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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 61 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY CLEAR

51 50

CROSS CAMPUS A society of scholars. Adding

to Yale’s growing list of Rhodes scholars, Julian De Freitas ’13 has been named an international Rhodes scholar from South Africa, bringing the University’s total Rhodes recipients this year to nine. The brainy Yalie is a Whiffenpoof, former co-captain of Yale Road Running and a cognitive science major. Congratulations!

We have competition. Harvard

received nearly 15 percent more early applications this year compared to last year, collecting 4,856 applications from eager high school seniors looking to join the Ivy League. By comparison, Yale received 4,514 early applications, a 4.4 percent increase from last year. Whatever, Harvard still sucks.

VOLLEYBALL ELIS FALL IN NCAA FIRST ROUND

ALLERGIES

MEN’S HOCKEY

FINALS

A new Yale Dining initiative will use food allergen stickers

BULLDOGS CONTINUE FOURGAME WIN STREAK

Staff photographer Sara Miller ’16 documents students at work

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE B3 SPORTS

PAGE 10 THROUGH THE LENS

City misses ‘Race’ cut CONNECTICUT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE TEST HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ RESULTS

100% 90%

Percentage meeting goal Percentage considered proficient

80% 70%

BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER

60%

would have been allotted to the city’s “Engage New Haven” initiative, a three-prong plan to develop new infrastructure for capturing and responding to student performance data, attract talented educators and endow all district schools with a base level of technology. But while Garth Harries, the dis-

Singaporean opposition leaders challenged the establishment of Yale-NUS at a panel discussion in Sheffield-SterlingStrathcona Hall Friday afternoon. Secretary-General of the Singapore Democratic Party Chee Soon Juan and Secretary-General of the Reform Party of Singapore Kenneth Jeyaretnam called for a reevaluation of Yale’s motives in partnering with the National University of Singapore in the creation of Yale-NUS, condemning Yale’s alleged compliance with restrictions enforced by the People’s Action Party — the party currently in charge of Singapore’s government. Roughly 100 members of the Yale community attended the panel, which was co-sponsored by the Yale International Relations Association and the Council on Southeast Asia Studies at Yale and also included Meredith Weiss, associate professor of political science at the State University of New York at Albany. “When you seek to advance your interest at the expense of ours, I wonder if you are our friends at all,” Chee said. “Teachers and students, if you will not accept anything less for yourselves here in New Haven, why do you deny it in Singapore?” Chee, whose speech elicited a prolonged applause from the audience, said his worst fears were realized when he found out the Singaporean government would restrict political activity on the Yale-NUS campus, and urged Yale not to be complicit

SEE RACE TO THE TOP PAGE 4

SEE SINGAPORE PAGE 4

50% 40% 30% 20%

Not quite crowdsourcing, but still. The Yale College

Council is asking students to complete an online survey about their thoughts on what Provost and President-elect Peter Salovey should do to improve Yale. But is that really necessary? Based off the crowdsourcing Google Doc the YCC sent a few weeks earlier, it seems like most students want the administration to do something about the cold weather and dark streets — such as hand out British torches — and build a footbridge over Elm Street.

Fashion faux pas. Looking for the perfect stocking-stuffer for the person you hate? Consider Campus Customs’ signature Yale crocs, which come in classic navy and are endowed with generous “ventilation ports” for the sweaty-footed. Yalies give back. School of Medicine professor Vincent DeVita has been elected president of the 2012–’13 board of directors of the American Cancer Society, a national volunteer health organization dedicated to cancer issues. Can you make the final cut?

Registration for Yale’s annual culinary competition “Iron Chef Yale: The Final Cut” close today. The preliminary competition will take place in each residential college dining hall on Dec. 9, and the final event will take place in Commons on Feb. 21. Get your cookbooks ready! Harvard gets kinky.

Administrators approved a BDSM group called “Harvard College Munch” that aims to provide a space for students to discuss their sexual desires. After over a year of informal meetings, the group has grown from seven to roughly 30 members, according to The Harvard Crimson.

10% 0% 2007

2008

BY NICOLE NAREA STAFF REPORTER Though New Haven is at the forefront of a national thrust for education reform, the city lost out last week on nearly $30 million in federal funds from Race to the Top, a grant competition launched by President Barack Obama that encourages innovation in public school peda-

2009

2010

gogy. Nationwide, 372 school districts including New Haven competed for allocations of Race to the Top’s over $400 million in grant funds. Bridgeport and Hartford were among the Department of Education’s 61 finalists announced Nov. 26, and 15 to 25 of the finalists will be awarded fouryear grants varying from $5 million to $40 million. Race to the Top funds

Lacrosse players coach youth

2011

2012

Conservatives talk communism

BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER Tuning into NBC Friday night, viewers were temporarily greeted not by negotiations in Washington, but by New Haven and Hartford youth playing lacrosse. In its daily two-minute “Making a Difference” segment, “Nightly News,” NBC’s flagship news program, detailed the efforts of Inner City Lacrosse (ICL), a nonprofit dedicated to bringing lacrosse to underprivileged youths in New Haven and Hartford. As middle school students buzzed around SEE LACROSSE PAGE 5

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1969 The New Haven Black Panthers issue a statement saying they expect local police to raid their headquarters and arrest individuals on “trumped-up” charges.

The William F. Buckley Program’s Friday panel discussed how “Witness” galvanized the conservative movement. BY ROSA NGUYEN STAFF REPORTER

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ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Singaporean opposition challenges Yale-NUS

MICHAEL GARY

Inner City Lacrosse is free of charge and enrolls over 50 students.

Roughly 100 students, alumni and government officials gathered in Linsly-Chittenden Hall Friday to commemorate the 60th anniversary of “Witness,” an anti-communist manifesto written by conservative columnist Whittaker Chambers. The event, hosted by the William F. Buckley Program, aimed to exam-

ine “Witness” from both historical and present-day perspectives through three panels and a dinner with Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels. Panelists such as John Gaddis, a history professor, and Elliott Abrams, former assistant secretary of state for human rights and humanitarian affairs, discussed the book’s controversial history in sparking the beginning of the conservative movement.

Daniels said he agreed with the book’s message of freedom and anti-communism, but he criticized its pessimistic depiction of a Western world succumbing to communism. Instead of possessing a pessimistic view of modern-day Americans relying on the government, he said he thinks Americans can still become self-made people SEE BUCKLEY PAGE 5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

“This reader would love to see the Yale administration make subtle changes .COMMENT to encourage drinking, but condemn drunkenness.” 'KELLYGREEN' ON 'STUDENT yaledailynews.com/opinion

DRINKING TOPS NATIONAL AVERAGE'

Pay college athletes? A

s we traveled back from Yale-Harvard weekend, my friend who was driving piped up to ask, “Hey guys, remember to tell me when to get off the highway.” We all looked at our phones, only to realize we had gone due west about 80 miles in the wrong direction. While I’d like to simply blame this on Apple Maps, the real culprit was that the other three of us had been yelling about college football for the last hour or so — specifically, how student-athletes should be treated on campuses. With the Bowl Championship Series having been set yesterday, this is generally the time of year for such conversations to take place. Specifically, whether or not student-athletes are treated fairly at big-name universities. Perhaps, if they are even treated as students at all. One of my friends in the car had a rather bleak assessment of the current state of such college athletics: Universities with gigantic sports programs (Alabama, Ohio State, Florida, etc.) have become factories over academies, “immorally” using student-athletes for their own gain. In part, there is a fair case to be made here. It is impossible to ignore the numerous reports regarding the manipulation of academic standards and expectations for athletes, all in hope to ensure their eligibility (and performance) for game day. Nevertheless, from this reasonable foundation, more and more people — be it my friend in the car or advocates nationwide — have thus espoused a solution drastically more troublesome than the original problem. Their proposal? Pay studentathletes. And while this may appear appealing at first — as a neatly conceived manner of restoration — it is positively deleterious to the very core of the academy. Of course, there is something that sets athletes apart. Some suggest that this factor is a unique time burden; however, I think this is difficult to maintain in comparison to actors, musicians, dancers, newspaper editors and the like. What is exceptional, though, is the revenue they generate. Athletes are pictured as tremendous cash cows, while greedy universities hoard money at their expense. This great disparity is what incites such scrutiny. To be clear, though, it is wholly fictitious that athletes go entirely uncompensated for their efforts. They are paid, through full academic scholarships, with four years of a college education — an opportunity that often would not otherwise be available. Granted, a reasonable objection still remains: Sure, they receive a certain benefit, but it is remarkably below the value they create. The problem with this logic, though, is a fundamental

conflation of value from the lens of the academy. When a u n ive rs i ty places a tangible pecuniary value HARRY on one stuGRAVER dent’s contribution — Gravely particularly, a contribuMistaken tion that is primarily of the body over the mind — compared to that of another, it is impossible to escape the latent cultural implication that follows. This prioritization of the commercial over the cerebral places a sort of sentimental, secondary value on the great musician or writer, whose great boon is perhaps decades down the road. The idea that these artistic young minds have no immediate value, at a university of all places, is intellectually unjustifiable. Paying student-athletes in an effort to curb a sense of exploitation on the field will shatter the larger sense of a university’s identity. The academy must never allow the cold, arithmetical metrics of the marketplace to ever encroach on its evaluations of students. Nobody is compelled into athletics, just as nobody is compelled into Shakespeare or journalism. A college offers a service: an education. We can approach and access this however we so choose. And while concerns regarding academic practices are certainly valid at times, no college, of whatever athletic merit, should permit the litany of precarious consequences that would come in creating this semiprofessional class of students. But let’s not take these problems as cause to throw the baby out with the bathwater. There is often a latent qualm undergirding most of the concerns about collegiate athletics — a problem with the very existence of the programs altogether. Yet, if we look to our time in college outside of a lens of sterile scholarship, and treat it more as an incubator for our foundational perceptions — senses of community, history, shared identity — the legacies of athletic programs are of paramount importance. For such schools, teams do not end at the university borders; they are the product and lifeblood of their communities. To bear this mantle, even for just a few years, is a remarkable opportunity for a young man, not an onus we should wholly lament. But let’s not search for a dollar figure to measure this experience. HARRY GRAVER is a junior in Davenport College. Contact him at harry.graver@yale.edu .

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G U E ST C O LU M N I ST CA R O L I N E L E ST E R

Found in translation

S

aturday, I went to a memorial service. It was for a recently departed professor, a woman I didn’t know. My friend had been her advisee, and I went with him as a sort of external support system. We live in circles of small communities. They are made up of our families, our high schools, our churches or temples, our childhood or college friends. For most of us, our dominant community is now Yale and the smaller communities we find here. At Yale, we hear of many people before we meet them. Names take on characteristics or stories before they are illuminated by physical appearance. It’s a strange way to get to know someone — secondhand first. I had the honor of getting to know María Rosa Menocal through her memorial service. My understanding of her was shaped by the stories her colleagues told, by the music selected for her service and by the response of her friends and family to her death. I have a sec-

Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Marissa Medansky and Dan Stein Opinion Editors Yale Daily News opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 61

WE EXIST BOTH INTERNALLY AND EXTERNALLY We can never know another person, my philosophy professor once said, because we can never know what that person is thinking. And that’s what makes us human, I think — our actions hint at our internal self, yet can only reveal our externalities. I remember being horrified by my professor’s comment — my first misguided freshman existential crisis. "Do I know anyone?" I neurotically thought.

Are all my relationships built from hollow reflections of the other? We are encased by our bodies. And when our soul departs, we leave behind a shell of what once was. Thus, we exist both internally and externally. Our internal existence is what we keep for ourselves, and what we hope to reflect through the external. Our external existence is made up of ripples that permeate others. We communicate ourselves through translation, from internal to external, from external to others. Our own understanding of our various communities is gleaned from those translations. This is how we connect, through translations of communication. We do not always act and speak under the notion that those actions and words communicate our souls. But that is what we leave behind, and what is reborn through others' secondhand stories and interpretations. Multiple speakers at profes-

sor Menocal’s memorial service spoke of her love of words. From what I understood, she communicated herself with vivacious bravery, punctuated by a sharp wit and humor. I hope to communicate myself as gracefully as she did. The words of those who spoke at her memorial service were clear; the translations appeared flawless. My professor was right. We can never know exactly what another person is thinking. Our knowledge of the souls of others must be gleaned from translations. And thus, we evolve into a mosaic consisting of our selves, but constructed by others. We become multifaceted, and through memories, immortal. When our external selves depart, we continue to commune with others through the internal. Beauty is the clarity of self, echoed in another’s thoughts. CAROLINE LESTER is a junior in Ezra Stiles College. Contact her at caroline.lester@yale.edu .

The News congratulates its newest staffers O

n Friday, the Oldest College Daily held its fall semester staff inductions. It is with great pride that we annnouce the newest inductees to the Yale Daily News. STAFF REPORTERS

STAFF COLUMNISTS

Dhruv Aggarwal Delhi, India

Payal Marathe West Windsor, N.J.

John Aroutiounian Lexington, Ky.

Sebastian Medina-Tayac Takoma Park, Md.

Giovanni Bacarella Astoria, N.Y. Yuval Ben-David Pittsburgh, Pa. Rishabh Bhandari Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

Leah Motzin Phoenix, Ariz. Nicole Narea Greenwich, Conn.

Geng Ngarmboonanant Bangkok, Thailand Michelle Taylor Kenner, La. Xiuyi Zeng Shanghai, China STAFF OPINION BLOGGERS

Margaret Neil Easton, Md.

John Masko Cumberland, R.I.

Lavinia Borzi Rome, Italy

Rosa Nguyen West Warwick, R.I.

Diana Rosen Chicago, Ill.

Patrice Bowman Columbus, Ohio

Marek Ramilo Atlanta, Ga.

Hayley Byrnes Saline, Mich.

J.R. Reed Chicago, Ill.

Patrick Casey Chicago, Ill.

Hannah Schwarz Chapel Hill, N.C.

Alex Eppler Bethesda, Md.

Issac Stanley-Becker Washington, D.C.

Colleen Flynn Rose Valley, Pa.

Joseph Tisch New York, N.Y.

Emma Goldberg New York, N.Y.

Ashton Wackym Portland, Ore.

Apsara Iyer West Lafayette, Ind.

Amy Wang Phoenix, Ariz.

Jessica Hallam Chepachet, R.I.

David Whipple Brookline, Mass.

Jasmine Horsey Kent, United Kingdom

Eric Xiao North Canton, Ohio.

Nitika Khaitan New Delhi, India

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission.

ondhand understanding of her as a person. Yet the image I’ve constructed is multifaceted, colorful, vivid. I wish I had been lucky enough to know professor Menocal; I left the service echoing the loss I heard throughout.

Matthew Lloyd-Thomas Fairfax, Va.

STAFF MULTIMEDIA

DESIGN STAFF Allison Durkin West Pittston, Pa. Emma Hammarlund Ängelholm, Sweden Leon Jiang Jericho, N.Y. Jason Kim Las Vegas, Nev. Jennifer Lu Livingston, N.J. Laura Peng Carmel, Ind. Skyler Ross Stamford, Conn.

Britta Hjelm Devon, Pa.

Isidora Stankovic Houston, Texas

Kate Walker Lutherville, Md.

Mohan Yin Munster, Ind.

COPY STAFF Emma Fallone Whitefish Bay, Wis.

Sihua Xu Cupertino, Calif. STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ian Gonzales Miami Lakes, Fla.

Philipp Arndt Eichenau, Germany

Douglas Plume Anchorage, Alaska

Sari Levy Great Neck, N.Y. Sara Miller Waynesville, Mo. STAFF ILLUSTRATORS Annelisa Leinbach Mesa, Ariz. Kate McMillan Houston, Texas


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Any idiot can face a crisis — it’s day-to-day living that wears you out.” ANTON CHEKOV RUSSIAN DRAMATIST AND AUTHOR

CORRECTIONS FRIDAY, NOV. 30

Development wins state funds

The article “Kreiss-Tomkins ’12 faces recount” misspelled the Alaskan city of Hydaburg. It also mistakenly stated that Alaska law allows candidates who lose an election by less than 0.5 percent to request that the state conduct a recount. In fact, Alaska law allows anyone to request a recount. If the margin is less than 0.5 percent or 20 votes, the state will pay for it regardless of who ends up winning. Otherwise, a deposit is required to request the recount.

Dining introduces allergen stickers SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The planned construction of urban boulevards along Route 34 seeks to reconnect the Hill neighborhood with downtown New Haven. BY MICHELLE HACKMAN STAFF REPORTER

KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale Dining plans to implement a system of food allergen stickers starting next spring. BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG STAFF REPORTER In response to a student’s violent allergic reaction to mislabeled dining hall food last spring, Yale Dining has begun to roll out a new picture-based label system to help students easily identify meals containing allergens. Yale Dining will add eight food allergen stickers — intended to identify egg, soy, fish and other common allergens — to labels that currently list ingredients and nutritional information in dining halls. Though the stickers were supposed to be phased in two weeks ago, Yale Dining faced delays with its labeling printer and hopes to introduce the stickers next semester. Students with allergies said the new stickers will not help with the mislabeling that persists in the dining halls, but added that the stickers will make it easier to identify what allergens a dish contains. “I think the stickers are a fabulous idea,” said Chloe Drimal ’13, who has a gluten allergy. “To have a quick, visual way to identify key allergens will be really helpful. But often food will be outright mislabeled, and the stickers won’t fix the fact that certain ingredients don’t show up on the label when they are in the dish.” The new stickers are part of a larger effort to address allergy labeling on Yale Dining dishes. Director of Residential Dining Cathy Van Dyke SOM ’86 assembled a focus group last spring to study how Yale Dining can better address student allergies after a student had a severe reaction to mislabeled food. The focus group — made up of Van Dyke, Director of the Resource Office on Disabilities Judy York, Dean of Undergraduate Admissions and Master of Timothy Dwight College Jeffrey Brenzel and representatives from Yale’s General Council — prepared a form for students to identify their allergies and the severity of their reactions to various allergens, which Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry sent students in an email on Aug. 29, 2012. Though Van Dyke said about 60 students filled out the form, she added that more frequent Yale Dining surveys show that “more like 120 students” have food allergies. When Yale Dining begins to use the stickers in the spring, chefs will include them when they make specials, as such dishes require dining staff to

print new labels. Van Dyke added that dining halls will incorporate stickers on all food labels next academic year. “We already use these stickers in posters in the dining halls, and so it made sense to expand and include them in the individual food labels,” Van Dyke said. “The group was trying to think of ways to improve our communication and signage, and these stickers look much neater.”

New Haven will receive $2.2 million from the Connecticut Department of Transportation for the Downtown Crossing project. Mayor John DeStefano Jr. and U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro announced on Thursday that they had secured funding from the state for the city’s largest development project, which will replace portions of Route 34 with urban boulevards and erect a medical office tower in the cleared space. The project, expected to total $135 million in public and private funding, aims to reconnect the Hill neighborhood of New Haven with the downtown area. “I am thrilled that the state was able to award Downtown Crossing these funds and do so in a fiscally responsible manner, using dollars that otherwise would have gone unused,” DeLauro said in a Thursday press release. “Finding the resources to allow this project to move forward in a

timely manner is incredibly important to economic growth and job creation. The eventual connection of Temple and Congress and Orange and South Orange will help revitalize the area, help our innovative local business to grow and give a sizable boost to our local economy.” After more than a year of deliberation, the Board of Aldermen approved the Downtown Crossing project at its Aug. 6 meeting, paving the way for the city to repurpose 11 acres of land from Route 34 into an expanded downtown business district. Under the plan, the city, state and federal government will contribute a combined $35 million to clear the cite of 100 College St. — the project’s signature first phase — for real estate development. Winstanley Enterprises was awarded ownership of the land at 100 College St., last year and the business plans to spend $100 million building a parking garage and 10-story office building targeting biomedical companies as residents. Urban design consultants envisioned

other possibilities for the rest of the repurposed land — including another medical building, a housing tower, a third building for Gateway Community College and a park — at a November meeting in the New Haven Public Library. City officials have said the plan will not only generate new jobs and tax revenue but also reunify the downtown area and medical district now bifurcated by Route 34. “This project is transformational — we are talking about taking out a highway,” City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton told the News in April. “It will be a game changer in terms of the character and experience of the downtown area.” Construction on the project will likely begin in January, according to the New Haven Register. Contact MICHELLE HACKMAN at michelle.hackman@yale.edu .

IMF exec. talks life choices

The stickers won’t fix the fact that certain ingredients don’t show up on the label when they are in the dish. CHLOE DRIMAL ’13 While both Van Dyke and Jeffrey Kwolek, Timothy Dwight College dining manager, said the stickers are based on “internationally recognized symbols,” neither could name the organization that makes the labels. Students with food allergies said the stickers do not address the problem of mislabeled food in dining halls. Julian Debenedetti ’15, who is allergic to dairy, soy, nuts, fish and shellfish, said he had to go to the hospital three times last year after eating mislabeled food. “The labeling system in and of itself is not a bad system — the problem is that many times the food’s ingredients are not all listed on the labels,” Debenedetti said. “Nothing really changed until I emailed my master and dean, and they got much more concrete results. … This year it’s largely been better, but that’s more a product of me talking to the chefs more often.” Zoe Egelman ’13, who is allergic to peanuts, also pointed out that many students with allergies are used to reading ingredient lists, and so visual stickers may not be that much more helpful. Next summer, the allergy form Gentry emailed to all undergraduates will be incorporated into the freshmen housing survey, Van Dyke said. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Outgoing Jackson Institute fellow Rakesh Mohan ’71 encouraged students not to worry about their future career prospects in a Friday talk. BY DAVID BLUMENTHAL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Speaking before an audience of roughly 10 students last Friday, a renowned urban economist, public servant and outgoing Jackson Institute for Global Affairs fellow discussed the relatively low stakes involved in students’ life choices. Rakesh Mohan ’71, India’s executive director-designate for the International Monetary Fund, discussed the nonlinear progression of his career. He came to Yale as an undergraduate having already earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at Imperial College London. He later went on earn a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton, work for the Indian government and join the IMF. He encouraged audience members to pursue their own interests without worrying about their future career prospects, adding that students should capitalize on the diversity of career paths available after graduation. “You must do what really interests you,” Mohan said. “It will get you where you want to be eventually. There are far more options now to be involved in different ways from the total private sector to the public sector.”

Mohan said he originally chose to study engineering because of the South Asian cultural bias toward math and science, but he added that he grew dissatisfied with his career path. On a respite from his job on the shop floor of the tankmanufacturing firm the Armstrong Institute, he stumbled across a copy of the Yale Blue Book. He described this event as crucial to his choice to change careers and apply to Yale as an undergraduate, a decision he described as proof that “things may not turn out as you expect.” Mohan also spoke about the global economy and his views on the modern city. He said the biggest threat to today’s world economy is a potential euro crisis. “Because of the vastly interconnected nature of the financial system, when there is a crisis, it’s massive,” he said. Mohan contrasted India’s 1991 IMF rescue package with Greece’s presentday bailout as an example of the increasingly strong ties between international economies: Greece’s $175 billion bailout dwarfed India’s $5 billion one, despite India’s significantly larger population. Although many question the purpose of cities in the postindustrial world, Mohan said that technological progress will not make a city’s primary strength,

which he described as face-to-face human interaction, obsolete. Mohan said in an interview after his talk that he will miss interacting with students once he leaves Yale to work for the IMF. “[Being a Jackson Institute fellow] was a great experience both in terms of the work I am doing and the teaching,” Mohan said. “The students have been excellent in the courses I have taught in the last two years.” Two students interviewed at the event said they enjoyed Mohan’s talk. Abigail Olvera GRD ’14 said she appreciated Mohan’s frankness and his encouragement that students pursue their passions. Natalie Langburd ’14 said she thought Mohan’s points on the modern city were particularly interesting. “His point about personal interaction was one of the more fascinating parts,” Langburd said. “As interconnected as we are through social media, at the end of the day, there will always be a need for cities.” Mohan assumed his position at the IMF on Nov. 1. Contact DAVID BLUMENTHAL at david.blumenthal@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Schools fumble federal grant RACE TO THE TOP FROM PAGE 1 trict’s assistant superintendent, said officials were “disappointed” that New Haven did not become a grant finalist, they also anticipated that the district’s application to Race to the Top was a “long shot.” The city was just awarded $53 million in September — which Harries called “a testament to the progress being made in New Haven to improve schools” — from the five-year federal Teacher Incentive Fund, a program that seeks to reward and recruit effective educators. “We have lots of work going on already in our schools to provide personalized and technologyenhanced learning to students, the focus of the grant,” Harries said. “We are proud of what we are accomplishing with school change, and we continue on that mission.” Connecticut exhibits the largest achievement gap between lowincome and non-low-income students nationwide, according to the Connecticut Council for Education Reform, but New Haven has garnered national attention since 2009 for its groundbreaking reforms in public education. The city was among the first to recognize the correlation between teacher evaluations and student performance, focusing on retaining top talent through salary hikes and merit bonuses to improve student test scores. The reforms have been lauded by The New York Times, Obama’s Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten. Mayor John DeStefano Jr. called said New Haven public schools provide a “national model” for education reform in his February State of the City address. Race to the Top funds would have built upon existing pro-

“I believe public education is the new civil rights battle.” ANDREW CUOMO GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK

NEW HAVEN ENVELOPED IN FOG

grams established through the Teacher Incentive Fund, such as training for new teachers. Grant money provided 22-year-old Lisa Kieslich, a first-year sixth-grade teacher at New Haven’s John S. Martinez School, with the opportunity to seek training in teaching math, allowing her to create better lesson plans that engage students on an individual basis. “We learned how to really get the students to think on a higherorder level,” Kieslich said. “We could connect it more to their personal life.”

It would be the great failure of our time if we don’t see the job of school change through. JOHN DESTEFANO JR. Mayor, New Haven In spite of efforts to boost teacher training, results from this year’s Connecticut Mastery Test and Connecticut Academic Performance Tests do not meet the New Haven district’s goal of improving test scores by 4.6 percent from last year. DeStefano, however, said he was confident that New Haven would remain a leader in education reform. “We are so far in front of the curve on school reform, it would be the great failure of our time if we don’t see the job of school change through,” DeStefano said in his February address. New Haven Public Schools will receive their first $12 million installment of Teacher Incentive Fund grants this year. Contact NICOLE NAREA at nicole.narea@yale.edu .

ANNELISA LEINBACH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

IT MUST BE THE DEMENTORS Harkness Tower is partially blocked by a dense fog that overtook Yale’s campus throughout the weekend. The fog is expected to continue today.

Singaporean discussion elicits applause SINGAPORE FROM PAGE 1 with the ruling party’s oppressive policies toward the Singaporean people. In October, YaleNUS administrators announced that branches of existing political parties in Singapore as well as organizations “promoting racial or religious strife” would be prohibited on the college’s campus in accordance with the nation’s laws. Jeyaretnam said he thinks healthy political debate cannot exist in a society that is not free. In Singapore, he said, all national media and bloggers who attempt to circumvent state control are frequently threatened with defamation suits by the government, which he added are facts that Yale-NUS President Pericles Lewis has over-

looked. By the time they enroll in a university, he added, young Singaporeans are conditioned to self-censorship, as most live in government-owned flats. But Bryan Garsten, a political science professor and member of the social sciences faculty search committee for Yale-NUS, said in a question and answer session following the panel that intellectual liberty has been fundamental in the college’s planning process. “It is hard to sit and hear the generalizations about Yale and Yale-NUS [being made here],” Garsten said. “I want to state that intellectual freedom has been essential and assumed in all of the conversations about the Yale-NUS curriculum.” Yale-NUS President Pericles Lewis said that the college’s

I am astounded that Levin and Lewis are so blinded by the commercial possibilities of this joint venture that they look the other way. KENNETH JEYARETNAM SECRETARY-GENERAL, REFORM PARTY OF SINGAPORE

We had hoped that given Yale’s proud history, that it would not allow Singapore’s government, or any other government, to dictate the kind of experience it provides for its students. CHEE SOON JUAN SECRETARY-GENERAL, SINGAPORE DEMOCRATIC PARTY

There is increasing space for engagement and increasing claim for voice, [but] the fact that someone is speaking does not mean that anyone is listening. MEREDITH WEISS ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT ALBANY

charter is available on the college’s website. No one involved in the venture is trying to hide any specifics, he said, adding that Yale-NUS administrators welcome advice on how to proceed with the venture. Keith Darden, a political science professor at Yale until last semester and an associate professor of social sciences at YaleNUS, said during the event that since Yale is a not-for-profit corporation, it cannot legally profit from the Singaporean liberal arts college. The Yale-NUS community is made up of top scholars who are not controlled by anyone, he added. Because channels that would allow Singaporean citizens to express themselves freely remain absent or blocked, Weiss said, most Singaporeans raised under the rule of the People’s Action Party do not expect to have a major voice in the government’s decision-making process. Still, Weiss said she thinks Singaporean civil society has “increasing space for engagement.” Both Chee and Jeyaretnam questioned Yale’s financial reasons for establishing the new college, expressing concern that through Yale-NUS, the University will “simply line [its] own pockets” and disregard its established academic goals to maintain a presence in Singapore. “For [President Levin], this is purely a business transaction,” Jeyaretnam said. “What happens to the citizens of my country is not his or Yale’s concern.” Chee said the Yale-NUS degrees — which will be awarded by the National University of Singapore instead of Yale — are evidence that Yale’s engagement in Singapore might be superficial, though he added several times that he hopes his suspicions will be proven wrong. “Is Yale not proud of the students it produces in Singapore?” he asked. Chee and Jeyaretnam both said that since Yale-NUS is “a done deal,” Yale’s next steps will be crucial for the success of the

BENJAMIN ACKERMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Chee Soon Juan, secretary-general of the Singapore Democratic Party, urged Yale to not become complicit with the ruling People’s Action Party’s restrictions on campus freedom. venture. During the Q-and-A session following the panel, history professor Glenda Gilmore and classics professor Victor Bers said the Yale-NUS agreement formalizing the joint venture should be made public to clarify Yale’s role in the project. E-Ching Ng GRD ’13, a Singaporean graduate student, said she thinks several facts, such as that Singapore is 40 percent more expensive than New York,

were misrepresented during the panel, but she was impressed by Chee’s sincerity during individual conversations with audience members. Rayner Teo ’14, copresident of the Malaysian and Singaporean Association, said after the event that he thought Jeyaretnam appeared “more interested in regurgitating his party’s platform than engaging in substantive dialogue.” Marko Micic ’15 said he still believes Yale-NUS’ fundamen-

tal problem lies in the secrecy surrounding the project. “Nobody is really sure what the real motivation for creating it is, and so consequently people are free to speculate,” he said. The Yale-NUS campus is scheduled to open in August 2013. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT Trinity, Yale lacrosse join forces

MICHAEL GARY

Inner City Lacrosse, founded by New Haven native, Michael Gary, brings together lacrosse players from Trinity and Yale to coach underprivileged youth. LACROSSE FROM PAGE 1 the perfectly green pitches of Yale and Trinity College in the background, founder and New Haven native Michael Gary described the program, which brings lacrosse players from the two schools together as coaches for students. “I feel a sense of accomplishment, like I’ve actually accomplished a goal that I’ve been trying to accomplish for a long time,” 11-yearold Kobi Spence, who participates in ICL, said about playing her first game on “Nightly News.” Gary founded the program, which is free of charge and currently enrolls over 50 students, this past summer. He told the News that in addition to providing underprivileged youths with an introduction to lacrosse and role models in the Yale and Trinity players, the program aims to change lacrosse’s reputation as an elite sport. Throughout the fall, he brought members of Yale and Trinity’s lacrosse communities into the program and convinced equipment manufacturers to donate the necessary lacrosse gear. Andy Shay, the men’s lacrosse coach at Yale, said that after receiving an email from Gary during the summer he quickly signed on to the program. Shay added that while the Yale and Trinity programs have played an important part in ICL’s development, the program owes itself to Gary’s efforts. “He did all the legwork,” Shay said. Every Sunday until Nov. 11, middle school students from New Haven and Hartford made their way to the lacrosse fields of either Yale or Trinity, where members of the schools’ lacrosse teams coached the students for two hours. David Better ’15, who helps lead the program, said that 10 Yale students volunteered on a regular basis. Better said that at the beginning of the fall, the Yale lacrosse players were “a little nervous” about how committed and enthusiastic the ICL participants would be. “The kids exceeded expectations beyond anything imagined. Nearly everyone stuck it out through the whole program,” Better said. “The enthusiasm was overwhelming.”

In addition to teaching lacrosse, Gary also hopes that ICL will encourage students to look to Yale and Trinity athletes as role models and take academics seriously. “The excitement you have on this field for this game is the same excitement you need to have at school,” Gary told the ICL participants in a “Nightly News” clip. The program is unlikely to remain only in New Haven and Hartford for long, Better said. Gary would like to expand the program to every college along Interstate 91 in Connecticut, according to a Trinity College press release. Gary, who was raised in New Haven public housing, told “Nightly News” that he “grew up in the section where they told the Yale students not to go.” Despite this, at age 13 he had the opportunity — through the Ulysses S. Grant Foundation — to go to tutoring sessions with Yale students, which he said had a profound impact on him. “When I walked on Yale’s campus as a little boy going for enrichment classes, I felt so important, I felt smart,” Gary told “Nightly News.” “And so I wanted to introduce that element.” Gary eventually went on to attend the Pomfret School and then Trinity College. He now serves as director of admissions for Phillips Exeter Academy, a prep school in Exeter, N.H. Gary could not be reached for comment Sunday. Better and Shay said NBC’s coverage of ICL can only help the program as it attempts to attract more students, expand to other schools and help make sports accessible to underprivileged youths. “That publicity will hopefully be able to help foster programs in lacrosse, or whatever it is, in other cities in similar situations,” Better said. According Nielsen ratings, “NBC Nightly News” drew an average of 10.153 million viewers for the week ending Nov. 23. Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

OPINION. YOUR THOUGHTS. YOUR VOICE. YOUR PAGE.

DESIGN We’re the best-looking desk at the YDN.

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com

We see you. design@yaledailynews.

“The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.” WINSTON CHURCHILL LEADER OF THE U.K. DURING WORLD WAR II

Panel debates identity BUCKLEY FROM PAGE 1 with economic freedom. “Changes must come to welfare state policies, and we must trust in our fellow citizens,” Daniels said. “The government is designed to encourage and enable individual freedom — if we summon the best from Americans, we must assume the best about them. We must tell them, ‘We believe in you and your ability to decide for yourself.’” During the first panel, Gaddis, journalist M. Stanton Evans and historian of the conservative movement Lee Edwards discussed the life of Chambers, a former Soviet spy who testified in the 1948 espionage trial of then-United Nations official Alger Hiss. Hiss was accused of spying for the Soviet Union, and Chambers denounced his Communist allegiances and testified against Hiss. Edwards said “Witness,” which details Chambers’ story, was “the glue that held [the Republican Party] together” in the 1950s because it helped differing conservative factions unite against the common enemy of communism. Evans commended Chambers as a man who realized the dangers behind communism and defended his conservative beliefs despite living in an atmosphere predominantly sympathetic to the Soviets. The second panel, led by Abrams, Max Boot, a military historian and fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations, and Jay Nordlinger, a senior editor of the National Review, examined whether Chambers’ anti-communist message remains relevant in present-day matters of foreign policy. Nordlinger said communism still causes problems in the world today through human rights violations such as Chinese labor camps. “It’s hard to find people left of center who are willing to take up the cause [against human rights violations],” he added. “George W. Bush paid a lot of attention to political prisoners. Obama’s more interested in having warm relations with these Communist regimes.” Boot and Abrams said they think the communist threat has been replaced by the jihadist movement in the Middle East, and they advocated for increased U.S. political involvement in the region. The third panel included Norman Podhoretz, the former editor of Commentary magazine, Alfred Regnery, the former publisher of The American Spectator, and Peter Berkowitz, a senior fellow at Stanford University, who discussed ways that conservatives could define themselves without an immediate communist threat.

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels argued during the panel discussion that Americans can still become a self-made people with economic freedom. Podhoretz said he thinks conservatism would remain united by a belief in economic freedom, while Regnery said the ideology is bound by its fundamental pillars, such as tradition and order. But Berkowitz said he believes in a new approach to conservatism that discourages politicians from seeking a smaller government in size and instead advocates for a government with limited abilities.

The conservative movement doesn’t know how to define itself right now. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY ’13 President, William F. Buckley Program Buckley Program President Nathaniel Zelinsky ’13, a staff columnist for the News, said he enjoyed the third panel because it addressed confusion about the identity of the conservative movement after the 2012 election. “The conservative movement

doesn’t know how to define itself right now, and the whole panel focused on what the movement needed to become,” he said. “It’s something that’s necessary for the University and for the country.” Ugonna Eze ’16 said he thought Gaddis, who discussed Cold War personalities in contrast to one another, portrayed the clash between Hiss and Chambers well. Dimitri Halikias ’16 said he believed Berkowitz embodied the spirit of Buckley, who aimed to change the approach to the conservative movement without giving up on its core principles. Ken Bickford, who spoke at a Buckley Program event last February, said he disagreed with panelists on the final panel because he did not understand the distinction between a small government and one with limited powers. The Buckley Program will host a lecture featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning political columnist George Will in January 2013. Contact ROSA NGUYEN at rosa.nguyen@yale.edu .


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NEWS

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Patchy fog before 10am. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 57. Northwest wind 3 to 8 mph.

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

High of 58, low of 47.

High of 54, low of 29.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, DECEMBER 3 7:00 PM What is Creativity? A Discussion with Artist Carmen Lund Join InspireYale for a discussion with the New Haven-based artist Carmen Lund about creativity and how to become a more creative person. This event will feature paintings made by Yale students at The Big Brush Workshop™. Refreshments, food and chocolate will be served. This event is open to all members of the New Haven and Yale community. Office of International Students and Scholars (421 Temple St.).

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4 5:00 PM Katsaounis on Storytelling Come join the Yale Hellenic Society for a talk and dinner with Nikos Katsaounis, a New York City documentary filmmaker most well-known for his work on NBC’s coverage of the 2004 Athens Olympics, for which he won an Emmy Award, and prism.gr, a collaborative video project which explores many facets of Greek society. He will speak about storytelling in the age of the Internet and his diverse projects and experiences. This will be followed by dinner in a residential college dining hall. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Room 117.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 12:00 PM “Chasing the Dragon: Sex, Finance, and Masculinities in Vietnam’s New Global Economy” The speaker is Kimberly Kay Hoang, a sociologist at Rice University’s Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality and the Kinder Institute for Urban Research. Part of the Southeast Asia Studies Brown Bag Seminar Series. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Room 203.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

6:00 PM Silent Auction Benefit Student and faculty artwork will be auctioned for Hurricane Sandy relief charities. No online bidding. Full payment must be made in person. Yale School of Art (1156 Chapel St.), Green Hall Gallery.

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To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE DECEMBER 3, 2012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Mascara recipient 5 Lie in store for 10 Naval jail 14 __ rug 15 Swiss capital, to the Swiss 16 One and only 17 Hollywood 19 “My great hope __ laugh as much as I cry”: Angelou 20 Impressive property 21 Dugout leader 23 Mattress make 24 Outdoor seating option 26 Airport screening org. 27 WC 29 Italian three 30 “Stop-__”: UGK hit 31 Classic theater name 33 Ignore socially 34 Festive centerpiece adorned with the starts 17-, 24-, 49- and 57-Across 39 Big cat’s cry 40 Ballet bends 41 Flightless Aussie bird 42 Pickle’s place 45 Computer application file extension 46 CBS-owned cable movie sta. 49 All the details, casually 52 Group of eight 54 Not taking sides 55 Pointed abode 56 Gets hitched 57 Venezuelan natural wonder 59 __ above the rest 60 Just right 61 Flower-loving buzzers 62 Peeps from pups 63 Pub game 64 Miss in Mex. DOWN 1 Most current news, with “the”

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12/3/12

By Gareth Bain

2 Crops up 3 Nissan compact 4 Assails 5 Blessed with skills 6 __ behind the ears 7 Yummy smell 8 Needing, with “of” 9 Sawbuck, to a Brit 10 HMS Bounty’s illfated captain 11 ’80s-’90s wisecracking TV mom 12 Cloak-anddagger doings 13 Former Prizm maker 18 And others, in bibliographies 22 Unhittable serve 24 Crotchety oldster 25 Stick up 28 Drinks in the a.m. 31 “I need a sweater!” 32 Baseball arbiter 33 Yearbook gp. 34 Five-time Olympic gold winner Nadia

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12/3/12

46 Less fresh 47 “To be, or not to be” speaker 48 Ukrainian port 50 Thirsts (for) 51 Alleged Soviet spy Hiss 53 “Deadliest Catch” boatful 55 “__ fair in love ...” 56 Technique 58 “Dig in!”

8 5

1 3 4 7 1 8 6 8 5 9 2 9 7 2 8 3 4 5 6 6 5 4 1 2 6 1 4 1 2 9 8 5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T

Dow Jones 13,025.58, +0.03%

S S&P 500 1,416.18, +0.02%

NASDAQ 3,010.24, -0.06%

T 10-yr. Bond 1.61%, -0.01 T Euro $1.30, 0.20

S

S Oil $88.96, +0.09%

GOP mulls ‘cliff’ plan

Brinkmanship on Medicaid expansion BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHRIS USHER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner answers questions about the “fiscal cliff” on an episode of “Face the Nation.” BY ANNE FLAHERTY ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Republicans have to stop using “political math” and say how much they are willing to raise tax rates on the wealthiest 2 percent of Americans and then specify the spending cuts they want, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner said in an interview that aired Sunday. Just four weeks from the proverbial “fiscal cliff,” House Speaker John Boehner countered that Republicans have a plan for providing as much as $800 billion in new government revenue over the next decade and would consider the elimination of tax deductions on high-income earners. But when pressed on “Fox News Sunday” for precise details, the Ohio Republican declined to say. There are “a lot of options in terms of how to get there,” Boehner said. Both Boehner’s and Geithner’s latest remarks indicate it could be some time before serious negotiations begin between the White House and Republicans on how to avert economic calamity expected in less than a month when President George W. Bush-era tax cuts expire and automatic, acrossthe-board spending cuts kick in. Last week, the White House delivered to Capitol Hill its opening plan: $1.6 trillion in higher taxes over a decade, hundreds of billions of dollars in new spending, a possible extension of the temporary Social Security payroll tax cut and enhancing the president’s power to raise the national debt limit. In exchange, the president would back $600 billion in spending cuts, including $350 billion from Medicare and other health programs. But he also wants $200 billion in new spending for jobless benefits, public works projects and aid for struggling homeowners. His proposal for raising the ceiling on govern-

ment borrowing would make it virtually impossible for Congress to block him. Republicans said they responded in closed-door meetings with laughter and disbelief. “I was just flabbergasted,” Boehner said. “I looked at him [Geithner] and I said, ‘You can’t be serious.’” Boehner described negotiations as going “nowhere, period,” and said “there’s clearly a chance” the nation will go over the cliff. Geithner, the administration’s point man for negotiations, was slightly more optimistic while saying the ball was in Boehner’s court. But the treasury secretary also said he didn’t expect a counteroffer right away, as Republicans work to sort out tensions within the party in the wake of bruising national elections that left Democrats in charge of the White House and the Senate. Boehner acknowledged in his interview, aired Sunday, that he wasn’t happy with public remarks by Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma, who said he was ready to go along with Obama’s plan to renew expiring income tax cuts for the majority of Americans and negotiate the rates on top earners later. “They’re trying to figure out where they go next,” Geithner said of Republicans, “and we might need to give them a little time to figure out where they go next.” He called the back-and-forth “normal political theater,” saying all that’s blocking a timely deal is the GOP’s reluctance to accept higher tax rates on the wealthy. “It’s welcome that they’re recognizing that revenues are going to have to go up. But they haven’t told us anything about how far rates should go up … [and] who should pay higher taxes,” Geithner said. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi said Sunday that she will try to force a vote on the Senate-passed bill favored by Democrats to avert a fiscal cliff. But she

was unlikely to line up enough Republicans to succeed. Obama’s political team ramped up its efforts, blasting out an email Sunday night urging supporters to pressure Congress to extend tax cuts that would add up to about $2,000 for a middleclass family of four. Stephanie Cutter, who was Obama’s deputy campaign manager, said in the email that the president was trying to get Congress to “do the right thing and act before the New Year, but he needs our help. We’ve got a good track record here: When we make our voices heard and urge Congress to take action — whether it’s about health care, student loans, Wall Street reform, or ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ — they listen.” Republican leaders have said they accept higher tax revenue overall, but only through what they call tax reform — closing loopholes and limiting deductions — and only coupled with tough measures to curb the explosive growth of Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. “If we gave the president $1.6 trillion of new money, what do you think he’d do with it?” asked Boehner. “He’s going to spend it. It’s what Washington does.” Cole didn’t back down Sunday on his earlier comments that Republicans should agree to Obama’s plan for continuing Bush’s tax rates for middle-class America and focus the negotiations on the other issues. Doing so, he said, would make the GOP position even stronger. “The reality is, nobody can look at this budget and think if you don’t reform entitlements you can balance it. You can give the president every tax increase he’s asked for, you’d still be in the hole,” he said. Geithner appeared on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” NBC’s “Meet the Press,” CNN’s “State of the Union,” ABC’s “This Week” and “Fox News Sunday.” Cole appeared on ABC “This Week.”

WASHINGTON — It’s health care brinksmanship, with hundreds of billions of dollars and the well-being of millions of people at stake. President Barack Obama’s health care law expands Medicaid, the federal-state health program for low-income people, but costwary states must decide whether to take the deal. Turn it down, and governors risk coming off as callous toward their neediest residents. Not to mention the likely second-guessing for walking away from a pot of federal dollars estimated at nearly $1 trillion nationally over a decade. If the Obama administration were to compromise, say by sweetening the offer to woo a reluctant state, it would face immediate demands from 49 others for similar deals that could run up the tab by tens of billions of dollars. As state legislatures look ahead to their 2013 sessions, the calculating and the lobbying have already begun. Conservative opponents of the health care law are leaning on lawmakers to turn down the Medicaid money. Hospitals, doctors’ groups, advocates for the poor, and some business associations are pressing them to accept it.

It makes no sense to send our hardearned federal tax dollars to our neighbors in Illinois. JOE PIERLE Head, Missouri Primary Care Association “Here’s the big thing: The state does not want to expand Medicaid and get stuck with the bill,” said Dr. Bill Hazel, Virginia’s health secretary. “Our legislators do not like to raise taxes to pay for a benefit someone else has promised. The concerns we have … are around federal solvency and the ability of the federal government to meet its commitment.” Medicaid covers nearly 60 million lowincome and disabled people but differs significantly from state to state. Under the health care law, Medicaid would be expanded on Jan. 1, 2014, to cover people making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line, or about $15,400 a year for an individual. About half the 30 million people gaining coverage under the law would do so through Medicaid. Most of the new beneficiaries would be childless adults, but about 2.7 million would be parents with children at home. The federal government would pay the full cost of the first three years of the expansion, gradually phasing down to a 90 percent share. The Supreme Court said states can turn down the Medicaid expansion. But if a state does so, many of its poorest residents would have no other way to get health insurance. The subsidized private coverage also available under Obama’s law is only for people making more than the poverty level, $11,170 for an individual. For the poor, Medicaid is the only option. Although the health care law fully funded the Medicaid expansion and Obama has protected the program from cuts, the federal government’s unresolved budget struggles

don’t give states much confidence. Most states, including Republican-led Virginia, are considering their options. A recent economic analysis by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation and the Urban Institute found that states will receive more than $9 from Washington for every $1 they spend to expand Medicaid, and a few will actually come out ahead, partly by spending less on charity care. States are commissioning their own studies. So far, eight states have said they will turn down the expansion, while 13 states plus the District of Columbia have indicated they will accept it. The eight declining are Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas. Nearly 2.8 million people would remain uninsured in those states, according to Urban Institute estimates, with Texas alone accounting for close to half the total. Hospitals aren’t taking “no” for an answer in the states that have turned down the expansion. Although South Carolina’s Republican Gov. Nikki Haley has had her say, the Legislature has yet to be heard from, said Thornton Kirby, president of the South Carolina Hospital Association. Hospitals agreed to Medicare cuts in the health care law, banking on the Medicaid expansion to compensate them. “We’ve got a significant debate coming in January,” said Kirby. “There are a lot of people tuning in to this issue.” In Maine, Democrats who gained control of the Legislature in the election are pushing to overcome Republican Gov. Paul LePage’s opposition. “Obamacare” was once assailed as a job killer by detractors, but on Wednesday in Missouri it was being promoted as the opposite. Missouri’s hospital association in released a study estimating that the economic ripple effects of the Medicaid expansion would actually create 24,000 jobs in the state. The University of Missouri study found that about 160,000 state residents would gain coverage. “This is not a political issue for us … this is the real world,” said Joe Pierle, head of the Missouri Primary Care Association, a doctors’ group. “It makes no sense to send our hard-earned federal tax dollars to our neighbors in Illinois.” By Thursday, Gov. Jay Nixon, D-Mo., had announced his support for the expansion, but he faces a challenge in persuading Republican legislative leaders. In Florida, where GOP Gov. Rick Scott says he is rethinking his opposition, the state could end up saving money through the Medicaid expansion, said Joan Alker, executive director of the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, which studied the financing. The reason is that Florida would spend less on a state program for people with catastrophic medical bills. Back in Washington, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius says states can take all the time they need to decide. They can even get a free trial, signing up for the first three years of the expansion and dropping out later. But she hasn’t answered the one question that many states have: Would the Obama administration allow them to expand Medicaid just part way, taking in only people below the poverty line? That means other lowincome people currently eligible would be covered entirely on the federal government’s dime, and they would be getting private coverage, which is costlier than Medicaid.

Annual carbon pollution increases BY SETH BORENSTEIN ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The amount of heattrapping pollution the world spewed rose again last year by 3 percent. So scientists say it’s now unlikely that global warming can be limited to a couple of degrees, which is an international goal. The overwhelming majority of the increase was from China, the world’s biggest carbon dioxide polluter. Of the planet’s top 10 polluters, the United States and Germany were the only countries that reduced their carbon dioxide emissions. Last year, all the world’s nations combined pumped nearly 38.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the air from the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, according to new international calculations on global emissions published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change. That’s about a billion tons more than the previous year. The total amounts to more than 2.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide released into the air every second. Because emissions of the key greenhouse gas have been rising steadily and most carbon stays in the air for a century, it is not just unlikely but “rather optimistic” to think that the world can limit future temperature increases to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees

Fahrenheit), said the study’s lead author, Glen Peters at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway. Three years ago, nearly 200 nations set the 2-degree C temperature goal in a nonbinding agreement. Negotiators now at a conference under way in Doha, Qatar, are trying to find ways to reach that target. The only way, Peters said, is to start reducing world emissions now and “throw everything we have at the problem.” Andrew Weaver, a climate scientist at the University of Victoria in Canada who was not part of the study, said: “We are losing control of our ability to get a handle on the global warming problem.” In 1997, most of the world agreed to an international treaty, known as the Kyoto Protocol, that required developed countries such as the United States to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 5 percent when compared with the baseline year of 1990. But countries that are still developing, including China and India, were not limited by how much carbon dioxide they expelled. The United States never ratified the treaty. The latest pollution numbers, calculated by the Global Carbon Project, a joint venture of the Energy Department and the Norwegian Research Council, show that worldwide carbon dioxide levels are 54 percent higher than the 1990 baseline.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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WORLD

“God’s love doesn’t leave out Jews or Muslims or anyone.” DYAN CANNON AMERICAN FILM AND TELEVISION ACTRESS

Abbas returns triumphantly from UN BY DALIA NAMMARI AND ARON HELLER ASSOCIATED PRESS RAMALLAH, West Bank — The Palestinian president returned triumphantly to the West Bank on Sunday, receiving a boisterous welcome from thousands of cheering supporters at a rally celebrating his people’s new acceptance to the United Nations. An Israeli decision to cut off a cash transfer to the financially troubled Palestinian Authority, following an earlier decision to build thousands of new homes in Jewish settlements, failed to put a damper on the celebrations. But Palestinian officials acknowledged they were undecided on what to do with their newfound status, and were waiting for upcoming Israeli elections and new ideas from President Barack Obama before deciding how to proceed. Outside the headquarters of President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank city of Ramallah, some 5,000 people thronged a square, hoisted Palestinian flags and cheered their leader’s return from New York. Large posters of the Palestinian leader, whose popularity had plummeted in recent months, adorned nearby buildings. “We now have a state,” Abbas said to wild applause. “The world has said loudly, ‘Yes to the state of Palestine.’” The United Nations General Assembly last week overwhelmingly endorsed an independent

Palestinian state in the West Bank, east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, territories Israel captured in the 1967 war. The move to upgrade the Palestinians to a nonmember observer state does not change much on the ground, but it carries deep potential significance. The vote amounted to an international endorsement of the Palestinian position on future border arrangements with Israel and an overwhelming condemnation of Israeli settlements in the areas claimed by the Palestinians. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejects a return to Israel’s 1967 lines. Israel remains in control in parts of the West Bank and considers east Jerusalem, the Palestinians’ hoped-for capital, an integral part of its capital. Israel also continues to restrict access to Gaza. Israel withdrew seven years ago from the coastal strip, and it is now ruled by Hamas Islamic militants who regularly fire rockets at Israel. Israel, backed by the U.S., campaigned strongly against the statehood measure, accusing the Palestinians of trying to bypass direct peace negotiations, which it said were the only viable path to a Palestinian state. The Israeli lobbying efforts failed miserably. Just eight other countries voted with Israel, and even its closest allies in Europe, including Germany, Italy, France and Britain, either abstained or voted with the Palestinians.

Israel responded strongly and swiftly. The following day, it said it would start drawing up plans to build thousands of settlement homes, including the first-ever development on a crucial corridor east of Jerusalem. Although the project is likely years away, if it happens at all, the announcement struck a defiant tone. Building in the area, known as E1, would sever the link between the West Bank and east Jerusalem, the sector of the holy city the Palestinians claim for a future capital, and cut off the northern part of the West Bank form its southern flank. The Palestinians claim such a scenario would essentially kill any hope for the creation of a viable state. The U.S., Britain, France and other European states all denounced the plan. On Sunday, the European Union’s foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, expressed concern that such settlement expansion “may represent a strategic step undermining the prospects of a contiguous and viable Palestine with Jerusalem as the share capital of both it and Israel. She urged Israel to show its commitment to the early renewal of peace talks but not going ahead with the settlement plan. “The European Union has repeatedly stated that all settlement construction is illegal under international law and constitutes an obstacle to peace,” Ashton said in a statement.

NASSER SHIYOUKHI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas celebrates Palestine’s successful bid to win U.N. recognition.

Egypt’s highest court rebels BY HAMZA HENDAWI ASSOCIATED PRESS CAIRO — Egypt’s rebellion of the judges against President Mohammed Morsi became complete on Sunday with the country’s highest court declaring an open-ended strike on the day it was supposed to rule on the legitimacy of two key assemblies controlled by allies of the Islamist leader. The strike by the Supreme Constitutional Court and opposition plans to march on the presidential palace on Tuesday take the country’s latest political crisis to a level not seen in the nearly two years of turmoil since Hosni Mubarak’s ouster in a popular uprising. Judges from the country’s highest appeals court and its sister lower court were already on an indefinite strike, joining colleagues from other tribunals who suspended work last week to protest what they saw as Morsi’s assault on the judiciary. The last time Egypt had an all-out

strike by the judiciary was in 1919, when judges joined an uprising against British colonial rule. The standoff began when Morsi issued decrees on Nov. 22 giving him near-absolute powers that granted himself and the Islamist-dominated assembly drafting the new constitution immunity from the courts. The constitutional panel then raced in a marathon session last week to vote on the charter’s 236 clauses without the participation of liberal and Christian members. The fast-track hearing pre-empted a decision from the Supreme Constitutional Court that was widely expected to dissolve the constituent assembly. The judges on Sunday postponed their ruling on that case just before they went on strike. Without a functioning justice system, Egypt will be plunged even deeper into turmoil. It has already seen a dramatic surge in crime after the uprising, while state authority is being challenged in many aspects of life and the courts are

NASSER NASSER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A supporter of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi flashes the “victory” sign as riot police guard the entrance of Egypt’s top court in Cairo.

burdened by a massive backlog of cases. “The country cannot function for long like this, something has to give,” said Negad Borai, a private law firm director and a rights activist. “We are in a country without courts of law and a president with all the powers in his hands. This is a clear-cut dictatorial climate,” he said. Mohamed Abdel-Aziz, a rights lawyer, said the strike by the judges will impact everything from divorce and theft to financial disputes that, in some cases, could involve foreign investors. “Ordinary citizens affected by the strike will become curious about the details of the current political crisis and could possibly make a choice to join the protests,” he said. The Judges Club, a union with 9,500 members, said late Sunday that judges would not, as customary, oversee the national referendum Morsi called for Dec. 15 on the draft constitution hammered out and hurriedly voted on last week. The absence of their oversight would raise more questions about the validity of the vote. If the draft is passed in the referendum, parliamentary elections are to follow two months later and they too may not have judicial supervision. The judges say they will remain on strike until Morsi rescinds his decrees, which the Egyptian leader said were temporary and needed to protect the nation’s path to democratic rule. For now, however, Morsi has to contend with the fury of the judiciary. The constitutional court called Sunday “the Egyptian judiciary’s blackest day on record.” It described the scene outside the Nile-side court complex, where thousands of Islamist demonstrators gathered since the early morning hours carrying banners denouncing the tribunal and some of its judges. A statement by the court, which swore Morsi into office on June 30, said its judges approached the complex but turned back when they saw the protesters blocking entrances and climbing over its fences. They feared for their safety, it added.

yale institute of sacred music presents

VENETIAN

VESPERS Music for St. Mark’s by Rosenmüller and Legrenzi, ca 1670

YALE SCHOLA CANTORUM SIMON CARRINGTON, CONDUCTOR FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 · 5 PM Christ Church Episcopal 84 Broadway at Elm, New Haven PRECONCERT TALK by Kerala Snyder · 4 pm

Free; no tickets required. Information at 203.432.5062 or www.yale.edu/ism.

Thousands attend anti-Nazi rally BY PABLO GORONDI ASSOCIATED PRESS BUDAPEST, Hungary — Thousands attended an antiNazi rally Sunday in Hungary organized by Jewish and civic groups to protest a far-right lawmaker’s call to screen Jews for national security risks. The rally was unusual because politicians from both the government and opposition parties shared a stage outside parliament. Marton Gyongyosi of the farright Jobbik Party said Monday in the legislature it was time “to assess … how many people of Jewish origin there are here, and especially in the Hungarian Parliament and the Hungarian government, who represent a certain national security risk.” Gyongyosi later apologized to “our Jewish compatriots” for his statement, but added that Hungary needed to be wary of “Zionist Israel and those serving it also from here.” Some 550,000 Hungarian Jews were killed in the Holocaust. Hungary’s Jewish population is now estimated at 100,000. Antal Rogan, parliamentary faction leader of the govern-

ing Fidesz Party, addressed the crowd, which Hungarian media estimated at over 10,000 people. “I came because in this situation I cannot stay quiet,” Rogan said. “Hungary defends its citizens.” Rogan said he would take his two sons to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, where it is estimated that onethird of the Nazis’ victims were Hungarian. Some posters held by protesters mocked Gyongyosi by showing him with a Hitler moustache and the crowd chanted “Jobbik, go away!” Attila Mesterhazy said his opposition Socialist Party would boycott Parliament’s foreign affairs committee as long as Gyongyosi remained its vice chairman. He also called on Prime Minister Viktor Orban to address the issue in Parliament next week. Jobbik President Gabor Vona, however, said the protest was part of an “artificially induced campaign of lies” meant to divert attention away from Hungary’s economic problems and that the groups that took part in the rally wanted to “destroy” Jobbik.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 路 yaledailynews.co

THROUGH THE LENS

W

ith classes nearing an end and finals around the corner, Yale students have taken to libraries to write papers and prepare for exams. Staff photographer SARA MILLER documents the good, the bad and the overly caffeinated.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL N.Y. Jets 7 Arizona 6

NFL New England 23 Miami 16

SPORTS QUICK HITS

NFL Green Bay 23 Minnesota 14

NCAAF (2OT) 21 N. Illinois 44 17 Kent St. 37

MONDAY

WOMEN’S HOCKEY COACH JOAKIM FLYGH NAMED TO SWEDISH TEAM STAFF Third-year women’s hockey coach Joakim Flygh has been selected as the video coach for Sweden for the upcoming 4 Nations Tournament to be held in Öreboro, Sweden on Dec. 14-16. The Swedish women’s team will compete against Finland, Germany and Russia.

CALVIN HILL ’69 RECEIVES IVY FOOTBALL HONOR The four-time NFL Pro Bowler will be honored at the 2013 Ivy Football Association Dinner on Feb. 7 in New York. Hill also set records in the long and triple jump for Yale before being selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the first round of the 1969 NFL Draft.

NCAAF 2 Alabama 32 3 Georgia 28

“We’re really proud of how the season’s turned out.” JARED LOVETT ’13 CAPTAIN, MEN’S SWIMMING

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

HOCKEY

BULLDOGS SLIP PAST THE BEARS

THE BULLDOGS NEEDED A COMEBACK LED BY SENIOR LEADERS TO TAKE DOWN THE BEARS 4–3 ON SATURDAY. PAGE B3

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Antoine Laganiere ’13 has made five assists this year for 13 total points and is tied with Kenny Agostino ’14 for tenth place in points in the ECAC.

Yale falls in first round

Elis sweep UMass to remain perfect BY DIONIS JAHJAGA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Elis headed to Amherst, Mass. on Saturday and continued their strong start to the season, placing first in every event to defeat Division I University of Massachusetts 213– 87.

MEN’S SWIMMING The team was able to put pressure

on the opposition early by taking the top two spots in the first three events. In the 200-yard medley relay, Yale’s “A” team of Mike Lazris ’15, Andrew Heymann ’15, Alwin Firmansyah ’15 and Pat Killian ’15 broke a pool record with a time of 1:32.01. In total, the Bulldogs swept five events on Saturday, taking the top three spots in the 100-yard backSEE MEN’S SWIMMING PAGE B2

PHILIPP ARNDT/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The 3–2 loss was Yale’s first five-set match of the season after last year’s team played in four such matches. BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER The greatest season in Yale volleyball history is over.

VOLLEYBALL The Bulldogs (18–6, 14–0 Ivy) fell 3–2 to Bowling Green in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Friday evening at Penn State, breaking the team’s 15-match winning

streak that dated back to a Sep. 19 victory over Albany. The loss came after just the second 14–0 season in Ivy League history and the team’s fourth conference title in five seasons. “It’s a lot of pressure, playing at that level the whole year,” head coach Erin Appleman said. “It’s so mental, and I thought they did a great job of balancing that out with the physical aspect of just being good players.” Yale certainly gave the Falcons (22– 11, 13–3 MAC) all they could handle. The Bulldogs went down 2–1 after

being dominated in the second and third games, but turned it on in the fourth set to route Bowling Green 25–13 and push the match to the tiebreaker. Yale held a 9–7 lead in the deciding game but unraveled following a service error from setter Kendall Polan ’14 and fell 15–11. “Two of those sets, we weren’t ourselves at all,” Appleman said. “That’s the part that is so heartbreaking. Nobody likes losing but when you

STAT OF THE DAY 34

SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B2

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jake Goldstein ’16 and captain Jared Lovett ’13 finished first and second, respectively, in the 200-yard butterfly.

SECONDS BETWEEN GOALS FOR THE MEN’S HOCKEY TEAM IN THE BULLDOGS 4–3 WIN OVER BROWN. Andrew Miller ’13 scored with 2:29 left in the second period to tie the game 3–3, and then Antoine Laganiere ’13 pushed another goal past Brown just 34 seconds later to go ahead for good.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“If you ever held a title belt you would know how Michael felt / Tyson, Jackson, Jordan — Michael Phelps” KANYE WEST, “THE ONE”

Bulldogs face tough competition

Swimming remains undefeated M. SWIMMING FROM PAGE B1

day. She was joined by Megan Murphy ’16, who walked onto the squad last week and won several bouts at Brandeis. Katherine Miller also performed well, finishing with a 13–5 record throughout the day. “I think the whole women’s team will see this tournament as a learning experience, as we think about everything from how to best warm up to how to best stay energized,” Lauren Miller said. The women’s fencing team will be on break until it returns to Payne Whitney on Jan. 19 to host Sacred Heart.

stroke, the 100-yard breaststroke, the 200yard butterfly, the 500-yard freestyle and the 200-yard IM. Captain Jared Lovett ’13 attributes the team’s success to its attitude and versatility. “A good mentality of ours has been, ‘Let’s see if we can break some records,’” Lovett said. “We have a lot of depth in our team.” Heymann, Lazris, and Rob Harder ’15 each won two events apiece, with Heymann breaking another pool record, this time for the 100-yard backstroke with a time of 56.81. Firmansyah, who had won three individual events in each of the two prior meets, was again in top form, winning the 50-yard freestyle, as well as contributing to two other relay victories. Lovett called particular attention to the improvements Firmansyah has made this year. “Alwin’s incredibly talented,” Lovett said. “He’s started off really, really well and taken on a leadership role now that he’s not a freshman.” The team has started the season strong, building on what it did last year when it finished third in the Ivy League. In addition to a first-place finish at Bucknell on Nov. 16, they have amassed two scrimmage victories and a win over their biggest rival Columbia. The team’s next meet is against Cornell (0–4) on Jan. 7 at home. Lazris said that while Cornell has struggled so far this season, the Bulldogs must be focused by the time the meet comes around. “We have to give the same intensity every meet,” Lazris said. “It’s very easy to lose.” Although they have no meets before their match against Cornell, the Bulldogs will be hard at work, training as they do every year over winter break. “We don’t get a lot of time off,” Lovett said. “We’ll do a ton of work and come back to New Haven to face Cornell. We’ll be focused and ready.” The team will head to Florida on Dec. 27 to prepare for the second half of the season. Until then, Lovett noted that they are satisfied at where they stand. “We’re sitting pretty high right now,” Lovett said. “We’re really proud of how the season’s turned out.”

Contact GIOVANNI BACARELLA at giovanni.bacarella@yale.edu .

Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Bulldogs lost the first five matchups of their fall season finale but ended the Brandeis Invitational with a 14–13 win over MIT. BY GIOVANNI BACARELLA STAFF REPORTER Battling against stiff competition and a long day of bouting, the women’s fencing team closed out its fall season with a 1–5 performance at the Brandeis Invitational on Sunday. After falling to Johns Hopkins, St. John’s, Boston College, University of North Carolina and Brandeis in succession, the Elis prevailed in a close encounter with MIT at the end of the day.

WOMEN’S FENCING “We were relatively disappointed in our performance today,” epeeist Katherine Miller ’16 said. “We won

one of our matches but many of our defeats were very, very close.” Before the team could garner any momentum for the day, it suffered a 18–9 loss to Johns Hopkins and a loss to St. Johns by the same margin in its first two matchups. In closer bouts with Boston College and home team Brandeis, the Bulldogs lost by only one point, 14–13. The Elis fell for the fourth time on the day, 16–11, against UNC sandwiched in between its defeats to Boston College and Brandeis. At the end the day, the team’s spirit and morale helped the fencers battle through their last bouts, Lauren Miller ’15 said. As teammates continued to coach each other along the strip, the Elis came way with a 14–13

Army pulls away to win

ANNELISA LEINBACH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Black Knights dominated inside, outscoring the Bulldogs 28–12 in the paint en route to a 53–47 win at West Point on Saturday. W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE B4 mers’ game-high 24 points, the Knights outscored Yale 28-18 in the paint and shot 41.2 percent from the field. Halejian, who contributed her own 12 points, complemented Sarju’s standout performance. Keita and guard Janna Graf ’14 each had seven points as well. “I think our large number of scoring threats is what has allowed me to be an offensive contributor on this team. We have

ton of offensive threats and we are pretty balanced team when it comes to scoring,” Sarju said. Yale has lost to Army 17 out of their 28 meetings on the court, and Army is currently on a sixgame winning streak. The Bulldogs will continue non-conference play on Tuesday, Dec. 4 against Fordham. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m. at Payne Whitney Gymnasium. Contact DINEE DORAME at dinee.dorame@yale.edu .

win against MIT. “It’s tough at the end of the day, with momentum and physical tiredness working against us,” Robyn Shaffer ’13 added. “I think everyone wanted to finish strong with a win, and we knew we could try to do that against MIT.” The foil squad contributed to the win with an 8–1 round. “Each individual squad fenced well at different rounds during the day,” Shaffer said. “In our future competitions, we need to be more confident in our team’s capabilities and focus on putting forward a high-energy performance, so that all our squads are on point together.” Foilist Lauren Miller won fourteen of her nineteen bouts throughout the

Yale falls in five-set thriller VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 don’t play to your potential, that’s the hardest part.” The Bulldogs sent Bowling Green a message early by routing the Falcons 25–16 in the opening set to take a 1–0 lead. Setter Kelly Johnson ’16 provided the early spark for the Elis, scoring three of the team’s first six points and recording five kills and four assists in the set overall. That was part of an impressive postseason debut for Johnson, who logged a teamhigh 12 kills to go along with 12 assists on the match. “There were definitely some nerves [before the match],” Johnson said. “But as a team, we went out and we were confident. We had nothing to lose, so we played our hearts out.” After the shocking first-set loss, the Falcons rebounded and took a 2–1 lead with decisive victories in the second and third sets. In the second game, the Elis fell into an early 7–1 hole and recorded a meager .025 hitting percentage as Bowling Green took a 25–15 victory. The third set was all Paige Penrod as the Falcons junior outside hitter exploded for eight of her match-high 16 kills after notching just four in the first two sets combined. But the Elis did not do themselves any favors in the middle set, committing two crucial service errors down the stretch to open up an opportunity for Bowling Green. After Yale pulled within 16–15, outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 hit one into the net and libero Christine Wu ’16 committed one herself with the Bulldogs trailing 20–17. But the Bulldogs stepped up on the defensive end in the fourth set and recorded five blocks to hold the Falcons to a –.171 hitting percentage, which was their lowest of the match. With an 11–10 lead, Yale took advantage of four consecutive Bowling Green attack errors and a service ace from libero Maddie Rudnick ’15 to capture a 25–13 blowout win. “In the second and third sets we were playing a little scared,” Rogers said. “We weren’t really playing our game. Before the fourth set we said, ‘This is our last chance so let’s just go out there, have fun and trust each other.’ We were more relaxed and really went for it.” In the fifth and deciding game the two

SARA MILLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis fell 3–2 to Bowling Green in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Friday evening at Penn State. sides were neck-and-neck for the first time in the match. They had already had five ties when Danielle Tonyan’s attack error evened the score at seven. Middle blocker McHaney Carter ’14 then recorded one of her nine kills and Polan delivered the service ace to put Yale up by two. But the Bulldogs could not hold on. The Falcons went on an 8–2 run and Penrod scored two of Bowling Green’s last three points to give the Falcons the 15–11 win. The 3–2 loss was Yale’s first five-set match of the season after the team played in four such matches last season. Bowling Green was playing in its 10th five-set

match of the year after winning eight of its first nine. “I don’t think [playing five sets] had anything to do with the loss,” Appleman said. “I don’t think it caught us off-guard. We came out strong in the first game then we were not very good in the second. If we had been able to maintain our intensity and our drive I think it would have been a different story.” Bowling Green went on to fall 3–0 to Penn State in its second-round match on Saturday night. Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

SPORTS

Northern Illinois becomes first MAC team to play in BCS bowl No. 15 Northern Illinois busted a BCS bowl lineup filled with national powers to earn a spot in the Orange Bowl, becoming the first team from the Mid-American Conference to play in a BCS bowl. The Huskies “stole” the spot from No. 11 Oklahoma by finishing in the top 16 in the final BCS rankings and ahead of at least one champion from an automatic qualifying conference.

Laganiere scores twice in win

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Harvard

3

0

1.000

3

0

1.000

Princeton

2

0

1.000

2

0

1.000

Yale

1

0

1.000

2

0

1.000

4

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

1

1

0.500

5

Columbia

1

2

0.333

2

2

0.500

Penn

1

2

0.333

2

2

0.500

7

Cornell

0

4

0.000 0

4

0.000

NA

Brown

0

0

0.000 2

0

1.000

1

LAST WEEK

NEXT Jan. 7, 2013, Yale at Cornell, 12:00 p.m.

Yale 213, UMass 87

WOMEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING IVY

1

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Andrew Miller ’13 had one goal and two assists, and Antoine Laganiere’13 had two goals and one assist on Saturday against Brown. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER The men’s hockey team capitalized on four power plays Saturday night to best Ivy rival Brown 4–3 in the Elis’ first home conference game of the season.

MEN’S HOCKEY The Bulldogs (6–2–1, 3–2–0 ECAC) fell behind 2–1 in the first period but made a comeback on a five-on-three advantage late in the second period to edge out the Bears (3–5–2, 0–3–2 ECAC). After two overtime victories against nationally ranked teams on Nov. 23 and Nov. 24, Yale has extended its winning streak to four straight games. Saturday night’s game started off quick, and despite outshooting Brown 14–9 in the first period, the Bulldogs fell behind when the Bears scored at 10:22 and 14:00. Head coach Keith Allain pulled goalie Nick Maricic ’13 after the second Brown goal and replaced him with Jeff Malcolm ’13, who remained in goal for the rest of the game. On a power play towards the end of the first period, Yale’s top scorer, forward Antoine Laganiere ’13, got the team’s first goal of the night off an assist from

defenseman Gus Young ’14 and brought the Bulldogs into the second period down just 2–1. “I thought we had a good start, even though we fell behind,” Allain said. “We stuck with it and played a little better in the second period.” Team captain and forward Andrew Miller ’13 added that the team wanted to change the game’s momentum after a frustrating first period and began to see results as the second period progressed. “Early in the second period we weren’t scoring, but we had a lot of opportunities and sustained pressure, which is important,” Miller said. While the Bears scored at 4:47 in the second on a power play, the floodgates soon opened for the Bulldogs. Yale outshot Brown 17–7 in the period, and the scoreboard reflected it. Forward Kenny Agostino ’14 directed a one-timer off an assist from Miller into the top right corner of Brown’s net at 7:53, marking the Bulldogs’ second power play goal of the game. Both Miller and Laganiere noted that the team’s power play lines were very successful in Saturday’s game. “We haven’t had an outburst like that in a while,” Miller said. That outburst continued late

in the third. Brown took two penalties, for holding and crosschecking, within such short succession that the Bulldogs earned 1:22 of a five-on-three man advantage. Twenty seconds into the two-man advantage, Miller tipped in the equalizing goal past Brown net-minder Marco DeFilippo off an assist from Laganiere and defenseman Tommy Fallen ’15. On the same shift at 18:05, Laganiere took advantage of the team’s remaining power play to give Yale the 4–3 lead. He slapped a wrist shot into the Bears’ net off a reciprocal assist from Miller and Agostino for his eighth goal of the season. “[Our power play] just worked today,” Laganiere said. Miller added that the team does not run special plays during its extraman situations and just works to find the open player. “The best play is the available play,” Miller said. Miller had one goal and two assists on Saturday, and Laganiere had two goals and one assist. Laganiere has made five assists this year for 13 total points and is tied with Agostino for 10th place in points in the ECAC. The third period saw no additional scoring from either team, and the Bulldogs maintained their lead

with strong backchecking and goaltending despite the Bears’ effort. “Brown pushed hard at the end and took some chances offensively, which is what teams that are behind do,” Allain said. “We did a good job on the backcheck, and Malcolm did a heck of a job in the third period.” The Bulldogs found success on Nov. 23 and Nov. 24 in Colorado in two non-conference games against then-No. 2 Denver and No. 14 Colorado College, winning both games in overtime 2–1 and 6–5, respectively. As a result, Yale was ranked No. 15 in the USCHO Division I poll earlier this week. But Allain said the Bulldogs’ recent national attention is not the key to team confidence going into games. “I think the fact that we worked our tails off in practice this week did more for our confidence than those wins,” Allain said. Yale hopes to continue its winning streak next weekend as it takes on two more conference opponents, Rensselaer and Union, at Ingalls Rink. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

4

6 NA

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

Harvard

3

0

1.000

3

0

1.000

Princeton

2

0

1.000

2

0

1.000

Yale

1

0

1.000

1

0

1.000

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

2

1

0.667

Penn

1

1

0.500

2

1

0.667

Columbia

0

2

0.000

0

2

0.000

Cornell

0

2

0.000

0

2

0.000

Brown

0

0

0.000

2

0

1.000

LAST WEEK

NEXT

Brown Invitational (in progress)

Jan. 7, 2013, Yale at Cornell, 12:00 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

Columbia

0

0

0.000

4

4

0.500

Harvard

0

0

0.000

3

3

0.500

3

Cornell

0

0

0.000

4

5

0.444

4

Brown

0

0

0.000

3

4

0.429

Princeton

0

0

0.000

3

4

0.429

6

Dartmouth

0

0

0.000

2

3

0.400

7

Penn

0

0

0.000

2

6

0.250

Yale

0

0

0.000

2

6

0.250

1

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK Weds. Yale at Bryant,7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at New Hamp., 1:00 p.m

Thurs. Hartford 60, Yale 51

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

Elis top five teams in Boston

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

1

Harvard

0

0

0.000

6

2

0.750

2

Princeton

0

0

0.000

5

2

0.714

3

Cornell

0

0

0.000

5

3

0.625

4

Brown

0

0

0.000

3

5

0.375

5

Penn

0

0

0.000

1

3

0.250

6

Dartmouth

0

0

0.000

1

5

0.167

7

Columbia

0

0

0.000

1

6

0.143

Yale

0

0

0.000

1

6

0.143

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK Tues. Yale vs. Fordham, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at St. Francis, 2:00 p.m.

Sat. Army 53, Yale 47

MEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L D %

W L D %

1

Dartmouth

4

1

1

0.750

6

2

2

0.700

2

Yale

3

2

0

0.600 6

2

1

0.722

3

Princeton

2

1

3

0.583

3

4

3

0.450

4

Harvard

3

3

0

0.500

4

3

0

0.571

Cornell

3

3

2

0.500

6

3

2

0.636

Brown

0

3

2

0.200

3

5

2

0.400

6

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Sat. Yale 4, Brown 3 Sat. Yale 4, St. Lawrence 2

Fri. Yale vs. Rensselaer, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale vs. Union, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY ECAC SCHOOL

W L D %

W L D %

1

Harvard

7

0

0

1.000

8

1

0

0.889

2

Cornell

8

2

0

0.800

10 3

0

0.769

3

Dartmouth

3

3

1

0.500

4

3

2

0.556

4

Princeton

2

6

2

0.300

5

7

2

0.429

5

Brown

1

5

0

0.167

1

7

1

0.167

Yale

1

5

0

0.167

2

10 0

0.167

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale lost its chance at a sweep by falling to St. John’s for its third year in a row, 12–15. MEN’S FENCING FROM PAGE B4 matches in one day. Even after hours of bouting, Yale continued to topple its opponents. In a close matchup with their Brandeis hosts, the Elis pulled through with a 14–13 victory. They then finished up the tournament with a decisive 17–10 win over MIT.

While the team’s loss to St. John’s foiled any hopes for a Yale sweep, the Bulldogs were able to score individual successes in their contest against the Red Storm. Given the opportunity to face Race Imboden, a 2012 U.S. Olympian and St. John’s foilist, Bryan Wang ’16 demonstrated the promise of the freshman class

with a 5–1 sweep. “I tried not to even think that [Imboden] was an Olympian,” Wang said. “I just did my best and gave it my all … I’m really excited since this is my first college tournament.” Hugh O’Cinneide ’15 added that the transition from an individual sport in high school to a team setting in college is some-

times difficult but the freshmen all stepped up to the challenge and performed well. With fall competition behind them, the Bulldogs are officially on break until they return to the strip on Jan. 19 to host Sacred Heart in Payne Whitney. Contact GIOVANNI BACARELLA at giovanni.bacarella@yale.edu .

OVERALL

LAST WEEK NONE

THIS WEEK Fri. Yale at Union, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at Rensselaer, 4:00 p.m.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

“As far as playing the game [on Sunday], I thought that was the best for us to do, because that’s what we do.” ROMEO CRENNEL KANSAS CITY CHIEFS HEAD COACH ON PLAYING DAY AFTER JOVAN BELCHER’S MURDER-SUICIDE

Shooting woes continue as Elis fall to Army

ANNELISA LEINBACH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis shot a higher percentage from beyond the 3-point line than from the field for the fifth time this season as they dropped their fourth straight game with a loss to Army on Saturday. BY DINEE DORAME CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Despite a 15-point performance from guard Nyasha Sarju ’15, the women’s basketball team fell to Army 47–53 last weekend at West Point.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Bulldogs (1-6, 0–0 Ivy) traveled to upstate New York on

Saturday to take on the Black Knights (7–1, 0–0 Patriot) and suffered their fourth straight loss this season. “We went into offensive lulls where we would have crucial turnovers at crucial times,” Sarju said. Sarju is second on the team in scoring with 10.9 points per game and was 5–7 from the threepoint line against Army. She has appeared in all seven games

and has contributed a total of 76 points this season. Yale started off the game with a 10–0 run and center Zenab Keita ’13 scored the Bulldogs’ first five points. But the Black Knights slowly chipped away at the Bulldog lead, and Black Knights guard Kelsey Minato’s jump shot with two seconds left in the first half put Army ahead for the first time, 22–20. In a game that saw six lead

changes in the second half and a two-point Army lead with less than a minute remaining, the Bulldogs were undone by a 31.4 percent field goal percentage and a 41–29 rebounding deficit. Yale also committed four turnovers in the final 10 minutes of the game. On the other side of the ball, Keita praised the active Bulldog defense that forced Army into 20 turnovers and held the Black Knights to 34.6 percent shooting

in the first half. But that defensive effort lapsed in the second half, and Army shot 12–25 from the field over the final 20 minutes. Continuing the back-andforth second half battle, Yale cut the lead to one point with seven minutes remaining on Halejian’s 3-pointer. But Army scored six straight points to stretch the lead to seven with just under four minutes remaining. With the Elis trailing 42–49,

Sarju made her third 3-pointer of the game and Sarah Halejian ’15 converted both attempts from the free throw line with 1:40 remaining to pull Yale within two. From that point on the Bulldogs went cold, missing three shots from the field in the final two minutes as Army pulled away for the victory. Led by senior guard Anna SimSEE W. BASKETBALL PAGE B2

Bulldogs excel at Brandeis BY GIOVANNI BACARELLA STAFF REPORTER The men’s fencing team ended competition for its fall season on Sunday with a dominant performance at the Brandeis Invitational in Waltham, Mass.

MEN’S FENCING In a long day of bouts against six other schools, the Bulldogs posted a 5–1 record that included victories against Johns Hopkins, Boston College, UNC, Brandeis and MIT. The team surpassed the 4–1 performances it produced in each of its past two trips to the annual tournament. “The team had a lot of energy going into the tournament,” team captain Cornelius Saunders ’14 said. “Everyone fenced to his best ability, especially in the beginning.” The Bulldogs topped Johns Hopkins, 15–12, to start the day, but fell to St. John’s for the third year in a row with a 12–15 loss in their next competition. Sabreur Hugh O’Cinneide ’15 saw a silver lining in the loss. The team improved from last year’s 9–18 loss. “We really kept the energy up [and] they were definitely the hardest team out there,” he said. The Elis rebounded in their next two matchups against Boston College and UNC, winning by 20–7 and 16–11 margins, respectively. In each of the past two years, Yale and five other teams have traveled to the tournament, but this year Johns Hopkins was added to the tournament roster, stretching the Elis to six SEE MEN’S FENCING PAGE B3

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Bulldogs surpassed last year’s score at the Brandeis Invitational by one win with a 5–1 record on Sunday. The Elis’ lone loss came at the hands of St. John’s.


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