consultant – RSK

I opened the webpage at 07:00 on the 16th March and leapt out of bed with excitement and disbelief. I read the page about 10 times before messaging all my friends and family. I don’t think I have ever been ready for work so early, I couldn’t wait to get in to the office to thank my colleagues and managers for their support with the nomination. Upon receiving my email I first went through panic mode at the task ahead but soon my organised mind took control of planning for the Judging day. I feel incredibly shocked and honoured to have won the award for ‘Best Woman Consultant’ and still can’t quite believe it. I see it as a representation of my hard work and dedication to my role within RSK and the support from my colleagues over the past five years. Over the past few years I have noticed the number of women in the industry growing and am pleased to see an increased number of female graduates. I will continue to fulfil my job role and additional activities to the full and use the award as a symbol to other women, to prove we can do it! Being part of the process has already sparked the interest of many graduates and I have been keen to answer the questions and

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help them progress with their careers. Winning this award will only promote more interest and give me another tool to encourage young women interested in STEM to stick at it. The main emotions felt during the process were anxiety and fear, mixed with excitement. The support from colleagues and managers has been overwhelming. The experience has motivated and encouraged me to help others and has given me a huge boost in confidence. I have realised throughout the process that I actually do a lot above and beyond my initial job role and 9 days out of 10, I love it! I would defiantly advise RSK to nominate other women in 2018 and have already started looking out for candidates to suggest. The experience has been delightful and given me a huge boost of self-confidence that I feel women in this industry really need, after all, the two questions we are tackling at the moment are: how do we recruit more women; and how do we retain them? My advice to companies considering submitting nominations in 2018 is... What have you got to lose? It’s an inspiring processes and your nominee will feel appreciated and motivated no matter what the outcome.


Best Woman Contractor

CONCEPCION VICENTE Project Manager, Tideway Central, Ferrovial Agroman

I was thrilled to be told about my selection as finalist for the WICE Awards 2017: Best Woman Contractor. The first thing I did when I heard about it was to share the news with my colleagues that had put me forward for the award, and to let my family know. They have constantly supported me and have always been proud of my career and how far I have come. My father was definitely over the moon with the news. I feel extremely lucky to have the opportunity to develop my professional career doing a job that I feel passionately about, in an industry that actually makes a real difference to society and people’s lives. Winning this award is an extraordinary achievement for me and represents a huge responsibility as a role model within the industry, not just for my team and colleagues, but for other professionals and future generations of engineers. Taking part in these awards has been a challenge and an enriching experience. The preparation of my nomination package helped me to step back for a moment and gain perspective on my current role as the only woman Project Manager on the Thames Tideway Central contracts, what I have done to reach this point and what I would like to achieve in the future – more women PMs on our contract for one! I have also learned from the experience how to articulate concisely what I do and what I have done to get here. It has

been a truly worthwhile exercise that I was not expecting to provide me with such revealing thoughts and ideas. What has been priceless is meeting so many other talented women with amazing career paths and sharing our experiences, concerns, lessons learned and powerful examples of progress within the industry. There are many brilliant women at Ferrovial Agroman working hard to deliver key civils projects so I would definitely recommend that the business nominates more team members next year. Although it takes considerable effort to prepare yourself for the process, I have felt extremely supported by my company and senior colleagues across our different disciplines. We have worked together on this, sharing our different experiences and feedback which has made me feel comfortable and valued. My biggest thank you goes to them for the confidence they have in my abilities and the effect such recognition has had on me and my career. For other companies considering submitting nominations in 2018, I would definitely advise them to go for it. Nominate as many women as possible. Promoting women within the industry is urgently required and the more we can all do together, the better it is for all of our companies and the industry as a whole.

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Best Woman Electrical & Mechanical Engineer

ANOUSKA MARTIN Mechanical Engineering Department Manager, Fluor

“Hopefully, my win will inspire others in the company to step out of their comfort zones. I may even join the millennials and write a blog about my experience!�

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When told that I had been nominated for this award, I was flattered but also a bit embarrassed. I wasn't sure I had done anything worthy of the nomination; however, as I wrote my application, I was surprised at the wide range of activities I had been involved with, both within the company and in the wider industry, to promote engineering and the training and development of engineers. And all done whilst managing to undertake a variety of challenging roles in my job. I am delighted to receive this award and am in complete shock to have won my category as all the candidates were worthy winners. I have been very fortunate to have been given some amazing opportunities at Fluor and to work with some incredible people. Hopefully, my win will inspire others in the company to step out of their comfort zones. I may even join the millennials and write a blog about my experience! I have really enjoyed being part of this process. Taking part in the judging day, seeing how many inspirational women there are in the industry and how passionate they are about their careers has been an uplifting experience. It has given me confidence that the engineering and construction industry will become more diverse in the future. I would definitely recommend Fluor to nominate other women in the future as we have some amazing engineers in our company who deserve recognition and who would benefit from the whole process.

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Best Woman in Environment & Sustainability

ANITA MITCHELL Head of Sustainability - Lendlease Being a task oriented person, the first thing I did after hearing the news that I had been selected as a finalist was to try to block out time in my diary to prepare for the judging day. Lendlease had a number of finalists in different categories who all came together to support each other in the preparation process, which was fabulous. Having only recently arrived in the UK from Australia, I was truly surprised to have firstly been selected as a finalist and then to eventually win the award. Australia is a much smaller market, but has really led sustainability in the built environment, so to be able to bring my skills and experience to our projects here in Europe has been a fantastic development opportunity. Winning the award is more of a reflection of the passionate people I work with than it is of me. No project can be sustainable without bringing the entire team with you, from architects, engineers, cost planners, the finance team, and pretty much everyone needs to buy into the vision of what we are trying to create. I hope that others in the industry will be inspired to learn more about what Lendlease is doing in this space. The property industry has an enormous opportunity to help solve some of the world's largest problems, from climate change, resource constraints, pollution, inequality, connectedness, to mental health and physical wellbeing. I find this incredibly exciting and I love the construction industry because what you create is such a tangible outcome, seeing people enjoying the spaces that you have helped to shape makes it all worthwhile. Of course I would encourage companies to consider nominating for the awards, not only is it a rare moment to stop and celebrate our achievements, it also showcases the role that women play in the construction industry and to highlight the amazing breadth of the careers that are available.

“No project can be sustainable without bringing the entire team with you, from architects, engineers, cost planners, the finance team, and pretty much everyone needs to buy into the vision of what we are trying to create.� THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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Best Woman Quantity Surveyor

ISLA HILL Quantity Surveyor, BAM Ritchies

Secretly nominated, my delight at being included was no great secret. The time and effort taken to put me forward can be attributed to the people I work closely with every day. This is an insight into the environment in which I work where we celebrate and support each other in our achievements. I have worked in the civil engineering industry for 7 years and while I am not blinkered to the challenges, I am more often excited about my journey. I am privileged to have a job in an industry that has taken me from the power house of a hydro scheme inside a mountain on the shores of Loch Ness to the chalk mines of Hertfordshire and everywhere in between, and consider myself fortunate to have met the enlightened and creative people that have made this such a positive experience so far. In an industry where so few women are in senior roles as managers, directors or partners I am planning on being one of the women who does lead. As BAM Nuttall have opened the doors through participation in their Emerging Leaders Programme, nomination to the CBI Future Leaders Group and pairing with a mentor from high level management this is a reality for me. Winning this category has real significance to me because I have been on a long journey to get here. I have worked hard to seize every opportunity and gain as much education and experience as I possibly can; this award feels

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like recognition of this achievement. This has been possible thanks not only to my own work but also to the people at BAM Nuttall who gave me a chance, put me forward for projects and programmes and continue to believe in my potential. Because of this backing I am now in a position to give other women the same experience that I have had. My approach to the issues surrounding diversity in our industry is to do what I am best placed to do share my positive experience, change unconscious bias and be an example to young women who might not otherwise consider this career. I believe in the changes I am trying to make because I see that the mentoring, Women at BAM group, Bring Your Daughter To Work Days, and the genuine support we offer to women is making a difference. Being asked by another attendee at the WICE judging day if I can share what our company do with them to help structure a programme for women similar to ours made me realise that we aren't just talking about it, we really are making a difference. As an experience that boosts women’s confidence, allows us to shout about our achievements and meet other incredible women with shared goals then participation in the WICE awards is unmissable. If you have women with great potential then nominate them for the opportunity to be a part of this fantastic journey.


Best Woman Project Manager

PAULA CHANDLER Design Manager - Bouygues UK

When I discovered that I had been selected as a finalist in the category of Best Woman Project Manager I felt overjoyed and overwhelmed that my achievements had impressed the judges enough to include me on the short list. Often, when we perform a function on a daily basis, we forget to stop and look around and appreciate the contribution or impact we are having on the projects we undertake or the people with whom we come into contact. After an extremely intense, but incredibly rewarding judging day I left the venue hoping only that I had given a good account of myself to the judging panel. When I found out that I had actually won the award I was speechless – and anyone who knows me, knows that it takes a lot to render me silent! Having been so impressed by the calibre of the other candidates, and the passion exhibited by each for the role they fulfil, it really is something quite special to be named as the Best Woman Project Manager for 2017. Throughout my career I have been fortunate enough to benefit from the support of some inspirational people. It is a combination of my drive, steely determination and their faith in my abilities that has allowed me to reach this high point in my career whilst also being a dedicated mother to 2 year old twins. I am determined to pay this forward; to be a positive influence, an encourager, an advocate and a role model. For some time I have been actively involved in a number of women’s empowerment and mentoring initiatives with the primary objective of giving something back to the industry I love. Winning this prestigious award will now offer a more high profile platform from which to perpetuate positive

reinforcement, develop and nurture support networks and raise the profile of exemplary female colleagues working within Bouygues UK and beyond. I am committed also to inspiring the next generation of engineers who may not yet know the extent of opportunities available to them within the industry. From the honour of being a WICE judge in 2016, to the wonderful (and nerve racking!) experience of being a finalist in 2017 I have relished the opportunity to showcase my achievements whilst celebrating the inspirational stories of other women in construction. The talent we have witnessed is awe-inspiring and will only serve to offer a positive legacy for the future of the industry. I am proud to say that, this year, Bouygues UK had 11 finalists selected for various categories in the awards – testament to the hard work and dedication of each of those women and to the support that Bouygues UK offers its employees in an environment which promotes diversity and equal opportunities. It is my hope that this amazing accolade will be repeated, if not bettered, next year in recognition of the wealth of talent we have working on our projects. Based on such a positive experience, I would encourage any company to submit nominations for the WICE Awards in 2018 to celebrate the achievements of their female employees; a vital part of every team, a driving force for collaboration, an equal partner in achieving your successes. The contribution of women in the industry should be applauded and encouraged and what better showcase for both your business and your employees than an awards process attended by the most influential and well respected names in our industry today.

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Best Woman in Health & Safety

SUKHY HOGWOOD Technical Safety Manager, EDF Energy Nuclear New Build

“As a winner, I will extend that impact to inspire more women to work in construction, to believe in themselves and to have the selfassurance to break down any barriers they face.� 102

I stayed up until midnight to see whether I was a finalist. When the announcement was made online, I was so excited that I woke up my husband to tell him! Although, I was kinder to my mum and best friend, I waited until the morning to call them. The next call I made was to my line manager. He had nominated me, believed in me and supported me through the whole process. My career hasn't been an easy journey, it's been a labour of love, so to win and to do so because I have a career that I enjoy, and work for a company and project that keep me motivated and energised, well, it's the ultimate honour. The entire WICE awards process gave me confidence in my abilities as a safety professional. It gave me an opportunity to pull together all of my achievements in one place and to recognise that I was making a difference to the industry. The project I work on will positively impact generations, as will my work in health & safety. But as a winner, I will extend that impact to inspire more women to work in construction, to believe in themselves and to have the self-assurance to break down any barriers they face. I know that EDF Energy will continue to nominate women for these awards, and I think that's a great thing, because it really helps us to push boundaries and believe in ourselves. Any organisation that want to nominate again next year, should grab the opportunity. At the judging day, I really felt that I was in the presence of greatness, surrounded by so many amazing individuals. That in itself was such a fulfilling and worthwhile experience.

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Best Young Woman in Construction

AGNIESZKA WISNIEWSKA Works Manager - Budimex SA

When my company nominated me for the WICE Awards I felt an overwhelming sense of achievement and value to Budimex. Being a finalist gave me such a boost and ignited a motivational flame under me. And now, I am a winner I would love to shout: I am over the moon! I am so proud I managed to fulfil my dreams and get to where I am today. I am grateful for what construction has given me and I am always looking forward to the next challenge – WICE Awards being one of them! Nowadays, when construction is so male dominated, young women have to work extremely hard to become a role models in this industry. I was the lucky enough to have a mentor to show me the most important aspects of civil engineering. Now my goal is to become someone like that for my younger colleagues, especially girls. Do you know what gives me the motivation? Watching a construction grow from foundation to completion. It's seeing the results of my labour. I cannot help but feel proud when I walk past one of my buildings or show friends and say "Look, that's my work". Simply amazing! The best thing about civil engineering is creating something monumental. Something that will have an impact on our society. It gives me a feeling that I am changing the world somehow, one slab of concrete at a time. I love that. And know that long after I gone a little piece of me will live on in my work. Civil engineering is not just my job, it is a part of me! Marcus Garvey said, "With confidence, you have won before you have started". At a time when the world can weigh so heavily on us, it can take looking at the past to push us into the future.

“Do you know what gives me the motivation? Watching a construction grow from foundation to completion.”

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Best Young Woman Engineer

NAJWA JAWAHAR Senior Structural Engineer – WSP

The first thing I did when I heard the news that I had been selected as a finalist is to share it with my close friends at work I then turned towards my line manager, Stephen Jackson, who nominated me for the awards and told him that I made it to the finals, with a massive smile on my face. I checked who the other finalists are from WSP and in my category, and then read the requirements for next stage and started brainstorming ideas for my presentation and 1 min pitch. I have no words to describe my feelings. I am just speechless at having won the Best Young Woman Engineer 2017. It’s a huge achievement! Standing in front of a room full of women of such high calibre is nerve wracking but an extremely proud moment. I felt satisfied! I have been working in the industry and at WSP for 5 years. “Nothing is impossible” is my motto for life and I strongly believe that a little determination (or stubbornness) can take you a long way! Success doesn’t discriminate between any religion or culture, it only sees the passion. This award is a lot more than just a trophy to me. It’s a key milestone and a validation that I am on the right track towards my ambitious goals. It feels great- in my mind, I am dancing to Beyonce’s “Who run the world”! (Girls, of course). I want to become a living example of what women can achieve in the construction industry. I want to show everyone, that there’s more to engineering than muddy boots. No cultural or religious barriers and no fears and limits. This win is fantastic, it will help me expand my profile and

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gain exposure at a much wider platform that I could achieve otherwise. I will continue to act as an ambassador for women in engineering through WSP and other institutions I have been involved with in past. It’s always very difficult to explain someone what you have achieved in life, but it’s even more difficult to convince yourself that what you have done is incredible. The entire process has been very motivational, especially mid-way through the chartership exam revision, when I had doubts about myself, WICE awards process, constantly reminded me what I am capable of. I absolutely enjoyed the entire process: writing my nomination application, the judging day and my favourite part, the 1 min pitch. Not only writing my own but listening to other women fiercely beating the drum of their success with confidence was truly inspirational. The award was also a fantastic opportunity to seek feedback from the seniors, my peers and my clients. WSP has a very good track record of recognising talent within the business and has been showcasing them and celebrating their recognition in past. I am sure this will continue in future. The young talent in the industry and those who are yet to enter the industry never fails to impress me. I am a strong advocate of continual learning and promoting engineering, especially to girls from minority groups. I want to help them recognise their strengths and will continue to do so in future. WICE awards are a perfect platform for me to achieve my goals. My advice to the companies considering submitting nominations next year is that It’s definitely worth it, both for the individuals and the company.


Best Woman Construction Planner

ROSE MAKWARA Senior Planner - Bouygues UK

I remember waking up very early to check whether I had made the list of finalists. I first told my mum who shouted ‘hallelujah, hallelujah’ (she’s very religious) and my husband who was beaming with joy. When I got to work, I told my manager Paul Suthard who has been instrumental in my development as my manager and mentor. He really is the best! However, Bouygues intranet beat me to telling my colleagues, as it turns out, I wasn’t the only one excited; the business was as well! Eleven of us made the list of finalists! I couldn’t have had a better start to my day. Winning my category feels very surreal as I competed against some very impressive and capable women in the industry. I am very humbled to have won Best Construction Planner and I am really excited! I have been very fortunate to have met and worked with great mentors and some outstanding colleagues who believed in me from the first time they met me. I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone that helped me with testimonials, encouragement and unflappable support (you know who you are, thank you!!). I can only say that standing here as a winner means that all of the hard work has paid off! I plan to use this award as a platform to inspire women (and men) within my company and the industry as a whole to keep up the good work and to continue to be passionate about our contributions to the industry. The construction industry is an exciting place to work with varied roles and projects that can certainly accommodate more women. I am convinced that young pupils and students in my former primary and secondary schools will be inspired to consider construction as a career

path. I will not hesitate to talk to anyone that I come across about construction planning as it is quite understated in the industry and not recognised enough! Having said that, I believe if one is passionate about construction and engineering, then that passion, with hard work will drive one to success. Never give up. I will continue to work hard to raise the profile of women in the construction industry. The judging day was nerve racking and very exciting at the same time. Being amongst professionals and other competent finalists, with like minds and like experiences was very insightful. Taking part in this award has made me take a step back to recognise my own contributions to projects. Most times, this is lost as I often work as part of a team. Hence, appreciating my in-put has raised my level of self-awareness and confidence which can only be positive. I would definitely encourage Bouygues UK to continue to nominate other women in the company. The industry needs more women and Bouygues UK is among the companies that recognise this and is leading the way. 28.7% of staff employed at Bouygues UK are women and what better way to showcase this and show appreciation to these hardworking professionals than by continuing to nominate! This is a very prestigious award that not only recognises women in the industry, but also opens doors for networking and platforms for promoting women in construction and engineering. My advice for companies considering submitting nominations is ‘time to stop considering, go ahead and nominate, nominate, nominate’.

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Best Woman Structural Engineer

ROSSELLA NICOLIN Associate Director – Aecom

“This award as an amazing opportunity for me to get more out there and help women in my company and in the industry.”

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When I found out I was a finalist, I could not help but jumping for joy! Also, it was even better to discover that half of the finalists in the structural engineering category were from AECOM. Once the initial surprise phase was over, I started emailing people to thank them and to let them know the good news and share the excitement with my fellow finalists in the company. And that was only the beginning. On the award night, when I heard my name to be called on the stage, I could not really believe it and the surprise and joy were even bigger! I feel it is a great recognition of the hard work done so far, for my project work but also for all the other activities – including international development – that I carried on in parallel to my daily job. I see this award as an amazing opportunity for me to get more out there and help women in my company and in the industry. The construction industry needs more and more people, especially women, and this award is for me a further push to get out there in schools and participate to special events. The WICE experience, both the judging day and the award ceremony, has been an incredible journey. On one side it was an opportunity to reflect back on my career and to receive positive feedback from colleagues and clients; on the other side, it was an enriching process to experience diversity. One of the key features of the WICE event is the breadth of award categories, spanning every possible role in the construction sector. I have met an incredible number of talented women, each one with their own different story and career, and talking to them was inspiring. AECOM have been doing an amazing job both in promoting the awards internally and in supporting all candidates in the submission questionnaire and interview process. Hence for next year, I am hoping my company will keep doing just more of the same and I will make sure to be there in supporting our candidates. This year AECOM had a record number of finalists and we need to continue with the trend. The WICE awards are a terrific opportunity for women to be recognised and I am strongly recommending all companies to put forward their candidates. It is not just about winning but giving a voice to all the sung and unsung “female heroes” of our industry.

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Best Woman Oil and Gas Engineer

MICHELLE WELLSBURY Head of Technical and Professional Development,

Genesis Oil and Gas Consultants

First thing I did when I heard I’d been selected as a finalist was to call my parents. My dad is also an engineer and was my inspiration for entering the oil and gas industry in the first place. So to say that they were beyond excited is an understatement. I feel incredibly proud winning this award. Just as I was leaving the judges table to do my one-minute presentation, one of the judges reminded me to say why I wanted to win. I had missed that element in my preparation but immediately knew the reason. I wanted to win because it’s an award for everyone who has got me this far. I mean this in the truest sense. It’s an award for my family, first and foremost, who have to put up with my disappearing sometimes with little notice. My headteacher, who believed I could do anything I set my mind to (he actually wrote to me as a result of the nomination and was thrilled when I called to let him know I’d won). The senior management at Genesis who, although they’d never had a flexible worker before, trusted that I could still deliver for the company with no compromise on quality. They then continued to support and give me the time to put in place a number of initiatives such as a Graduate Training Scheme and a dedicated Work Experience Week which benefit both Genesis staff and the wider community. All the phenomenal teachers and group volunteers who invite me to speak (via STEMNet) to their students in the belief that I will inspire at least one or two per group. I am really looking forward to my next talk when I can show students that achievements and hard work can be recognised in this manner. This award is for all of them. I absolutely love my job and the industry I’m part of, but sometimes getting the balance right between work and family has been hard. The wish to show them that their belief in me is worthwhile is what drives me forward. This award scheme is a fantastic initiative for both company and individual. I sincerely hope that Genesis and other oil and gas companies continue to nominate employees in future. Celebrate these women and those who enable them to be the best they can be.

“I wanted to win because it’s an award for everyone who has got me this far.”

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Best Woman Young Architect

GEMMA HINCHLIFFE Architect – NPS Barnsley par of NPS Group

“With such recognition I aim to promote female representation within my company (NPS) and across the industry, inspiring other young women and children to pursue a vibrant career in construction and engineering.” 108

The first thing I did when I found out I'd been selected as a finalist was pinch myself to check that I wasn't dreaming! After discovering the news was not a figment of my imagination I continued to email my (female) MD and fellow colleagues who nominated me for this award to pass on my gratitude. I also messaged my family on our group what's app chat to pass on the good news. All were equally excited and proud, as I was to be shortlisted for this award. I feel immensely proud to be recognized within the industry and to receive the award for Best Young Woman Architect. Many inspirational women (and men) during my architectural career have inspired me throughout my journey. Without the continued support (and occasional shoulder to cry on) from my mum, twin sister and boyfriend I may not have completed the Architectural career that I am so passionate about. With such recognition I aim to promote female representation within my company (NPS) and across the industry, inspiring other young women and children to pursue a vibrant career in construction and engineering. I plan to mentor and educate future generations over the coming years to share my knowledge and passion and give something back to the community. I have thoroughly enjoyed taking part in the awards process. It has been refreshing to meet so many inspirational and successful women. I would definitely advise my company to nominate other women in the years to come. I am already considering colleagues who I can nominate for the 2017 awards. The awards recognize and reward the positive contribution women make to this industry and that is something we should all do more of. I ask that all companies join me and nominate for the WICE awards! There are so many women out there who should be recognized for their contribution as together we can be a force to be reckoned with.

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Best Woman Architectural Technologist

SOLAM SIZER Partner, SA Architectural Services I was thrilled and excited to be told the news of my selection. The first thing I did was to contact my business partner and colleagues to pass on the wonderful news. I could barely contain my excitement that I had been shortlisted amongst a select group of talented women. I am honoured and proud to be recognised by professionals in our industry to have won in the category of Best Women Architectural Technologist. There are so many amazing women in this industry I am completely overwhelmed, and couldn’t be more grateful for the nomination. As an immigrant, and a woman in a predominantly indigenous British, male dominated sector this has of course, at times, been challenging. It has taken a lot of hard work, dedication & passion to get to where I am today. It is great to have some recognition for this. I hope this award will inspire, influence and of course motivate others, of all sexes, races, genders & dispositions, not only within my company as we grow, but also those I engage with. I really hope it will push others towards reaching the highest standards, and achieving the very best they can from their built environment education and career. Taking part in the awards has been a thoroughly enjoyable & inspirational experience. I have enjoyed every minute. I have taken great pleasure in the opportunity to meet so many amazing, likeminded & professional women in the industry who are all doing outstanding within their varied careers. I have made some great contacts, which I hope will become business opportunities, and perhaps even friends. Any company considering submitting nominations in 2018, I honestly couldn’t recommend it enough. It really is a fantastic opportunity for all women. It is the ideal opportunity to promote yourselves, and to show the rest of the industry what amazing women you have working for you. Just go for it!

“I hope this award will inspire, influence and of course motivate others, of all sexes, races, genders & dispositions, not only within my company as we grow, but also those I engage with.”

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Best Woman in Tunnelling & Underground Construction

BETHAN HAIG Tunnel Manager - Dragados/Dr. Sauer & Partners

I found out that I had been selected as a finalist for these awards by receiving a text from a colleague, so the first thing I did was to go online to confirm it for myself, and then let my mum and dad know! I received quite a few messages of encouragement in the first few days, but there were also a few people noting how in-depth the judging process was going to be and wishing me luck. The nomination process had taken place during a very busy period at work, so it was only really then that I had a chance to read up on the judging day and realised just what the task ahead of me was. I am extremely proud to have been selected as the "Best Woman in Tunnelling and Underground Space" in 2017. When I started out in this industry our numbers were really quite small. With recent high profile projects, the industry has attracted many more female engineers that have been able to gather a range of invaluable experience in a comparatively short space of time. Winning this category is only going to get harder in the future, as more projects take place and female engineers build on their knowledge and move up and up, so I am relieved I got in now! My project has a strong contingent of fantastic female engineers that have been supporting me through this process. They are already aware that the only thing that will limit them in this industry is their own effort and self-belief, but

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I always think there is nothing like a good dose of positive reinforcement to pick you up on a trickier day, so hopefully this win will serve as a reminder that our contribution, in spite of occasional additional barriers, is recognised and appreciated. Taking part in the awards has been a bit of a roller coaster. It was lovely to meet the other finalists at the judging day, and it opened my eyes to the range of sectors and careers outside of my tunnelling bubble. Hearing some of their experiences, both good and bad, was both an inspiration and made me appreciate the teams that I have worked in. There are times when I forget how lucky I am, and the awards served as a timely reminder that until the top of the industry is more fully reflective of the range of engineers out there, female engineers need to make sure that they are supporting each other to make up for our minority status. I would advise my company to nominate other women in the future, because our team has some wonderful engineers that also deserve recognition for their efforts and achievements. I would say to all companies that while it may feel odd to pick out your female engineers for an award not open to everyone, don't focus on that, but recognise the support and encouragement the process can give to those that may be being inadvertently excluded from opportunities their male peers don't even realise are exclusively theirs.


Best Woman in Highways

JWEREA MALIK Associate - Balfour Beatty

As I sat in silence, anticipation and full of nerves, slowly scrolling down the finalist list taking great care not to miss my name, my picture suddenly appeared filling me with both surprise and great delight to see myself as a finalist for the Best Woman in Highways. I immediately took a picture of my screen and texted everyone, sharing my good news and took a moment to receive congratulatory replies and compliments. I certainly felt overwhelmed by it all. Being nominated by Balfour Beatty was a huge compliment and honour, let alone being selected as a finalist. Knowing that my hard work, commitment and dedication to the company and industry was acknowledged by my managers and peers made me feel very appreciated. Meeting all the inspirational women on judging day, it was a great comfort to know that there are people out there breaking the barriers and reaching for their goals regardless of personal circumstances or any obstacles they have faced. The room was certainly full of talent and strong contenders and I never for a moment thought I would win in my category. I feel exceptionally proud to have won and I am over the moon. This award is a testimony to both Balfour Beatty and my line managers for their support and encouragement in what is still a challenging industry for a woman. It shows that, regardless of gender or age, through hard work and striving for your goals you will be recognised and rewarded. Being a strong believer in encouraging youngsters into STEM subjects and into the industry, I will use this award to show that times have changed, that you can be a successful woman in the construction industry; that barriers have been broken

and that we are always stepping closer to gender equality. I will look to be a role model to youngsters through school and university talks to help drive their encouragement and enthusiasm towards the industry. I will also use this win to encourage Balfour Beatty to further nominate and encourage nominations across the business and in all categories, and also show other women they can be recognised and rewarded for their hard work. I will advise Balfour Beatty to consider more nominations in 2018, as it will give opportunity to showcase the talent of the hardworking women we have in the business. The WICE process is encouraging and inspiring and allows women to feel rewarded and appreciated just by being nominated alone. Companies need to support their nominees through the whole judging process and also use their success to showcase them across the business and industry. Partaking in the whole WICE experience has been exciting and nerve wracking but an enjoyable process. Colleagues feel that my key strengths are recognising abilities in others and encouraging them to develop and reach their potential; Yet I found writing about myself a challenging task and questioned if others really want to partake in the ‘Jwerea show’. It turns out they did, and not only was it encouraging to look at all my successes but having people asking questions and showing interest in everything I have done was both motivating and fulfilling. The process has allowed me to meet and establish a network of successful and inspiring women and was overall a fantastic experience.

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Best Woman Facilities Manager

FRANCESCA KAVANAGH Senior Property Manager,

Community Solutions Partnership Services

I found out I was a finalist when I was waiting in my car about to go into a client meeting and as I was early I thought I would take the time to scan my emails, many of the subject lines contained “Congratulations”, my Director had been so excited he’d emailed the full division of our company to share the news! So it was a pleasant start to my day of meetings but, it was business as usual, even if I was a little distracted thinking about the exciting things to come. Being part of such an elite, diverse and successful group of women as one of the finalists was rewarding enough but to be the winner of my category has bowled me over. I think I am still in shock. I am very thankful for the experience and the support that I have had from my colleagues over the years who have contributed to me gaining this achievement. For me there’s been two key lessons I would take away from the WICE awards experience. Firstly, never forget that you are not alone. It was so refreshing to hear that other women, industry wide, face the same challenges that I have faced. As a women in the industry there are many disadvantages but the WICE awards really helped me to focus and celebrate the many advantages that we perhaps forget that women naturally bring to the workplace. Secondly, it is so important to look back and take stock. I would never have done that if I hadn’t gone through this process. It’s so easy to get lost

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in the day to day work in our fast paced industry and forget all the great experiences you’ve had, people you’ve met and customers you’ve served. Looking to the future, I intend to use the award as a platform to promote skills development, to inspire the next generation to consider a career in Facilities Management. Fortunately, I have a great opportunity to do that as I will be managing two secondary schools this year and I can get involved in their career events. Hopefully, these small steps will give me an opportunity to make a significant impact. I also would like to explore mentoring both by becoming a Mentor myself and by acquiring a Mentor. Many people at the event spoke highly of both experiences and it’s something I have yet to try. Furthermore, I am passionate about integrating technology into service delivery and customer experiences and I look forward to working with my colleague’s across Facilities Management to make this happen. In terms of the future WICE Awards, my company are very supportive and I would definitely recommend that this support continues as it has been such a great experience for all of us who have taken part across the categories. For other organisations that were not represented this year, I would strongly recommend submitting next year. It’s great for your nominee and your organisation so it’s a win/win situation.


Best Woman Rail Engineer

SHARON YOUNG Lead Project Engineer - Transport for London

I was thrilled when I heard that I had been selected as a finalist for 'Best Woman in Rail Engineering' and very honoured to have reached the finalist stage alongside such a strong and talented group of women. My immediate reaction was, 'now the hard work really starts!' Having not done anything like this before I knew I needed to focus straight away on what was needed for the judging day. I enjoyed researching the judges, their backgrounds and thinking about what I wanted to say about myself, my career, TFL and Women in the Construction and Engineering industry. I love my job and couldn't imagine doing anything else for a career and because of that 'going to work' is absolutely no effort and never has been. I am extremely proud to receive this award, which recognises the years of hard work, determination and 'juggling' of family and work commitments which I, and many women out there, do every day and manage successfully. To have been given an award for doing something I love is amazing and one of my greatest achievements to date. My achievement in winning this award has given me increased exposure within TFL, and within the industry in general, and has reinforced the fact that I am a role model within TFL and an inspiration to other women following me in their careers. I plan to use this exposure as an example of what can be achieved to all

women out there, not just those in the Engineering and Construction community, and continue to promote women in engineering through increased active involvement as a STEM ambassador and to continue to mentor female graduates and industry placements. Taking part in these awards has been an amazing and extremely fulfilling experience. I have met a huge number of talented, interesting and charismatic women, who have helped to make this whole WICE process exciting, scary but ultimately hugely rewarding. I would whole heartedly recommend TFL to nominate other talented women in the company for awards in 2017. I was one of four TFL employees who reached the finalist stage of these awards, which shows that TFL are definitely doing something right and is encouragement itself for the company to continue to promote careers in Construction and Engineering to women. The recognition of being nominated for these awards by your employer is hugely motivational and is testament that TFL strongly support the development of women in the Construction and Engineering industry. It is not all about winning but about inspiring the next generation of women. The judging day alone is an extremely well planned, informative, fun and educational day that any woman would find a fulfilling and inspirational event to attend. Well done WICE.

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Best Female Mentor

REBECCA MULLENS Commercial Manager - Interserve Construction

Having been honoured to be nominated, I struggled to hide my excitement at being shortlisted to finalist. It’s rewarding to work for Interserve and the team I work with inspire my achievements. The acknowledgement of this and my success in supporting and building my team directly on site and our social values team outside it, has been energising. When I found out I had won I struggled to contain my excitement. I have to say having met the other Finalists on the judging day, I felt that we were all brilliant examples of how the Construction Industry is an Industry for the future. Our group sessions were nurturing and supportive naturally. Whilst initially apprehensive about the day to come it turned out to be an enjoyable morning sharing ideas of best practice and identifying ways that we can support our teams to enable their full potential. It really is encouraging to see that I work in an Industry that is striving to develop the next generation of men and women, to provide stretching opportunities, removing obstacles and embracing the benefits of diversity. I feel as much as I have won this award, that Interserve should take significant credit as it’s my Managers I’ve worked with that have provided the culture that has shaped me to be who I am.

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It’s with Interserve’s focus on training and providing further development opportunities that have enabled me to push boundaries and try new ideas out with success. Having won the award, I’m going to continue to build my team but also continue my work within schools and Girl Guiding. It is important that we communicate and educate the next generation to the satisfaction of working within Construction and Engineering. I feel my role is important to show other girls and women that the Construction Industry is a challenging and inspiring Industry to work within and that there are more and more women on sites. I will continue to be a role model to students acting as an influence and inspiration for those looking for careers and a place at the forefront of technology and diversity. Being part of the judging day has further inspired and energised my work with students and apprentices. I would recommend Interserve to nominate again next year, not only has the award recognised my achievements, it’s also recognised the business as the exceptional Employer that it is. I would recommend every business, that has a leading woman to shout about, should nominate, raising their profile and that of women in Construction and Engineering!


Best Male Mentor

GEOFF BEE Senior Partner - Weston Williamson + Partners

When I heard the news I'd been selected as a finalist, I was in the very fortunate position to be able to celebrate with my fellow nominated mentee, by receiving an very early 6.45am phone call, where I was informed we'd both successful! Upon arriving at work, I was also delighted to discover that our other office nominees had also been selected, continuing the success we had achieved year before. The WICE awards is an amazing event, and a vital part of the construction industry's progress in promoting and solving gender issues, and I'm honoured to have won 'Best Male Mentor.' The selection event itself was a joyful and inspiring day. I was able to listen and learn from my fellow Mentor nominees, alongside the experience and knowledge imparted from the guest speakers. We undertook a role play event, where we could learn and appreciate each other's techniques and advice. As a result of the days event, I'm now investigating ways of how to bring mentoring education into our business model. I'm extremely proud of all the people and I have

mentored, and their commitment and achievements inspires me to continue to encourage the growth in diversity in our industry. There are far too many 'dinosaurs' in our sector, who fail to appreciate the qualities each person possess, even though they may be different from them. I'm extremely proud to say that 55% of my delivery team members are female, and a 70% are being led by a female lead. I hope to maintain this momentum going forwards! The enthusiasm, passion, and pure energy from all the participants at the judging day was palpable. This aspect alone will ensure I push for Weston Williamson + Partners to ensure even more participation in next year's event. Everyone who attended will come away with even more motivation and commitment to further their career in the industry. I would also highly recommend that any company considering taking part next year, stops thinking, and goes for it! In my opinion, participation will bring, not only real benefits to the individual team members, but considerable benefits to the overall business also.

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Lifetime Achievement in Construction

KATHRYN LADLEY Senior Consultant - NPS Leeds part of NPS Group

In April 1977, just two years after Kathryn achieved her RICS qualifications, the trade magazine ‘Building Trades Journal’ ran an article on women quantity surveyors entitled ‘Women QS: Confident and Highly Professional’. The article stated that the IQS had just nine women associate members and the RICS had 28 women QS members. It was reported that Kathryn was one of only three women who had both IQS and RICS qualifications. Early in her career working for Leeds City Council (LCC), Kathryn gained the knowledge and experience which laid the groundwork for her future successes. When LCC began to focus on commissioning construction related external consultants, Kathryn - with her knowledge of the industry, and project and programme management skills was approached to develop and manage the process. During her later years with LCC she was promoted to Construction Best Practice Executive Officer, a role which she loved as it enabled her to bring the benefits of Constructing Excellence, Lean Construction, two stage tendering and other ways of collaborative working and supply chain management to LCC. In 2003, the findings of a Best Value Review of Professional

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Design Services resulted in LCC establishing a strategic partnership with Jacobs. With her skills and integrity, care and diligence, Kathryn was the perfect choice to lead the team that organised the procurement and managed the relationship with Jacobs. In 2012, Kathryn was asked to join the LCC group negotiating the terms for a new joint venture – NPS Leeds. She was also approached to manage the in-house Architectural Design Services, again reflecting the confidence in both her expertise and knowledge. Since joining NPS, Kathryn has maximised her experience in contracting, consultancy and local government to assist in setting up new joint ventures across the country, and is currently based in the Leeds office for their five year review looking at processes to strengthen and facilitate the NPS relationship with Leeds City Council. Early in her career Kathryn was asked whether she had made the right choice in becoming a quantity surveyor. At the time Kathryn said ‘I could never imagine doing anything else’. Now, some 45 years later, Kathryn says the feeling is still the same.


Lifetime Achievement in Engineering

GEOFF COX Managing Director, Built Environment, Baker Hicks

Forty years ago, in 1977, Geoff arrived as a young and keen Senior Engineer. At that time the business name was the IDC Group. Over the following years the business saw many changes, of staff and its own name. Geoff Cox was not one of those changes. He remained a constant and central part of the business, and as he celebrates his 40th year of service, the business is celebrating its 60th anniversary. Geoff Cox, now our Managing Director, Built Environments, is undoubtedly one of the pillars of Baker Hicks. Geoff is committed to design and construction integration and recognises the influence an excellent design service can make to a business’ success. He is a recognised expert in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical projects.

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Afi Aofori

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How Digitization is Disrupting Construction: Strategies Forward By MICHAEL SHOMBERG, Global Vice President – Construction & Real Estate Solutions, SAP SE

From 3D printing to prefabrication and assembly, the digitization and industrialization of construction is already underway. Knowledge and technology developed by the other industrialized industries is enabling construction to leapfrog to the latest, proven methods at breakneck speed. Today’s construction industry is at an inflection point. Digitization is changing everything, including barriers to entry. In the new digital world, new business models are emerging, disrupting the industry and requiring new processes for the way we work and deliver services.

Digital technologies changing the construction industry: 3D printing & IoT From supply chain to workforce planning, digital technologies are bringing greater efficiency and scalability to the construction industry. Robotics and 3D printing, for example,

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require 30% to 60% less building materials and can be completed 50% to 80% faster. The market for portable and modular buildings is growing as digital technology powers faster completion rates. Portakabin, a UK-based construction company building, uses 3D building information modeling (BIM) and a factory-like setting to construct portable and modular buildings 50% faster than conventional buildings. This allows Portakabin to obtain a higher

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level of precision, delivering construction on time and within budget. The Internet of Things (IoT) is powering new efficiencies and smarter asset utilization. For example, CCC, a large Middle Eastern contractor, faced weak demand in 2008. The company had two choices: become more efficient or go out of business. Today, CCC uses IoT to monitor and improve the utilization of its assets, saving approximately $15 million per year.


Digitization of construction: does your business have the right strategy? Construction companies that shift to digital stand to realize significant gains over the competition. These are the five key areas being most impacted by digitization and industry transformation: 1. EXPERTISE AND KNOWLEDGE As a new generation enters the workforce and more experienced craftsmen retire, there is an urgent need to make up for the resulting experience gap. Capturing and utilizing best practices can no longer be just a goal; it must be a reality. Otherwise, accidents, rework, and delays will become more commonplace – jeopardizing safety, efficiency, and productivity. Technology-savvy millennials expect digital rather than paper-based processes. For example, consider the knowledge and experience that helps determine the amount of consumables or small tools required for a job. This knowledge will need to be translated into a format, such as tablets, that can be easily accessed at the job site. 2. CONSTRUCTION SITES Many activities traditionally performed piecemeal onsite will be consolidated and moved to efficient factory-like settings with safety and equipment availability greatly improved. The use of modern, lean techniques, including a major role for robotics, will improve quality, greatly reduce waste, and improve costs and schedules Prefabricated “Lego-like” components will be produced with great precision and transferred to the job site. Here, 3D models and wearable technology will direct “skilled-enough” labor to quickly and accurately assemble the components. Sensors gathering up-to-date information will transform the construction site, improving safety, monitoring progress, and reducing unnecessary downtime by anticipating and correcting potential problems, like a lack of materials or equipment issues. The project status will be continuously transmitted back to headquarters to ensure contractors are paid faster and that their pay is based on progress.

3. PROJECT COLLABORATION Owners, contractors, architects, and other members of the construction team will work on contracts designed to improve information sharing. They will be compensated based on the project’s success, rather than individual accomplishments. For example, project-as-the-tenant collaboration systems will be available to everyone on the project. This includes up-to-date structured (2D/3D renderings, job cost, etc.) and unstructured (documents, procedures, manuals, etc.) information. With project collaboration, case studies show that change orders can be virtually eliminated. RFIs will document decisions already reached in the field. Under this new digital model, trust and respect are commonplace, driving the shared stakeholder collaboration that is paramount for greater success. 4. SKILLED LABOR NETWORK Labor unions are evolving. A digitally networked workforce may replace some aspects of their role. Skilled craftsmen and staffing firms will post online for available jobs with large contractors. Contractors, in turn, will be able to compare the costs, track record, skill set, availability, etc. of every person before the hire, similar to Angie’s List in the consumer marketplace. Pre-negotiated contracts based on volume and certified suppliers will save contractors time and money. An Uberlike availability and simplicity will be accompanied by reliable feedback. Unions, in turn, will implement new

training programs to help members better understand these new technologies and enhance skill level. 5. COMMISSIONING AND OPERATIONS The handover of critical information from the construction phase to the operational phase will occur seamlessly and without having to re-enter the information into asset systems. BIM data is linked to the ERP and project management information, providing visual components throughout the process that will help minimize errors and costly rework. Information captured in the design phase will have a common thread that will be used to populate the information in the asset management systems. Equipment installed in the construction will have information on warranty and maintenance stored in an open network that operators will be able to access well after the construction phase is completed.

Next steps: moving towards full digitization The digitization of expertise and knowledge, intercompany collaboration, commissioning and operations, and the construction site as a whole demands new business models and construction methods. Companies must be prepared to embrace these changes or risk being out-performed and out-innovated by the competition.

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Building Products Industry: Don’t Neglect Social Media! By MICHAEL SHOMBERG, Global Vice President – Construction & Real Estate Solutions, SAP SE

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ocial media is no longer an afterthought strategy for most companies, even if they are in the building materials industry. These businesses understand that social media can help them interact with customers and be recognized by them. Think about it: If someone enters your company name or a product you offer in a Google browser, will you appear on the first page? If your customer types their problem in a search engine, does your company name show up, too? Is it time for your business to maximize the benefits of digital customer engagement? Improving the customer experience is a key principle of digital transformation. Not only can you help your B2B orB2C customers find the information they need with greater ease, but you can also use innovative ways, such as social media, to market your business name. Here’s how you can make it happen.

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Innovation in building products Digitalization on the consumer side is forcing building products companies to think how social media can be used to address changing customer needs and behavior. We have connected consumers, always online, sharing their views on social media, making purchase decisions based on online searches. This is why we need to include social media into our go-tomarket strategy. Digitalization has changed consumer behavior—and the building products industry needs to use technology to support new business models and business process as it figures out how to adapt to new customer and market realities. Social media is partially responsible for changing and expanding customer expectations. Customers now demand

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innovation, and sometimes are even willing to pay for it. For example, many customers will pay more for green products, as they recognize the added benefit in terms of environmental stewardship. Ever-changing regulations that demand new approaches require innovation. Contractors need solutions to improve productivity. By focusing on innovation, a company can improve its market share significantly. But how do you get all this information out to your customers? Social media is a great tool. Facebook has been a hot channel for both B2C and B2B interactions in the past, and LinkedIn has also recognized this challenge, developing tools to allow for better B2B interactions to build a better market share in that sector.


“Imagine a company where solutions are in place to deal with rapid market shifts: A particular innovative product has been featured in a popular blog post. The blog post is shared across multiple social media channels. As momentum builds, an analytics solution accurately projects the expected sales and market sector. This information is used to influence production, marketing, and sales approaches.�

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“The business can create predictions and simulations, in many cases allowing it to catch problems before products leave the factory.” Improving the customer experience While customers demand innovation, that’s not the end of the story. Information on supply chain and distribution networks is expected to be available at any time and on any device. Tailored information for the customer strengthens the relationship to the building products business. It also boosts revenue. Sensors within a product allows for after-sale revenue when, for example, a product has a faulty part. But this can be taken a step further. Imagine a forecasting solution that predicts when a part will fail. This allows the building product business to improve reliability before the product even leaves the factory. This added reliability adds up to a larger market share. Why? Customers spread the word over social media that their product has great reliability.

Better availability through demand sensing One area where social media is especially helpful is demand sensing. By monitoring social media channels, a business can predict when demand is rising or falling. This information can

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be fed into predictive analytics, helping the company determine which products are needed in which location and by which customers. This in turn allows the company to better forecast production numbers, creating a leaner operation and more flexibility as the supply network is optimized for agility in delivery. Imagine a company where solutions are in place to deal with rapid market shifts: A particular innovative product has been featured in a popular blog post. The blog post is shared across multiple social media channels. As momentum builds, an analytics solution accurately projects the expected sales and market sector. This information is used to influence production, marketing, and sales approaches. What could have been a bland launch is now looking like an awesome opportunity. The company’s market share grows.

Improving customer experience through modeling Social media can be a wonderful or a terrible thing. It provides the opportunity to promote a business, but it can also cause harm through bad reviews or posts to a company or product page. How do you avoid unforeseen problems? Even with extensive testing of beta products, issues can arise. The key is

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to prevent problems from occurring in the first place. In addition to beta testing, using sensors to capture data can help do this. This data can come from manufacturing machines, from the vehicles used to transport the product, or from the products themselves. By having this data on hand, the business can create predictions and simulations, in many cases allowing it to catch problems before products leave the factory. Imagine a factory that produces building products in which the operations manager typically doesn’t discover that a machine is out of specifications until the company has already received many customer complaints. Instead, sensors on the plant floor catch the problem before it becomes more serious. Automation eliminates many menial tasks so that only exceptions, such as substandard quality, require intervention. Employees are used more effectively. The production line faster and more cost effectively. Improved production leads to better quality products, and the company’s social media page is full of wonderful reviews and fewer complaints. Used right, social media can be a marketing dream. Having information available to the customer across a range of channels provides better user experience. This leads to higher profits, lower overhead, and a leaner, more agile business.


INTERESTED IN NOMINATING FOR 2018 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS?

www.wiceawards.com

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Why Green Building Requires Construction Companies to Digitize By MICHAEL SHOMBERG, Global Vice President – Construction & Real Estate Solutions, SAP SE

The global green marketplace grew to $260 billion in 2013, reflecting steady client and market demand for green construction. Between 2015 and 2023, commercial building owners and managers will invest an estimated $960 billion globally in green infrastructure. Top green construction investment priorities include retrofitting old buildings, investing in energy-efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning, and upgrading plumbing fixtures and other key technologies, reports the U.S. Green Building Council. Green construction is rapidly becoming a competitive differentiator for construction projects. From major office buildings to multi-family developments, the market for green construction remains resilient even in the face of economic challenges. Demand for residential green construction grew from $18 billion in 2009 to $48 billion in 2013, despite the economic recession. Companies and consumers are voting with their wallets: green construction is here to stay. Construction companies that fail to meet this market demand risk being out-performed by the competition. The digitization of the construction industry creates new opportunities for innovation and improving green methods in construction. THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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LEED Certified Green Building - Phoenix Convention Center

LEED certification and greening construction Integrating green methods into construction is an opportunity to better use available resources while creating healthier and more energy-efficient homes and buildings. This starts with LEED certification. LEED, short for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification. For example, the use of spray polyurethane foam (SPF) insulation is increasing in both new and existing homes. Using SPF can help lower heating and cooling costs thanks to a significant reduction in buildingenvelope air leakage, according to recent studies by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program. The biggest energy savings are achieved when homes use SPF together with energy efficient windows and doors, HVAC systems, hot water heating, major appliances, and lighting. For example, LEED-certified buildings use 25% less energy than non LEED-certified buildings, which translates to a 19% reduction in aggregate operational costs. 128

LEED-certified buildings use 25% less energy than non LEED-certified buildings, which translates to a 19% reduction in aggregate operational costs.

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Industry pushing for Green Construction Code updates, compliance documentation challenges remain In 2014, industry representatives joined together to announce new amendments to the International Green Construction Code (IgCC). The goal is to strengthen code enforcement for energy codes, proactively assess buildings for energy performance, more effectively capture energy-saving strategies (like building orientation) in codes, and empower the International Energy Conservation Code to recognize reductions in energy use at the systems level. Representatives from across the building industry, including code officials, building owners, manufacturers, designers, and energy efficiency advocates, have come together under the leadership of the National Institute of Building Sciences to develop a new approach to meeting energy efficiency requirements. “A new compliance path based on targeted energy outcomes in the IgCC would represent a transformative change in the building industry that may be as significant as the advent of energy codes more than 35 years ago,” said Ralph DiNola, executive director of the New Buildings Institute. “This evolution to outcome-based performance requirements recognizes that prescriptive and modeled design approaches are often not representative of the actual energy outcomes of buildings, and that current codes fail to regulate some of the most significant

energy end uses in buildings today.” DiNola accurately sums up one of the greatest challenges facing the green construction industry: despite the best efforts of the construction industry, a single, unified approach to documentation remains a challenge. New compliance regulations will create a simplified, streamlined approach to green building, but they also pose a challenge to construction companies that may not have the resources to accurately measure energy savings reductions.

The greening of the construction industry Sustainable, “green” construction is rapidly becoming standard practice. Between 2013 and 2015, 63% of construction companies completed new green projects, and 50% completed renovation/retrofitting work, reports McGraw-Hill’s research into world green building trends. “Going green” is not just a trend for construction companies; it is a business imperative. Green builders face challenges putting best practices into reality. New products such as low volatile organic compound (VOC) coatings, for example, may require special installation procedures in order to perform, so contractors can’t rely on tried and true methods. They must access and use current, accurate information to ensure quality installation and compliance. The same goes for the LEED standards that are driving sustainability projects. In order to achieve and document the performance levels required in LEED facilities, contractors must remain nimble. Digital construction solutions can help.

Next steps: How digitization supports green building practices In a digital world, new business models are emerging to disrupt traditional business processes. This includes the emergence of an open talent economy that breaks people skilled in green construction methodologies together in a borderless workplace. Contractors can scale operations rapidly by sourcing experienced talent from trade workers and management via a talent network. Digital collaboration tools and networks further support this borderless workplace, empowering effective collaboration within teams and between partners and clients. This digital approach delivers real-time status updates and eliminates lost downtime waiting from materials and equipment. SAP’s ERP core provides near real-time information and creates the backbone required for managing projects effectively and distributing the knowledge to all the stakeholders. These digital solutions are essential to helping construction companies remain nimble and adopt green building best practices.

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Facility Lifecycle Management: BIM Benefits For Design & Construction By MICHAEL SHOMBERG, Global Vice President – Construction & Real Estate Solutions, SAP SE

Globalization, shifts in workforce composition, and changing demographics are affecting the way companies approach project execution and facility lifecycle management. In the era of digital empowerment, construction firms must reimagine their business models and adjust their processes to stay competitive. This starts with enhanced facility lifecycle management through BIM (building information modeling).

What are the benefits of BIM for construction? The benefits of BIM start during the building design phase of the construction process. The preparation of construction documents using two-dimensional CAD drawings can be a challenge. BIM represents a major advancement in information modeling by producing realistic threedimensional views and visualization walkthroughs for design clarity. Most significantly, BIM supports building performance analysis in the earliest design phase, guiding the decisionmaking process regarding mechanical systems and building materials. Since BIM can be embedded with data, new data is then generated as the design process unfolds, making previously daunting tasks (like the calculation of building supplies) precise to the smallest fraction of a penny. As the design phase transitions to active construction, BIM tools offer two key benefits for construction 130

companies and general contractors. First, BIM empowers general contractors to better coordinate schedules with various subcontractors and suppliers, allowing for just-in-time delivery. This enhanced coordination is key for large urban projects where staging areas are limited. Second, BIM tools enable contractors to identify layout errors in advance, reducing the need for expensive change orders and lengthy construction delays.

BIM and facility lifecycle management: Understanding the new digital process The growing preference for green construction, LEED certification, and sustainability has made facility lifecycle management a business imperative for today’s commercial real estate developers and construction companies. The International Facility Management

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Association (IFMA) reports that “building design professionals are embedding data on life expectancy and replacement costs” directly into construction plans. Their goals is to help developers and owners better understand the benefits of investing in materials and systems that may have a higher upfront cost but ultimately generate significant maintenance savings over the life of the building. Facility lifecycle management uses (BIM) as the primary information conduit for the collection, harmonization, and enrichment of data throughout a building’s lifecycle. This starts during the construction process when BIM provides an easy means for realistic three-dimensional building representation, including detailed visual representation of mechanical systems. Increasingly, BIM combines with building automation systems (BAS) to provide realtime monitoring and control over a building’s sophisticated electrical and mechanical systems.


Next steps: Embracing the power of digitization

This complex process is not without challenges, however. These challenges include deciding which building information to track, how to manage this data, and how to infer actionable intelligence. New digital solutions are emerging to help streamline the management process for facility managers and building owners.

Digitization of lifecycle management: Reimagining the process

are used to ensure that the workforce clearly understands the plan and the work environment. The core ensures just-in-time delivery of resources and prefabricated components. Business networks allow automated progress reporting and deliver work instructions and safety information directly to workers via enhanced reality devices. Real-time monitoring enables a continuous feedback loop that keeps the project on track. Asbuilt information is collected via the business network and augmented with commissioning data, facilitating a seamless handover to the customer.

In the reimagined process, project planning is captured in the digital core and communicated to stakeholders through business networks. Stakeholder feedback enables accurate estimates and proactive risk identification/analysis back in the core. Business networks then optimize sourcing of materials and workforce allocation. Virtual mockups

This is a digital process for effective project delivery and efficient, seamless transition to operations. It provides an optimized, visual context to information delivered to the right person at the right time to improve productivity, reduce errors, and eliminate injuries. This gives users a competitive advantage by leveraging visualizations to deliver real value.

BIM technology is most rapidly being adopted in Asia, reports IFMA. BIM tools were recently used in the construction of the 128-story Shanghai Tower, for example, and the government of Singapore is “actively promoting BIM� in all new construction projects. In the United States, federal agencies including the General Services Administration, Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Smithsonian Institution are all beginning to integrate BIM technologies, reports the National Institute of Building Sciences. The McGraw Hill Construction 2014 Smart Market Report estimates that 70 percent of North American contractors were using BIM as of 2012, up from just 17 percent in 2007. We are at a tipping point in the construction industry. Soon, an entire construction project will be designed, managed, and executed from a single file. SAP is at the forefront of this digital process revolution. SAP estimates that the new digital process for facility lifecycle management will result in 10 percent fewer engineering changes, 45 percent less rework, and 79 percent lower accident frequency. SAP is powering this revolution with digital solutions for facility lifecycle management that include strategy alignment, opportunity assessment, solution road map and ROI, value realization, and governance. These solutions will maximize BIM investments, value creation/delivery, and continuous innovation for facility lifecycle management.

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7 Ways

Robotics is Transforming the Construction Industry By CONSTRUCTION WORLD, www.constructionworld.org, @const_world_org

Robotic technology provides the construction industry with numerous advantages. With the goal of automating processes and increasing productivity, robotics are being used to get work done quicker, cheaper and with more precise detail. This article outlines certain areas of construction that are being impacted by robotic technology, discussing its current impact on the industry, as well as what you can expect to see in the future.

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— Automated Technology

— Altered Workforce

One of the uses of robotics is to allow for greater automation in various processes. In many aspects of construction, specifically manufacturing, packing and building, automating these processes is becoming the goal. With greater development in robotics and machinery, construction companies are becoming more open to utilizing technology. With robotic technology, you can expect traditional construction activities like welding, material handling, packing, dispensing, cutting and packing to be fully automated. This will not only allow for precision and accuracy throughout all construction processes, it represents a significant time and financial savings as well.

According to a report from the World Economic Forum, roughly 5 million jobs are expected to be lost by 2020. They attribute much of this job loss to artificial intelligence, machine-learning, 3D Printing and robotics, all of which will significantly impact the construction industry, accounting for an anticipated 10% of total job losses. The WEF predicts that these technologies will be slowly integrated, replacing specific tasks, not jobs entirely. However, with machines taking over certain aspects of a job, this allows companies to employ fewer staff who become responsible for a variety of activities. In a few years, with automated processes increasing, the core skill set of construction workers will look drastically different than it does today. Although it looks as though the construction industry will be hit hard by this robotic revolution, the WEF predicts that over 400,000 jobs in architecture and engineering will be needed.

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Over 400,000 jobs in architecture and engineering will be needed — World Economic Forum

— Lean Construction Practices One of the biggest and most important movements in construction is lean construction. This contemporary ideology aims to increase efficiency and productivity, often centered on the elimination of waste. Traditional construction practices produce an inordinate amount of waste, which is not only bad for the environment, but significantly affects profitability. Robotic technology however can help reduce the amount of waste created because of its ability to ensure accuracy and precision. An investment in this technology, like 3D printers for example, may be a daunting task for many businesses. In the long run however, reduced waste and standardized materials will positively impact profitability.

— Higher Quality

— 3D Printing

With most robotic systems completely automated, manufacturing parts and materials will be much more consistent, with a higher quality. By removing human error and inconsistency, these machines can take advantage of speed, efficiency and repeatability to ensure better overall quality.

The introduction of 3D printing is continuing to grow in the construction industry. Now it is possible to print complex, layered, parts and objects that can be used in the construction of homes, buildings, bridges and roads. In Addition, robotic machines can standardize the production of pieces that can be used throughout various projects, saving both time and money.

— Brick Laying

— Demolition One of the earliest uses of robotics in construction has been demolition. Considering the number of construction projects currently in place, speeding up the demolition process can provide a large saving of time and money. Breaking down walls, crushing concrete, and gathering all debris is the first step in many construction processes, and robotics is making these processes much more efficient.

Although there is a belief that robotics is used for modern processes only, this is not the case. Machines have been developed to increase efficiency in tasks like brick laying. Although residential construction has been slow to adopt technology and change, robotics in brick laying should be a serious consideration. It is a rather simple process whereby construction workers simply feed bricks into a machine, and using CAD software, it is laid out accurately and precisely. Some of the most advanced brick laying machines can complete an entire house within a few days.

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How Virtual Reality Will Change the Construction Industry By CONSTRUCTION WORLD, www.constructionworld.org, @const_world_org

The use of virtual reality in the construction industry continues to grow, providing an extremely immersive experience for users. Although the entertainment and automotive industries are quick to adopt this technology, the construction industry is not far behind. Virtual reality provides an extremely versatile tool in construction, and its applications can be seen in multiple areas. This article discusses the current uses of virtual reality in construction, the benefits of its application and how it may impact the future of the industry. 138

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3D Models and Virtual Reality To better understand virtual reality, one must start by recognizing the importance of 3D models. One of virtual reality’s most prominent use in construction is through building information modeling (BIM), and works by collecting a series of images to create detailed three-dimensional pictures. A variety of technologies, like 3D laser scanning and drone collected imagery are used to create these lifelike and vivid set of pictures. For real estate developers, designers and architects, this newfound design experience is able to take potential customers and clients on a virtual tour of homes, buildings, skyscrapers and offices – before a project even breaks ground. On a smaller scale, home and office renovations, redesigns and small

Future Applications As it stands, construction companies are not using virtual reality to its fullest capabilities, and only aid in certain parts of a project’s process. Virtual reality is mainly used in pre-production as a design feature, but also has the ability to provide accurate projections during the course of a given project. Although the benefits of virtual reality are well known, the technology’s main obstacle lies in its public perception. Because virtual reality originated from the video game industry, construction companies and customers alike may be skeptical to adapt its use. As it stands, the current technology is quite effective, but changing people’s perception and

construction projects can also take advantage of 3D models, to create a more accurate plan of client’s demands, established during the pre-construction stage. A set of virtual reality glasses brings these 3D models to life, allowing users to immerse themselves into a finished product. Apart from assisting in the design phase, 3D models and virtual reality is starting to be implemented during the construction process as well. 3D models and virtual reality are slowly being introduced during highcoordination and architecturallycomplex projects. Conflicts and mistakes can be found on a 3D model, during the construction process and this data can divert any errors before it is made on a construction site. Computer-generated imagery also helps to envision the end-results of a project during the design stages.

increasing its application in more professional settings will help expand the technology. In order for this to happen, more construction companies must apply virtual reality, which will help to showcase the benefits of this technology. One element that may help push virtual reality to the forefront of construction would be the growing number of younger workers in construction. Younger generations are far more open to change, with many who are eager to innovate and revolutionize the construction industry. With the influx of virtual reality software, programs and apps, its acceptance will only continue to grow, and will eventually influence construction in a much more impactful way.

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Top 10

Construction Technology Trends to Look Out For By CONSTRUCTION WORLD, www.constructionworld.org, @const_world_org

Construction technology is constantly evolving, with innovations ranging from powerful GPS tracking solutions, to new construction apps introduced to the market every day. In Construction World’s ‘10 Construction Technology Trends to Watch Out For,’ we assess what particular construction technologies are spreading like wildfire, as well as outline overarching trends that the industry is currently going through. With new materials, designs and greater uses of digital and mobile, the construction industry is going through a technological renaissance that only continues to grow. Many of the latest technology trends listed below are only present in niche areas of the construction industry, but expect to see these innovations transforming construction sooner rather than later.

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— Mobile will become widespread —

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Often times, trends in consumer behaviors slowly seep into the workplace. One area where we are seeing this is through the slow integration of smartphones and mobile technology into work processes, extending much farther than simple emails and phone calls. In 2015, 64% of American adults were smartphone owners, up from 35% in 2011. Smartphones are not only used for communication, but act as an entryway into the online world. Social media, watching videos, GPS capabilities and keeping up with breaking news have become the main uses for mobile technology, but some companies are tapping into other functionalities to aid in the workplace. A survey done in 2014 by Gartner suggests that roughly 40 percent of workers at large enterprises use their personally owned mobile device for work purposes. This number is only going to up, with more workplaces encouraging smartphone use or allowing a BYOD (Bring your own device) policy. The 40 percent of respondents who use smartphones for work typically do so for email, phone calls and GPS tracking. Many of these functions however, are not specific to any company and have become convenient alternatives. In the future, expect to see greater commitments by businesses to maximize smartphone use beyond basic communication, ultimately integrating work-related functions through mobile. We foresee the following mobile features to become much more widespread in all industries, but specifically in construction.

Mobile Reporting Through mobile construction apps, companies are provided with files like blueprints, plans and contracts directly through their device in an electronic form. Whether a construction worker, foreman or project managers find themselves in the office, field or on the road, greater access to information can only be a good thing. With all pertinent data now available

through mobile, reporting is much easier. With mobile construction apps, administrative tasks can be automated and executed much more efficiently. Everything form job costing, scheduling, invoicing, daily progress reporting and timesheet processes can be done in a matter of minutes. Rather than relying on back office staff for reports, mobile reporting allows users to effectively use their data and information to generate reports whenever they wish, from where ever. More importantly, mobile reporting ensures that construction companies are equipped with up-to-date and relevant information, rather than having to rely on month old reports. A series of project management apps are emerging, in addition to the growing number of construction software that are now providing mobile capabilities. To stay current and competitive in the fast moving construction industry, top businesses are utilizing mobile in innovative and exciting ways. Through speeding up traditionally slow and outdated processes, mobile provides companies a unique opportunity to conduct all business functions in a more efficient manner. Expect to see the number of mobile construction apps continue to grow, and look out for greater uses of mobile by traditional construction software companies. A Study by Gartner predicts that by the end of 2017, market demand for mobile app development services will grow by 5 times, and by 2019, the 2.1 billion phones worldwide will become depended on for full enterprise capabilities.

Advanced Uses for GPS Although GPS tracking solutions aren’t a new innovation, they are being used in creative and resourceful ways within construction. First and foremost, surveying has improved dramatically since the implementation of GPS, with crews no longer needing to use traditional surveying equipment. Collecting data for prospective project sites as well as sites under construction is now done more quickly,

and accurately using GPS units. Another area where GPS tracking solutions are used is within fleet management. Project managers now equip each vehicle with a GPS device that can be tracked on a computer or on smartphones, which allows teams to know where a given vehicle is. Furthermore, lost or stolen equipment is now better tracked through GPS solutions. Locating equipment has become incredibly simple, and generating maps and allowing you to pinpoint the exact location of any piece of equipment. In terms of the growth of GPS technology, applications in autonomous vehicles and wearable technology are on the rise.

GPS will expand with driverless vehicles As the robotic revolution continues, driverless or autonomous vehicles continue to grow. Driverless vehicles are expected to be available to the public as early as 2020, but this technology is capable of extending much farther than commercial cars. Buses, trains and trucks are also being worked on for a self-driving upgrade, with construction fleets not far behind. Construction equipment manufacturers are already working on autonomous vehicles that are capable of creating efficiencies on jobsites. Caterpillar and John Deere are currently working on dozers with automatic blade control with hopes of developing fully autonomous and driverless versions. The construction industry is also borrowing from the mining industry, with a piece of equipment by Tokyo– based Komatsu which uses GPS to move high-grade ore without the need of a driver. GPS becomes even more important with the influx of driverless vehicles, providing a reliable and powerful guide to automated machinery. GPS tracking solutions are also being relied upon for positioning and sensor integration that autonomous vehicles will need to avoid accidents and ensure safety.

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— More companies will adopt cloud-based solutions —

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Although associated with mobile technology, cloud-based solutions is actually quite different. Cloud refers to new technologies and services that allows data to be transferred over distribution networks into a secure location often maintained by a vendor. Cloud providers serve a large number of clients, with data transfers between vendors and clients done safely and securely. Mobile on the other hand, is associated with new devices and interfaces that can be accessed through internet browsers. Despite its similarities, mobile is typically a consumer-facing service, but is becoming more commonplace in the professional spheres. Furthermore, cloud computing or cloud software is used more by businesses and companies. Although there is a perception that the construction industry uses outdated forms of software or management systems, a growing number of businesses are shifting to cloud-based software to handle everything from project management, accounting, and payroll, among other important functions. With more than half of prospective software buyers still using pen and paper and countless spreadsheets, a younger generation of workers are influencing more traditional-minded businesses to adopt technology. Here are some reasons why many companies are making the jump to cloud-based software: •

SCALABILITY: Cloud construction software is becoming a more popular solution for businesses that plan to grow. With a solution that is extremely flexible, adding resources, storage and bandwidth is much easier than traditional construction software. Furthermore adding or removing users can also be done in seconds.

MOBILITY: cloud-based options allow for easy access anywhere with Internet connection. Real-time data is at a contractor’s fingertips, which can help if pressing decisions need to be made.

COLLABORATION: With users in various locations able to review, edit and examine the same documents, it is much easier to work together and make suggestions using real time information.

LOWER COST OF OWNERSHIP (LCO): With cloud-based software, the costs often associated with traditional serverbased solutions are eliminated. No need to upgrade to a more powerful server or update operating systems. In addition, a large number of solutions are subscriptionbased, and can help companies avoid large start-up fees.


— Prefabricated Construction grows into the mainstream — Another new construction technology gaining traction is prefabricated or offsite construction. Prefabricated construction is the practice of assembling a variety of components of a structure at a manufacturing site and transporting those sub-assemblies to the location of the construction jobsite. Prefabricated construction is sometimes thought of as a low-end and mass produced mode of construction. In reality however, it is quite the opposite. Prefabricated construction is becoming more common, improving in quality, and has become available at all price points. Despite the perception of prefabrication, there are numerous benefits to this type of construction. Of the latest technology trends, ones that merge environmentalism and green techniques with technology are ones to watch out for going forward. Some of the benefits that prefabricated construction provide include:

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ECO-FRIENDLINESS: since prefabricated sub-assemblies are constructed in a factory, extra materials can be recycled. This is a vast improvement from traditional construction practices that often send large amounts of waste to landfills.

FINANCIAL SAVINGS: Prefabrication is beginning to cater to all price points and budgets, often creating an affordable option for all companies. Savings can be found in bulk discounts from material suppliers, and a shorter construction time can save businesses in the long run.

SAFETY: Since sub-assemblies are created in a factorycontrolled environment utilizing dry materials, there is less risk for problems associated with moisture, environmental hazards and dirt. This ensures that those on the construction site, as well as a project’s eventual tenants are less likely to be exposed to weather-related health risks. THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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— Modular construction will be used for more than just temporary structures — Often associated with prefabrication is modular construction. This construction technology trend centers on values of flexibility, multiuse and versatile design. Once seen as a method for portable classrooms or trailers, modular construction has evolved into a viable option for everything from retail structures to affordable housing units. Often times, modular structures utilize offsite and prefabricated construction techniques to achieve a consistent quality. This particular method provides many benefits including shorter construction time, and a more cost-effective alternative. Furthermore, modular buildings are much easier to relocate, and can be reused for a variety of purposes. Interestingly, another trend occurring alongside modular construction is the rise of permanent modular structures. Because of its lower cost, in combination with growing concerns for environmental damage done by traditional on-site builds, many retailers, banks, restaurants are utilizing modular construction practices and its 30 to 90 day timeframe as a viable, long-term alternative. Some of the world’s biggest companies have adopted permanent modular construction principles, like McDonalds and Google, so expect to see many more of these structures in the near future.


— Virtual reality will continue to expand —

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Another construction technology beginning to gain steam is virtual reality. The use of virtual reality in the construction industry continues to grow, providing an extremely immersive experience for users. Although the entertainment and automotive industries are quick to adopt this technology, the construction industry is not far behind. Virtual reality provides an extremely versatile tool in construction, and its applications can be seen in multiple areas. Real estate developers, designers and architects, are taking advantage of this newfound design experience to take potential customers and clients on a virtual tour of homes, buildings, skyscrapers and offices – before a project even breaks ground. On a smaller scale, home and office renovations, redesigns and small construction projects can also take advantage of 3D models, to create a more accurate plan of client’s demands, established during the pre-construction stage. A set of virtual reality glasses brings these 3D models to life, allowing users to immerse themselves into a finished product.

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— Drones will serve a variety of functions — Although not seen primarily as a construction technology just yet, drones are becoming more and more common in the industry. One way that drones will and are already making an impact is through improved project evaluation. Rather than having surveyors conduct inspections on foot, drones utilize aerial surveys to evaluate any given jobsite. In addition, drones can be used as building and contractor surveillance. Rather than paying for security personnel, drones are able to take their place, saving companies time and money, and allowing businesses to reallocate their resources to other areas. Drones can also assist project managers and contractors of large projects to oversee and supervise the productivity of all construction workers through drone-assisted video and photography.

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— Wearable technology will increase safety and communication —

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Although already a popular consumer device, wearable technology is also making its way into the construction industry, primarily for increased safety and communication. Smartwatches, smart glasses and smart clothing are becoming more popular and are capable of making an impact in terms of health and safety through tracking vital signs, and allowing injured workers to signal for help. Often connected to mobile construction apps, wearables provide another way for site supervisors other employees to keep track of others.

In 2014, 4,821 workers were killed on the job, which amounts to roughly 13 deaths per day. Although this number is going down, any safety precautions that construction companies implement must be a serious consideration. Wearable tech is often connected through construction apps, so expect to see the number of wearables available surge, along with the mobile revolution that the construction industry is currently undergoing.

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— 3D Printing will become a serious consideration —

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Another construction tech trend taking off is 3D printing. 3D printing is a manufacturing process by which a threedimensional object is created from a digital model. The process entails laying down successive layers of thin horizontal cross-sections until the entire project is completed. As this technology continues to grow, demand is also on the rise in many industries. 3D Printing is now present in the retail, aviation and healthcare spheres, and is steadily growing in construction. To execute largescale construction projects, super-size printers are needed in conjunction with specialized materials. This unique method has proven to allow for shorter project times and less waste production, which creates a more efficient construction system. If more companies adopt this latest technology trend, some of the benefits you will see include increased speed and accuracy, lower labor costs and less of a need for materials.


— Augmented reality will soon match virtual reality —

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Another tech trend we are seeing being adopted in construction is augmented reality. Augmented reality is a copied view of a physical environment, with its elements supplemented by computer-generated images. In comparison, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated environment, whereas augmented reality takes what is already existing in the real world and enhances it. Although the two concepts are related, there is a clear distinction between them. For construction specifically, augmented reality has the potential to impact a wide range of professionals, from architects, engineers, project managers and many more.

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— Self-Healing concrete will be used on roads, buildings and homes — The most widely produced and consumed material in the construction industry is concrete, and is necessary for the creation of buildings, roads and bridges. According to a WWF report, by 2030, urban growth in China and India will place global cement output at 5 billion metric tons per year, with our current output already making up 8% of the total global emissions. This number is only slated to go up. With this in mind, scientists have been developing ways of limiting the environmental impact that concrete has, with selfhealing concrete being slowly introduced. Hendrik Jonkers, a microbiologist at Delft University has developed an innovative plan to increase the lifespan of concrete. The process includes embedding self-activating limestone-producing bacteria within the building material itself. It is designed to decrease the amount of new concrete produced, and lowers the costs for maintenance and repairs that city officials, building owners and homeowners typically have to pay.

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SINCE 1955

“We were women with electricity in our veins, cement dust on our shoes.” Alice Ashley, co-founder of NAWIC

www.nawic.co.uk (Afiliated since 2003) Twitter: @nawicUK @nawicLDN , @nawicMIDS, @nawicNE THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2017

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COMING SOON

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS NORTH AMERICA

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25th January 2018 Nominations Closed

29th March 2018 Finalists Announced 26th April 2018 Judging Day

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*Dates are a subject to change

24th May 2018 Awards Dinner

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25th September 2017 Nominations Open

For more information about The European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards visit our website www.wiceawards.com or contact Skye Seymourr skye.seymour@wiceawards.com

European Women In Construction & Engineering 2017  
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