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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 60 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY RAINY

47 32

CROSS CAMPUS

YALE CORNERS HIDDEN RES. COLLEGE SPACES

TAILGATE

LOCKDOWN

BARS

Students weigh in on first year of new tailgating policies

CRISIS PLANS PUT INTO ACTION OVER BREAK

New legislation looks to combat gun violence in Elm City bars

PAGE 10 THROUGH THE LENS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 5 CITY

YALE FALLS TO HARVARD FOR SEVENTH YEAR

The home stretch. The light

at the end of the tunnel called fall semester is now distantly visible. One can almost see a single green glow, minute and faraway, perhaps at the end of a dock...

BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER

All clear, except for the filter. After the campus lockdown was lifted last Monday, the University Instagrammed a photo of Harkness Tower with the caption “All clear.” The Instagram received over 1,000 likes and somewhere, a Yale press office employee got his wings. Too soon. In response to a USA Today tweet about the lockdown on campus, an Obama administration official made the following joke on Facebook: “Waitlisted…” The reply was quickly deleted and the official has since claimed the statement to be an accident according to the Daily Caller. Ironically, the official was a member of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. ‘What do you do with a B.A. in English?’ was probably

one of the songs performed at a recent karaoke night for graduate students organized by the Yale Graduate Housing Office. Graduate Housing residents enjoyed the night out at Karaoke Heroes on Crown Street. Guess which library this time! In the vastly underrated

Style section of CNN, a photo feature ran this week on the world’s “most exquisite libraries.” The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library was recognized and its 50th anniversary this year was noted. “All light comes through the stones in the wall, and the honey-color trickle of sun rays makes it magical,” the piece said. Many former prep school students may have also be delighted to find that the Phillips Exeter Academy library was also recognized. Winter art is coming. White paper sculptures on display along Chapel Street store windows are part of a ‘winter wonderland’ display from the Paier College of Art.

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

THE GAME Yale and Harvard met on the football field for the 130th time on Saturday, Nov. 23. Although Yale leads the all-time series 65–57–8, Harvard prevailed 34–7 in the Yale Bowl for the Crimson’s seventh straight victory over Yale on the gridiron.

Professor found dead BY MAREK RAMILO AND ISAAC STANLEYBECKER STAFF REPORTERS Over a week after Yale assistant professor Samuel See was found dead in a New Haven jail cell, few details have emerged — and many questions remain — surrounding the cause of his death. See was detained Nov. 23 following a domestic dispute at his home on St. John Street. He was found unresponsive in his cell on Nov. 24, but as of Sunday the death was listed as “pending further study,” according to the chief state medical examiner’s office. See, whose research focused on British and American modernist literature and sexuality, was on leave this semester from Yale’s English Department. Both the Connecticut Judicial Branch and the NHPD are investigating the circumstances surrounding See’s death, accord-

A Canadian Thanksgiving.

Students in the “Writing Tribal Histories” seminar traveled to Montreal, Canada over the break to study the city’s indigenous history. There’s something rotten in the state of Cambridge.

“The UC, Going Forward Into Irrelevance” read the headline of a Harvard Crimson editorial on their recent student body elections, which were won by a joke ticket. At least nobody won their YCC position as a joke...? THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1905 The membership list of the Banjo Club is officially released. A joint practice is set up for the Banjo and Mandolin clubs. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE goydn.com/xcampus

Gun scare shakes campus

ing to press releases issued on Wednesday by Judicial Branch spokesperson Rhonda StearleyHebert and NHPD spokesman David Hartman. “[See] was alert and communicating with Judicial Marshals throughout his detainment,” Stearley-Hebert said in the Judicial Branch’s statement. “Marshals found him nonresponsive in his cell at approximately 6 a.m. on Nov. 24 [and] immediately provided CPR and other lifesaving efforts.” She added that an internal review is being conducted to make sure the Judicial Marshals’ policies and procedures were followed. Hartman said See was placed in police custody after being treated for a minor injury at Yale-New Haven Hospital following a confrontation with his husband, Sunder Ganglani, last Saturday afternoon. Although See and his husband SEE PROFESSOR PAGE 4

A tip regarding plans for a shooting on Yale’s campus Monday brought SWAT teams to the University and forced a five-hourplus lockdown, which ended only when New Haven and Yale Police Department officials said they could be confident that the threat had either passed or never existed. At 9:48 a.m. on Monday, the NHPD received a call from an anonymous man who said that his roommate had a gun and was headed to the University’s campus with plans to shoot people, according to NHPD spokesman David Hartman. Hartman said that authorities were not able to extract further information from the caller, who hung up just seconds after placing the call from a phone booth in the 300 block on Columbus Avenue. At 10:50 a.m., the Yale Alert System mandated a campus-wide lockdown via email, phone call and text message to students, faculty and staff. Updates continued throughout the day but no new informaSEE GUN SCARE PAGE 4

Yale students win Marshall, Rhodes SEVEN CURRENT AND FORMER YALE STUDENTS RECEIEVED THE TWO PRESTIGIOUS SCHOLARSHIPS TO STUDY IN ENGLAND BY RISHABH BHANDARI STAFF REPORTER After a grueling application process that began with informational sessions in February and ended with a series of intensive interviews, seven Yale students will be studying in England next year after winning either a Rhodes or Marshall scholarship. Last Sunday, three Yale students were named as members of the Rhodes Scholars Class of 2014. The winners — Isabel Beshar ’14, Vinay Nayak ’14 and Suzanna Fritzberg ’14 — all said they experienced disbelief and delight when they first heard they had received the Rhodes Scholarship, which provides full funding for students to study at the University of Oxford for two or three years. Four graduates — Alyssa Bilinksi ’13, Tantum “Teddy” Collins ’13, Natalia Emanuel ’13 and Derek Park ’13 — expressed similar sentiments upon winning the Marshall Scholarship, which covers the cost of graduate study and living at a British university

of the recipient’s choice for up to two years. “It’s been a big shock. I keep asking my family if I’ve been dreaming this,” Beshar said. “The past few days have been kind of crazy.” Katherine Dailinger, director for national fellowships at the Yale Center for International and Professional Experience, said that while dozens of students apply for one of Yale’s nominations for these elite scholarships, student interest in the award may have been even higher than usual this year because Yale won nine Rhodes Scholarships last year, breaking the University’s record. Dailinger added that Beshar, Nayak and Fritzberg are all “wonderful scholars [who showed] desire to fight the world’s fights as well as a demonstrated potential to do that.” Although no Yale students or alumni won Marshall Scholarships in 2012, the University had one winner in 2011 and three winSEE MARSHALL RHODES PAGE 6

1979 – 2013

Students, colleauges remember See BY MAREK RAMILO AND ISAAC STANLEYBECKER STAFF REPORTERS Samuel See, an assistant professor of English at Yale known by many as a compassionate teacher and gifted scholar, was found dead on Nov. 24 in a New Haven jail cell, according to spokespeople for the State Judicial Branch and the New Haven Police Department. He was 34. See, who came to Yale in July 2009, was on leave this semester from the English Department, where he focused on British and American modernist literature and sexuality studies. On Nov. 27, the NHPD and the Connecticut Judicial Branch — the state department that administers the detain-

ment facility at 1 Union Ave. where See died — issued press statements outlining the circumstances of the unexpected death, the causes of which are still under investigation. Colleagues at Yale and at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where See received his Ph.D., said the scholar’s passing was a loss not only to the academic field in which he excelled but to the many students he inspired as a teacher and advisor. “He was a committed teacher and an innovative scholar with a sparkling intelligence and an open, generous heart,” said Langdon Hammer ’80 GRD ’89, chair of Yale’s English Department. “He deeply touched all of us who worked with him here at Yale.”

John Rogers ’84 GRD ’89, the director of undergraduate studies for the department, said in a Thursday email to the News that See greatly shaped the intellectual lives of dozens of Yale students during his time at the University. See’s professors and colleagues at UCLA shared the sense of grief that swept the Yale English Department over the Thanksgiving holiday. Christopher Looby, an English professor at UCLA, said in a Friday email that See’s death came as tragic news to those who admired him as a charismatic teacher and imaginative scholar. UCLA English professor Michael North said he was bewildered by the news. SEE OBITUARY PAGE 4

YALE


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “We rarely stop to reflect upon, much less treasure, the lessons we have yaledailynews.com/opinion

Knocking out racist myths A couple days before Thanksgiving break, we received an email from Yale University Police Chief Ronnell Higgins. The email’s subject, “Public Safety Update,” certainly sounded innocuous enough, but its contents quickly dispelled this assumption. “The New Haven police have shared with us that they are beginning to see incidents of something called the ‘Knockout Game’: groups of teenagers or young adults coming up to individuals on public streets and hitting them,” Higgins wrote. “The goal appears to be to hit and then to run away, rather than robbery.” Higgins proceeded to mention several recent incidents that occured fairly close to Yale’s campus and added that “the ‘Knockout Game’ appears to be a national trend.” I appreciate Chief Higgins’s concern. I especially appreciate the work done by the Yale University Police Department and the New Haven Police Department to keep me safe. But Chief Higgins’s email plays into a troubling media narrative. It perpetuates a myth founded not in facts, but in selective statistics and racism. I am certain that Chief Higgins was unaware of the sordid history of his information, yet I feel someone must point out the damaging fallacies undergirding reports of a national “Knockout Game” trend. In recent weeks, pundits have been sounding the alarm about the “Knockout Game.” According to CNN, the Knockout Game is a trend that is “spreading,” with victims “piling up.” Fox News expounded on this, reporting that “confirmed thugs on the street” are “polar bear hunting” — looking for white victims. A great number of these media reports claim that the assailants are usually black, the victims usually white. Mark Steyn wrote in the National Review: “Groups of black youths roam the streets looking for a solitary pedestrian, preferably white.” Steyn proceeded to refer to the Knockout perpetrators as “moronic savage[s].” Respected journalists Thomas Sowell and Alec Torres repeated his claims. The fear that bands of black youths are skulking the streets and terrorizing innocent passersby is hardly new. Following the Civil War, plantation owners reported mobs of former slaves threatening their wives and daughters. For the next century, these claims — wildly inflated and usually outright false — were the justification for lynching and Jim Crow laws. Pundits of that period used racialized language to spread fear of “savages” and “thugs.” Sound familiar? Many liken the hysteria surrounding the Knockout Game with “wilding,” the idea, popular in the 1980s and 1990s, that groups of dark-skinned youths were on the streets making trouble for mostly white pedestri-

ans. Fears of “wilding” led to the wrongful convictions and incarceration of countless teens, SCOTT including STERN the Central Park Five. A Stern Reports of Perspective the Knockout Game have been around since the '90s, though they remain isolated and rare — often reported with racist code words. The oft-reported claim of an epidemic of black-on-white street crime is a bigoted myth. In fact, the opposite appears to be the case. In 2011, there were 3,645 victims of “racially motivated hate crimes,” according to data compiled by the FBI. Nearly 72 percent of the victims, an appalling majority, were targeted because of “anti-black bias.” Pundits have cherry-picked the data in order to wildly sensationalize claims that murderous bands of young men, especially black men, are roaming the streets, knocking out passersby. In this country, aggravated assaults occur at a rate of one per minute. There are more than 4 million violent attacks each year, 125,000 with “hands and fists.” With so many cases of random street violence, to interpret a few isolated instances of Knockout as a national trend is simply wrong. Philadelphia police have seen 5,000 violent assaults without guns this year, and just one of these has been confirmed as the Knockout Game. There is — and always will be — street crime. But that does not a national trend make. By treating every random and alleged assault as a potential case of Knockout Game fever, the media is attempting to create the false impression of an epidemic — one regularly couched in racist language. As one police spokesman told the New York Times last week, “If there ever was an urban myth, this was it.” Urban myths derived from selective statistics and racialized punditry allow policymakers to enact harsh laws that disproportionately affect persons of color, such as New York’s stop-andfrisk policy. These myths also mislead police officers, such as Ronnell Higgins. Chief Higgins’s email, while undoubtedly sent with the best of intentions and thankfully not hypothesizing about the race of the assailants, nonetheless perpetuates this dangerous idea. The real trend at hand isn’t the Knockout Game — it’s the epidemic of powerful people deceptively spreading fear. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. His columns run on Mondays. Contact him at scott. stern@yale.edu .

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learned from those we love."

'MARIA ANN' ON 'LESSONS FROM MY AUNT'

GUEST COLUMNIST CRAIG WRIGHT

The state of online education MOOC mania indeed! MOOCs — massive open online courses — have dominated the national headlines about online higher education. Numerically, however, the new MOOCs constitute only about 10 percent of what is going on in online education today — and at Yale, despite their potential importance, even less than that. So what is happening with online education at Yale? In his inaugural address on Oct. 13, President Peter Salovey described his priorities. First, the primary mission of the online initiative will be to improve education at Yale. Yes, we will push forward with online education, but take what we learn from the experience to reinvigorate teaching and learning here on campus. In other words, the online engagement can, and should, add value to what has been historically the essence of the Yale educational experience — intense personal engagement and deep critical thinking. The online initiative should be multifarious in its approaches and broadly based, involving all three parts of the University: the professional schools, the Graduate School and Yale College. This coming summer, with the approval of the Course of Study Committee, there will likely be as many as 17 online courses offered through the Yale Summer Online program, an increase from 12 this past summer. Yale College students constitute 97 percent of those taking those online courses for credit. Equally important, Yale faculty like me who have taught these online courses for credit uniformly concluded that they were as demanding for the students as the regular courses we teach. During the spring and fall terms, language students are currently enrolled for credit in an innovative program, in conjunction with Columbia and Cornell, for the teaching of language courses with small enrollments, such as on Dutch and Zulu. Wags have deemed such courses SPOCs (small, private, online courses). The success of this initiative suggests that similar consortia might be formed among graduate or professional schools to bring together students online in courses with small enrollments. Faculty around Yale, such as law professor Akhil Amar, are engaged in exciting online projects. Amar will be using the lecture material developed for his “Constitutional Law” MOOC, launching in January, to enhance his Yale Summer Online course in 2014 as well as his courses on campus. Others, such as Jim Rolf, instructor of Calculus of Func-

ANNELISA LEINBACH/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

tions with One Variable, have built upon a platform developed by Coursera, an educational disseminator with which Yale is partnering. Rolf has done this, not to create a MOOC on Coursera, but rather to reimagine how a basic math course might be conceived and executed at Yale; preliminary student evaluations are highly positive. Professor Laura Wexler is participating in an online experiment this fall known as a distributed open collaborative course, or DOCC for short. The goal of the DOCC is to recognize the collaborative nature of learning in a digital age. As such, Wexler made available components from her “Gender & Sexuality in Media & Popular Culture” course to faculty members at 14 other institutions. In turn, she herself was able to use components from courses offered at these other schools. Leaders of HackYale, undergrads Rafi Khan and Zack Reneau-Wedeen, have suggested ways in which online projects might enhance this exciting, experimental program — undergrads teaching undergrads. And grad student Sara Ronis has been working to evaluate the impact of online teaching, and how best practices might be shared with grad students — the college instructors of tomorrow. Looking beyond Yale College and the Graduate School to the professional schools: Here we see equally innovative examples of faculty implementing online programs that can further the missions of the schools

by expanding the numbers of those who benefit from a Yale education. President Salovey in his inauguration also talked about the opportunities to harness new technology to expand the reach of Yale’s great teachers to “more people in more places.” The School of Nursing now offers a hybrid degree program to healthcare professionals where roughly half of the coursework is completed online; this enables practicing professionals to gain an advanced degree without interrupting their careers. The School of Forestry and Environmental Studies has offered in-person executive certificate programs for some time, but in 2013 was able to extend the reach of the programs through on-line delivery to “students” who studied in Latin America. And the School of Management is delivering two courses online this semester, in which students enrolled in the Global Network for Advanced Management study in a virtual classroom with Yale SOM students. Soon the School of Medicine will implement a new curriculum that will take advantage of instructional videos in combination with flipping aspects of the curriculum to enhance learning and provide formative feedback to students and faculty. Eventually, these medical videos may well be “exported” to students around the world. But back to MOOCs. Yale was an innovator in this field; under the leadership of Professor Diana Kleiner, Open Yale Courses were created, starting in 2007, and

now 42 are available on YouTube and at iTunesU. Open Yale Courses were and remain the gold standard of “first generation” MOOCs. The first of Yale’s second generation MOOCs will appear in January and will offer state-of-the-art content by leading professors in their fields: Professors Akhil Amar, Paul Bloom, Robert Shiller and Diana Kleiner. The introductions to their courses can be seen on the Yale Coursera website. The problem to the moment for online education at Yale has been a lack of information. Thus, next month we will launch a website where the community will find vastly more information about online education here. But more immediately, to get the word out as to what is happening, the Online Education Committee will hold an Open Forum this afternoon at 4:00 p.m. in Linsly-Chittenden Hall. President Salovey has emphasized that Yale’s online initiative will only be successful if it is faculty-driven — ideas must percolate up from those faculty excited about reimagining the classroom experience, not imposed from on high by an administrative office. So please join us this afternoon to learn more and give us your ideas as to how digital initiatives might be used to energize the classroom by those teachers who wish to do so. CRAIG WRIGHT is Henry L. and Lucy G. Moses professor of music and the academic director of online education. Contact him at craig. wright@yale.edu .

The bearded man and me Coming home is always a mixed bag frequently full of boisterous relatives, warm nights on the couch with parents and time to reflect while briefly outside of the college rat race mentality. But it’s a mixed bag because it also means lying in bed, staring at the ceiling and thinking, “How many more days like this will I have?” What if Metro North derails tomorrow or there’s a gunman on campus — and the thin balloon of invincibility is popped? What if something happens to my parents? Who will I call to feel safe? Not just comforted, but safe. Gratitude for each day is an ideal, at least in my own case, very inconsistently practiced. But the gratitude that rushes in at home during nights like those isn’t just plain gratitude. It comes with a generous burst of dread. Dread because precious moments are so short, and once you realize you’re in the middle of one, even shorter. I’d give a lot to take this awareness away and to live in the moment again the way kids do, when the “big picture” meant Arthur at 4 p.m., not thinking about internships, plans for after graduation, marriage and the possibility of being alone. But being at Yale, you’ve got to put this wistful mood aside. There are papers to write and goals to make. You shelve your

v u l n e ra bility far away and focus on running the race; when you need a break (but JOHN have AROUTIOUNIAN can’t one long enough Johnny Come when each day feels Lately shorter a n d shorter, daylight savings time or not), it’s off to Toad’s we go. Pause, rewind, repeat. Each time, we get a little more impatient and a little harder on the inside. But on the thirtieth time you encounter the bearded man who paces up and down Chapel Street, occasionally asking for money, something happens. You’re sitting in Starbucks with a professor, and the bearded man comes in. The professor says, “Hey man! Want some coffee?” He stops to say he’s doing just fine, a cup of coffee would be great, thanks. He asks who I am. “Oh, just one of my students!” When he leaves, the professor explains that he’s a regular at his church. And no matter how little the man has, he always puts something in the collec-

tion basket. I bring the conversation back to where it was — some obscure book theme that now seems pathetically trivial — hoping he doesn’t notice as I pretend to look at the British Art Museum display and wipe the moisture from the corner of my eye. And then there’s the day full of missteps, when you come back to your room and your ritualistic online news browsing is interrupted by wandering thoughts about that unpleasant look from someone in section, the friend you’ve neglected, the grandmother you haven’t called in a month. You catch yourself, and you think, “No! No time for these thoughts! Save it for break.” And then, on Facebook, that picture of the pope kissing a terrifyingly disfigured man pops up. He is huddled in the pope’s embrace. The cynic, the rat racer on your left shoulder smirks: “What a great PR stunt!” But then you keep looking. The man looks awful. It’s the type of thing that might make you cross the street if you saw it in person. And then you realize — you just thought of him as a “thing.” The balloon of invincibility is popped. You’re glad your roommate isn’t home, because your shirt quickly becomes damp from drying your eyes and you don’t want him to think you were doing anything involving bodily

fluids — especially crying. And in that moment, you love the pope, a better man than you can ever imagine you’ll be. In these moments, and countless others like it, our feelings are exposed to everyone — and most of all, to ourselves. What’s unsettling in all these moments is the possibility that not everything is a construct, that maybe there are things, including untapped energies within us, that point to the transcendent — that maybe some meaning was, and is, and will always be there long after we’re gone. It’s almost as if, even in our world, we’re still haunted, to paraphrase Flannery O’Connor, by the suspicion that we’re here for an actual reason, and that reason is equally true for all of us, whether or not we believe in it. The thanks we give on Thanksgiving comes and goes. It’s already mostly gone, in fact. But we’re still here, operating in our broken world as our broken selves. But our lives are filled with moments like these when, if we only stop to listen, the ineffable person inside is asking, however faintly: “Remember me?” JOHN AROUTIOUNIAN is a junior in Jonathan Edwards College. His columns run on alternate Mondays. Contact him at john.aroutiounian@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth.” CHARLES DICKENS ENGLISH WRITER

Admins underscore communication in scare BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER When reports of a gunman on Yale’s campus surfaced last Monday, administrators set into motion a series of procedures that they had hoped would never be necessary. In the wake of the scare — which began from an anonymous phone call to the New Haven Police Department and resulted in a campus-wide lockdown and room-byroom search of Old Campus — administrators told the News that they believe the University’s reactions to the situation were fast and effective, with campus-wide communication and emergency response plans smoothly put into effect. Students who were on and off campus during the incident echoed administrators’ opinions about the response to the scare, though many added that they believe the University could have provided more regular updates. “While we feel that the University responded quite well to the situation, there will always be areas for improvement,” University President Peter Salovey said over the weekend. “But generally, I’d like to stress that this incident went remarkably smoothly from an operational standpoint.” PLANNING FOR THE UNTHINKABLE The administration’s response on Monday was not improvised. According to University Director of Emergency Management Maria Bouffard, Yale maintains extensive emergency plans that cover situations including threats of a shooting on campus. The plan implemented last week — along with plans for other events such as hurricanes, power outages or floods — was developed through the University’s emergency operations team, a group of roughly 50 Yale department heads and other University administrators. The team, led by Bouffard and University Vice President Linda Lorimer, meets regularly to conduct tabletop exercises, in which the group walks through potential scenarios and develops responses. Providing information to the Yale community is a major part of the University’s plan for incidents, such as Monday’s, in which law enforcement officials play a major role. “We did implement our emergency communications plan and were pleased with the way it worked, getting timely information out to our community,” Bouffard said, adding that the University’s loudspeaker system played a critical role in staying in communication with the Yale community. As the whereabouts and eventually even the existence of the gunman became increasingly unclear, Yale shifted into a crisis mode. The group in charge of the emergency response quickly formed, led by Senior Adviser to the President Martha Highsmith. It also included Lorimer, Bouffard, Associate Vice President for Administration Janet Lindner and University Chief Communications Officer Elizabeth Stauderman. While the responsibility for finding the gunman fell to the police, a group of administrators in Woodbridge Hall, led by Highsmith, distributed information to students, staff and faculty members about the potential danger. The administrators made use of the Yale Alert system — which sends email, text messages and phone calls to the Yale community — along with Twitter and the speakers located throughout University buildings. Through the Yale Alert system, administrators sent 10 text messages and six emails with updates on the developing situation. In addition, the University posted eight tweets related to the gunman scare, all of which conveyed similar information to the text messages and emails. The team of administrators also coordinated with both Yale Police and the NHPD.

Students find tailgate chaotic BY JOSEPH VINSON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

GUSTAVO SANCHEZ/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The University implemented plans that had been developed by the emergency operations team, which includes Yale department heads and other administrators. Highsmith and Lindner served as points of communication for the two police forces, according to Salovey, and were “informed on an up-to-the-minute basis.” “The day also reinforced the strong partnerships developed with other law enforcement agencies, particularly New Haven Police and the FBI,” Lindner said, adding that local, state and federal law enforcement representatives frequently participate in the University’s emergency management team sessions. COMMUNICATING IN A CRISIS Students interviewed said they were largely satisfied with how the University kept them informed throughout the anxiety-riddled day. YCC Communications Director Andrew Grass ’16 said the University “definitely let students know what was going on,” describing the emergency system as effective. Still, a gap in communications from the University in the early afternoon caused some students to suggest that Yale should have sent more frequent updates. At 11:55 a.m., a Yale Alert message reiterated that the shelter-in-place order remained across campus. The next University-wide communication came nearly two hours later at 1:45 p.m., when a Yale Alert message announced that police would conduct a room-to-room search of campus. “[The alerts] could have been more frequent even if they were repeating themselves,” Austin Bryniarski ’16 said. Grass expressed the same sentiment. Students on Old Campus, which was the center of the search for the gunman, expressed frustration about receiving mixed messages from administrators and law enforcement officials as to whether they could leave campus for the Thanksgiving holiday during the lockdown. Greg Wang ’17, who lives in Bingham Hall on Old Campus, said he rescheduled several train tickets after receiving the shelter-in-place orders. But after asking an FBI officer through an open window whether or not he could leave, the officer — contrary to the University’s messages — told Wang he was free to go. “The restricted zone ended two feet away from my door,” said Wang, who eventually left Bingham at 3:45 p.m., several hours after he planned to depart. While Yale College students said they were generally satisfied with the communication they received from the University, other members of the Yale community were far less positive about Yale’s response. At Yale-New Haven Hospital, where many Yale students and faculty were working and studying, information appeared far less abundant. “I really had zero idea what was happening, and what areas were safe or to be avoided. The few text message and email warnings were nonspecific and repetitive,” Travis Rabbit MED ’14 said. “From [the

hospital] and the medical school campus, the warnings issued by loudspeaker were just muffled noise. CNN provided better updates on where to avoid than the campus warning system.” With most students away from campus for the Thanksgiving holiday and only occasional updates from Yale’s emergency system, many turned to social media sites for information on the suspected gunman. Twitter was a particularly active source of information for some students, as Yale and New Haven news publications posted updates on developments. EMERGENCIES TO COME Yale College Dean Mary Miller, who was in New York for much of the day but communicated through email with the parents of Yale College students, said that the importance of regular tabletop exercises was the most significant lesson she learned from the day. Other administrators expressed similar sentiments about the importance of planning for a variety of scenarios. But despite the general success of the University’s plans last week, an “after incident” group has now formed to assess and improve Yale’s procedures, which Bouffard described as standard operating procedure. Last Tuesday, she met with Lorimer to begin discussing the incident and possible refinements to University responses for future situations. In a Sunday email to the News, Bouffard said the full emergency operations team will meet in the coming days to further discuss Yale’s response to the gunman scare. “We are reviewing all aspects of the day, as we do in any emergency situation on campus, to learn what we can that might improve our protocols, and to reaffirm what worked well,” Lindner said. None of the administrators interviewed elaborated on what aspects of the University’s response might be altered. But Bouffard said that the incident showed there were some members of the community who did not receive the Yale Alerts, which the University will seek to rectify. She also added that the emergency management team is currently searching for ways to include other individuals around campus — such as visitors, surrounding residents and business-owners — in the Yale Alert system. Salovey said that even if the incident is proven to be a hoax, he believes that the University benefited from the experience by learning how to better structure its future response plans. “We are now even better prepared to address any emergency situation like this that may arise in the future,” Salovey said — though he added that he “fervently hopes it will not.” Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

Though streams of disappointed Yale students piled onto buses to return back to campus after the football team’s 34–7 defeat to Harvard on Nov. 23, students had been in high spirits at the tailgate before kickoff. This year marked the first Harvard-Yale game since the University tightened tailgating regulations and changed the location of the tailgate in 2012. Despite these policy changes, students danced, chatted and celebrated in the designated tailgate village in the hours before kickoff. Though students interviewed said they were generally satisfied with the pregame festivities, some said they were frustrated by the long lines for the shuttle to the Yale Bowl and the fact that the tailgate was required to end by kickoff. “It is the people you are with that makes the experience, so in that regard changes in regulation and location didn’t affect the atmosphere,” John Urwin ’14 said. This year’s tailgate was well attended, with 11 residential colleges, 10 undergraduate student organizations, nine graduate student organizations, nine Harvard houses and eight Harvard student groups holding registered tailgates, according to Assistant Athletic Director Andy Dunn. Though Dunn said he does not know the exact number of attendees at the tailgate, he said nearly 5,000 wristbands were given out to individuals over the age of 21 to signify that they could drink alcohol on the premises. “The athletic department is happy with how the tailgate went,” Dunn said. “We had a great turnout and think that everyone in attendance had a very positive experience.” Yale administrators tightened student tailgate policies after a woman was struck and killed by a U-Haul truck during the Harvard-Yale tailgate in 2011. The new rules banned kegs and vehicles in the village and required tailgates to end by kickoff at 12 p.m. At the time, many students were apprehensive about the

effect the regulations would have on their tailgating experience. Though students interviewed said this year’s tailgate was a success, some expressed dissatisfaction with various aspects of the event. Ben Mallet ’16 said the student section of the tailgate this year was crowded, disorganized and hard to navigate. Residential colleges provided catered food for their students in tents around the tailgate village, but these stations had to close before kickoff. As a result, two students interviewed said food was no longer being served by the time they arrived at the tailgate. Many students also faced long lines for the shuttle between Payne Whitney Gymnasium and the Yale Bowl. “I waited 50 minutes in the cold and missed most of the tailgate,” Mujtaba Wani ’17 said. The student tailgate village was located outside gate C, adjacent to Yale’s Cullman-Heyman Tennis Center. When The Game was held at Yale in 2011, the tailgate was located on the intramural fields. In a message to the Yale community after the tailgate location was changed in 2012, Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry said the new location “offers plenty of entertainment, food, souvenirs and the chance to cheer on the team as the Yale Band leads it into the stadium.” Under the changed regulations, all students over 21 were allowed to have two free beers in the beer garden, which was open from 10 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. All guests, students and alumni entering the student tailgate area were required to present valid identification, and those over 21 received a wristband. Alumni also faced new restrictions this year. Parking permits had to be purchased in advance, and there were limitations on the size of vehicles that could enter the lots. 50,934 people attended The Game this year. Contact JOSEPH VINSON at joseph.vinson@yale.edu .

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

This year’s Harvard-Yale Game was the first since the new tightened tailgating rules.

Connecticut feels effect of Food Stamp cuts BY SEBASTIAN MEDINA-TAYAC STAFF REPORTER One chilly afternoon in mid November, Kimberly Hart made her familiar walk to Mount Hope Food Pantry in Dixwell. At 5:15 p.m., she thought she was early, but the 50 people lined up in front of her had beat her by 5 hours. By the time she reached the front, the canned ham or small chicken she was counting on to make up her and her 11-year-old son’s source of protein had already run out. Like New Haven’s 36,210 other recipients of the Supplemental Assistance Food Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, Hart has been relying more and more on food pantries and soup kitchens since the federal government reduced her monthly food assistance check from $252 to $212 on Nov. 1, when the boost to the program from the 2009 stimulus package expired. After Novem-

ber’s round of cuts, The 2013 Farm Bill currently under negotiation in Washington is almost certain to cut SNAP benefits even deeper, with the Democrat-controlled Senate calling for a $4.5 billion cut over ten years, while the Republicancontrolled House has proposed a $40 billion cut. Hannah Croasmun ’01, who works with the New Haven Food Policy Council to train SNAP recipients to advocate against federal budget cuts, said that reliance on emergency food assistance nationwide is going to increase, straining non-profit and churchrun food banks, food pantries and soup kitchens. In the month of November, Hart has taken her 11-year-old son to eat at a soup kitchen three times — the same number of times as in all of 2012. “The hunger outweighed the embarrassment,” she said. “I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with the soup kitchen, but we were not

accustomed to it. Now we’re going to have to be because SNAP used to be enough — now its not.” The food at many New Haven food banks is already old and stale, said Elaine Peters, a New Haven resident and SNAP recipient. She added that there are several major barriers preventing her and other low-income residents from accessing healthy food, including inadequate transportation and high prices. “[The lawmakers] aren’t in our shoes,” she said. “It’s hard to manage providing healthy meals for yourself and your family daily. Our community and children … suffer greatly and struggle to make ends meet.” The increase in SNAP benefits, put in place by the Federal Stimulus Package in 2009, was intended to be temporary. But volunteers and recipients say the boost should have been maintained because of increased cost of living. “The price of food has gone up

since 2009. They should have left it as it is,” said Cher Frampton, volunteer coordinator for Lutheran Community Services, Delaware’s largest food pantry, which has publicized its difficulties in the wake of the most recent SNAP cuts. “Households that are using SNAP are living off of nothing. Taking away $60-70 from a family of six means a lot to them.” Billy Bromage, chair of the Food Access Working Group for the New Haven Food Policy Council, said New Haven will face serious social impacts, including increased rates of obesity as people are forced to rely on cheap calorie-dense foods, and a wider achievement gap as low-income students have trouble concentrating because of hunger. In Washington, New Haven Rep. Rosa DeLauro finds herself in the minority when advocating to keep SNAP funding at current levels. Renewal of The Farm Bill, into which the SNAP cuts are bundled, is already over a year past due.

“It is beyond disappointing that so many of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle have chosen to focus on cutting a program that helps feed the poorest and most vulnerable,” she said in an email. “I fear we may be looking at a cut that would cause deep harm to the families that need SNAP to help put food on the table, and especially the nearly 21 million children [across the country].” But House Republicans maintain that the bill will streamline the program and encourage recipients to not lean on federal assistance. In a public statement about the $40 billion cut to SNAP, Lucas wrote, “[The bill] encourages and enables work participation, closes program loopholes, and eliminates waste, fraud and abuse while saving the American taxpayer nearly $40 billion.” Bromage said the cuts will not only reduce some families’ monthly food budget — it will remove many families from the

program entirely. It will also reduce programs designed to help people get the most out of their food stamps, he said. Currently, SNAP dollars are worth twice as much at New Haven farmer’s markets, which programs such as CitySeed bring to low-income neighborhoods in the city. He said that cutting food stamps would be a step in the wrong direction if Washington wanted to see more revenue, citing a report by Mark Zandi, the chief economist of Moody’s Economy.com, which concluded that each dollar invested in food stamps returns $1.73 in economic stimulus. The number of food insecure Connecticut residents rose by 5.8 percent in the last 10 years, compared to the national average of 3.9 percentage points. Contact SEBASTIAN MEDINATAYAC at sebastian.medina-tayac@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“I love those who yearn for the impossible.” JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE GERMAN WRITER

Gun Scare shuts down campus GUN SCARE FROM PAGE 1 tion had been reported by Sunday night. “Confirmed report of person with a gun on/near Old Campus,” said a Yale Alert text message sent to the University community at 11:02 a.m. “SHELTER IN PLACE. This is NOT a test.” NHPD and YPD officers were joined on campus by four SWAT teams and agents from federal law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation. To facilitate the investigative sweep of campus, major city streets around the intersection of Elm and College Streets were shut down. Early reports indicated that a gunman might be located in or near Battell Chapel, which is located at that intersection. Police conducted a series of room-to-room searches, which began in Calhoun College at around 1:45 p.m. NHPD Chief Dean Esserman said that searches would continue in all Old Campus rooms before a definite conclusion on the matter could be reached. No injuries or gunfire were reported at any point throughout the day, and the lockdown was lifted in all campus areas at 4:50 p.m. “Once we have geared up, we don’t just gear down,” Esserman said at a press conference

before the University had ended the lockdown. “That is why we’re going back [to Old Campus] to stay the course. We have a very strong operations plan where we are going room to room … until we make sure that we are satisfied.” As officers from the NHPD and YPD were initially dispatched to the scene, a Yale employee reported seeing a man walking around campus with a rifle. That this second tip came in after the University lockdown had started seemed to legitimize the first phone call received by police in the morning. Esserman later revealed, however, that the witness might have mistaken an armed police officer for a gunman. Though the investigation has not been officially closed, Esserman said the lack of concrete leads since the early morning has led him to conclude that there is a possibility that the phone call received at the beginning of the day was disingenuous. University Vice President Linda Lorimer sent an email to all University faculty, staff and students to review the day’s events. “The combined police forces combed the area and have found no suspicious person,” Lorimer said in the email. “However, the police are taking nothing for granted. They are working to track

down who made the first (anonymous) phone call … if it was a prank call that started this chain of events, the authorities intend to prosecute the individual to the fullest extent of the law.” The episode unraveled on a relatively empty campus, as many students had vacated their dorms for the start of Thanksgiving break. Those that remained on campus, however, were forced to take precautionary measures as part of the lockdown. Some residential college masters emailed students advising them on how to deal with the increased police force and threat of a potential gunman by telling them to lock their rooms and refuse entry to anyone, even those identifying themselves as police. When the plan to search room by room was announced, YPD Chief Ronnell Higgins sent an email to students notifying them of the procedure that would follow. Instructions were also delivered over the Yale Alert system. “Out of an abundance of caution, Police will be doing a room to room search starting with the residential college areas,” Higgins said in the email. “When they knock on your door, a Yale Police Officer will slip their Yale ID under the door. Please cooperate.” Despite the mass influx of

ARNOLD GOLD/NEW HAVEN REGISTER

An anonymous phone call warning of a gunman headed for campus led to a campus-wide lockdown. heavily armed officers, those present said the scene on campus was relatively stable. Rob O’Gara ’16 said that students around his suite in Saybrook College were “very calm” as the lockdown unfolded. Calhoun College was the site of a large SWAT team effort — a large, armored truck was stationed out-

side its gates on Elm Street, and students were evacuated from their rooms to the college dining hall as in-room searches took place. Still, the focus of the investigation remains on the initial phone call that set the day into motion. “You don’t just walk away … no matter how long it takes,” Esser-

man said. “We are going to find who [made the phone call] and we’re going to put handcuffs on who did this.” Press conferences were held in the lobby of the Shubert Theater on College Street. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

Professor found dead in New Haven jail SEE PROFESSOR FROM PAGE 1 had mutual protective orders against each other, Ganglani had returned to their Wooster Square home on Saturday afternoon to retrieve some belongings, leading to the confrontation, Hartman said. Police arrived after one of the men’s sisters reported the domestic dispute to the police. When officers on the scene informed See that his husband also had a protective order against him, See “became enraged,” Hartman added. “He yelled that it was his house and that he shouldn’t be arrested. See fought with Officers when they tried handcuffing him,” Hartman said in the NHPD release. “As See was led

to a Police car, he yelled to one of the arresting Officers, ‘I will kill you … I will destroy you.’” Both men, who were married in May, were arrested Sept. 18 on charges of assault in the third degree and breach of peace. Ganglani is due to appear in court Thursday on the charge of violating a protective order during Saturday’s confrontation. See was also charged with violating a protective order, in addition to interfering with police and threatening in the second degree, Hartman said in the Wednesday release. Officers called Emergency Medical Services to the scene to evaluate a cut above See’s eye — the only injury reported after the confrontation — and an ambulance

transported See to Yale-New Haven Hospital, where his injury was treated. Mark D’Antonio, the media coordinator for Yale New HavenHospital, said that patients brought in under police custody are given the same level of treatment as any other patient. Patients, like See, would only be released if they were declared fit for discharge by hospital staff, D’Antonio said. D’Antonio did not comment on the prevalence of tests for drugs or other potentially fatal substances in the hospital’s examination of arrested patients. On Thursday, the New Haven Independent quoted an unnamed source — neither an

inmate nor a judicial marshal but an alleged witness to the early Sunday morning events in the detention facility — saying that See had not committed suicide and that there was no sign of a struggle in his cell. Neither the New Haven police nor the state Judicial Branch has released any further information about what unfolded in the detention center or the cause of death. As of Sunday afternoon, Yale Spokesperson Tom Conroy said the University had no updated information regarding See’s death. Conroy said the University is awaiting the medical examiner’s report and is also in communication with police, who are conducting a “number of interviews.”

See remembered as teacher, friend OBITUARY FROM PAGE 1 Students close to See recalled a devoted and eager professor who inspired them to think deeply about literature and to master the mechanics of analytical writing. “He was an intensely rigorous professor — one of the best I had,” said Andrew Sotiriou ’13, who took See’s “Tragedy” course. “The rigor in that program was greater than so many upper-level seminars that I took. And I think that was the course, but also that was definitely his persona.” Sotiriou, who said he stayed in frequent contact with See even after completing the course, remembered See as a sweet but intense man who sometimes seemed to struggle under the pressures of academia. Emily Wanger ’13, a former City editor for the News, said she chose to major in English because of the class she took

with See — a professor she said “embodied the ideals of a truly great teacher: passionate about teaching and learning, simultaneously patient and exacting with regard to students’ work, and sincere in his willingness to mentor his students.”

The man described in the news articles does not sound at all like the Professor See I knew. LINDSEY UNIAT ’15

Lindsey Uniat ’15, a staff reporter for the News, similarly traced her decision to major in English to a class with See titled “Writing about Literature.” She said See took a deep interest in his students — not just in their academic work, but in their

extracurricular interests. She recalled an hours-long conversation with See over lunch in Jonathan Edwards College, and said she frequently went to his office to discuss coursework as well as her other interests. “I only hope that the unfortunate circumstances surrounding his death do not … influence how he is remembered,” Uniat said. “The man described in the news articles does not sound at all like the Professor See I knew.” Biographical information about See remained sparse in the week following his death. He received his B.A. in English from California State University, Bakersfield in 2001, going on to receive two master’s degrees and a Ph.D. in the subject. Both Yale College Dean Mary Miller and Yale spokesperson Tom Conroy said they did not know details about family members by whom See is survived. See’s husband, Sunder Ganglani, could not be reached for comment. The couple was mar-

ried in May 2013 but subsequently became estranged, each registering a protective order against the other. The violation of those orders is what precipitated the domestic dispute last weekend that sent See to jail. Ganglani served as a teaching assistant at the University while studying at the Yale School of Drama and currently works in New York City as an artist, according to his LinkedIn page. He posted a message on his Facebook page on Nov. 25, the day following the death of his husband, asking friends for company and declaring that “there is nothing that can take love away.” At the time of his death, See had begun work on a book manuscript entitled “Queer Natures: Feeling Degenerate in Literary Modernism.” Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu and ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

In the wake of See’s death, speculation also mounted surrounding the professor’s personal life. The New Haven Register launched an investigation into See’s background last Friday, raising questions about the professor’s involvement in a local escort service called Ryan Cochran Escort Services, whose website features pictures of See that match the professor’s LinkedIn profile image. A Facebook page under the name Ryan Cochran includes See’s home address and has at least one picture of See. The Facebook page indicates that the user has checked in at locations that include Los Angeles, New Haven and Brooklyn. A White Pages Online search of the name

Ryan Cochran yielded no results in the New Haven area. Christopher Looby, an English professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, where See received his Ph.D., said he had no information about See’s personal life. Members of the Yale English department similarly declined to comment on information concerning See’s life beyond the classroom. Neither Conroy nor Hammer responded to request for comment regarding the date that the University was first made aware of See’s passing. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu and ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“The pursuit of truth does not permit violence on one’s opponent.” MAHATMA GANDHI FREEDOM FIGHTER

Local businesses weather gun scare BY RACHEL SIEGEL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Instead of the usual pedestrian traffic up and down the shops lining Chapel Street, rows of police cars and snipers crisscrossed the streets last Monday, responding to reports of a gunman on Yale’s Old Campus. When the University instituted a campus-wide lockdown from approximately 11 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. on Monday, police also ushered car and foot traffic off of Chapel Street, from College Street to York Street, diverting the stream of customers that would normally frequent Chapel Street restaurants and stores during lunchtime. Several businesses reported significant financial losses due to the lockdown, although many also served as refuges for customers with nowhere else to go. Claire’s Cornercopia, which sits at the corner of College and Chapel streets, saw an influx of students and residents of the Taft Apartments — who entered the restaurant from a side door — in search of company for the duration of the lockdown. Owner Claire Criscuolo said that, despite the diminished foot traffic, spirits remained high inside the bakery, where she and her employees were rolling pie crust for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. “We keep the rosary beads in the kitchen,” she said. “We were just rolling the pie crust and praying the rosary.” Though the Yale Police Department sent out a number of alerts to University staff and students, several store employees said that no one officially informed them that a campuswide lockdown was in place. For these businesses, the day mostly passed without updates or specific instructions. Colleen Carroll, the manager of Atticus Book Store, said that at no point did police officers enter the store to notify employees of the situation once the lockdown began. Only at about 3:30 p.m., when Carroll

noticed fewer patrol cars lining the street, did workers “stick their heads” out to ask if it was safe to leave. Carroll estimated that Atticus lost a few thousand dollars in sales between the bookstore and the café during the lockdown. Though some deliveries to the store could not be made, it did not take long for business to pick back up, she added. In the meantime, customers waiting for the all clear passed time on their laptops, reading books or eating. “This was the place to be stuck,” she said. “We had food, coffee and a bathroom. I think people felt safe.” Book Trader Café also reported losses, as the lockdown practically dissolved its regular lunch crowd, according to store manager Kelly Pyers. Those deficits were quickly recovered, however, as a rush of hungry customers flooded the doors once the lockdown was lifted. Five employees and half a dozen customers remained inside over the course of the lockdown, though Pyers said customers were allowed to leave if they so chose. The lockdown may have even brought Book Trader several new customers. “There were policemen in the streets, but they would come in to use the bathroom and get hot chocolate,” Pyers said. At the Study Hotel a few blocks down, guests continued to arrive and were checked out without any issues. Cars still managed to pull up in front of the lobby after some extra direction from hotel personnel, and employees came to work as scheduled. As a safety precaution, doors were locked to any non-guests, according to front desk supervisor Camille Falcone. Police determined that there was likely no shooter on campus by 4:50 p.m., when they lifted the lockdown on Old Campus and Calhoun College. Contact RACHEL SIEGEL at rachel.siegel@yale.edu .

YDN

Atticus Bookstore Café, among many other Chapel Street storefronts, lost several thousand dollars in sales during the lockdown last Monday.

Nightclub violence sparks movement for legislation BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER With the last few months of his tenure, Mayor John DeStefano Jr. is making one last push to curb violence around bars and nightclubs. In the wake of the Oct. 26 shooting at the Key Club Cabaret that killed one New Haven resident and wounded five others, DeStefano announced his hopes of enacting a six-part legislative package that would impose stricter standards on liquorlicensed entertainment venues and increase security presence during peak hours. The Key Club shooting was the latest in a string of violent incidents around nightclub establishments — four homicides and 11 shootings have taken place in

or around nightclubs in 2013 — that has resulted in a citywide desire to get the legislation in place soon. On Nov. 19, a public safety committee consisting of seven aldermen met to discuss this plan. “The general idea is that we’ve submitted these concepts to the Board of Aldermen for a public hearing and public discussion on what the best ideas are,” said Robert Smuts, the city’s chief administrative officer. “We’re encouraging the public, bar owners, legislators and anybody else to give their input and further shape [the ideas].” Smuts added that once the plan has been sufficiently refined, a public hearing will be held in New Haven before the proposal is sent to the state in early 2014 for approval by the

legislature. At a press conference following the Key Club shooting, DeStefano said that he believes that it is important for New Haven citizens to begin a discussion about addressing nighttime violence. “[This is] the right opportunity for public comment on the proposed legislation,” DeStefano said. “It’s going to be a good thing to have that discussion locally, including anyone affected by the proposed legislation who wants to come out and engage us.” The most significant and complicated aspect of the legislation that DeStefano has proposed concerns the creation of a tax that only entertainment venues would pay. Smuts said that bars and restaurants in the

entertainment district would be able to vote on the amount that they would be taxed and the resulting funds would increase nighttime security. According to Smuts, the majority of club and bar owners have an interest in helping to fund enhanced bar security, which he said speaks to the generally cooperative relationship that the city has had with bar and club owners so far in pushing for this reform. However, he added that there has been some resistance, generally from those that own venues with histories of violence. “[The relationship with bar owners] varies,” Smuts said. “Ones that we view as responsible have been receptive to these ideas. Some of the ones that we have more problems with have

been more hostile.” New Haven Police Department involvement is another focus of the plan, which would regulate the licensing and training of bouncers and approach the State Liquor Control Commission with the names of bars that have a history of some violence. The last three components of the plan involve tightening the requirements in place for clubs to acquire different types of liquor permits. They would also provide the authority to seek an injunction and close a venue for being a “threat to public safety” and, for venues that do not need to be shut down, but that have some history of violence, mandating that they hire more security officers. Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04 said that the move-

ment to stop nightlife violence through legislative action did not arise in response to the alarming spike crime at clubs in 2013, but that the legislation has been in the works for several years. Hausladen added that it is in the best interest of these bars and clubs to curb violence and also to maintain an exciting nightlife in New Haven. “[Club and bar owners’] incentive is to stay in business,” Hausladen said. “Violence is not good for their business, just like it’s not good for a neighborhood or the victims of that violence.” Smuts said that downtown New Haven has the heaviest concentration of bars and clubs in the city. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

9

Winners of the Rhodes Scholarship for 2013

Last year was a record-setter in terms of the Rhodes Scholars for Yale University. Winners consistered of seven Yalies from the United States and two internationals.

Seven Yalies bound for England MARSHALL RHODES FROM PAGE 1 ners apiece in 2010 and 2009. Nayak said that he could not believe his ears when the Rhodes Trust affiliates came down to the waiting room and called his name as one of the two recipients chosen from his home district of Illinois and Michigan. “I was speechless. I was, and still am, in a state of shock. I never thought in a million years I’d be given such a wonderful opportunity,” he said, adding that he is grateful for his friends, family members and professors who have served as his academic mentors. According to its website, the Rhodes Scholarship is awarded annually to 32 Americans, along with students from 13 other countries, who exhibit “outstanding intellect, character, capacity for leadership and commitment to service.” Though each student won the same award, their interests are diverse, ranging from political science to global health. Beshar, who is one of two recipients from New York, is a double major in Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology and History of Science and Medicine with a focus in chronic diseases such as diabetes. Though she became interested in global health before she came to Yale, Beshar pointed to the University’s global health fellowship and to her work at a Type 1 diabetes laboratory as two important reasons for her success at Yale.

Beshar said she first considered the Rhodes Scholarship as a sophomore after one of her professors recommended that she apply. After researching more about the scholarship and about how it would fit with her aspiration to attend medical school, Beshar said she came to view graduate school at Oxford as a unique opportunity to study medical anthropology. Studying this field would help her construct health interventions for diabetes in developing countries because it would teach her how cultural and religious factors may contribute to the disease’s prevalence in specific communities, Beshar said. Nayak, who majors in Political Science, intends to study public policy and the social science of the Internet at Oxford. He said his academic interests stem from a desire to empower and motivate ordinary individuals to become better political citizens. Nayak has extensive experience in this field, as he managed national digital programs and social media outreach initiatives for President Barack Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign and interned for the White House Office of Digital Strategy this past summer. “At Oxford, I hope to learn new ways to engage people in civic discourse, in elections and in government,” Nayak said, adding that he is excited to be studying in the United Kingdom when a general election takes place in 2015. While Nayak

does not know his future plans beyond his sojourn at Oxford, he said he wants to remain involved with political organizing. Fritzberg, who currently majors in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and is interested in poverty policy research, cited the major differences between how Britain and America approach policy alleviation as one reason for her desire to study at Oxford after graduation. Whereas American policymakers use piecemeal programs to fight poverty, the British government seeks to use a more holistic approach and also has a robust welfare state, she said. She also added that she was drawn to Oxford because of the strength of its faculty, many of whom have written extensively about the connection between gender and the welfare state. Although she was familiar with the Rhodes Scholarship for a number of years, Fritzberg said she did not decide to apply for it until the summer before her senior year, when her intellectual interests narrowed after she worked as an Arthur Liman fellow as a poverty policy analyst at the Roosevelt Institute. Fritzberg said that while the Rhodes never seemed like an unattainable ambition, she was grateful every time she passed another hurdle to the scholarship. All three students interviewed said they are excited to experience Oxford’s unique culture and also meet their fellow Rhodes Scholars.

“I would say I’m most excited by the opportunity to immerse myself in the Rhodes Scholars community at Oxford. They come from all cultures, walks of life, and all different academic backgrounds and I’m really looking forward to meeting those inspiring people and the chance to learn from them,” Nayak said.

I would say I’m most excited by the opportunity to immerse myself in the Rhodes Scholars community at Oxford. VINAY NAYAK ’14 Recipient, Rhodes Scholarship Outside the classroom, the students said they look forward to participating in a range of activities such as a cappella, intramural sports and some of Oxford’s richer traditions like cricket and punting. All said they are also excited to choose one of Oxford’s residential colleges in which to spend the next few years of their academic lives. Oxford’s residential system is “like Yale’s on hyperdrive,” Fritzberg said. The Marshall Scholarship is awarded to candidates who “have the potential to excel as scholars, as leaders and as con-

tributors to improved UK-U.S. understanding,” according to its website. Like the Yale students who won Rhodes Scholarships, each of the graduates who won a Marshall scholarship had diverse interests and intended fields of study. Bilinski, a political science major and global health fellow at Yale, is interested in improving global health through the application of empirical analysis. She is the only one among the four who did not opt to study at Oxford. Instead, she will first pursue a M.Sc. in health policy, planning and financing, cotaught at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the London School of Economics and Political Science, and then a M.Sc. in epidemiology. Collins, a Global Affairs major, spent his first year after graduating from Yale working on a book with General Stanley McChrystal, a senior fellow at the Jackson Institute. Next fall, Collins will study international relations at Oxford University. At Yale, Collins was the president of the Yale International Relations Association and a freshman counselor in Timothy Dwight College. Emanuel, who graduated with a degree in economics, currently works as a research assistant for the National Bureau of Economic Research. At Yale, Emanuel worked with the Yale Hunger and Homelessness Action Project in the Prison Education program. She also advocated for

inmate rights within the New York Department of Correction and helped create America’s first Social Impact Bonds system for the state of Massachusetts. These efforts led Emanuel to be the first undergraduate recipient of the Yale-Jefferson Award, which is awarded for inspirational contributions to public service. At Oxford, Emanuel plans to study evidence-based social intervention. Park was an intensive ecology and environmental major at Yale before conducting research this year at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. A Beckman Scholar for excellence in chemistry and the biological sciences, Park will pursue a doctorate at Oxford, where he hopes to conduct further cancer research. After his time as a Marshall Scholar, Park hopes to attend medical school and continue a career in research. Six students from the Rhodes Scholars Class of 2014 came from Harvard — the only school that surpassed Yale’s representation. While Stanford also claimed three recipients, Princeton, the University of Virginia and West Point won two scholarships apiece. Twelve other schools were represented in this year’s class. The Marshall scholarship, which is awarded to 40 Americans annually, has yet to publish a list of this year’s winners on its website. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu .

Tantum “Teddy” Collins ’13 A Global Affairs major and the former president of the Yale International Relations Association, Collins will study for an M. Phil. in international relations at Oxford. Collins spent his first year after graduating from Yale working on a book with General Stanley McChrystal, a senior fellow at the Jackson Institute. At Yale, Collins was also a freshman counselor in Timothy Dwight College and spent a semester abroad in Jordan and another in China. At Oxford, Collins hopes to study international organizations and how their structures have changed in the digital age.

MARSHALL

Vinay Nayak ’14

Derek Park ’13

A political science major from Illinois, Nayak’s academic work focuses on how social media can amplify and encourage citizen engagement in political elections and campaigning. He worked in the Obama 2012 re-election campaign’s headquarters in Chicago, where he managed national digital programs and social media accounts. At Oxford, he hopes to learn how political campaigns can use online tools to motivate individuals to be more politically active. At Yale, Nayak is a captain of the Yale Mock Trial team and a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. As a sophomore in 2011, he also ran and lost a campaign against Sarah Eidelson ’12 for Ward 1 Alderman.

Derek Park graduated from Yale magna cum laude as an intensive ecology and environmental major before conducting research this year at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fl. A Beckman Scholar for excellence in chemistry and the biological sciences, Park has published research in evolutionary biology focused on gene expression and oncoloytic virotherapy. He also was the nationally-ranked captain of Yale’s Pistol Team. With the Marshall Scholarship, Park hopes to continue studying the dynamic evolutionary processes involved in cancer growth at Oxford and ultimately bring novel therapies to patients. After his time at Oxford, Park will attend medical school either in America or England.

Isabel Beshar ’14

Natalia Emanuel ’13

Isabel Beshar, a double-major in molecular, cellular and developmental biology and history of science, history of medicine at Yale, plans to study medical anthropology at Oxford. After her term as a Rhodes Scholar ends, Beshar hopes to attend medical school before entering a career in global health. She is interested in chronic diseases such as diabetes and hopes to use her time at Oxford to help build health intervention plans in developing countries. At Yale, she is a Global Health Fellow and was the president of Yale’s Public Health Coalition. Beshar, who won one of New York’s two Rhode Scholarships, also works at a Type 1 Diabetes research laboratory, where she helped publish award-winning research.

A graduate in economics, Emanuel currently works as a research assistant for the National Bureau of Economic Research. Emanuel intends to pursue a PhD in economics after her time at Oxford, where she hopes to study evidencebased social intervention. The first undergraduate recipient of the Yale-Jefferson Award, which is awarded for inspirational contributions to public service, she worked with the Yale Hunger and Homelessness Action Project in the Prison Education program and helped create America’s first Social Impact Bonds system for the state of Massachusetts. In addition, she helped draft policy for inmate rights for the New York City Department of Correction.

Suzanna Fritzberg ’14

Alyssa Bilinski ’13

At Oxford, Suzanna Fritzberg wishes to study comparative social policy and pursue a career in domestic poverty policy research. At Yale, Fritzberg majors in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She said that she decided to apply for a Rhodes Scholarship after a summer spent working at the Roosevelt Institute Four Freedoms Center Think Tank. She also spent a summer working at the New Orleans Public Defenders Office. The public relations coordinator for the Yale Women’s Center, Fritzberg said she is excited to study in England in part because Oxford is a leading center for analyzing the relationship between gender and the welfare state. Fritzberg hails from Lake Forest Park, WA.

Alyssa Bilinski graduated from Yale as a Global Health Fellow with a degree in political science. Interested in improving global health through the application of empirical analysis, Bilinski is a data analyst for Partners in Health this year. She is the only one among the four Marshall scholars who did not opt to study at Oxford. Bilinski will instead pursue a joint-degree in health policy, planning and co-financing from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a masters in epidemiology from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

KEN YANAGISAWA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER, NATALIA EMANUEL, ALYSSA BILINSKI, DEREK PARK, TANTUM COLLINS


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

T

Dow Jones 16,009.99, +0.69%

S NASDAQ 3,969.16, +1.22% S

NATION

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Oil $95.22, -0.23%

Officials say worst health care web bugs over

S S&P 500 1,795.85, +0.81% T 10-yr. Bond 2.78%, -0.01 T Euro $1.35, -0.09%

NYC train derailment kills four BY VERENA DOBNIK AND DEEPTI HAJELA ASSOCIATED PRESS

PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius speaks at the Community Health and Social Services Center in Detroit, Nov. 15. BY PHILIP ELLIOTT ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The worst of the online glitches, crashes and delays may be over for the problem-plagued government health care website, the Department of Health and Human Services said Sunday. But that doesn’t mean HealthCare.gov is ready for a clean bill of health. Officials acknowledged more work remains on the website that included hundreds of software bugs, inadequate equipment and inefficient management for its national debut two months ago. Federal workers and private contractors have undertaken an intense reworking of the system, but the White House’s chief troubleshooter cautioned some users could still encounter trouble. “The bottom line — HealthCare.gov on Dec. 1 is night and day from where it was on Oct. 1,” Jeff Zients told reporters. More than 50,000 people can log on to the website at one time and more than 800,000 people will be able to shop for

insurance coverage each day, the government estimated in a report released Sunday. If true, it’s a dramatic improvement from the system’s first weeks, when frustrated buyers watched their computer screen freeze, the website crash and error messages multiply. The figures — which could not be independently verified — suggest millions of Americans could turn to their laptops to shop for and buy insurance policies by the Dec. 23 deadline. “There’s not really any way to verify from the outside that the vast majority of people who want to enroll can now do so, but we’ll find out at least anecdotally over the coming days if the system can handle the traffic and provide a smooth experience for people trying to sign up,” said Larry Levitt, a senior adviser at the Kaiser Family Foundation. But, he added, HealthCare.gov is clearly working better than when it first went online. Its challenge now is to convince users who were frustrated during their first visit to give it another chance.

Politically, a fixed website could also offer a fresh start for President Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats after a wave of bad publicity surrounding the president’s chief domestic achievement. “This website is technology. It’s going to get better. It’s already better today,” said Rep. Keith Ellison, a Minnesota Democrat who is a co-chairman of the liberal Congressional Progressive Caucus. “And we’re only going to be working out more kinks as we go forward.” HealthCare.gov was envisioned as the principal place for people in 36 states to buy insurance under Obama’s health care law. But its first few weeks were an embarrassment for the administration and its allies. Obama set Saturday as the deadline to fix several significant problems and the administration organized a conference call with reporters Sunday morning to boast that 400 technical problems had been resolved. Officials, however, declined to say how many items remain on the to-do list.

NEW YORK — A New York City commuter train rounding a riverside curve derailed Sunday, killing four people and injuring more than 60 in a crash that threw some riders from toppling cars and swiftly raised questions about whether excessive speed, mechanical problems or human error could have played a role. Some of the roughly 150 passengers on the early morning Metro-North train from Poughkeepsie to Manhattan were jolted from sleep around 7:20 a.m. to screams and the frightening sensation of their compartment rolling over on a bend in the Bronx where the Hudson and Harlem rivers meet. When the motion stopped, all seven cars and the locomotive had lurched off the rails, and the lead car was only inches from the water. It was the latest accident in a troubled year for the nation’s second-biggest commuter railroad, which had never experienced passenger death in an accident in its 31-year history. Joel Zaritsky was dozing as he traveled to a dental convention aboard the train. He woke up to feel his car overturning several times. “Then I saw the gravel coming at me, and I heard people screaming,” he told The Associated Press, holding his bloody right hand. “There was smoke everywhere and debris. People were thrown to the other side of the train.” In their efforts to find passengers, rescuers shattered windows, searched nearby woods and waters and used pneumatic jacks and air bags to peer under wreck-

age. Crews planned to bring in cranes during the night to right the overturned cars on the slight chance anyone might still be underneath, National Transportation Safety Board member Earl Weener said. The agency was just beginning its search into what caused the derailment, and Weener said investigators had not yet spoken to the train conductor, who was among the injured. Meanwhile, thousands of people braced for a complicated Monday morning commute, with shuttle buses ferrying passengers to another line. Investigators were due to examine factors ranging from the track condition to the crew’s performance. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the track did not appear to be faulty, leaving speed as a possible culprit for the crash. The speed limit on the curve is 30 mph, compared with 70 mph in the area approaching it, Weener said. Authorities did not yet know how fast the train was traveling but had found a data recorder, he said. One passenger, Frank Tatulli, told WABC-TV that the train appeared to be going “a lot faster” than usual as it approached the sharp curve near the Spuyten Duyvil station. Nearby residents awoke to a building-shaking boom. Angel Gonzalez was in bed in his highrise apartment overlooking the rail curve when he heard the roar. “I thought it was a plane that crashed,” he said. Mike Gallo heard the same noise as he was walking his dog. He looked down at the tracks, saw injured people climbing out of the train and “knew it was a tragedy right away.”


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“Sometimes I wonder if men and women really suit each other. Perhaps they should live next door and just visit now and then.” KATHARINE HEPBURN AMERICAN ACTRESS

Egyptians amend constitution

AMR NABIL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amr Moussa, the chairman of the panel tasked with amending Egypt’s Islamist-drafted constitution, speaks during a press conference at the upper house of parliament, in Cairo, Nov. 30. BY HAMZA HENDAWI ASSOCIATED PRESS CAIRO — Police fired tear gas to drive hundreds of supporters of Egypt’s ousted Islamist president from Cairo’s famed Tahrir Square on Sunday, as a panel tasked with amending the constitution adopted during his time in office agreed on changes to the text. The 50-member panel revising the Islamist-tilted charter adopted under former President Mohammed Morsi managed to resolve its differences after two days of clause-by-clause voting on the final draft. The text gives women and Christians “suitable representation” but says a future law must decide the details. It also calls for elections, either parliamentary or presidential, within 90 days after the draft constitution is adopted. The other election should be held up to six months later. The new charter would require future presidents to declare their financial assets annually, and allows lawmakers to vote out an elected president and call for early elections if they have a two-thirds majority. Members agreed that a contentious proposed article allowing military tribunals for civilians would be scaled back, allowing them only in case of direct attack on military personnel or assets. Rights activists had previously objected to the military’s trial of some 10,000 civilians when it ran the country during the 17 months after Egypt’s 2011 revolt that ousted longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak. The document is now to be handed over to interim President Adly Mansour, who has a month to call for a nationwide referendum on it. If adopted by the public, a giant step in the roadmap announced by the military when it removed Morsi last summer will have been completed. Morsi supporters have been staging near daily protests to demand his reinstatement, in Cairo and across much of the country. But for hundreds of them to enter and take over Tahrir, even briefly as they did Sunday, constituted a major, albeit symbolic, propaganda coup for them. They would have attracted many more like-minded protesters had they been able to gain a solid foothold in the square. It was the first time in more than a year that Islamists entered the central square in significant numbers. The location has been the near exclusive domain of liberal and secular protesters since shortly after Morsi took office in June 2012 as Egypt’s first freely elected president. Also in the background to Sunday’s events was scathing criticism of the military-backed government by a top rights group that called

on authorities to immediately release five Morsi aides who have been kept at an undisclosed destination since their arrest on July 3, the day Morsi was ousted. Police in Tahrir acted quickly and appeared to surprise protesters, firing heavy tear gas to clear them from the central plaza barely minutes after they took it over and sending them to take refuge in side streets. After an initial salvo of some two dozen canisters, armored police vans rushed to the square with sirens wailing. Later, six army armored personnel carriers arrived. After nightfall, the protesters and police fought pitched battles on side streets off Tahrir and in the downtown area, with police firing tear gas and the protesters pelting them with rocks. The square was the birthplace of the revolt that toppled Mubarak almost three years ago. That uprising was led by liberal and secular youth groups, whose differences with the Islamists began to surface later in 2011 over claims that Morsi’s Brotherhood and its allies were more interested in promoting their own political interests than pursuing the uprising’s goals. Sunday’s Islamist protesters came from Cairo University, where they have been protesting the death on Thursday of an engineering student at the hands of police. NonIslamist students were also protesting the death of the student on Sunday, but they restricted their demonstration to the area outside the Cairo University campus in the Giza district. It was not immediately clear why police did not stop the protesters from reaching Tahrir, a 30-minute journey on foot from the university campus on the west bank of the River Nile. There was no police presence outside the campus either. Jubilant Islamist students knelt down and offered a prayer of thanks as their march drew closer to Tahrir. Once there, they chanted slogans against the military and police and flashed the four-finger sign that commemorates the death of hundreds of Morsi supporters by security forces since a military coup ousted the Islamist president on July 3. Morsi’s supporters immediately relayed the news on social networks, calling on others to join them quickly and suggesting that camping out indefinitely in the iconic square would eventually topple the military-backed government. Also on Sunday, Egyptian authorities ordered the release from police custody of prominent activist Ahmed Maher, founder of the revolutionary April 6 Movement, a main player in the 2011 revolt against Mubarak. Prosecutors, however, extended by 15 days the detention of another iconic figure from the 2011 uprising - Alaa Abdel-Fattah.

Croatians block same sex marriage BY ELDAR EMRIC ASSOCIATED PRESS ZAGREB, Croatia — A majority of Croatians voted in a referendum Sunday to ban gay marriages in what is a major victory for the Catholic Church-backed conservatives in the European Union’s newest nation. The state electoral commission, citing near complete results, said 65 percent of those who voted answered “yes” to the referendum question: “Do you agree that marriage is matrimony between a man and a woman?” About 34 percent voted against. The result meant that Croatia’s constitution will be amended to ban same-sex marriage. The vote has deeply divided Croatia. Liberal groups have said the referendum’s question infringes on basic human rights. The Church-backed groups have gathered 750,000 signatures in its support. Referendum results signal that right-wing and conservative forces have been gaining strength in Croatia amid the deepening economic crisis and widespread joblessness. The country of 4.4 million, which became EU’s 28th member in July, has taken steps to

improve gay rights, but issues such as same-sex marriage remain highly sensitive in the staunchly Catholic nation. The referendum was called by the “In the Name of the Family” conservative group after Croatia’s center-left government drafted a law to let gay couples register as “life partners.” The Catholic Church leaders have urged their followers to vote “yes” in the referendum. Nearly 90 percent of Croatians are Roman Catholics. “Marriage is the only union enabling procreation,” Croatian Cardinal Josip Bozanic said in his message to the followers. “This is the key difference between a marriage and other unions.” Croatia’s liberal president, Ivo Josipovic, said he voted against amending the constitution. Josipovic said the referendum result must be respected, but added the government is preparing a law to allow some rights to gays and lesbians living together. “The referendum result must not be the reason for new divisions,” Josipovic said. “We have serious economic and social problems. It’s not worth it to focus on such issues.” Prime Minister Zoran Milanovic said earlier “this is the last

referendum that gives a chance to the majority to strip a minority of its rights.” Conservatives have also started gathering signatures for another referendum, demanding a ban of the Cyrillic alphabet in Croatia. The Cyrillic is used in neighboring Serbia and by minority Serbs in Croatia. The nationalists blame the Serbs for atrocities committed by their troops during Croatia’s 1991-95 war for independence from the Serb-led Yugoslavia. The EU hasn’t officially commented on the referendum, but has clashed with Croatia over some of its other laws, including an extradition law that has prevented its citizens from being handed over to the bloc’s other member states, which Croatia had to amend under pressure from Brussels. Several hundred gay rights supporters marched in the capital, Zagreb, on Saturday urging a “no” vote. “I will vote against because I think that the referendum is not a festival of democracy, but a festival of oppression against a minority, which fights for its rights and which does not have its rights,” Jura Matulic, a university student, said.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Patchy freezing fog before 8am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 47. Light and variable wind.

WEDNESDAY

High of 50, low of 31.

High of 46, low of 37.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 7:00 p.m. “The Transparent Trap: A Power Pointless Presentation.” This film screening is part of the Postwar Queer Avant-Garde Film Series: The Legacy of 1960s Queer Avant-Garde Film. There will be a post-screening discussion with performance artist Dynasty Handbag and “Dirty Looks” curator Bradford Nordeen. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3 3:00 p.m. Robert Hayden Centennial Celebration: “Fly Away Home.” Readings by Marilyn Nelson, Robert Stepto, and members of the Yale community as well as a musical performance will celebrate the life and work of poet Robert Hayden. Co-sponsored by the Depart of African-American Studies and the Yale University Art Gallery. Yale University Art Gallery (1111 Chapel St.), Lobby.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

5:15 p.m. Brass “Sounds of the Season” Holiday Concert. The Brass quintet returns to the Beinecke Library for its annual “Sounds of the Season” concert. In addition to holiday favorites — including selections from The Nutcracker — Brass will premiere several new arrangements from its upcoming CD. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.).

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4 10:30 a.m. Brett Carlsen and Juan Madrid: “Sacrificial City.” Photojournalist Brett Carlsen and photographer Juan Madrid will speak at this Poynter Fellowship in Journalism talk. Established by Nelson Poynter GRD ’27, the fellowship program aims to enable Yale to bring to its campus distinguished reporters, editors and others who have made important contributions to the media. Green Hall (1156 Chapel St.), Rm. G32.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

4:00 p.m. “JFK’s Last Hundred Days.” The Yale Center for the Study of Representative Institutions will host Thurston Clarke, American historian, author and journalist. Clarke’s most recent book is titled “JFK’s Last Hundred Days: The Transformation of a Man and the Emergence of a Great President.” Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Rm. 208.

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CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Mooing critter 4 Ancient region surrounding Athens 10 Reagan era mil. program 13 Disgusted grunts 15 Resident of Tibet’s capital 16 Muscle spasm 17 Illegal activity admitted by Lance Armstrong in January 2013 19 Writer for whom the Edgar award is named 20 Not sacred 21 Secret matters 23 Baba who stole from thieves 24 Singer with Crosby, Stills & Nash 27 Glass container 29 Actress Cannon 30 Peter Fonda’s title beekeeper 31 Opposed (to) 34 Hurts with a tusk 37 ESPN show with an “Inside Pitch” segment 42 Willem of “Platoon” 43 100-lawmakers group 44 “Peter Pan” pirate 47 Hang around 49 Pretoria’s land: Abbr. 50 Trousseau holder 53 Stomach-punch response 55 Start of the line that includes “wherefore art thou” 56 Female star 60 Comfy room 61 Volcanic Hawaiian landmark, and a hint to the first word of 17-, 24-, 37- and 50Across 64 Night’s opposite 65 __ Pie: ice cream treat 66 Reached base in a cloud of dust 67 “Tasty!” 68 Unsettling looks 69 Arid

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DOWN 1 Baby bears 2 Look at lasciviously 3 “So what?” 4 Alan of “M*A*S*H” 5 Like rosebushes 6 Pub spigot 7 “Woe __”: Patricia T. O’Conner grammar book 8 Gondolier’s “street” 9 Hopping mad 10 One of Minn.’s Twin Cities 11 Singer Warwick 12 Frigid historic period 14 Aretha’s genre 18 551, at the Forum 22 Dad’s nephew 25 Aerie hatchlings 26 Playing an extra NBA period, say 27 Quick blow 28 Gardner once married to Sinatra 29 Refusing to listen 32 Use, as a coupon 33 Entrepreneuraiding org. 35 Optimistic 36 Opposite of WSW

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

38 Come in last 39 Lasagna-loving cat 40 Growth chart nos. 41 Brewed drink 44 Poorly made 45 Wells’ “The Island of Dr. __” 46 Arnold Palmer or Shirley Temple, drinkwise 48 Where charity begins

SUDOKU EASIEST

12/2/13

51 Formally gives up 52 Raise, as a sail 53 Old fort near Monterey 54 Sounds of wonder 57 Grandson of Adam 58 Depilatory brand 59 Hot tub swirl 62 Alias letters 63 Former Russian space station

1 9 4 3 3 1 4 6 7 2 9 5 6 7 1 3 9 5 6 7 4 1 8 9 8 5 8 6

7 2

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

C

ontributing Photographer WA LIU explores the ‘secret spaces’ of residential colleges. Students are not often exposed to residential colleges other than their own, so these photos aim to display the hidden places that students may never know existed —from Silliman’s bookbinding room to the Calhoun Cabaret.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL New England 34 Houston 31

NFL Carolina 27 Tampa Bay 6

SPORTS QUICK HITS

ANDY HACKBARTH ’12 MEN’S SOCCER The Bend, Ore. native who played his last season at Yale in 2011, has signed to play soccer professionally for the Milwaukee Wave of the Major Indoor Soccer League. Hackbarth, a defender, was named an All-Ivy honorable mention in his first three years for the Elis.

NFL Philadelphia 24 Arizona 21

NFL Jacksonville 32 Cleveland 28

NFL Cincinnati 17 San Diego 10

MONDAY

KEVIN DOONEY ’16 MEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY Dooney will compete at the 20th SPAR European Cross-Country Championships in Belgrade, Serbia on Dec. 8 as a member of Ireland’s under-23 team. The sophomore represented Yale at the Division I NCAA National Championships on Nov. 23, placing 98th.

“[We] demand that in the future we can succeed in execution for 10 games, not just five.” BEAU PALIN ’14 CAPTAIN OF THE FOOTBALL TEAM YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Yale drops seventh straight edition of The Game FOOTBALL

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Wide receiver Deon Randall ’15 (No. 2) scored Yale’s lone touchdown against Harvard on Nov. 23. The Bulldogs lost 34-7 in the 130th iteration of The Game.

Polan makes history

BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The 130th edition of The Game was supposed to mark a sea change for the Yale football team. Though the Bulldogs had lost the last six meetings against the Crimson, this year appeared to be different. Not only did the Bulldogs take a winning record into the contest on Nov. 23, they were buoyed by the returns of three starters: quarterback Hank Furman ’14, wide receiver Chris Smith ’14 and preseason AllAmerican tailback Tyler Varga ’15. After allowing 28 points in the first half en route to a 34–7 loss, however, the Elis showed that there is still work to be done. “We did not play as well as we could have in the first half,” head coach Tony Reno said. “We got ourselves in a big hole.” Even from the first play, Yale (5–5, 3–4 Ivy) got off on the wrong foot. Smith took the opening kickoff to his own 16-yard line and immediately limped off the field, ending the day the same way he started. Adding to the Elis’ injury woes, Varga lasted just two drives and five carries before reaggravating his mid-foot sprain. SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B3

Elis reign supreme at Hartford

BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER Captain Kendall Polan ’14 was busy making history over Thanksgiving Break. On Nov. 21, Polan was selected as Ivy League Player of the Year for a record-breaking third time.

VOLLEYBALL Polan became the first player in conference history to win the award three times, and just the third player to be unanimously selected by the league’s coaches for the honor. “As cool as it is to win Player of the Year, I am much more excited about our fourth Ivy League title,” Polan said. “Every girl on the team contributes so much to our success that anyone could be named Player of the Year, and I would not be surprised.” Not to be outdone by their captain, setter Kelly Johnson ’16 and outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 joined Polan on the All-Ivy first team. Outside hitter Brittani Steinberg ’17 and libero Maddie Rudnick ’16 were both selected for the second team. Yale tied with Harvard in firstteam selections (3) and with Penn in overall selections (5). “I feel so honored to be chosen and I am even happier that I was able to be chosen along with four of my other teammates for AllIvy teams,” Johnson said. “I owe my selection to my team and my coaches. Without their support and encouragement I would not be in the position I am today.” But Yale did more than just win awards over the break. On Nov. 26, the Elis took their All-Ivy talent to New York to take on Stony Brook in their last regular season match. The Seawolves (16–18, 9–5 AEC) came into the match having lost three of their last four contests, SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B3

MARIA ZEPEDA/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Javier Duren ’15 (No. 20) scored a buzzer-beating three to beat Lafayette 79–76 on Tuesday, Nov. 26. BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER It may not have been pretty, but the Yale men’s basketball team got the job done on Saturday, defeating Hartford 54–49 for its second straight win.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

YDN

Captain Kendall Polan ’14 was named Ivy League Player of the Year for the third time.

STAT OF THE DAY 0:00

The Elis (4–3, 0–0 Ivy) were coming off a remarkable victory at Lafayette on Nov. 26, where, with the game tied at 76, guard Javier Duren ’15 drained a 30-foot jump shot to beat the buzzer and the Leopards. “I just wanted to get the ball in my hands and take it down court to see how far I could get,” Duren said. “I was aware of the clock the entire time and stopped short of where I wanted to end up, so I let it fly. Fortunately it went in.” The Elis entered their game with the

Hawks (2–6, 0–0 AEC) on Saturday hoping to establish a winning streak. Hartford came into the game having lost its last three contests, including an 87–48 blowout at the hands of No. 9 Louisville. The game got off to a quick start, with guard Armani Cotton ’15 and Hartford’s Mark Nwakamma trading 3-pointers. But the action tapered off from there, as the teams missed their next combined eight shots. At the end of the first half, both teams were shooting under 30 percent from the field. Both teams shot under 35 percent from the field for the game. Captain Jesse Pritchard ’14 attributed the poor shooting to the “dull environment.” “I don’t think it was necessarily the Hartford defense that was forcing us to miss shots,” Pritchard said. “We just SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE B3

TIME LEFT ON THE CLOCK WHEN GUARD JAVIER DUREN’S ’15 THREE-POINT ATTEMPT WENT THROUGH THE NET AGAINST LAFAYETTE, NOV. 26. Duren’s basket broke the tie and gave Yale a thrilling 79–76 victory over the Leopards.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Auburn upends Alabama 34–28 A 100-yard kick return by Auburn’s Chris Davis completed then-no. 4 Auburn’s (11–1, 7–1 SEC) comeback against then-no. 1 Alabama (11–1, 7–1) on Saturday. The Crimson Tide had won the last two NCAA FBS national championships, but Alabama is currently ranked fourth in the country and predicted not to return to the National Championship game.

Izmirlian scores in OT

FOOTBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Harvard

6

1

0.857

9

1

0.900

Princeton

6

1

0.857

8

2

0.800

3

Dartmouth

5

2

0.714

6

4

0.600

4

Brown

3

4

0.429

6

4

0.600

Yale

3

4

0.429

5

5

0.500

Penn

3

4

0.429

4

6

0.400

7

Cornell

2

5

0.286

3

7

0.300

8

Columbia

0

7

0.000

0

10

0.000

1

MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 shots, outshooting Merrimack 34–15. Lyon picked up his third win of the year and ended the night with 13 saves. The freshman started his fifth straight game after splitting time with fellow freshman netminder Patrick Spano ’17 at the start of the season. He ranks in the top 25 in the nation in both goals against average and save percentage.

It was a great team win and reassured us that we need to keep with our systems.

VOLLEYBALL IVY

MITCH WITEK ’16 Defenseman, Men’s hockey team “Lyon has been phenomenal for us,” forward Carson Cooper ’16 said. “Knowing he’s back there gives us real confidence in games.” Yale came out on top despite many of its stars being injured. Root missed the game, as did superstar defenseman Ryan Obuchowski ’16. Forwards Anthony Day ’15 and Nicholas Weberg ’15 missed their third and sixth consecutive games, respectively. “We had a couple of key guys out of the lineup, but other guys stepped up and played very well for us,” forward Carson Cooper ’16 said. “Merrimack is a very good team and they play a hard style of game. We played very well throughout the game except for a few times that led to their goals. With his assist on O’Gara’s game-tying

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Chris Izmirlian ’17 (No. 25) scored the game-winner in overtime. goal in the third period, Doherty now leads the Bulldogs in points with nine on the year. The freshman has registered points in five of the last six games after being paired with top line forwards Kenny Agostino ’14 and captain Jesse Root ’14. The Bulldogs return to ECAC play next weekend with a home slate, facing Dartmouth on Friday night and Harvard on Saturday night. The puck will drop for both games at 7:00 p.m. at Ingalls.

YALE

0

0

2

1

3

MER.

1

0

1

0

2

W

L

%

W

L

%

13

1

0.929

20

4

0.833

2

Harvard

9

5

0.643

14

9

0.609

3

Penn

8

6

0.571

14

11

0.560

Brown

8

6

0.571

12

13

0.480

5

Princeton

6

8

0.429

10

14

0.417

6

Dartmouth

4

10

0.286

11

15

0.423

Cornell

4

10

0.286

8

16

0.333

Columbia

4

10

0.286

6

17

0.261

ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

PTS

W L

T

%

1

Harvard

7

1

1

15

8

1

1

0.850

2

Cornell

6

0

2

14

9

1

2

0.769

3

Clarkson

5

2

1

11

12

3

2

0.765

St. Lawrence

5

2

1

11

6

9

1

0.406

5

Quinnipiac

3

2

4

10

12

2

5

0.763

6

Princeton

4

4

1

9

5

6

2

0.462

7

Rensselaer

3

3

0

6

6

8

1

0.433

8

Yale

2

3

1

5

3

8

1

0.292

9

Union

2

4

0

4

5

9

0

0.357

Dartmouth

2

7

0

4

2

9

0

0.182

11

Colgate

1

7

0

2

3

12

2

0.235

12

Brown

0

5

1

1

1

8

2

0.182

MEN’S ICE HOCKEY ECAC Forward Jana Graf ’14 (No. 34) scored 13 points against Miami and added 12 against Furman. sive end. We can still improve on our transition defense and playing consistent Bulldog basketball for a full 40 minutes.” The team returns home this week to face Bryant, a team the Bulldogs defeated last

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Quinnipiac

6

1

1

0.813

13

2

2

0.824

2

Union

5

1

0

0.833

7

3

2

0.667

Colgate

5

3

0

0.833

7

7

1

0.500

4

Cornell

4

3

1

0.5625

7

4

1

0.625

5

Clarkson

4

2

0

0.667

10

3

1

0.750

Yale

3

1

2

0.667

6

2

2

0.700

St. Lawrence

2

2

2

0.500

8

6

2

0.563

Rensselaer

2

3

2

0.429

7

5

2

0.571

9

Harvard

2

5

1

0.313

4

6

1

0.409

10

Princeton

2

6

0

0.250

3

10

0

0.231

11

Brown

1

4

1

0.250

3

6

1

.350

12

Dartmouth

1

6

0

0.143

1

8

0

0.111

season 78–65, on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.e.wu@yale.edu .

7

FORDHAM 80, YALE 52

MIAMI

47

44

91

FURMAN

28

38

66

FORDHAM

43

37

80

YALE

33

34

67

YALE

30

31

61

YALE

35

17

52

Nov. 22, 2013

Nov. 27, 2013

OVERALL

SCHOOL

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

FURMAN 66, YALE 61

Nov. 25, 2013

SCHOOL Yale

WOMEN’S ICE HOCKEY

YALE 3 (OT), MERRIMACK 2

W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B4

MIAMI 91, YALE 67

OVERALL

1

Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

Elis fall over break 19 and 12 points respectively against Furman (4–4, 0–0 Atlantic Sun). The two teams traded baskets in the first half, until the Elis were able to create an eight-point lead a little over 10 minutes into the game. Yale held on to its lead and went into the locker room at halftime up 30–28. In the second half, Furman came back to tie the game at 38 with 15:47 remaining in the game and did not fall behind again. The Paladins would jump out to an eight-point lead with under eight minutes to play, but the Bulldogs fought back to within one, bringing the score to 59–60 with over a minute to play. Yale’s rally fell short, however, as Furman knocked down its free throws down the stretch to put the game out of reach, defeating Yale 66–61. “The team improved both offensively and defensively during our road games this past week,” Graf said. “We learned to play better as a team and with more patience on the offensive end, while continuing to improve on our pressure and rotations on the defen-

OVERALL

Women’s hockey tops Huskies on Friday WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 lot against Quinnipiac. The score could have been a lot higher on Quinnipiac (12–2–5, 3–2–4). our end.” Early in the game, it appeared The previous Saturday and that the Bulldogs were going to Sunday, the Bulldogs faced off do just that, as Staenz and Mock twice against Minnesota (17–1– each tallied a goal within the first 0, 11–1–0 WCHA), which had just lost its first game in almost five minutes of the game. But the Bobcats came back two years the weekend before. with three consecutive goals, one in each period, and Yale was unable to respond. The final goal At the end of the day, we was initially an off-target shot, but it deflected off a Bobcat for- have to bury our chances ward’s leg and into the net to give Quinnipiac the lead. and we had a lot against Tomimoto said that the game against Quinnipiac was one of Qpac. the best that Yale has played all year. TARA TOMIMOTO ’14 Captain, Women’s hockey team “We came out really strong in the first period, which is something we wanted to change after playing UConn,” Tomimoto said. In both games, the Golden “At the end of the day, we have to Gophers brought an offensive bury our chances and we had a onslaught in the first two peri-

QUINNIPIAC 3, YALE 2

MINNESOTA 4, YALE 1

ods. They scored five in the first two on Saturday and four in that same time frame on Sunday. The Bulldog defense was able to stop the bleeding both times, and the offense could only respond with one goal in each game — by forward Hanna Astrom ’16 on Saturday and Ferrara on Sunday. Though the result was not in the Bulldogs’ favor, Tomimoto said that playing such a strong team was a learning experience. “There are a lot of things that Minnesota does that we want to be able to do,” Tomimoto said. “They receive passes, no matter whether it’s a bad pass or a good pass, they work very hard every shift and they play their systems to a tee.” Goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15 saved 33 shots through two periods on Saturday before Hanna Mandi ’17 replaced her in net for

MINNESOTA 5, YALE 1

the third and saved 19. On Sunday, Leonoff played the entire game and stopped 48 Golden Gopher shots, the most saves she has had in a game this season. Heading into the Bulldogs’ final game of 2013 against Providence, defenseman Kate Martini ’16 said that the team will be focusing on its zone defense in practice. “We want to make sure we’re spending as little time in our zone as possible and we have those systems down pat,” Martini said. “Against Quinnipiac especially, we had three breakdowns, and they scored three goals.” Yale will face off at Providence, R.I. this Friday at 7:00 p.m. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

YALE 5, UCONN 4

QUINNIPIAC

1

1

1

3

MINN.

3

1

0

#

4

MINN.

3

2

0

#

5

YALE

2

1

2

#

5

YALE

2

0

0

2

YALE

0

1

0

#

1

YALE

0

0

1

#

1

UCONN

2

1

1

#

4

Nov. 30, 2013

Nov. 24, 2013

Nov. 23, 2013

Nov. 29, 2013

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Defenseman Taylor Marchin ’17 (No. 44) scored the game-winner.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 , 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

“Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” KEVIN DURANT PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL PLAYER

Football falls to the rival Crimson FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 As poorly as the game began for the Yale offense, it started even worse for the defense. Harvard (9–1, 6–1 Ivy) marched to the Yale 25-yard line, where Crimson running back Paul Stanton took a handoff and dashed through a gaping hole for the first of his four touchdowns on the day. That number tied the all-time record for most touchdowns scored by a Crimson player against the Bulldogs in The Game. Yale’s next drive quickly turned catastrophic. After picking up a first down, backup running back Candler Rich ’17 fumbled at the end of a long catch-and-run, and Harvard recovered at the Yale 49-yard line. Five plays later, Stanton again found the end zone on a 21-yard screen pass, extending the Harvard lead to 14–0 with 3:02 left in the first quarter. Despite showing some tricks from Reno’s arsenal — wide receiver Deon Randall ’15 took snaps in the wildcat — Yale’s next possession ended with a punt to the Crimson. Harvard’s third touchdown silenced the 50,934 fans assembled at the Yale Bowl. The Cantabs took the ball 65 yards downfield, culminating in another screen to Stanton. The drive consisted of an even mix of passes and runs, fitting for a Crimson offense that put up 209 passing yards and 216 rushing yards on the day. “We get the momentum, put the pedal to the metal and don’t take it off,” Harvard head coach Tim Murphy said. Down three touchdowns, Reno opened his playbook even wider. Backup quarterback Mor-

HENRY EHRENBERG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Tailback Tyler Varga ’15 (No. 30), who had not played since Oct. 19, had five carries against Harvard. Varga was named a preseason All-American. gan Roberts ’16 came in for a few snaps under center while Furman lined up wide. But after the drive stalled at the Harvard 20-yard line, kicker Kyle Cazzetta ’15 missed a 37-yard field goal to again leave the Bulldogs emptyhanded. The Crimson then completed its fourth touchdown drive in a row on a Paul Stanton run. The 13-play drive was the second-longest allowed by the Elis’ defense on the season. Yale trailed 28–0 at the intermission, their largest halftime deficit of the season. “We’re not at all happy about our execution today and demand that in the future we can succeed in execution for 10 games, not just five,” said Yale captain Beau Palin ’14. In the second half, Harvard

started off with the same level of play that characterized the first half, moving the ball 69 yards to the Yale two-yard line. But the Bulldog defense managed to hold, limiting the Crimson to a field goal and a 31–0 lead. Though many fans in the Yale Bowl thought the game was already over, nobody told the Bulldog offense. Randall continued his playmaking ways, dragging his toes on the right sideline to make a catch on a crucial third down and later scoring on a three-yard touchdown run out of the wildcat formation. The 10-play, 74-yard drive cut the Crimson lead to 31–7. Randall’s touchdown capped a sensational season. The junior out of San Diego finished with 788 yards on 85 catches, finishing just one grab shy of the school

record held by Eric Johnson ’01. He was named to the all-Ivy first team on Tuesday. Revitalized by the offense, Yale’s defense forced a threeand-out after snuffing out a bubble screen and inducing an incomplete pass from Harvard quarterback Conner Hempel. While momentum had begun to shift in the Elis’ favor, their luck soon ran out. Yale failed to get any traction on its next drive. After Furman found Randall over the middle for a 20-yard gain, three plays lost two yards for the Elis, and the punt team came on. But on the first play of the fourth quarter, the Bulldogs caught a huge break when defensive lineman Dylan Drake ’14 stripped Stanton of the football and recovered it himself. Four plays later, however, Furman

threw an interception on fourth down to give the ball back to Harvard, effectively squashing the Elis’ chances at a comeback. Following the turnover, David Mothander nailed a 48-yard field goal to extend Harvard’s advantage to 34–7, where it would stay. Furman finished 21–34 for 179 yards and an interception, while Hempel was a precise 19–26 for 209 yards and two touchdowns. Hempel added 57 rushing yards on 10 carries. Stanton led all rushers with 118 yards. The Harvard victory, coupled with Dartmouth’s upset over Princeton, allowed the Crimson to win a share of the Ivy League championship. Although the year ended on a sour note for Yale, with big losses to Princeton and Harvard, Reno said that this season was a step in

the right direction. Reno oversaw a three-game improvement from last season, when their record was 2–8 with just a single victory in Ivy play. “I think the kids showed resiliency as we take this next step forward toward building Yale football,” Reno said. “It was a big step to get to 0.500 this year and we did that.” Yale still leads the overall series against Harvard 65–57–8. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

HARVARD 34, YALE 7 HARVARD

14

14

3

3

34

YALE

0

0

7

0

7

Elis to take on Utah at NCAAs VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 but proved early on that they were more than capable of competing. The Elis (20–4, 13–1 Ivy) again got off to a slow start, dropping the first set 25–19. “We weren’t really ready or prepared,” head coach Erin Appleman said. “We didn’t play very well and Stony played great. Once we settled down we started playing better.” In the second set, the Bulldogs came alive, smashing 18 kills on a scorching 0.425 hitting percentage. The Elis built an early four-point lead and never looked back as they took the second set 25–18. In the second half of the match, it was the Elis’ defense that kept them on top. Despite posting just a 0.218 hitting percentage over the last two sets, the Bulldogs only allowed 11 kills, while forcing 16 errors. Polan continued to rewrite the record books against Stony Brook. With 47 assists, the team captain moved into third all-time in Yale history with 3,181 career assists. Johnson added a 12-kill, 16 dig double-double, while middle blocker Maya Midzik ’16 contributed 10 kills, three digs and four block assists. Midzik has performed well for the team since being placed in the starting lineup after an injury to middle blocker Jesse Ebner ’16. Libero Maddie Rudnick ’15 paced the team with 18 digs. With this win, the Bulldogs recorded their 20th victory of the season. The tri-

umph also secured Appleman’s fourth 20-win campaign since she took over as head coach of Yale volleyball in 2003. “I didn’t even know it was that game,” Appleman said. “I don’t look at the milestones in that way. I look at how much better we can get. It’s great for recruiting, I’m not going to lie.” Appleman said she is already looking past the record to the team’s next challenge: the NCAA tournament. The Elis will now travel to Penn State for the first round, where they are set to play against Utah. If the team advances, as they did in 2004 and 2008, they will almost certainly be playing No. 2 Penn State. “It’s a homecoming for me,” Appleman said. “We’ve been [at Penn State] before, we know what the gym is like, we know what the crowd is like. We’re going to be more like a home team there than anywhere else.” Yale will take on Utah in the first round of the NCAA tournament this Friday at 5 p.m. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

YALE 3, STONY BROOK 1 YALE

19

25

25

25

3

S.B.

25

18

15

15

1

Nov. 26, 2013

NICK DEFIESTA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Middle blocker Maya Midzik ’16 (No. 8) scored eight kills as Yale beat Stony Brook last week.

Duren sinks Leopards on buzzer-beater M. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B1 were not able to come in and make shots we can normally make.” The Elis uncharacteristically struggled on the boards early on, grabbing just 15 rebounds in the first half to Hartford’s 21. Offensively, the story was not much better, as Yale’s top two leading scorers, forward Justin Sears ’16 and Duren, went a combined 2–10 from the field for six points. Duren said that the Bulldogs settled for too many jump shots early, but that head coach James Jones told the Bulldogs to attack the basket and get to the free-throw line. After Jones’ halftime adjustments, the Bulldogs returned for the second half revitalized. The Elis hit the boards and were able to get to the line 19 times. The team attacked the basket hard, only attempting three shots from beyond the arc in the second frame

after taking 12 3-pointers in the first half. The duo of Sears and Duren was particularly effective. Sears recorded 10 points and five rebounds in the second half, while Duren had 10 points and four rebounds. Together they combined for 12 attempted free throws in the second half. Sears filled out the stat sheet, leading the team in both scoring and rebounding with a 16-point, 10-board double-double in addition to four blocks and four steals. Through seven games, Sears is leading the team in both points (17.6) and rebounds (7.9) per game. Pritchard added eight points on 2–3 shooting from 3-point range. Forward Brandon Sherrod ’15, struggling with foul trouble, recorded four points, three assists and three rebounds. Hartford head coach John Gal-

lagher spoke highly of Yale in the postgame press conference. “For us to sit here and say it’s a complete negative, that wouldn’t be the case,” Gallagher said. “We held a team [Yale] that went to Easton, Pa., and won at Lafayette which is probably one of the harder feats to do, to 32 percent shooting in the game.” After three straight games with the number of free-throw attempts under 40, Saturday’s game was evidence that the freedom of movement rule changes, which the NCAA introduced this past off-season to limit handchecking on the perimeter, are still having an impact on the game. Yale and Hartford combined for 49 free throw attempts. Yale’s season opener against Sacred Heart featured a combined 64 trips to the line. “Teams are still getting used to the new rules,” Duren said. “It’s

frustrating at times because of the ambiguity of certain calls on defense, but on the flip side the offense can be more aggressive because refs are calling more fouls. It will take some getting used to.” Despite early rebounding troubles, the Elis won the battle of the boards 36–33 after recording a 19–10 edge in rebounds in the second half. Yale has continued the trend from last season, outrebounding its opponents by nearly four boards a game. Nonetheless, Pritchard said the team is determined to improve its rebounding numbers. “I don’t think we’re content

YALE 54, HARTFORD 49

with how we’re rebounding right now,” Pritchard said. “With the schedule coming up, we’re going to be able to really increase our margin of rebounding. It’s just a constant effort and a constant stress by our coaching staff.” Pritchard also said the Elis are concerned with the way they have been playing defense. Though the team scores well from distance, 6.1 threes per game on 36.4 percent shooting, they are giving up 7.6 threes per game on 42.1 percent shooting from deep. With the Elis now returning to New Haven for a two-game homestand against Bryant and

YALE 79, LAFAYETTE 76

New Hampshire, Pritchard said they will look to extend their winning streak. “Now is a great time to gear up,” Pritchard said. “We’re reaching a point in our schedule where the teams we play are very similar to the teams we’re going to play in [the Ivy League]. If we can get a winning streak going and start to form an identity, it would only raise our level of confidence.” The Elis will take on Bryant in John J. Lee Amphitheater Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

MERCER 81, YALE 54

YALE

20

34

54

54

YALE

39

40

79

79

MERCER

41

40

81

81

HART.

23

26

49

49

LAF.

38

38

76

76

YALE

28

26

54

54


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“Loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, loser, [points to self] winner.” CHRISTIAN LAETTNER PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL PLAYER

Bulldogs battle through Warriors

Road trip not kind to Elis

KATHRYN CRANDALL/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Guard Sarah Halejian ’15 (No. 1) scored a team-high 22 points against Miami and added 19 against Fordham. BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Mike Doherty ’17 (No. 24) leads the Bulldogs with nine points so far this season. BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER Despite dominating its game on Saturday, the No. 9 men’s hockey team suffered a post-turkey hangover, needing an overtime goal to sneak by Merrimack 3–2 at Ingalls. Forward Chris Izmirlian ’17 tallied the game winner with 45 seconds remaining in overtime.

MEN’S ICE HOCKEY “It was a great team win and reassured us that we need to keep with our systems,” defenseman Mitch Witek ’16 said. “Games like that can frustrate teams into playing a different style but we were consistent and that paid off in the end.” Yale (6–2–2, 3–1–2 ECAC) held the advantage in shots in the first period, 13–3, but went into the first intermission down a goal after Warrior forward Hampus Gustafsson tallied just four minutes into the opening frame. The second period was scoreless, despite powerplay opportunities for both sides. In his seventh start of the year, netminder Alex Lyon ’17 made eight saves in the second 20 minutes to keep Merrimack (3–9–1, 0-5–1 HEA) from adding to its

advantage. The Bulldogs finally broke through two minutes into the third period on a highlight reel goal by defenseman Gus Young ’14. The blueliner held off a Warrior defender, controlled the puck off the boards and put it between another player’s legs towards the net. Coming in off the goal line, Young went to his backhand, where he evaded another player on his knees and unleashed a shot that found its way past goaltender Rasmus Tirronen for the tying goal. But Merrimack scored nine seconds later to regain the lead with Gustafsson tallying his second of the game. Yale failed to take advantage of a man advantage at 4:59 in the third. The power play unit went 0–4 on the night, continuing its dismal start to the season. The Bulldogs have scored on 0.191 percent of its opportunities thus far. The Elis again tied the game with under eight minutes remaining thanks to another blueliner. Boston Bruins draft pick Rob O’Gara ’16 lit the lamp with a wrister from the right circle after some nice work by teammate Michael Doherty ’17. The freshman streaked into the zone and took a shot from the left side of the ice, which was pushed aside. Doherty picked up his own rebound, skated behind the net and found

O’Gara skating into the zone for an open shot. O’Gara put the puck home, top shelf. Despite peppering Merrimack’s net with 15 shots in the third, Tirronen remained firm for the Warriors and denied Yale a further goal, sending the game into sudden death overtime. The Bulldogs, who did not have a lead before overtime, got the win with under a minute to play in the contest. DiChiara, who had just stepped on the ice after a change, intercepted a pass at the opposing blue line after an attempted clearance. The forward skated in towards the net, drawing two defenders, and dished the puck to Izmirilan. The Highland Beach, Fla. native let go a wrist shot that deflected off Tirronen’s glove and landed behind the goaltender. Izmirlian was the first to react, following up his shot and poking the puck home for the win. “Izzy’s goal was very clutch,” Witek said. “It was great to see a freshman step up and make a play like that in overtime. We are very happy with the win. We played good hockey for the majority of the game, we just weren’t catching any break on the scoreboard.” Yale dominated the game in terms of SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

The women’s basketball team dropped all three contests it played over Thanksgiving break, including two against teams that played in the postseason last season.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL On Friday, the Elis (3–4, 0–0 Ivy) got off to a rough start against Fordham (5–2, 0–0 Atlantic 10), falling behind 28–10 less than 12 minutes into the first half. A 19–5 run by the Bulldogs brought Yale to within five points of the Rams with 20 seconds remaining in the half. Fordham, however, regained the momentum with a 3-pointer to close out the first half, bringing the score to 43–35. Fordham controlled the second half, outscoring the Elis 37–17 as Yale struggled to score from the field and at the line. Two Bulldogs finished in double figures: Guards Sarah Halejian ’15 and Hayden Latham ’15 each had 10 points. Overall the Elis were outshot 46.6 percent to 34.4 percent from the floor and outrebounded 47–36. “We lost a lot of our intensity and momentum starting off the second half which affected our performance both on the offensive and defense end,” captain and guard Janna Graf ’14 said. “This

combination allowed Fordham to go on a run and resulted in us losing our poise.” The Bulldogs then traveled to Florida on Monday to face Miami (5–2, 0–0 Atlantic Coast) and featured a strong performance from Halejian and Graf, who scored 22 and 13 points respectively. It was not enough, however, as five Hurricane players scored in double figures. The Elis were able to stay within striking range, trailing 28–25 with 7:33 remaining in the first half. The Hurricanes began to pull away by the end of the half, pushing their lead to 47–33. Miami extended its lead throughout the second half, going up by 20 points with just under 13 minutes remaining in the game. Miami dominated the paint, outscoring Yale 54–16 in the key, and also led in fast break points 16–2. A torrid shooting performance by the Hurricanes, who netted 58.3 percent of their shots, helped Miami to down the Bulldogs 91–67. “We did not pressure Miami enough defensively and gave them too many easy, uncontested shots in transition and in the half court,” Halejian said. “They were also very athletic and we struggled to contain their penetration.” On the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, Halejian and Graf once again paced the Bulldogs with SEE W. BASKETBALL PAGE B2

Hockey second in Nutmeg Classic BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While most students were home for vacation, the Yale women’s hockey team was hard at work last week, playing games on four of the nine days of Thanksgiving break.

WOMEN’S ICE HOCKEY The Bulldogs (3–8–1, 2–3–1 ECAC) lost 5–1 and then 4–1 to No. 1 Minnesota over the first weekend of the break. The next weekend, they played in the annual Nutmeg Classic at Quinnipiac and placed second in the four-team tournament. Yale beat Connecticut 5–4 on Friday in the first round of the Classic, thanks to a late gamewinning goal by defenseman Taylor Marchin ’17. In the championship game the next day, they fell 3–2 to No. 8 Quinnipiac, a team that they had tied 0–0 earlier in the season. On Friday against UConn, Yale got help from five different goalscorers in a game that had four lead changes. UConn went up 1–0 early in the first period. Over the course of the next two and a half periods, Yale scored twice, but then relinquished the lead by allow-

ing two goals. Yale came back and scored two more goals of its own to eventually take a 4–3 lead midway through the third period. Forwards Janelle Ferrara ’16, Krista Yip-Chuck ’17, Stephanie Mock ’15 and Phoebe Stanz ’17 contributed goals for Yale. The Huskies tied the game at four with a power-play goal, but Marchin finally put the game away with just 39.5 seconds left in regulation. Marchin’s goal was also on the power play because of a UConn hooking penalty. Though the Bulldogs ultimately ended up with the win, the Huskies outshot them by at least one in every period and 28–24 overall. In Yale’s 12 games thus far, the team has been outshot in all but two of them. “It was definitely not our best game,” said forward and captain Tara Tomimoto ’14. “We didn’t come out strong in the first, and that carried on throughout the entire game.” Defenseman Madi Murray ’15 added that this season, the Bulldogs have had better play as a team against higher-ranked teams than against weaker teams such as UConn. Yale advanced to the championship game hoping to upset SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE B2

JENNIFER CHEUNG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Stephanie Mock ’15 (No. 6) scored against UConn and Quinnipiac in the Nutmeg Classic this weekend.


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