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Exhibition or Catalogue Title Just In! 15 words max on Recent Acquisitions 3 lines max

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Just In! Recent Acquisitions

CONTENTS Foreword 2 Illustrated Works 6 Works in the Exhibition 104

January 26 - March 17, 2013


FOREWORD of his friend, Marguerite Lenfest, a trustee

WILLIAM R. VALERIO, PHD

of Woodmere whose support has been

The Patricia Van Burgh Allison

foundational to the life of the museum.

Director and CEO

In addition to a digital archives we are

The heart of any art museum is its

pleased to offer online catalogues, which

collection. Woodmere’s mission is to tell

will bring our collection and exhibitions

the stories of Philadelphia’s artists, and

to a whole new audience.

our ever-growing collection is central

We thank all of our donors, those who

to every exhibition and activity at our

gave works assembled here as well as

Museum. Through hundreds of generous

those whose gifts will be shown at a later

gifts and purchases, Woodmere’s

time.

collection has now grown to 3,404 works of art, with 701 having been acquired in just the last two years. As part of our initiative to make the collection available to everyone, Woodmere is also in the midst of digitizing its collection, making these important works by Philadelphia’s artists accessible to people all over the world. We invite you to our collection page, woodmerecollection.org, where you can search through our galleries and storage vault electronically. This leap into the digital age was made possible by a generous grant from philanthropist John McFadden in honor 2


View of Woodmere Art Museum (photograph by Nick Feldman). 3


Corridor Gallery, Installation of “Just In!: Recent Acquisitions in the Collection of Woodmere Art Museum,� 2013 (photography by Allan Orlyss). Works are organized in this section as they appear in the gallery space. 4


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FRITZ JANSCHKA American, born Austria, 1919

Fritz Janschka, an artist who came from

The Waterfinder 1977 Oil on wood

Surrealist ideas and sensibilities to the

Gift of Joan L. Tobias, 2012

three-dimensional “architecture” of the

Vienna, Austria to Philadelphia in the years after World War II, introduced conversations in the arts of the city. Here, differences in the scale of figures and between painted elements and the frame focus our attention on how we perceive the illusions of art. Janschka, a painter, sculptor, and graphic artist, studied at the Akademie der bildenden Künste (Academy of Fine Arts) in Vienna and was a founding member of the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism. He immigrated to Philadelphia in 1949. For more than thirty years, he was a professor of fine art at Bryn Mawr College.

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GERTRUDE FISHERFISHMAN American, born 1916

When Albert C. Barnes opened the

Untitled (Nude on Green Bench) early 1950s Oil on board

as education and inspiration; his goal,

doors of his Foundation in 1922, he presented his great collection of French Impressionism and European modernism in devising a program of study, was to transform American culture. He actively encouraged the participation of artists who, for one reason or another, hadn’t been afforded access to traditional

Promised gift of Louise Fishman

training in the arts. He encouraged African American artists, like Claude Clark (see next page), and women artists, like Gertrude Fisher-Fishman, to participate in the art program at the Barnes as a means to building their own voices as artists. In Fisher-Fishman’s Untitled (Nude on Green Bench), we look down upon a nude woman painted in soft pinks and surrounded by decorative patterns of flickering light and painterly gestures colors. We can imagine that she was inspired by Barnes’ paintings by Bonnard. Gertrude Fisher-Fishman was born in Philadelphia and was largely self-taught. At the Barnes Foundation, she studied with Violette de Mazia, the driving force behind the art education program there. 9


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CLAUDE CLARK American, 1915–2001

Brothers and Sister is a representation of

Brothers and Sister 1949 Oil on board

may have been inspired by Soutine and

three siblings with different skin tones. The dense brushwork suggests that he other expressionist artists in Barnes’ collection. Claude Clark moved to Manayunk when

Museum purchase, 2011

he was eight years old. He was awarded a scholarship to the Pennsylvania School of Industrial Arts and later studied at the Barnes Foundation. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Sacramento State College and the University of California. He is known as a great educator having built the art department at Talladega College, Alabama, and taught studio art and African-American Art history at Sacramento State College and Merritt College in Oakland. He designed and wrote the first curriculum for African and African American Art, A Black Art Perspective, A Black Teacher’s Guide to A Black Visual Art Curriuculum.

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CYNTHIA WILLARD ILIFF American, 1907–1998

Perched in a sheltering tree and

Golden Hours c. 1944 Lithograph

stepping stones in a stream. Iliff was

camouflaged by shadowy tones, two squirrels watch as two young boys place known to keep squirrels as pets and they are frequent subjects in her art. This two-colored lithograph

Gift of Ofelia Garcia, 2012

demonstrates the artist’s imaginative sense of design, virtuosity at creating

Photograph by Allan Orlyss

rich textures, and expressive use of line and color. As a student of Benton Spruance, (see pages 14-17) , Iliff adopted her teacher’s innovative methods of color lithography and became a master of the medium. Iliff taught at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts). In 1944, Golden Hours was chosen as the annual gift of the American Color Print Society to its members by Carl Zigrosser, the Curator of Prints at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Zigrosser, whose portrait by Benton Spruance is featured in the show, wrote a brief essay about Iliff’s work, and both the essay and the print were packaged in a portfolio that was given to the Print Society’s members. . 13


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BENTON MURDOCH SPRUANCE American, 1904–1967

Spruance depicts his friend Carl

Carl Zigrosser 1942 Lithograph

was a great advocate and friend to many

Zigrosser in a contemplative moment, perhaps thinking about something he’s just read in the newspaper. Zigrosser Philadelphia artists. He wrote numerous books on prints and rare books. In 1941, he became the first curator of prints at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Under

Gift of the Spruance Family, 2012

his direction, the collection grew from Photograph by Allan Orlyss

15,000 items to nearly 100,000. His writings and curatorial work raised the public’s awareness of printmaking as a serious art form. Born in Philadelphia, Spruance attended the University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He taught at Beaver College (now Arcadia University) for thirty-four years and later he became director of graphic arts at the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts). One of the most important printmakers of the twentieth century, he invented the subtractive process of multicolored lithography, developing prints from a single slab or sheet by reducing the area of the print surface on the slab as each new color was added.

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BENTON MURDOCH SPRUANCE American, 1904–1967

Dreamer is an intimate portrayal of

Dreamer 1939 Lithograph

from her surroundings. She looks down,

a young woman lost in thought. The exaggerated curve of her shoulders and fold of her arms enclose and separate her preoccupied with her thoughts and distracted from the lit cigarette in the tray and open book on the table.

Gift of the Spruance Family, 2012 Photograph by Allan Orlyss

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ALBERT GOLD American, 1916–2006

Albert Gold practiced a distinct brand of

Dozing 1940 Oil on Masonite

the gritty atmosphere of urban life. He

social realism, focusing on the everyday drama in the lives of working people and created interesting narratives through a wonderful sense of composition and painterly application.

Gift of Matty Gold, 2012

Dozing is a close-up portrait of a man sitting on the steps of a building. Market Workers (next page) depicts a scene most likely from the Reading Terminal Market or the Italian Market, two places in Philadelphia where Gold drew and painted frequently. An earlier lithograph of Market Workers was exhibited at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York.

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ALBERT GOLD American, 1916–2006

Gold was raised in North Philadelphia

Market Workers 1942 Oil on gesso on panel

Art (now the University of the Arts). He

Gift of Matty Gold, 2012

combat artist in Europe during World

and received a scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial was awarded the Prix de Rome, but was unable to go as he had been drafted into the army. He became an official Army War II, and participated in the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Hundreds of his war drawings and watercolors are in the collection of the Pentagon. After the war, Gold taught at the Philadelphia Museum School as well as the Fleisher Art Memorial and the Pyle Studio in Delaware. His work has been exhibited at the MusĂŠe Galliera in Paris, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, and Woodmere Art Museum and is in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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ARTHUR B. CARLES American, 1882-1952

The great modernist painter, Arthur

Moonlight c. 1908 Oil on canvasboard

Merritt Chase and Cecilia Beaux. From

Gift of Bill Scott in honor of the staff at Woodmere Art Museum, 2011

Fauves and the work of Henri Matisse,

Carles, first studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts with William 1907 to 1910, he made the second of five visits to France, where he was deeply struck by the daring new colors of the whom he met at the time. He was also fascinated by the work of Edvard Munch. During this visit, Carles created three small works, of which Moonlight is one. The painting is a poetic contemplation of the way nighttime light and color diffuse together, and the elements of landscape are simplified into shapes. Carles was a deeply influential artist and an important conduit for bringing the ideas of European modernism to the United States.

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ELIZABETH OSBORNE American, born 1936

Osborne painted this watercolor on

Winter Harbor 1983 Watercolor on paper

saturated colors, and tonal transitions.

location in Maine. Spans of color are exquisitely applied with delicate washes, The artist’s touch seems both immediate and light. Born in Philadelphia, Osborne completed

Gift of Peter Paone, 2011

her undergraduate degree at the University of Pennsylvania and pursued further study at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA). Subsequently, in 1963, she became the Academy’s third full-time female faculty member. Her work is included in numerous museum collections and in 2009, PAFA organized a retrospective of her work titled The Color of Light.

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LESA CHITTENDEN LIM American, born 1958

Rather than recording an exact external

Threesome - State I 2011 Three-plate etching and pastel

calmness, serenity, movement, awe,

reality, I express the inner sensations caused by my visual perceptions: desolation to name a few. The more I look, the more I believe that our surroundings are an allegory of life. I paint ‘portraits’ of trees, with their families, lovers, and friends.

Museum purchase with funds from the Perkins Center for the Arts Purchase Prize, 2011

—Lesa Chittendem Lim Lim often works on-site, seeking locations that provoke strong feelings. She created Threesome—State I using an etching process in which she made impressions on three different metal plates that were inked and printed together as one image. Each plate is printed with a different color, causing a layering and blending of the cool, muted blues and grays of the foreground and the deeper blues and greens of the background. Lim studied engineering and business at the University of Michigan. She later went on to study at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), where she was a student of Elizabeth Osborne (see page 24 ). Currently, she teaches at PAFA as well as in Northern Michigan. 27


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WILLIAM LANGSON LATHROP American, 1859-1938

In this rare self-portrait, Lathrop portrays

Self Portrait date unknown Oil on canvas

taught until he traveled to New York for a

himself in profile, looking outward with intent and gripping a pipe. He was born in Warren, Illinois, and was largely selfbrief period of study with William Merritt Chase at the Art Students League. By 1896, his paintings had won national recognition and in 1902 he was elected to

Museum purchase, 2011

the National Academy of Design. Lathrop is known as the “Father of the New Hope Art Colony.” He moved with his family into the historic property known as Phillips’ Mill in New Hope, Pennsylvania, in 1902. His reputation as an artist and a teacher attracted other artists who went on to form the group known as the Pennsylvania Impressionists. Lathrop’s home was the social and artistic center of the growing New Hope colony, with tea and conversation the order of the day every Sunday. So vibrant were the art activities at Phillips’ Mill that members of the New Hope community purchased it after Lathrop’s death and converted it into community-based art association that is still active today.

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MARTHA WALTER American, 1875-1976

This portrait captures the natural beauty

Portrait of a Woman c. 1920 Oil on canvas

vitality and charm. Walter was born in

Promised gift of Dorothy J. del Bueno

became student and friend of William

of youth; lush color and spontaneous brushstrokes convey the young woman’s Philadelphia and attended Girls’ High School and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), where she Merritt Chase. She later traveled to Paris

Photograph by Allan Orlyss

to study at the Académie Julian and the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. At the onset of World War I, she returned home and began painting plein air subjects, portraits of women and children, immigrants, and carnival and beach scenes. Her paintings are in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Columbus Museum of Art, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and Woodmere Art Museum, as well as the Luxembourg Museum and the Musée d’Orsay.

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TERESA M. HYLAND American, born 1952

Reality doesn’t describe all there is to

Untitled 2 2011 Oil on canvas

search—where will I wander and what

Woodmere Purchase Prize, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Annual Student Exhibition, 2011

in a painting, it is the energy, that very

being alive, right here, right now. My abstract paintings are really about the will I find there. It’s quite uncomfortable but ultimately thrilling. And while I greatly admire beautiful craftsmanship human expression of being fully present and engaged that gets my particular attention. It cannot be faked. —Teresa Hyland

Teresa Hyland was born in Philadelphia. She attended Temple University’s Tyler School of Art. She currently lives in New York.

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CHARLES EDWARD HARRIGAN American, born 1981

My View 2012 Oil on panel Woodmere Purchase Prize, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Annual Student Exhibition, 2012

For me, it’s in the play of symbols and ideas in the subject matter. —Charles Edward Harrigan

My View is a self-portrait. Cast in a glow of light, a male figure gazes out a window at a fantastical landscape derived from Hieronymus Bosch’s famous representation of the Garden of Eden in his triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights. Harrigan paints with extraordinary precision, applying the same attention to detail in his depiction of himself—a contemporary individual wearing a white T-shirt and blue jeans— and the imagined, innocent world of jewel-like trees, birds, and tiny creatures. Harrigan graduated from the Delaware College of Art and Design in 2008 and from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2012.

The Garden of Earthly Delights (detail), 1510, by Hieronymus Bosch (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid)


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FRANCIS C. TUCKER American, 1931-2012

Tucker’s painting evokes the quietness

Thrush’s Soliloquy 2004-08 Egg and size on panel

horizon and the landscape is simplified

of daybreak, when one may hear the thrush’s song. The sun is below the into sculptural shapes. An artist with a delicate touch, Tucker worked with egg tempera, mixing

Gift of Mary Ann Tucker, 2012

egg yolk directly with colored mineral pigments to create rich hues. Egg tempera paint generally produces an opaque, matte surface, but Tucker mixed in oils and other substances to create rich tones and textures. Tucker grew up on a farm, “chasing cows in the moonlight.” He attended the Albright Art School in Buffalo and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He also served in the US Army during the Korean War. In 1957, he worked for renowned frame maker Carl Laughlin, learning carving, gilding, and fine carpentry skills. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and he is credited with having dramatically upgraded the museum’s attention to framing, mounting, and the presentation of its collection.

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ROY C. NUSE American, 1885-1975

Nuse often painted the gardens, streams,

The Quarry at Rushland 1938 Oil on canvas

In this painting, the large, clay-like

Museum purchase, 2012

create the distinct textures of trees,

farms, and quarry near his home in Rushland, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. sculptural face of the quarry sweeps upward, revealing a sunny countryside beyond. Short, staccato dabs of paint rocks, houses, and land. Nuse was committed to creating paintings that remained faithful to nature, but at the same time his work demonstrates a symbolist sensibility. We must imagine that the quarry represents the intrusion of the modern world on the countryside: the aberration in the landscape that provides for the creation of modernity, literally providing the stones that became the building blocks of cities like Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, DC. Born in Springfield, Ohio, Nuse studied at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and later transferred to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), where he studied with Daniel Garber. He taught at PAFA from 1925 through 1954, as well as at Beaver College (now Arcadia University) and Oberlin College.

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BERNARD BADURA American, 1896-1986

Angular volumes of rock and geometric

Untitled (Lambertville Quarry) date unknown Grease pencil and/or soft graphite, and charcoal

sensitive rendering of the Lambertville

Museum purchase, 2011

State Normal School (now the University

industrial elements contrast with the soft swirls of trees and natural forms in this Quarry. A rhythmic application of charcoal marks, deep shadows, and areas of brilliant luminosity frame the massive landform of the quarry. Badura first studied at the Milwaukee of Wisconsin). He served in the US Army Air Forces during World War I, where his drawing skills led to an assignment in Paris in the army’s drafting and designing department. Upon returning to the United States, Badura attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and there studied with Arthur B. Carles and Daniel Garber. It was there also that he met his wife, artist Faye Swengel, another of Carles’s students. In 1937, he and Swengel moved to New Hope, where they would paint and work together for the rest of their lives. Badura’s work is in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Allentown Art Museum of the Lehigh Valley, among other important public and private collections.

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AMANDA BUSH American, born 1986

This painting was inspired by the Leaf

Leaf River, View from the West Bank 2012 Oil and acrylic on canvas

ribbons that seem to rush across the

River in Laurel, Mississippi, where Bush was born and raised. The horizontal top of this painting suggest the watery atmosphere of the luminous river. A gestural mass of yellow seems to move upward from the bottom of the canvas to the top, suggesting the massive form

Museum purchase, 2012

of a mountain; it feels massive, light, and effervescent at the same time. Zones of color and overlapping transparent layers create spatial ambiguities. Bush came to Philadelphia to pursue an MFA at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where she received her MFA.

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ELAINE KURTZ American, 1928–2003

Kurtz built her alluvial paintings with

Alluvial Series #9 (Celadon) 2002 Sand, pebbles, mica, bronze, and acrylic on vinyl-backed cotton, on canvas

formations of earth. Flecks of bronze

Gift of Jerome Kurtz, 2012

designer. She subsequently studied at

natural materials, creating sculptural layers that evoke sedimentary and alluvial powder on the rough surface of this work sparkle, just as a subtle wash of green paint suggests a patina of age. Born in Philadelphia, Kurtz graduated from the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts). She began her career as a freelance illustrator and package the Barnes Foundation, and then at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC, where her instructors were the abstract painters of the Washington Color School. Kurtz taught at the Philadelphia College of Art and Moore College of Art & Design, and her work has been exhibited at numerous museums and galleries. In 2011, Woodmere organized a retrospective of her work.

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Antonelli I Gallery, Installation of “Just In!: Recent Acquisitions in the Collection of Woodmere Art Museum,� 2013 (photography by Allan Orlyss). Works are organized in this section as they appear in the gallery. 46


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ARTHUR B. CARLES American, 1882-1952

Woman with Red Hair, thought to have

Woman with Red Hair c. 1922 Oil on canvas

of the twentieth century. Green and

Gift of Linda and James Ries in memory of Rose Ries, 2011

the dominant red of her thick hair. Art

been painted in Paris, shows why Carles was considered one of the great colorists purple in the model’s flesh—perhaps inspired by Henri Matisse’s famous blue nude—pose a striking contrast to historian Barbara Wolanin notes, “Woman with Red Hair is the most sensual, sensuously painted and fully developed portrait Carles painted of his French red-headed model, Angele. Rather than flattening the figure into an abstract composition, Carles artfully caught his model’s features in near-profile, showing her drape sliding suggestively off her shoulder.”

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ARTHUR B. CARLES American, 1882-1952

A wild energy pervades this mysterious

Pheasant with Green Apple c. 1924 Oil on canvas

aristocratic hunt. Thick brushstrokes with

and somewhat ominous representation of a dead pheasant, the spoils of an saturated colors of deep red, orange, yellow, and white describe the form and textures of the lifeless bird; markings that describe bright orange and red feathers cascade down into a sweep of violet.

Museum purchase, 2011

The stark white curving form of a cloth or shroud contrasts with the ambiguous space of the green apple and dark-toned background.

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ARTHUR B. CARLES American, 1882-1952

The late 1920s were a period of great

Nude Seated on Couch in Portico 1927 Oil on canvas

unstable architectural environment

experimentation for Carles. Here the bold, seemingly electric colors and an transform the classical subject of the seated nude into an icon of the tumultuous modern age.

Promised gift of an anonymous donor

Nude Seated on Couch in Portico was acquired by Carles’s student, Agnes Hood Miller (see page 99).

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DORCAS COOKE DOOLITTLE American, 1901-1993

Though small in size, Doolittle’s portrait

Portrait of a Woman (Margaret Breckendridge) date unknown Oil on canvas

seems caught in a moment of

of Margaret Breckenridge commands attention. Head tilted up, eyes looking down and to the side, Breckenridge uncertainty. The strong, warm yellow and pink tones of her face are dramatically juxtaposed with cool shadows of blue, green, and violet. Breckenridge was the wife of Hugh Breckenridge, Doolittle’s

Museum purchase, 2012

instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Born in Philadelphia, Doolittle graduated from a female seminary, and then enrolled at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (now Moore College of Art & Design), where she studied illustration. Later, she attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where her instructors included Breckenridge and Arthur B. Carles. Doolittle had a studio at 17th and Chestnut Streets where other women, including Quita Brodhead (see page 58), would paint and share the expense of models. Carles came once a week to critique their work. Doolittle exhibited her work regularly and continued to paint and teach.

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BETTY W. HUBBARD American, 1901-1967

Hubbard’s Nude demonstrates exquisite

Nude 1940s Oil on canvas

describe the contours of the body. An

Gift of Leslie P. Symington, 2011

green activate the composition.

sensibility in composition, proportion, and color. Strong lines gracefully easy naturalism is expressed through warm, tonal hues of dark and light crimson. Small patches of orange and

Hubbard was born in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia. She studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) from 1921 to 1925, together with Quita Brodhead (see next page), and took part in Arthur B. Carles’s Saturday morning costume sketch class. With Brodhead and others, Hubbard left PAFA in protest when Carles was dismissed, but she continued to study with him privately. Throughout her life Hubbard remained Carles’s strong supporter and he, in turn, advocated for her talent as well. Carles always kept a painting by Hubbard hanging in his studio and he admired her sense of color.

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QUITA BRODHEAD American, 1901-2002

Brodhead’s nude figure bends elegantly

Nude 1930 Oil on canvas

are created in subtle transitions of light

Promised gift of an anonymous donor

lines edge along her legs, grounding the

to the side, surrounded by vertical formations of soft draperies. Volumes colors to dark, warm colors to cools. A blue line creates an edge along the bottom of her torso; violet and brown figure in the space. This work was created early in Brodhead’s career, and it demonstrates her interest in the streamlined “cool” of Art Deco, an international style across the arts that signified an embrace of the machine age. Brodhead showed this painting in her first solo exhibition in New York, at Charles L. Morgan Galleries, in 1938. Born in Wilmington, Brodhead attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), where she studied with Arthur B. Carles, whose teachings and support had a lifelong impact on her work. When Carles was dismissed from PAFA, she left in protest and studied with him privately for a year.

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SALVATORE PINTO American, born Italy, 1905-1966

Woman on a Beach was painted

Woman on a Beach c. 1933 Oil on canvas

paintings of nudes, such as the sinuous

while Salvatore Pinto was in France, and demonstrates his adaptation of certain aspects found in Henri Matisse’s line, bright pink color, and simplified, flat forms. Pinto’s figure crosses her arms over her face, blocking out the intense sun. Her voluptuous figure is framed by

Museum purchase in honor of Mary Ann B. [Sally] Wirts, 2011

the stylized patterns of the sand below and the sky above. Part of a family of artists who moved to Philadelphia from Italy in 1909, Salvatore Pinto attended the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (now the University of the Arts) and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Pinto worked in media ranging from painting and printmaking to photography and furniture design. His work hangs in the Barnes Foundation and is in many other private collections. Pinto was a prized student of Dr. Albert C. Barnes and a teacher at the Barnes Foundation, In the summer of 1931, Pinto travelled to France with Barnes and met Henri Matisse, whose use of bright color and expansive, painterly style greatly inspired him. 61


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BETTY W. HUBBARD American, 1901-1967

Hubbard enjoyed equestrian sports,

Self-Portrait c. 1940 Oil on canvas

spontaneous strokes of warm brown fold

and in this self-portrait, she presents herself in her riding jacket and hat. Quick, and flow through her jacket, face, and hat. She appears alert and ready, about to move.

Gift of the artist’s daughter, Moira Hyle, 2011

This painting may have been inspired by the great nineteenth-century French artist, Édouard Manet, who also painted women in equestrian costume. While in Paris, Hubbard often visited Manet’s niece, Julie Manet, who was the daughter of Eugene Manet (Édouard’s brother) and another great Impressionist artist, Berthe Morisot. Hubbard is known for her translation from the French of Berthe Morisot’s letters, The Correspondence of Berthe Morisot (London: Lund Humphries, 1957)

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ALICE KENT STODDARD American, 1883-1976

My Housekeeper is a commanding

My Housekeeper 1935 Oil on canvas

close, her eyes looking downward in a

Promised gift of Dorothy J. del Bueno

and she was an expert at conveying the

portrait with vibrant color and fluid brushwork. Stoddard brings the woman moment of pause. A renowned society portraitist, Stoddard was commissioned to paint many prominent Philadelphians, ease and luxury of privilege. Here, a blue

Photograph by Allan Orlyss

blue-and and-white uniform defines the figure as a domestic worker. Born in Watertown, Connecticut, in 1883, Alice Kent Stoddard was a first cousin of renowned artist, Rockwell Kent. She studied at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (now Moore College of Art & Design), and then at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts with Thomas Eakins, Thomas Anshutz, and William Merritt Chase. She also worked as a combat artist in World War II and was sent to Europe as a mechanical draftsperson to designing airplanes for the Budd Company.

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MILDRED BUNTING MILLER American, 1892-1964

Miller’s Woman in a Pink Dress is a

Woman in Pink Dress date unknown Pastel on paper

profile is seen in close perspective. She

Museum purchase with funds from The Barra Foundation Art Acquisition Fund

of light that create the warm, gentle

sensitive and psycho-logical portrayal of a young woman. Sitting outside, her is deep in thought and serious, perhaps vulnerable. Miller beautifully uses the medium of pastel to layer soft passages pinks of her dress and complementary flickering green of the background trees. With a quiet intensity, Miller conveys the disparity between the discomfort of her thoughts and the serene atmosphere of a summer day. Mildred Bunting Miller was born in Philadelphia and attended Lafayette College, John Hopkins University, and the University of Maryland. She attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1910-15) and studied with Thomas Anshutz, Hugh Breckenridge, Daniel Garber, and Violet Oakley, whose selfportrait hangs to the left. Miller was also a resident artist, instructor and co-director at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Art’s summer school in Chester Springs, where she taught alongside Henry McCarter.

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VIOLET OAKLEY American, 1874-1961

In early 1895, twenty-year-old Violet

Profile of a Woman 1895 Watercolor and graphite on paper

art scene. She studied at the Académie

Oakley traveled to Paris with her family and immersed herself in the city’s vital Montparnasse, sketched in the Louvre and visited internationally renowned galleries, salons, and museums. Returning to the states, Oakley enrolled at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Partial museum purchase and partial gift in loving memory of Brian Zahn from Linda Zahn, 2012

in a course on portraiture taught by the Academy’s first woman instructor, Cecilia Beaux. Oakley’s accomplishments are unparalleled. She was the second woman ever hired to teach at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the first American woman to receive a public mural commission for the Pennsylvania State Capitol. She was one of the great citizen-artists of Philadelphia, a supporter of other local artists, a popular and wellspoken civic leader, an internationally known pacifist, and a cofounder of numerous arts organizations including the Plastic Club, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, and the Play & Players Theatre.

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ELIZABETH OSBORNE American, born 1936

Osborne portrays a young girl sitting in

Woman Reflected 1970 Charcoal and watercolor on paper

like image is suggested in the misty

an undefined space. A sense of pathos emanates from the girl, whose ghostatmosphere to her side. This work reflects an earlier period when Osborne’s drawing and painting was largely representational and figurative. Her work gradually evolved into abstraction.

Museum purchase, 2012

Osborne has exhibited throughout the United States. Sheis the third woman to be hired as an instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. One of her watercolor paintings hangs in the Corridor Gallery.

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MILLICENT KROUSE American, born 1933

The simple, elegant composition of

Reclining Woman 1960 Woodcut

of immediacy possible with a woodcut

Museum purchase, 2012

with a pattern of dense lines in her hair,

Reclining Woman demonstrates the wonderful textural qualities and sense print. A rough, ragged line delineates the contour of her figure. The graceful bareness of her back is contrasted decorative fabric and the overall surface quality on which she lies. The primarily black and cream composition is accented by a line of magenta which emphasizes the horizontality of the pose. Woodcuts are relief prints in which the image is drawn on a surface of a wooden block. The areas intended to be blank are then cut away, leaving the raised image that is to be printed. Millicent Krouse was awarded a full scholarship to study at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. After graduating, she attended a woodblock printing course offered by Morris Blackburn, where she “fell in love with printmaking� and quit painting altogether. She created woodblock prints exclusively for the next 25 years.

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BETTY W. HUBBARD American, 1901-1967

Untitled (Male Nude) date unknown Watercolor on paper Gift of Leslie P. Symington, 2011

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EDITH NEFF American, 1943-1995

Edith Neff’s portrait of a male nude is a

Nude on Sidney’s Balcony 1973 Oil on canvas

Sidney, the man is painted large in scale

Museum purchase, 2012

An intensity and sense of frozen time

direct and bold confrontation. Based on photographs given to her by her friend, and isolated by the green wall of the balcony. Neff conveys a stillness and quiet in his pose and the city behind. is created with contrasts of rich greens, burnt orange, white and gray. The exchange between the nude and the viewer is both intimate and disturbing. Edith Neff was born and lived in Philadelphia. She received her BFA in Painting from the Philadelphia College of Fine Arts (now the University of the Arts). In 1978, she joined the faculty at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts where she taught figure painting and drawing until the time of her death. She received national acclaim for her paintings. Her work is in many public and corporate collections including the Philadelphia Museum of Art , the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Delaware Art Museum, and the Minnesota Museum of Art.

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78


STERLING SHAW American, born 1982

The figure is wearing a skirt, topless,

Grapes 2010 Acrylic on canvas

floating in the sky. There is a warm and

Museum purchase, 2012

titled it after another fruit that comes in a

looking off from the viewer, with clearly phallic bananas around her head. She is cool interplay evident on her body. With the title of the painting I wanted to call attention to the bananas indirectly, so I bunch. -Sterling Shaw

Sterling Shaw is from Philadelphia. He received a certificate in painting from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and has participated in several group and solo exhibitions

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Antonelli II Gallery, Installation of “Just In: Recent Acquisitions in the Collection of Woodmere Art Museum,” 2013 (photography by Allan Orlyss). Works are organized in this section as they appear in the gallery. 80


81


82


ARTHUR B. CARLES American, 1882-1952

Carles was driven by the need to

Abstract Bouquet 1939 Oil on canvas

France from 1929 to 1931, he began

Partial museum purchase and partial gift of Frederica and Howard Wagman, 2011

dynamic forms, planes of bold color, and

experiment and discover new ways of painting. After an extended visit to to create his own manner of Cubistlike painting. Here the floral still life is a springboard for a composition of swirling lines and textures. Barbara Wolanin, an authority on Carles, writes that the artist “created the sense that the bouquet is exploding, using the suggestion of a vase to provide stability and a corner of the table as a pivot point. The viewer’s eye is drawn to the surface by the brilliant touches of color and varied textures, from heavy impasto to bare canvas. Triangles outlined in charcoal remain vital parts of the composition, as if Carles were in the midst of trying out ideas and decided to stop when everything was working. “

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84


JAN BALTZELL American, born 1948

In 1966, Baltzell started spending time

Untitled 1990 Oil pastel and oil on Mylar

open sky and marshes surrounding the

Gift of Karen Segal, 2012

of the river’s dramatic, watery landscape.

each year in Wellfleet, Massachusetts, in a house overlooking a vast expanse of Herring River. For many years thereafter she made paintings like this one that grew from her experiences and memories Here, a tightly compressed and seemingly impenetrable knot of energy seems to release outward from the center, an opening of space as diagonal marks and shapes seem to expand to the work’s edge. By applying oil pastel onto the Mylar surface, she creates illusions of watery depth. Baltzell attended the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts), where her teachers included Larry Day and landscape painter Gretna Campbell. She received an MFA in 1971. Her works are in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Bryn Mawr College, and others. She has taught at PAFA since 1985. Baltzell is the daughter of Jane Piper, whose work also appears in this exhibition (see page 90).

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BENJAMIN PASSIONE American, born 1987

My pictures are the curious examples

Untitled 2010 Oil on canvas

is inadequate, it is always worth the

Museum purchase, 2010

Swirls of luminous shapes and painterly

of an attempt at sincerity. Although the process to capture the feeling attempt. —Benjamin Passione

applications of bright color seem to arc up and around, like leaves caught in a gust of wind, a grand gesture of energy. At the same time, an expanse of space seems to open at left, a large void described by subtle shades of warm white paint. Raised in Cinnaminson, New Jersey, Passione developed an interest in art at an early age and drew as a child. He attended life-drawing classes as part of Moore College of Art & Design’s Summer High School Program. He is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he studied with Jan Baltzell, Bill Scott, and Michael Gallagher. He is the recipient of the Lewis S. Ware Memorial Travel Scholarship and the Cuff/Sammak Prize for Abstract Painting.

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88


GREG BICHÉ American, born 1990

I’m drawn to clusters, scatters, scenes of disarray, and moments of explosion or of slow decay.

Plants from Three Vertical Positions from the Eye or Something 2012 Oil on linen

—Greg Biché

Biché thinks of his painting as a puzzle or hunt for specific relationships between the expressive impact of the work of art as a whole and the energy of it

Promised gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest

many parts: a dynamic equilibrium. He prizes accidental markings or painterly “events” that occur in the course of the creative process. Leaf shapes and lively brushstrokes cluster, overlap, and explode with energy. Biché was raised in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania. While in high school, he attended after-school painting and drawing classes at The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He is now a student at the Academy and will graduate this year.

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90


JANE PIPER American, 1916-1991

Ambiguous relationships between

Three Bowls of Fruit 1983 Oil on canvas

pink, and green interact with expanses

Gift of Bill Scott in honor of Patricia S. Walsh, 2011

she wished: recede to the background,

objects and space characterize Piper’s still-life paintings. Bright orange, blue, of white that unite the dynamic composition. Piper is said to have been able to make white do almost anything jump to the foreground, or remain still. In the late 1930s, Piper studied privately with Arthur B. Carles, who became an important mentor and supporter of her work. In 1941, Carles encouraged Piper to study abstract paintings with famed modernist Hans Hofmann, who taught painting in a private studio in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Piper enjoyed a long career with exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Allentown Art Museum, Lehigh University of the Lehigh Valley, Woodmere Art Museum, and Swarthmore College, among others. For many years, she was an influential teacher at the University of the Arts. She also taught at the New York Studio School and PAFA.

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92


BILL SCOTT American, born 1956

In his recent work, Scott has begun to

The Cherry Tree 2011 Oil on canvas

on French Impressionist Berthe Morisot’s

Gift of Vivian Bullaudy and Hollis Taggart, 2011

structure of his own. One can discern

use specific historical paintings as points of departure. The Cherry Tree is based cherry harvest paintings of 1891. He uses compositional elements from Morisot’s painting as the springboard for the the diagonals of the ladder, the arch of the foliage, negative spaces of blue sky, and outlines of the figures’ dresses. However, as John Zarobell, former assistant curator of collections at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, states, “There the visual similarities end. . . . It is more an improvisation, like Coltrane playing a Cole Porter tune, forcing the underlying formal relation-ships of the

source into a decisively experimental rendition. . . . When looking at The Cherry Tree, the Morisot picture is not necessary as a point of reference, but Scott’s engagement with it amplifies his and our sensibilities; what he loves about the Morisot is expressed in this painting and expands its reach.”

The Cherry Tree, 1891, by Berthe Morisot (Private Collection)


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IRMA ROSENAU American, 1900-1972

In Rosenau’s beautiful collage, layers of

Untitled c. 1950s Collage on panel

textures. Sandwiched in the middle are

Gift of the artist’s daughter, Bobette Leidner, 2012

into the space of the tall black cypress-

paper express an abstract arrangement of natural forms full of atmosphere and large, leaf like shapes whose patterns resemble the cells of a leaf. Their red and white coloring pops forward with force tree shapes. Cut silhouettes of black branches move across the picture plane.

Photograph by Allan Orlyss

Soft, white paper swirls like the wind. Rosenau was born in Chicago and studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. In the mid-1930s, she moved to Philadelphia, where she studied with other painters such as Paulette Van Roekens and Edith Emerson. In 1939, Rosenau helped found the Old York Road Art Guild (now the Abington Art Center) in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. She exhibited her work at the Philadelphia Art Alliance and participated in group shows at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Woodmere Art Museum, and the Plastic Club.

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96


THOMAS GAUGHAN American, born England, 1925-2007

This small collage was made—literally—on

Untitled date unknown Mixed media collage on paper

specific places the artist has visited.

the back of an envelope. A travel log of sorts, it is a whimsical cluster of found papers or tiny sketches that represent In the center, a lovely, blue mountain landscape is surrounded by flags, people, flowers, postal cancellations, stamps, words, dates, numbers, and even a sign for the Broad St. Station.

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. William Wolgin, 2012

Known for his colorful abstract work,

Photograph by Allan Orlyss

Thomas Gaughan taught at the Fleisher Art Memorial. He exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and at the Mangel Gallery.

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98


AGNES HOOD MILLER American, 1908-1967

Hood Miller’s composition was painted

Composition with Poinsettias c. 1940 Oil on canvas

102). The objects in the painting seem to

Gift of Sarah Hood Bodine, 2011

Hood Miller was the oldest of four

from the same arrangement seen in her mother’s Still Life with Poinsettias (page melt into “interval” spaces of bold blues, yellows, violet, and red. The surrounding space becomes an abstract flow of colors.

children born to artist Mary Hood. She graduated from Swarthmore College and, with her mother, studied with Henry McCarter and Arthur B. Carles. She and her mother also visited the studios of Pennsylvania Impressionists Daniel Garber and Edward W. Redfield, who lived in the New Hope area. Hood Miller eventually moved to her family’s farm near New Hope, where she continued to paint. Her later work became largely abstract, making little reference to recognizable subject matter.

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100


MICHAEL GALLAGHER American, born 1957

switchback. n.

Switchback 2010 Acrylic on canvas

follows a zigzag course on a steep incline.

Gift of the artist and Schmidt Dean Gallery, 2011

dialogue between representation and

Photograph by Jack Ramsdale

his major motif, he builds his paintings

1. A road, trail, or railroad track that 2. A sharp bend in a road or trail on a steep incline. Gallagher engages in an ongoing abstraction in his work. Using still life as with thin applications of translucent color and clusters of overlapping shapes to create an illusion of depth and space. He also scratches into the surface layers of paint to allow the color beneath to show through. Areas of quiet greens give the viewer’s eye a place to rest amid the swirling shapes and colors. Gallagher received his MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) in 2002 and is currently an assistant professor there. He is an exhibiting artist at Schmidt Dean Gallery.

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102


MARY G.L. HOOD American, 1886-1967

Hood’s still life conveys her love of color

Still Life with Poinsettias c. 1940 Oil on canvas

vibrant colors and painterly brushwork.

Gift of Sarah Hood Bodine, 2011

tissue paper. Hood’s instructor, Arthur B.

and texture. The plants near the table’s edge converge into abstract spaces of The setup consists of potted poinsettias, a large pinecone, a dinner bell, and a bowl of fruit with sheets of deep blue Carles, often used florist’s tissue paper in the still life arrangements he made for his classes. Mary Hood attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) but curtailed her studies to marry and raise four children. She later returned to PAFA, but left after a year to study art privately with Carles and Henry McCarter. In 1941, the Hood family purchased and moved to Springdale, an eight-acre farm and historic property near New Hope, Pennsylvania. There Hood worked in her studio every afternoon, painting the beautiful flowers of her gardens and the surrounding landscape. Hood and her daughter, Agnes Hood Miller, had a joint exhibition at the Philadelphia Art Alliance in December 1941 and, more recently, at Woodmere Art Museum in 2011.

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WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION BERNARD BADURA

AMANDA BUSH

American, 1896-1986

American, born 1986

ARTHUR B. CARLES

Untitled (Lambertville Quarry), date unknown

Leaf River, View from the West, 2012

American, 1882–1952

Grease pencil and/or soft graphite, 19 x 24 in.

Oil and acrylic on canvas,

Nude Seated on Couch in Portico, 1927

Museum purchase, 2011

68 x 55 in.

Oil on canvas, 36 x 31 1/4 in.

Museum purchase, 2012

Promised gift of an anonymous donor

JAN BALTZELL

American, born 1948

ARTHUR B. CARLES

American, 1882-1952

ARTHUR B. CARLES

Moonlight, c. 1908

American, 1882-1952

Oil on canvasboard,

Abstract Bouquet, 1939

7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in.

Oil on canvas, 33 1/2 x 39 1/2 in.

Gift of Bill Scott in honor of the staff at Woodmere Art Museum, 2011

Partial museum purchase and partial gift of Frederica and Howard Wagman, 2011

Plants from Three Vertical Positions from the Eye or Something, 2012

ARTHUR B. CARLES

CLAUDE CLARK

American, 1882-1952

American, 1915-2001

Oil on linen, 60 x 48 in.

Woman with Red Hair,

Brothers and Sister, 1949

c. 1922

Oil on board, 9 x 12 in.

Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 27 in.

Museum purchase, 2011

Gift of Linda and James Ries in memory of Rose Ries, 2011

DORCAS DOOLITTLE

Untitled, 1990 Oil pastel and oil on Mylar, 29 1/2 x 41 1/2 in. Gift of Karen Segal, 2012 GREG BICHÉ

American, born 1990

Promised gift of Marguerite and Gerry Lenfest QUITA BRODHEAD

American, 1901–2002 Nude, 1930 Oil on canvas, 41 x 30 1/2 in.

American, 1901-1993 ARTHUR B. CARLES

American, 1882-1952

Promised gift of an

Phesant with Green Apple, c. 1924

anonymous donor

Oil on canvas, 22 x 18 3/4 in. Museum purchase, 2011

104

Portrait of a Woman (Margaret Breckenridge), date unknown Oil on canvas, 12 x 10 in. Museum purchase, 2012


GERTRUDE FISHER-

CHARLES EDWARD

TERESA M. HYLAND

FISHMAN

HARRIGAN

American, born 1952

American, born 1916

American, born 1981

Untitled 2, 2011

Untitled (Nude on Green Bench), early 1950s

My View, 2012

Oil on canvas, 60 x 52 in.

Oil on board, 8 x 10 in.

Oil on panel, 26 x 16 in. Woodmere Purchase Prize, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Annual Student Exhibition, 2012

Woodmere Purchase Prize, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Annual Student Exhibition, 2012

Promised gift of Louise Fishman MICHAEL GALLAGER

American, born 1957 Switchback, 2010 Acrylic on canvas, 45 x 39 in. Gift of the artist and Schmidt Dean Gallery, 2011 THOMAS GAUGHAN

American, born England, 1925-2007 Untitled, date unknown Mixed media collage on paper, 7 3/8 x 4 11/16in. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. William Wolgin, 2012 ALBERT GOLD

American, 1916-2006 Dozing, 1940 Oil on Masonite, 20 x 16 in. Gift of Matty Gold, 2012 ALBERT GOLD

American, 1916-2006 Market Workers, 1942 Oil on gesso on panel, 22 x 28 in. Gift of Matty Gold, 2012

CYNTHIA WILLARD ILIFF MARY G.L. HOOD

American, 1907-1998

American, 1886-1967

Golden Hours, c. 1944

Still Life with Poinsettias, c. 1940

Lithograph, 13 1/4 x 9 1/2 in.

Oil on canvas, 30 1/4 x 22 in. Gift of Sarah Hood Bodine, 2011 BETTY W. HUBBARD

American, 1901–1967 Nude, 1940s Oil on canvas, 28 x 35 in. Gift of Leslie P. Symington, 2011 BETTY W. HUBBARD

American, 1901-1967 Self-Portrait, c. 1940 Oil on canvas, 15 3/8 x 19 1/2 in. Gift of the artist’s daughter, Moira Hyle, 2011 BETTY W. HUBBARD

American, 1901–1967 Untitled (Male Nude), date unknown Watercolor on paper, 14 x 8 3/4 in. Gift of Leslie P. Symington, 2011 105

Gift of Ofelia Garcia, 2012 FRITZ JANSCHKA

American, born Austria, 1919 The Water Finder, 1977 Oil on wood, 10 x 9 1/4 in. Gift of Joan L. Tobias, 2012 MILLICENT KROUSE

American, born 1933 Reclining Nude, 1960 Woodcut, 19 x 34 in. Museum purchase, 2012 ELAINE KURTZ

American, 1928-2003 Alluvial Series #9 (Celadon), 2002 Sand, pebbles, mica, bronze, and acrylic on vinyl-backed cotton on canvas, 42 x 54 in. Gift ofJerome Kurtz, 2012


WILLIAM LANGSON

ROY C. NUSE

SALVATORE PINTO

LATHROP

American, 1885-1975

American, 1859-1938

The Quarry at Rushland, 1938

Americah, born Italy, 19051966

Self Portrait, date unknown

Woman on a Beach, c. 1933

Oil on canvas, 22 x 24 in.

Oil on canvas, 25 x 30 in.

Museum purchase, 2011

Museum purchase, 2012

LESA CHITTENDEN LIM

VIOLET OAKLEY

Museum purchase in honor of Mary Ann B. [Sally] Wirts, 2011

Oil on canvas, 27 1/8 x 23 7/8 in.

American, born 1958 Threesome - State I, 2011 Three-plate etching and pastel, in. Museum purchase with funds from the Perkins Center for the Arts Purchase Prize, 2012 MILDRED BUNTING MILLER

American, 1892-1964 Woman in a Pink Dress, date unknown Pastel on paper, 14 3/4 x 12 in. Museum purchase with funds from The Barra Foundation Art Acquisition Fund, 2011 AGNES HOOD MILLER

American, 1908–1967 Composition with Poinsettias, c. 1940

American, 1874-1961 Profile of a Woman, 1895 Watercolor and graphite on paper, 9 x 8 1/8 in. Partial museum purchase and partial gift in loving memory of Brian Zahn from Linda Zahn, 2012

JANE PIPER

American, 1916–1991 Three Bowls of Fruit, 1983 Oil on canvas, 46 x 52 in. Gift of Bill Scott in honor of Patricia S. Walsh, 2011 IRMA ROSENAU

ELIZABETH OSBORNE

American, born 1936 Woman Reflected, 1970 Charcoal and watercolor on paper, 21 1/2 x 20 in.

American, 1900-1972 Untitled, c. 1950s Collage on panel, 24 1/4 x 25 3/4 in.

Museum purchase, 2012

Gift of the artist’s daughter, Bobbette Leidner, 2012

ELIZABETH OSBORNE

BILL SCOTT

American, born 1936

American, born 1956

Winter Harbor, 1983

The Cherry Tree, 2011

Watercolor on paper, 9 x 13 in.

Oil on canvas, 61 x 22in.

Oil on canvas, 16 x 26 in.

Gift of Peter Paone, 2011

Gift of Vivian Bullaudy and Hollis Taggart, 2011

Gift of Sarah Hood Bodine, 2011

BENJAMIN PASSIONE

STERLING SHAW

American, born 1987

American, born 1982

EDIT NEFF

Untitled, 2010

Grapes, 2010

American, 1943-1995

Oil on canvas, 54 x 52 in.

Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36in.

Nude on Sidney’s Balcony, 1973

Museum purchase, 2012

Museum purchase, 2012

Oil on canvas, 60 x 43 in. Museum purchase, 2012

106


BENTON MURDOCH SPRUANCE

American, 1904-1967 The Dreamer, 1939 Lithograph, 12 3/4 x 8.5 in. Gift of the Spruance Family, 2012 BENTON MURDOCH SPRUANCE

American, 1904-1967 Carl Zigrosser, 1942 Lithograph, 14 1/2 x 11 1/4 in. Gift of the Spruance Family, 2012 ALICE KENT STODDARD

American, 1883-1976 My Housekeeper, Oil on canvas, 26 x 28 in. Promised gift of Dorothy J. del Bueno FRANCIS C. TUCKER

American, 1931-2012 Thrush’s Soliloquy, 20042008 Egg and size on panel, 24 x 21 3/4 in. Gift of Mary Ann Tucker, 2012 MARTHA WALTER

American, 1875–1976 Portrait of a Woman, c. 1920 Oil on canvas, 26 x 21 in. Promised gift of Dorothy J. del Bueno

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This exhibition was supported in part by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Š 2013 Woodmere Art Museum. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. Photography by Rick Echelmeyer unless otherwise noted. Front cover: Woman with Red Hair, c. 1922, by Arthur B. Carles (Woodmere Art Museum: Gift of Linda and James Ries in memory of Rose Ries, 2011)

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Profile for Woodmere Art Museum

Just In!: Recent Acquisitions in the Collection of Woodmere Art Museum  

Woodmere’s collection tells the story of the art and artists of Philadelphia. Over the last two years the Museum’s holdings have grown signi...

Just In!: Recent Acquisitions in the Collection of Woodmere Art Museum  

Woodmere’s collection tells the story of the art and artists of Philadelphia. Over the last two years the Museum’s holdings have grown signi...